FAQ: Disused and Abandoned Stations

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Many stations of the New York City subway system have fallen into disuse or have been abandoned, no longer used by the Transit Authority for their original purpose: serving passengers. Some stations are fully abandoned, rotting away and seen only from passing trains. Others are in use as storage facilities. Some have extra platforms that were closed long ago. And some, like City Hall, are architectural marvels that give a glimpse into the city's past.

City Hall IRT Station

Brooklyn Bridge IRT Station Local and Express Platforms

18th Street IRT East Side Station

91st Street IRT West Side Station

City Hall BMT Station Lower Platform

Chambers Street BMT

42nd Street IND Station Lower Platform

Ninth Avenue, Brooklyn BMT Lower Level

South Ferry IRT Inner Loop

Myrtle Avenue BMT

9th Ave. El Remains in the Bronx

Roosevelt Avenue IND Terminal Station

Dean Street

Some other abandoned station areas include: Station Beach Pneumatic Transit 14th Street (side platforms) Worth Street Canal Street BMT (Manhattan bridge line) Nevins Street IRT (lower level) Myrtle Avenue (Manhattan bridge approach) 1915 Court Street Bergen Street lower level Hudson Terminal (PATH) 19th Street (PATH) 28th Street (PATH) 1936 1968 1909 1909 1910 1956 1946 1976 1971 1954 1937 Now houses the Transit Museum Built 1933 Opened Closed 1870 1904 1904 1917 1873 1910 1962 Closed when south side of Manhattan Bridge is closed for repair Never used (built 1908) Honorary Mention Notes

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ABANDONED STATIONS

http://www.columbia.edu/~brennan/abandoned/
by Joe Brennan. Receiving a total overhaul in August, 2001, this must-visit site is the definitive guide to abandoned subway stations in NYC. Now incorporates the former separate elevated and Bronx railway station pages.
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THE NEW YORK SUBWAY: ITS CONSTRUCTION AND EQUIPMENT

http://www.nycsubway.org/irt/irtbook/
The 1904 book by the Interborough Rapid Transit Company which commemorated the opening of New York's first subway.

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A PHOTOGRAPHIC HISTORY OF THE STATIONS OF NEW YORK'S FIRST SUBWAY LINE

http://wt.mit.edu/Subway/Archives/Project.html
A tour of the stations that opened on October 27, 1904, in period and recent photographs. By Saul Blumenthal. [Offsite Link]
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DISUSED AND ABANDONED STATIONS IN BOSTON, MASS.

http://members.aol.com/eddanamta/abandoned/abanstas.html
A look at abandoned subway stations in Boston, by Jonathan Belcher. [Offsite Link]
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CLOSED STATIONS OF THE PARIS METRO

http://w3.teaser.fr/~aquintanar/ratp-img-en.html
A photo tour and history of closed stations on the Paris Metro. [Offsite Link]
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METRO de PARIS

http://www.metropolitain.org/usindex.html

A site similar to www.nycsubway.org for the Paris Metro. Histories of the lines, rolling stock photographs, historical photographs, closed and abandoned stations, and more. (French and partial English translation available.) [Offsite link.]
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LONG ISLAND RAIL ROAD ABANDONED RIGHTS OF WAY

http://www.lirrhistory.com/abandon.html
Photos and info about the Rockaway Branch, Montauk-Long Island City closed stations, Bay Ridge Branch, etc. [Offsite Link]
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TORONTO'S SUBWAY SECRETS

http://www.interlog.com/~cygnals/zine/issue8/subway.htm
A visit to Toronto's Lower Bay station, now closed and used mostly for movie shoots. [Offsite Link]

www.nycsubway.org > Subway Technical FAQ Copyright © 1995-2002 New York City Subway Resources This site is not affiliated with any transit agency or provider. This page last modified on Friday, 25-Jul-2003 12:52:18 EDT. http://www.nycsubway.org/faq/abandsta.html (dreamland)

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This page details major changes and additions, in reverse chronological order. For minor updates, corrections, and photo additions, see: Table of Contents Pages By Date Newest Images

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APRIL 1, 2003. New page about the Roosevelt Island Tramway, by new contributor Matt Richman, added to the Around New York section. Also, several pages of new photos of Remains of the NYW&B submitted by Howard Finkel. MARCH 9, 2003. Changed the caption format on the photo pages; the Newest Images page now shows photo thumbnails instead of a simple list. DECEMBER 5, 2002. The out of date and wildly inaccurate Redbird scrap notes have been removed until such time that they can be updated. SEPTEMBER 28, 2002. New version of the Route Map representing subway service as of 9/15/2002; reopening of the South Ferry branch. Sorry for the delay, Michael Calcagno actually sent this to me in advance but I forgot to post it before vacation. AUGUST 9, 2002. Revamped the subway yards pages, now part of the Subway Cars section. ALL of the yard photos on the site are now available in the yard pages. MARCH 5, 2002. New pages of NYW&B Remains added to the collection of New York, Westchester, & Boston Railroad items, thanks to Howard Finkel. FEBRUARY 28, 2002. New Bus FAQ & Glossary page, a work in progress, starting with Michael Ditkoff's BusTalk Glossary. FEBRUARY 22, 2002. Search engine dialog box on front page converted to use Google instead of local search engine. Site FAQ and Contributors pages updated. (Please note: The contributors list hadn't been updated in ages and I am still getting around to adding many contributors to the list! Don't feel slighted if your name does not yet appear.) FEBRUARY 12, 2002. New version of the Route Map representing subway service as of

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1/28/2002, including resumption of "E" service to Chambers St. (former World Trade Center station).
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DECEMBER 24, 2001. New version of the Route Map representing subway service as of 12/16/2001, including the new "V" train. DECEMBER 18, 2001. Posted the winners of the 2001 (first annual) nycsubway.org Photo Contest. DECEMBER 4, 2001. New photos of the R-143 Train on the "L" line contributed by Trevor Logan. NOVEMBER 21, 2001. Announcing the first annual nycsubway.org Photo Contest. NOVEMBER 20, 2001. New version of the Route Map representing subway service as of 11/5/2001. NOVEMBER 5, 2001. New version of the Route Map representing subway service as of 10/28/2001 uploaded. SEPTEMBER 28, 2001. Our kind friends at the MTA New York City Transit public affairs office have sent us some photos of the damage to the IRT Cortlandt Street/World Trade Center station. SEPTEMBER 25, 2001. More Route Map updates; the old versions of the route maps added to the Historical Maps page. SEPTEMBER 17, 2001. Michael Calcagno sends along an updated Route Map reflecting the service diversions related to the World Trade Center disaster. AUGUST 25, 2001. New pages/photos of: Redbird Reef, thanks to Bill Johnston. JULY 25, 2001. Michael Calcagno sends along an updated Route Map reflecting the July 22, 2001 Manhattan Bridge changeover. JULY 14, 2001. Some Track Map Updates from Peter Dougherty, including the 63rd Street Connection and Manhattan Bridge route changes. JULY 9, 2001. Also new today, Bus Fest 2001 photos by Sid Keyles, and some new Redbird Scrap Line Photos, the first two thanks to Daniel Boyar. JUNE 30, 2001. Server upgrades!! SubTalk post 232,767 has all the details. JUNE 15, 2001: Uploaded Peggy Darlington's line by line guides to the New Jersey Transit Northeast Corridor and Morris & Essex lines. JUNE 12, 2001: A bunch of minor bug fixes and a new page in the guide to Subway Signals: Holdout signals and bidirectional traffic, courtesy Bernard S. Greenberg.

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APRIL 28 2001: Contributor Daniel Boyar sends some photos of the Newark City Subway's New Shop Facility, including photos of the new Kinki-Sharyo LRV cars. MARCH 5, 2001: Station-by-station guide to NJT's North Jersey Coast Line, by Peggy Darlington with photos by Chris Leverett, and Mark S. Feinman's first section of his history of the BMT, Early Rapid Transit in Brooklyn. JANUARY 21, 2001: Lots of new things to report. Historic American Engineering Record - The Interborough Subway is a collection of scholarly papers and photographs about the First Subway and its effects on the city, prepared in 1978 for the National Park Service. Roosevelt Avenue Terminal Station is a tour of the remains of an IND Second System station at Roosevelt Avenue, Queens. Also, lots of new photographs and miscellaneous page updates. Check the Pages by Date and Newest Images links at the top of the page. DECEMBER 10, 2000: Created a new section to hold all of the information pertaining to the Dual Contracts Period of Subway Expansion, including a new guide to the Dual Contracts published in June, 1913 by the New York City Public Service Commision. NOVEMBER 15-17, 2000: New photos of the extension of the Hudson-Bergen Light Rail. JULY 30, 2000: An overhaul to the Subway Techinical FAQ was installed, including updated pages about the R-110A/R-110B Test Program and the R-142/R-142A Cars. Also, since everyone's itching for more new pictures, more pictures were added to the R142 fleet page taken 7/29/2000. APRIL 13, 2000: Thanks to Jean-Michel Rubio we have our first multi-lingual feature: a French translation of Bernard S. Greenberg's Guide to Signals, Les signaux du New York City Subway.. APRIL 8, 2000: Continued the reorganization of the site. Rearranged some of the top level categories as follows: Rolling Stock Maps Tech. Also, Michael Calcagno has contributed a Fantasy Subway Map. Also, a series of views of the Park Avenue subway construction: Building the IRT Subway: Some Early Views. Finally, a page of photos from a recent visit to the New York Transit Museum. MARCH 26, 2000: The opening of the Hudson-Bergen Light Rail in New Jersey is just around the corner, so our HBLR section has been revised to include the beginnings of a station-by-station guide covering Harborside to Liberty State Park. MARCH 21, 2000: By request, an automatic list of all images added to the site within the last 60 days has been created. Visit Newest Images to find out what we've been up to. FEBRUARY 5, 2000: Introduced a radical site reorganization. The major topics have been arranged into divisions based on the original operating divisions of the subway: the IRT, BMT, and IND. Many of the other topics have been moved around slightly or merged with others to better organize things. If you can't find what you're looking for, the Table of Contents is a good place to check. (Some sections are temporarily offline while they are reorganized.) Also, the Subway Bibliography has had a major facelift, adding a number of new items and now covering cities other than New York City. JANUARY 24, 2000: New Route Maps by Michael Calcagno, reflecting this month's C line

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shutdown.
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DECEMBER 17, 1999: A new section, Predecessor Elevated Lines, will contain information about the elevated train lines in Manhattan and Brooklyn that predate the construction of the subway, and are now long-gone. The first feature is The 9th Ave. El, just in time for the upcoming Polo Grounds Shuttle walking tour. DECEMBER 14, 1999: Still not much new content, but just in time for the holidays is a full upgrade to the www.nycsubway.org server, including new hardware (3x as fast and 4x the RAM), new version of the operating system, and new version of the Apache web server package. As a result, CGI-based applications previously residing on brighton.nycsubway.org (SubTalk, BusTalk, Upcoming Events, and the search engine) are being moved back to www.nycsubway.org this week. NOVEMBER 29, 1999: Not much to report lately, but we have a NJT Raritan Line Station by Station Guide, by Alan Braunstein, going up today. OCTOBER 24, 1999: An overview of the PATH signal system, thanks to Hank Sundermeyer. AUGUST 20, 1999: Added Mark S. Feinman's Capsule History of the IND, and Peggy Darlington's Day in the Life of a Station Agent. AUGUST 13, 1999: Cleaned up the Newark City Subway section and added a Brief History and Station-by-Station Guide. Also, a new field trip report of a visit to Corona Yard on June 25, 1999. JUNE 11, 1999: A new field trip report: Hudson-Bergen Light Rail: A First Look with photographs by Sid Keyles. JUNE 1, 1999: A field trip to the Shore Line Trolley Museum's 1998 New York Days by Constantine Steffan has been added to our Field Trip Reports. MAY 30, 1999: Thanks to Sid Keyles, many new photos have been added to the Coney Island Complex Tour: new photos of the repair, overhaul, and inspection shops and the yards are included. Sid also contributed photos from his visit to BusFest 1999 which took place on 5/23/1999. APRIL 10, 1999: David M. Rosenthal has contributed a number of single line signal diagrams and other drawings of the 1939 World's Fair Railroad (IND Subway Extension). Along with these diagrams Bernard S. Greenberg has written up a description of Single Line Signal Diagrams. MARCH 25, 1999: Added a new page entitled What is a Rotary Converter?, courtesy Bernard S. Greenberg. This page complements our recently-added photos of IRT Substation #21. MARCH 24, 1999: A new page of NYC Historical Bus Maps goes up with a 1940s-era NYC Omnibus Corp. map to start off. MARCH 21, 1999: More bus photos added to the New York City Buses section, including a page of photos and info about Brooklyn Trackless Trolleys MARCH 17, 1999: Also, a new page of photos, also by David Rosenthal, of the Livonia Yard,

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specifically of the switch/signal relay room.
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MARCH 7, 1999: A new section, IRT Substation #21 added, with photos courtesy David Rosenthal. MARCH 2, 1999: Uploaded a large list of Subway Movies in which the subway plays a large or featured role. Find out about the "classics" and some obscure films with subway scenes. Also, the Subway Bibliography is now part of the Amazon.COM Associates Program. FEBRUARY 2, 1999: Complimenting our faster SubTalk is a new BusTalk bulletin board, at http://talk.nycsubway.org/cgi-bin/bustalk.cgi. JANUARY 30, 1999: The SubTalk section is moved to a new server allowing much faster access. The new URL is http://talk.nycsubway.org/cgi-bin/subtalk.cgi. JANUARY 11, 1999: A new redesign of the web site is released today. The top-level categories have been completely redone, resulting in a site that is easier to navigate and find what we had hidden away in our prior design. Comments and feedback welcome! NOVEMBER 29, 1998: Better late than never, a selection of photos courtesy Constantine Steffan of the Transit Museum's Bus Fest 1998 begin a new section on buses in New York City. More will come! OCTOBER 20, 1998: Just in time for the 94th Anniversary of the opening of the IRT subway on October 27th, we present Day One on the IRT: Press Coverage of the Opening of the Subway, articles from the New York Times on October 27th & 28th, 1904, describing the opening day events and the public's reaction to the new subway. SEPTEMBER 22, 1998: NYC Subway Yards: Re-did this section, incorporating the maps and photographs, especially a new page of photos from an open house at Westchester Yard thanks to Constantine Steffan. More pictures to be added soon. AUGUST 20 1998: Illustrated Subway Car Roster: Many new pictures uploaded, mostly BMT Standards, R10, and R32 cars; also a new Scrapped/Wrecked Cars list has been added. The New York Subway Line by Line: New sections added: IRT Flushing, BMT Broadway Subway, BMT 4th Ave. Subway. New illustrations added to each section. The New York, Westchester & Boston Railway: Added illustrations to three of the sections and a new section called the IRT Dyre Avenue Branch: The Last Legacy of the NYW&B. JULY 7 1998: The New York Subway Line by Line: New sections added today: IND 8th Avenue, IND 6th Avenue. Expanded: IND Rockaway Branch. Updated: BMT Astoria. MAY 13 1998: Illustrated Subway Car Roster: This section has been completely revised making it more "browse-friendly". Also, the SubTalk bulletin board messages have been separated into a current section and an archive, to hopefully improve performance. APRIL 13 1998: Subway Bibliography: Reformatted and new books added. APRIL 10 1998: New York Subway Line By Line: New sections have been added to the Line By

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Line descriptions: IRT Broadway/7th Avenue, IRT Lexington/East Side, BMT Astoria. JANUARY 11 1998: The New York, Westchester, & Boston Railway: This section contains reproductions of articles detailing the construction and operation of the NYW&B, a subsidiary of the New Haven in the Bronx and Westchester County, New York. As time permits more text and photos will be added. SEPTEMBER 24 1997: Many Coney Island Complex photos rescanned and cleaned up. SEPTEMBER 17 1997: The new section on New York City Subway Signals and Signs has been completely enhanced by Bernard S. Greenberg, with a short tutorial and explanation of all of the signal types and aspects. SEPTEMBER 14 1997: Added a new section describing New York City Subway Signals and Signs. Added many, many new photos to the NYC Subway Car Roster. Since it hasn't been listed here before, the New York City Subway FAQ will live here, and it is currently in beta version. A new page about rail transit at the 1964 World's Fair, including the monorail, has been added to the NYC Photo Album. SEPTEMBER 7 1997: Added a page of Scrapyard Photos, Historical Commuter Train Photos, lots of new historical BMT Cars photos, and cleaned up the thumbnails of lots of pages. AUGUST 10 1997: Michael Calcagno has contributed new route maps showing service based on time of day in a new stylized format. Even the MTA doesn't have these! NYC Subway Routemap. JULY 20 1997: Added a page of information about Brooklyn trackless trolley coach operation prior to 1965, including a "trackless" map, courtesy Sanford Gardner. Brooklyn Trackless Trolley Operations. Added a new 1939 World's Fair edition IND map to the Historical Maps. Also, fixed the NYC Transit Sites listing to be printer-friendly (with URLs printed out longhand). Added some pictures to the BMT Pre-Unification Roster page including the Bluebird, Zephyr, and Multisection cars. And finally, converted more of the top-level pages to the "new look". JULY 1997: Lots of new images have been added to various pages and rescans of images have replaced some older images. Highlights can be found in the Subway Car Rosters, Historical Perspectives, Disused and Abandoned Stations (especially the Myrtle Avenue page). Also some older sections are being reorganized or removed. Sections removed are the Hoboken Festival and Whippany Railroad Museum photographs (the quality of these was not very good, overall). Also the Nostalgia Train and Day One on the IRT sections have been removed, much of the content being reorganized into other sections. JUNE 1 1997: Introduced our new domain name, www.nycsubway.org. Hopefully the new name will be easier to remember for everyone. MAY 1997: Added New York Subway Line by Line, where each line of the subway system will be described and illustrated. The first sections include the BMT Brighton Line, the IND Rockaway Line, and the Staten Island Rapid Transit system. MARCH 29 1997: Second Avenue Subway: A collection of planning documents, maps, and other items about the never-built Second Avenue Subway.

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MARCH 24 1997: Revamped the NYC Subway Cars pages. FEBRUARY 27 1997: Visit the NYC Subway Resources' new SubTalk web-based bulletin board. It's open to discussion regarding subway and transit systems worldwide. OCTOBER 30 1996: Added search engine capability on main index page. OCTOBER 26 1996: Added Tracks on Broadway: A recent construction project revealed streetcar tracks on upper Broadway. A photo essay by Joe Brennan. SEPTEMBER 22 1996: Added new feature section: Farewell to the R30 Fan Trip, with photos by Mark Feinman. This fan trip visited a number of yard areas and the abandoned lower level of Ninth Avenue, Brooklyn, on May 30, 1993. AUGUST 25 1996: The New York Subway: Its Construction and Equipment is finally completed. AUGUST 18 1996: New version of Michael Calcagno's NYC Subway Routemap. JULY 27 1996: Some excellent new pictures of abandoned stations at City Hall, 42nd Street, and elsewhere have been added to a new section: Disused and Abandoned Stations. Thanks to Peter Dougherty for the great new photos. MARCH 2 1996: Added new section Coney Island Complex, a visit to the Coney Island maintenance and repair facility. FEBRUARY 29 1996: Added new section Historical Perspectives, with a set of photos from Steve Hoskins. DECEMBER, 1995: First edition of the New Jersey Transit Photo Album, with photos from the 15th Annual Hoboken Festival, and the "Snoboken" Terminal photos. First edition of the Philadelphia Photo Album. First edition of the Subway Car Roster. Winter 1995 Nostalgia Train trip to Rockaway photos. List of subway items for sale. Guide to subway items at the Library of Congress. First set of historical maps. First chapters of The New York Subway: Its Construction and Equipment. OCTOBER, 1995: Added: Day One on the IRT photo essay, Hoboken Festival photos, both since reorganized into new sections. SEPTEMBER, 1995: Added the fine collection of Track Maps. AUGUST, 1995: First photo essay about the Transit Museum's Nostalgia Train put up (since reorganized).

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www.nycsubway.org Copyright © 1995-2002 New York City Subway Resources This site is not affiliated with any transit agency or provider.

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Disclaimer DISCLAIMER: www.nycsubway.org (NYC Subway Resources) is not sponsored by, approved by, or affiliated with the Metropolitan Transportation Authority, New York City Transit or any other transit agency. None of the pages contained on the www.nycsubway.org site are provided by transit agencies and are not to be considered official, unless specifically indicated. The use of the name www.nycsubway.org is not meant to cause confusion in this regard. The official New York City Transit web page is at http://www.mta.info/. Copyright Notice Entire original contents Copyright © 1995-2001 New York City Subway Resources. Contributed items are copyright © their respective creators. No part of this work may be copied or republished in electronic or printed form without prior approval of the respective copyright holder. Send feedback using the Feedback Form for details. Q: Who's the webmaster? Is this his full time job? The site is maintained and managed by David Pirmann. You can use the feedback form to contact me. No, it's not my full time job. I don't even work, in any capacity, for a transit agency. Nor am I even a professional researcher, historian, teacher, or webmaster. (Although I am a professional Unix system administrator.) Q: What is the purpose of the site? It's easier to describe what ISN'T the purpose of the site, and that is to attempt to duplicate what I would consider "official" information about a transit system. That is to say, up to the minute, accurate info about: fares, schedules, service outages, etc. I expect people to find that sort of thing on official web sites of transit agencies. Q: When did the site first go up and what was the reason it was created? The first pages went up around August 1995. You can get an approximate history of site growth on the What's New

page. The first sections were photo essays about a New York Transit Museum tour of City Hall Station and a ride on their BMT D-Type "Nostalgia Train". These photo essays were inspired by seeing some other rail-related travelogues and photos on the then-infant World Wide Web. Q: What kind of operating expenses are associated with running the site? It costs me $4000/year for server co-location at the hosting facility. Every so often server upgrades are performed costing some additional amount of money in hardware purchase. Q: Who sponsors the site? The site is funded privately by the webmaster with voluntary contributions by individuals, using the Amazon "Honor System" for managing the contributions. In addition, items in the book and video bibliography are linked to Amazon, and if you purchase something by clicking thru from this site, Amazon contributes a small percentage back to us. If you would like to help by contributing a small amount by credit card, you can do this through the Amazon Honor System by clicking the banner below:

Q: Why is there no advertising on the site? Because this is my hobby and it doesn't need to be commercialized. I enjoy the fact that there are still sites out on the web, although they are getting fewer and further between, that aren't rampant with banners, pop ups, pop unders, etc. As long as I can afford to host it, I anticipate that this arrangement will continue. However there is a small chance you might see an Amazon Honor System paybox at the top or bottom of pages. Q: How many hits/week does the site get? Soon I'll make stats available in thie space. Q: Are visitors to the site tracked in any way? Other than by counting page views, there is no tracking of a visitor through the site. The site does not use cookies or other methods to plot the path a visitor takes or what pages s/he looks at. I don't do anything with the statistics gathered from the page view counts, and they rarely tell me anything I don't already know about which areas are popular. The Subtalk and Bustalk bulletin board use cookies to store personal preferences but their use is not required. Q: What kind of hardware and software supports the site? Prior to July 2001, the site ran on a variety of hand-me-down Sun hardware, including a Sparc 1+, a Sparc IPX, and a Sparc 20. From July 2001 to April 2002, the site ran on two servers, a Dell Poweredge 350 running RedHat Linux, and a dual processor Sun Sparcstation 20, running Solaris 8. In April 2002, the Dell server crashed and was replaced with a dual processor Sun Ultra 2. Both servers are running Apache 1.3.x, mod_perl 1.21, perl 5.6.0+various modules. In May 2002 the database was converted from mSQL 2.x to MySQL 3.23.x. The machines as of July 2001 are shown below in

their rack. Looks a little different now but you get the picture.

The machines are co-located at a New York internet reseller with several high bandwidth lines serving his network. If you are in need of high bandwidth web hosting or co-location service please get in touch with our friends at TTSG Internet Services and mention that you were referred to them from here! You might not get a special rate but it will ensure my costs don't increase too rapidly! All of the "development" is done at home on a Linux workstation configured with the same software as the "production" site. When I'm finished making changes I distribute the new stuff up to the servers. Tools that I like to use to support the site are: xv, ImageMagick, gimp, and xpaint (for image manipulation), apache, perl, and mod_perl (web server and scripting language), and MySQL (database). Q: What's the future like for nycsubway.org? I want to continue expanding its coverage of other cities and occasional score some historical material to expand the NYC subway pages. This latter part is hard without library legwork that few people are willing to do as a volunteer. There will be continued expansion of coverage in cities around the U.S. and the world, particularly Europe, as new volunteers are found to contribute material. Q: Who has contributed material to the site? There is a long list of contributors without whom the site would not be nearly as interesting! Q: Has the site received any mentions in the press? Several! Q: What kind of feedback do you receive? Lots of nostaligic responses from current and ex-New Yorkers who appreciate being reminded of a part of their home town. Several times a week I get requests from journalists, students, and other individiuals asking what I consider "research questions", which I just have to return a message of "sorry I'm not a professional historian or researcher; no I don't have access to MTA documents (blueprints, personnel records, etc); no I can't help you with your homework assignment".

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FAQ: Subway Technical FAQ

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This is the New York City Subway Technical FAQ. It attempts to answer some of the "technical" and historical questions about the subway system. Currently it does not address questions about how to travel on the subway, fare/ Metrocard information, subway schedules, etc. A good place to look for this information is the MTA Website at http:// www.mta.nyc.ny.us. Feedback is appreciated via the Feedback Form.

The Most Frequently Asked Questions
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. [09/10/02] Facts & Figures [06/22/03] Photography in the Subway [07/19/03] Photography on Other Transit Systems [04/04/03] Manhattan Bridge and Broadway Express [08/26/00] Completed Sections of the 2nd Avenue Subway [08/29/03] The R142 Cars [07/21/03] The R110A Cars [07/17/03] The R110B Cars

Part I - Overview
1. [02/15/03] Glossary of Subway Terminology and Abbreviations 2. [01/09/01] IRT - BMT - IND: A Brief History of the Subway 3. [01/14/03] Touring the Subway

Part II - Early Transit in New York City
1. [08/08/01] Early New York City Tunnels

Part III - The Subway and How It Developed
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. [02/04/00] What was the Opening Day of the Subway Like? [07/31/00] IRT, BMT, IND: Which Are Which? [08/29/03] Train Number, Letter, and Color Code Systems [01/17/03] History of the Independent Subway [07/25/03] The IRT Division [02/25/03] The IND Division [02/23/03] The BMT Division

Part IV - Day to Day Operations
1. [06/26/02] A Day in the Life of a Transit Employee 2. [06/24/02] All About Subway Signals

3. [01/20/03] NYC Subway Accidents

Part V - Abandoned, Unused, and Unbuilt
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. [07/25/03] Abandoned Stations (including City Hall) [01/17/03] Unused Subway Tunnels/Connections [01/15/03] Unused Express Tracks [07/25/03] Evidence of Demolished, Abandoned, and Unbuilt Lines [04/04/03] Broadway Express, Canal Street, and the Manhattan Bridge [07/31/00] Well Known "Non"-Connections

Part VI - Rolling Stock
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. [08/29/03] The R142 Cars [04/24/03] The R143 Cars [02/22/02] How to Identify Each Car Type [08/04/01] Line Assignments & Number of Trains for Rush Hour Service [02/22/02] How Subway Cars are Delivered - Connections to other Railroads [02/22/02] What is OPTO (One Person Train Operation)? What is ATO (Automatic Train Operation)?

Part VII - Tracks and Connections
1. [02/22/02] Interconnections Between IRT and IND/BMT Divisions 2. [09/11/02] Elevated Portions of the Subway 3. [02/22/02] Three-Track portions of the subway

Part VIII - Misc.
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. [02/22/02] Radio Codes [02/22/02] Train Marker Lights [04/14/03] Index of NYC Subway Map Versions, 1963-present [12/04/02] What Books are there about the Subway? Bibliography/Reference [12/04/02] What Movies are there about the Subway?

www.nycsubway.org Copyright © 1995-2002 New York City Subway Resources This site is not affiliated with any transit agency or provider. This page last modified on 09/10/03. http://www.nycsubway.org/faq/index.html (dreamland)

IRT East Side: City Hall

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www.nycsubway.org > The IRT Division > IRT East Side/Lexington Ave. Bowling Green Wall Street Fulton Street City Hall Brooklyn Bridge Worth Street Canal Street Spring Street Bleecker Street Astor Place 14th StreetUnion Square 18th Street 23rd Street 28th Street 33rd Street Grand Central 51st Street 59th Street 68th Street 77th Street 86th Street 96th Street 103rd Street 110th Street 116th Street 125th Street

City Hall Subway Station: This line is operated by the Interborough Rapid Transit Co., which runs two tracks of local and two tracks of express trains. Total length of route, 25.7 miles, having 81.9 miles of tracks. (Early Postcard)
City Hall was the original southern terminal of the Interborough Rapid Transit subway. Opened in 1904, this station in front of City Hall was designed to be the showpiece of the new subway. City Hall Station was in use for passengers until 1945, when it was closed. The platform is short and very tightly curved. Increased ridership of the subway required the original 5-car local stations to be lengthened to accommodate longer trains, and the IRT underwent an extensive program of station lengthening in the 1940s and early 1950s. The new longer trains had center doors, and at City Hall's tight curve, it was dangerous to open them. It was decided to abandon the station in favor of the nearby Brooklyn Bridge station. City Hall Station was never an important one in terms of passenger use even when it was open; the Brooklyn Bridge station was heavily used as it served both local and express trains, and the Brooklyn Bridge streetcar terminal was above. While very few people have actually seen City Hall Station, it is not completely abandoned. The #6 trains still pass through it on their way northbound, reversing direction using the loop for the journey back to the Bronx. From time to time the NY Transit Museum has tours of this station, but these have been suspended due to perceived security risks in the area around City Hall. City Hall Station is unusually elegant in architectural style, and is unique among the original IRT stations. The platform and mezzanine feature Guastavino arches and skylights, colored glass tilework, and brass chandeliers. It was truly the centerpiece of New York's new subway. As for now, the station is only accessible via subway train. On the surface all that can be seen is a concrete slab inset with glass tiles: the skylights for the platform below. This patch of concrete is in the middle of a grove of dogwoods in front of City Hall, close to Broadway. Recent security measures at City Hall have this area mostly off-limits to visitors. City Hall Station remains a ghost station under City Hall Park, a "modern" ruin.

Diagram from the I.R.T. commemorative book The New York Subway: Its Construction and Equipment, shows the relative locations of Brooklyn Bridge and City Hall Stations.
To get to City Hall station, one must ride on an out-of-service #6 train. The motorman has to key open a a single end door to allow visitors to step carefully out onto the platform. First-time visitors are awe-struck at the station's huge glass and brick arches and tiling.

EARLY VIEWS
These early views of the station show how the skylights provided much of the natural light, and the ticket booth that once sat on the mezzanine level.

(image 17476) (30 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: City Hall (IRT East Side) Line: IRT East Side Photo by: Detroit Publishing Co. Collection of: Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division Date: 1904 Notes: City Hall IRT Station, Platform Viewed (this week/total): 30 / 1235

(image 17477) (30 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: City Hall (IRT East Side) Line: IRT East Side Photo by: Detroit Publishing Co. Collection of: Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division Date: 1904 Notes: City Hall IRT Station, Mezzanine Viewed (this week/total): 26 / 946

(image 17499) (84 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: City Hall (IRT East Side) Line: IRT East Side Photo by: IRT Company Date: 1904 Notes: Mezzanine Viewed (this week/total): 35 / 1066

(image 17500) (75 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: City Hall (IRT East Side) Line: IRT East Side Photo by: IRT Company Date: 1904 Notes: Stairway Arch Viewed (this week/total): 26 / 1129

(image 17501) (72 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: City Hall (IRT East Side) Line: IRT East Side Photo by: IRT Company Date: 1904 Notes: Platform Arch, Skylight, and Trackway Viewed (this week/total): 26 / 889

Library of Congress photos in this section are from the Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division, Detroit Publishing Company Collection. The Library of Congress is not aware of any U.S. copyright or any other restrictions in the photographs in this collection. Photos in this section by the IRT Company are from the commemorative book The New York Subway: Its Construction and Equipment.

PLATFORM VIEWS

On each side of the platform, there is a glass tile sign, and a third is above the single stairway to the mezzanine. No other signs like this exist in the other I.R.T. stations of the era; the lettering is quite unique, as is the deep blue and tan glass tiling. The arched ceiling has simple brass light fixtures along its length. The station is kept clean and free of trespassers and vandalism, and in a sense still remains the showplace that it was designed to be.

(image 7568) (258 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: City Hall (IRT East Side) Line: IRT East Side Photo by: Peter Dougherty Notes: Existing-light photograph (1/15th, f/4 or f/5 6, ISO 1000) showing the entire length of the platform Viewed (this week/total): 31 / 1422

(image 7566) (120 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: City Hall (IRT East Side) Line: IRT East Side Photo by: Peter Dougherty Notes: Western half of the oncebeautiful platform Viewed (this week/total): 26 / 1171

(image 7570) (138 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: City Hall (IRT East Side) Line: IRT East Side Car: R36 9553 Photo by: Peter Dougherty Notes: Train of IRT redbirds using the loop for its rush-hour journey north. Note the wide gap between train and platform Viewed (this week/total): 42 / 2050

(image 7580) (39 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: City Hall (IRT East Side) Line: IRT East Side Photo by: David Pirmann Notes: City Hall Station name sign on wall Viewed (this week/total): 13 / 271

(image 7571) (151 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: City Hall (IRT East Side) Line: IRT East Side Photo by: Peter Dougherty Notes: Station name sign above stairway to mezzanine Viewed (this week/total): 13 / 456

(image 7567) (95 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: City Hall (IRT East Side) Line: IRT East Side Photo by: David Pirmann Notes: Stairway view from platform (right side) Viewed (this week/total): 12 / 344

MEZZANINE VIEWS
The mezzanine featured a ticket booth and two stairways to the street. The ticket booth is long gone, but the stairways, long filled in and boarded over, are currently being reopened. Soon, the stairwells and skylights will again let in the fresh air and sunlight of City Hall Park.The complex green, tan, and white tiling pattern on the ceiling meets in the four corners of the vault.

(image 7572) (182 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: City Hall (IRT East Side) Line: IRT East Side Photo by: Peter Dougherty Notes: Ascending the staircase to the mezzanine level Viewed (this week/total): 20 / 861

(image 7573) (119 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: City Hall (IRT East Side) Line: IRT East Side Photo by: Peter Dougherty Notes: The staircase barrel vault Viewed (this week/total): 13 / 456

(image 7579) (50 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: City Hall (IRT East Side) Line: IRT East Side Photo by: David Pirmann Notes: Corner of vault at stairway Viewed (this week/total): 12 / 402

(image 7574) (146 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: City Hall (IRT East Side) Line: IRT East Side Photo by: Peter Dougherty Notes: Looking up the north stairway toward the street level Viewed (this week/total): 14 / 724

(image 7578) (44 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: City Hall (IRT East Side) Line: IRT East Side Photo by: David Pirmann Notes: Corner of main mezzanine vault Viewed (this week/total): 10 / 241

(image 7569) (52 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: City Hall (IRT East Side) Line: IRT East Side Photo by: David Pirmann Notes: Closeup of ceiling arch tile Viewed (this week/total): 15 / 319

COMMEMORATION

When City Hall Station opened, plaques were hung on the far track wall commemorating the Interborough Rapid Transit company and honoring the Rapid Transit Subway Construction Co.. The plaques listed the directors, engineers, and financiers, including August Belmont, Cornelius Vanderbilt, and John D. McDonald. These plaques were removed when the station was closed, and relocated to the Brooklyn Bridge station, where they hung near a token booth until 1995. As of early 1996, the plaques are back in their original positions on the trackside wall. Contrary to popular rumor, there was no plaque here honoring Alfred Ely Beach's early pneumatic subway.

(image 7575) (165 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: City Hall (IRT East Side) Line: IRT East Side Photo by: Peter Dougherty Notes: Rapid Transit Construction Company commemorative plaque Viewed (this week/total): 17 / 400

(image 7576) (191 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: City Hall (IRT East Side) Line: IRT East Side Photo by: Peter Dougherty Notes: City of New York commemorative plaque Viewed (this week/total): 17 / 432

(image 7577) (65 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: City Hall (IRT East Side) Line: IRT East Side Photo by: David Pirmann Date: 10/1995 Notes: Commemorative plaque on platform floor awaiting re-installation Viewed (this week/total): 11 / 389

MORE....

(image 7905) (104 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: City Hall (IRT East Side) Line: IRT East Side Photo by: David Sagarin Collection of: Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division Date: 8/1978 Notes: Control area. Viewed (this week/total): 24 / 444

(image 7906) (124 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: City Hall (IRT East Side) Line: IRT East Side Photo by: David Sagarin Collection of: Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division Date: 8/1978 Notes: Name plate. Viewed (this week/total): 9 / 182

(image 7907) (110 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: City Hall (IRT East Side) Line: IRT East Side Photo by: David Sagarin Collection of: Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division Date: 8/1978 Notes: Skylight and entrance to control area. Viewed (this week/total): 12 / 216

(image 7908) (93 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: City Hall (IRT East Side) Line: IRT East Side Photo by: David Sagarin Collection of: Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division Date: 8/1978 Notes: Platform and Gustavino vault. Viewed (this week/total): 18 / 497

(image 8063) (120 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: City Hall (IRT East Side) Line: IRT East Side Route: Fan Trip Car: Low-V 5292 Photo by: Doug Grotjahn Collection of: Joe Testagrose Date: 12/11/1977 Viewed (this week/total): 18 / 610

(image 8064) (140 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: City Hall (IRT East Side) Line: IRT East Side Route: Fan Trip Car: Low-V 5292 Photo by: Doug Grotjahn Collection of: Joe Testagrose Date: 5/5/1979 Viewed (this week/total): 22 / 949

(image 8133) (107 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: City Hall (IRT East Side) Line: IRT East Side Route: Fan Trip Car: Low-V 5443 Photo by: Steve Zabel Collection of: Joe Testagrose Date: 9/25/1979 Viewed (this week/total): 21 / 921

www.nycsubway.org > The IRT Division > IRT East Side/Lexington Ave. Copyright © 1995-2002 New York City Subway Resources This site is not affiliated with any transit agency or provider. This page last modified on Thursday, 31-Jul-2003 17:04:17 EDT. http://www.nycsubway.org/irt/eastside/irt-eastside-cityhall.html (dreamland)

IRT East Side Brooklyn Bridge Station

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www.nycsubway.org > The IRT Division > IRT East Side/Lexington Ave. Bowling Green Wall Street Fulton Street City Hall Brooklyn Bridge Worth Street Canal Street Spring Street Bleecker Street Astor Place 14th StreetUnion Square 18th Street 23rd Street 28th Street 33rd Street Grand Central 51st Street 59th Street 68th Street 77th Street 86th Street 96th Street 103rd Street 110th Street 116th Street 125th Street

Brooklyn Bridge/City Hall Station is now the southern terminal of the East Side IRT local service, assuming this role from the City Hall Loop station in 1945. It is a typical four track, two island platform configuration. South of the station, the downtown local track splits into three tracks. One is the loop track that returns to the uptown side, passing through the City Hall station noted above. The other two are layup tracks parallel to the downtown express track. Until the 1960s they merged into the downtown express track north of Fulton Street station but since then they are spurs ending a little ways north of Fulton St. Trains are occasionally stored there. Plans are on the books to rejoin the layup tracks to the express track. The station has been recently renovated, with new tile (poorly approximating original IRT tile) and ADA-compliant elevator access. This station provides transfer to the BMT Nassau St. Subway. This station is the zero point for the IRT East Side chain; mile 0 is at the south end of the station. The Brooklyn Bridge station has a number of abandoned areas as construction and service patterns have required changes to be made to the station. In addition to the two existing island platforms, there are two short local platforms on the outer edges of the station. Like those at 14th St. and 96th St., these local platforms were built to accommodate extra passenger volume and were built to the 5-car length of original IRT local trains. These side platforms did not see much use as they were located at express stations that required transfer via the island plaforms, and, as the trains were lengthened to their current 10-car length it was impractical to lengthen both these small side platforms and the island platforms. They were closed in 1910 after only six years in operation and walled off along the platform edges. The side platform on the southbound is now home to some electrical equipment and a backup control tower for the Brooklyn Bridge interlocking. This tower is functional but not normally used, because the Grand Central tower is the primary control point for the whole line. The interlocking board can be seen through a window along the wall along the southbound local trackway. The south end of the downtown side platform is still visible near the dispatcher's booth on the downtown island platform. There are also some closed portions at the south ends of the existing express platforms. During the station lengthening projects it was easier to lengthen the express platforms to the north. The curves at the south end proved impossible to rework so the station was lengthened northward (allowing Worth St. to be abandoned), and the curved southern ends of the express platforms closed. Gap fillers and original mosaic tiles remain in the closed ends. The book The New York Subway: Its Construction and Equipment has a detailed plan of the station as it was originally constructed. Station Decoration
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Artwork: Cable railings and mezzanine skylight, Cable Crossing, Mark Gibian, 1996.

The Open Portion

(image 24192) (109 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: Brooklyn Bridge/ City Hall (IRT East Side) Line: IRT East Side Route: 5 Car: R142 6716 Photo by: Peter Ehrlich Date: 3/4/2003 Viewed (this week/total): 21 / 1035

(image 3532) (67 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: Brooklyn Bridge/ City Hall (IRT East Side) Line: IRT East Side Route: 6 Car: R142A 7330 Photo by: David Pirmann Date: 7/4/2001 Viewed (this week/total): 15 / 402

(image 3534) (75 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: Brooklyn Bridge/ City Hall (IRT East Side) Line: IRT East Side Route: 6 Car: R142A 7350 Photo by: David Pirmann Date: 7/4/2001 Viewed (this week/total): 22 / 514

(image 3537) (72 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: Brooklyn Bridge/ City Hall (IRT East Side) Line: IRT East Side Route: 6 Car: R142A 7361 Photo by: David Pirmann Date: 7/4/2001 Viewed (this week/total): 11 / 364

(image 3542) (62 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: Brooklyn Bridge/ City Hall (IRT East Side) Line: IRT East Side Route: 6 Car: R142A 7370 Photo by: David Pirmann Date: 7/4/2001 Viewed (this week/total): 14 / 469

(image 3551) (68 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: Brooklyn Bridge/ City Hall (IRT East Side) Line: IRT East Side Route: 6 Car: R142A 7410 Photo by: David Pirmann Date: 7/4/2001 Viewed (this week/total): 11 / 438

(image 6056) (65 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: Brooklyn Bridge/ City Hall (IRT East Side) Line: IRT East Side Route: 6 Car: R62A 1840 Photo by: David Pirmann Date: 7/4/2001 Viewed (this week/total): 14 / 477

(image 6060) (69 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: Brooklyn Bridge/ City Hall (IRT East Side) Line: IRT East Side Route: 6 Car: R62A 1855 Photo by: David Pirmann Date: 7/4/2001 Viewed (this week/total): 14 / 309

More Images: 1-8 9-16 17-24 25-32 33-40 41-48 49-52
Closed Local Platforms

(image 80) (67 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: Brooklyn Bridge/ City Hall (IRT East Side) Side Platform. Line: IRT East Side Photo by: Adam Weiss Date: 10/1995 Notes: Side platform wall and

(image 81) (66 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: Brooklyn Bridge/ City Hall (IRT East Side) Side Platform. Line: IRT East Side Photo by: Adam Weiss Date: 10/1995 Notes: Brooklyn Bridge

(image 82) (74 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: Brooklyn Bridge/ City Hall (IRT East Side) Side Platform. Line: IRT East Side Photo by: Adam Weiss Date: 10/1995 Notes: Detail of Brooklyn

(image 79) (45 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: Brooklyn Bridge/ City Hall (IRT East Side) Side Platform. Line: IRT East Side Photo by: David Pirmann Date: 10/1995 Notes: Closed off local

view of Brooklyn Bridge eagle plaque Viewed (this week/total): 9 / 318

mosaic in abandoned side platform Viewed (this week/total): 12 / 360

Bridge mosaic Viewed (this week/total): 8 / 221

platform view from top of stairs Viewed (this week/total): 10 / 506

(image 83) (81 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: Brooklyn Bridge/ City Hall (IRT East Side) Side Platform. Line: IRT East Side Photo by: David Pirmann Date: 10/1995 Notes: Closeup of Brooklyn Bridge eagle plaque Viewed (this week/total): 8 / 169

(image 84) (101 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: Brooklyn Bridge/ City Hall (IRT East Side) Side Platform. Line: IRT East Side Photo by: David Pirmann Date: 10/1995 Notes: Brooklyn Bridge mosaic; the door to the left leads to the tower Viewed (this week/total): 11 / 359

(image 85) (68 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: Brooklyn Bridge/ City Hall (IRT East Side) Side Platform. Line: IRT East Side Photo by: David Pirmann Date: 10/1995 Notes: Brooklyn Bridge backup interlocking tower showing City Hall loop Viewed (this week/total): 14 / 588

(image 86) (65 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: Brooklyn Bridge/ City Hall (IRT East Side) Side Platform. Line: IRT East Side Photo by: Jason R. DeCesare Date: 10/1995 Notes: Another view of eagle plaque Viewed (this week/total): 7 / 180

Closed Express Platforms

(image 78) (103 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: Brooklyn Bridge/ City Hall (IRT East Side) Closed Express Platform. Line: IRT East Side Photo by: David Pirmann Date: 10/1995 Notes: BB tile- south end of abandoned express platform areas Viewed (this week/total): 8 / 219

(image 74) (25 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: Brooklyn Bridge/ City Hall (IRT East Side) Closed Express Platform. Line: IRT East Side Photo by: Peter Dougherty Date: 10/1995 Notes: Close up on the gap fillers Viewed (this week/total): 14 / 369

(image 75) (50 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: Brooklyn Bridge/ City Hall (IRT East Side) Closed Express Platform. Line: IRT East Side Photo by: Peter Dougherty Date: 10/1995 Notes: View down the abandoned south end platforms, southbound side Viewed (this week/total): 16 / 415

(image 76) (63 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: Brooklyn Bridge/ City Hall (IRT East Side) Closed Express Platform. Line: IRT East Side Photo by: Peter Dougherty Date: 10/1995 Notes: Abandoned south end platforms, close up on wall mosaics Viewed (this week/total): 21 / 766

(image 77) (69 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: Brooklyn Bridge/ City Hall (IRT East Side) Closed Express Platform. Line: IRT East Side Photo by: Peter Dougherty Date: 10/1995 Notes: View across the tracks to the northbound platform Viewed (this week/total): 24 / 862 www.nycsubway.org > The IRT Division > IRT East Side/Lexington Ave. Copyright © 1995-2002 New York City Subway Resources This site is not affiliated with any transit agency or provider. This page last modified on Friday, 17-Jan-2003 11:46:02 EST. http://www.nycsubway.org/irt/eastside/irt-eastside-bkbr.html (dreamland)

IRT East Side: 18th Street

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www.nycsubway.org > The IRT Division > IRT East Side/Lexington Ave. Bowling Green Wall Street Fulton Street City Hall Brooklyn Bridge Worth Street Canal Street Spring Street Bleecker Street Astor Place 14th StreetUnion Square 18th Street 23rd Street 28th Street 33rd Street Grand Central 51st Street 59th Street 68th Street 77th Street 86th Street 96th Street 103rd Street 110th Street 116th Street 125th Street
The 18th Street station was open from 1904 to 1948. This station was closed because of platform lengthening, this time at 14th Street (you can see the 14th St. station just down the tracks).

(image 32) (42 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: 18th Street (IRT East Side) Line: IRT East Side Photo by: David Pirmann Date: 10/1995 Notes: Cast iron wall sign Viewed (this week/total): 23 / 724

(image 34) (47 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: 18th Street (IRT East Side) Line: IRT East Side Photo by: David Pirmann Date: 10/1995 Notes: Mosaic wall sign Viewed (this week/total): 16 / 691

(image 35) (62 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: 18th Street (IRT East Side) Line: IRT East Side Photo by: David Pirmann Date: 10/1995 Notes: Station overview Viewed (this week/total): 37 / 1597

(image 36) (23 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: 18th Street (IRT East Side) Line: IRT East Side Collection of: Saul Blumenthal Date: 1904 Viewed (this week/total): 28 / 1078

Disused and Abandoned Stations

www.nycsubway.org > The IRT Division > IRT East Side/Lexington Ave. Copyright © 1995-2002 New York City Subway Resources This site is not affiliated with any transit agency or provider. This page last modified on Friday, 17-Jan-2003 11:46:02 EST. http://www.nycsubway.org/irt/eastside/irt-eastside-18.html (dreamland)

IRT West Side: 91st Street

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www.nycsubway.org > The IRT Division > IRT West Side Broadway/7th Ave.

South Ferry Branch South Ferry Rector Street Cortlandt StreetWorld Trade Center Brooklyn Branch Wall Street Fulton Street Park Place IRT 7th Avenue / West Side Line Chambers Street Franklin Street Canal Street Houston Street Christopher StreetSheridan Square 14th Street 18th Street 23rd Street 28th Street 34th StreetPenn Station 42nd StreetTimes Square 50th Street 59th StreetColumbus Circle 66th StreetLincoln Center 72nd Street 79th Street 86th Street 91st Street 96th Street 103rd Street 110th Street 116th Street 125th Street 137th Street 145th Street 157th Street 168th Street 181st Street 191st Street Dyckman Street 207th Street 215th Street Broadway Bridge 225th Street 231st Street 238th Street 242nd Street
91st St. was in operation as a local station from 1904 to 1959. It was closed during a system-wide platform lengthening project, to accomodate longer trains. The lengthening created an exit from the 96th Street station only three blocks further north, so it was impractical to lengthen the platforms here and the station was closed to speed service. The 91st Street station is fairly well-preserved if you disregard the graffiti and spray paint cans all over the place.

(image 185) (155 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: 91st Street (IRT West Side) Line: IRT West Side Photo by: David Pirmann Date: 10/1995 Notes: View of southbound platform area Viewed (this week/total): 42 / 1722

(image 186) (166 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: 91st Street (IRT West Side) Line: IRT West Side Photo by: David Pirmann Date: 10/1995 Notes: Mens room doorway. Yes, stations used to have restrooms! Viewed (this week/total): 22 / 957

(image 187) (160 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: 91st Street (IRT West Side) Line: IRT West Side Photo by: David Pirmann Date: 10/1995 Notes: Stairway to street Viewed (this week/total): 26 / 1235

(image 188) (141 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: 91st Street (IRT West Side) Line: IRT West Side Photo by: David Pirmann Date: 10/1995 Notes: Looking up stairway toward street Viewed (this week/total): 26 / 1106

(image 189) (116 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: 91st Street (IRT West Side) Line: IRT West Side Photo by: David Pirmann Date: 10/1995 Notes: Terra-cotta tiling on ceiling Viewed (this week/total): 20 / 836

(image 190) (132 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: 91st Street (IRT West Side) Line: IRT West Side Photo by: David Pirmann Date: 10/1995 Notes: Graffiti with caption I just love tunnels and IRT Line Viewed (this week/total): 22 / 753

(image 191) (150 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: 91st Street (IRT West Side) Line: IRT West Side Photo by: David Pirmann Date: 10/1995 Notes: More graffiti Viewed (this week/total): 16 / 592

(image 192) (46 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: 91st Street (IRT West Side) Line: IRT West Side Photo by: Constantino Tobio, Jr. Date: 10/1995 Notes: Elf graffiti Viewed (this week/total): 16 / 740

www.nycsubway.org > The IRT Division > IRT West Side Broadway/7th Ave. Copyright © 1995-2002 New York City Subway Resources This site is not affiliated with any transit agency or provider. This page last modified on Sunday, 19-Jan-2003 11:31:38 EST. http://www.nycsubway.org/irt/westside/irt-westside-91.html (dreamland)

BMT Broadway: City Hall Lower Level

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www.nycsubway.org > The BMT Division > BMT Broadway Subway
The lower level of City Hall on the BMT Broadway line was (used DeKalb Avenue for storage), 2 island platforms, one unfinished. A full description of Lawrence Street- Metrotech this station is a part of our guide to the BMT Broadway Subway. Court Street Whitehall Street (image 1260) (131 kbytes) Rector Street Country: United States Cortlandt Street- World Trade Center City: New York System: New York City City Hall Transit City Hall Lower Level Location: City Hall Lower Canal Street Level (BMT Broadway) Line: BMT Broadway Prince Street Subway 8th Street Photo by: Peter Dougherty 14th Street- Union Square Date: 1996 Notes: North end of 23rd Street Western platform 28th Street (between tracks B3 and 34th Street BM), looking West. An oldstyle sign pointing toward 42nd Street- Times Square the upper level revenue49th Street service platform is one of 57th Street the only signs or markings other than graffiti on this 5th Avenue level. This is one of two Lexington Avenue lower-level platforms

Continue: Manhattan Bridge-DeKalb Avenue

Continue: Montague Street Tunnel Holed Through (1917)

never opened to the public at this station. A laid-up N train sits on track B3 awaiting the call to afternoon rush hour service. Viewed (this week/total): 29 / 1101

Continue: Broadway Subway Now Open (1917)

(image 1261) (125 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: City Hall Lower Level (BMT Broadway) Line: BMT Broadway Subway Photo by: Peter Dougherty Date: 1996 Notes: Last Stop! Looking North, about 1/2 way down the Western platform. The tracks serving these two lower platforms start at dead ends at Canal Street, and end just one station away. There is a network of diamond crossovers where lay-up trains can descend to and emerge from this ghost of stations past. Viewed (this week/total): 20 / 805 (image 1262) (104 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: City Hall Lower Level (BMT Broadway) Line: BMT Broadway Subway Photo by: Peter Dougherty Date: 1996 Notes: Looking North on the disused Eastern platform at lower City Hall, at the very South end. Here construction materials and accumulated water coat the floor. Viewed (this week/total): 9 / 359

(image 1263) (136 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: City Hall Lower Level (BMT Broadway) Line: BMT Broadway Subway Photo by: Peter Dougherty Date: 1996 Notes: Looking South on the Western platform. Note it is kept relatively clean and debris-free by maintenance staff. The N trains on both tracks are taking their mid-day siesta. Trains use only these two tracks, not the third, Eastern-most track. Viewed (this week/total): 22 / 791 (image 1264) (124 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: City Hall Lower Level (BMT Broadway) Line: BMT Broadway Subway Photo by: Peter Dougherty Date: 1996 Notes: Trackway extending South, where the continuation of track B4 would have continued had original plans been kept. The "roof" of this tunnel actually slopes downward (and eventually meets the floor) farther on than this picture shows, where the revenue-service N/R trains descend. There is a very surprising lack of graffiti or vandalism at this location. There were no rats or other signs of life present here, either. In fact, it almost appears to be new construction! The pooling of ground water is only about 4" deep. Viewed (this week/total): 18 / 957

(image 1265) (147 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: City Hall Lower Level (BMT Broadway) Line: BMT Broadway Subway Photo by: Peter Dougherty Date: 1996 Notes: Another view of the disused Eastern platform. The floor surface here is rougher and unfinished, unlike the Western platform. The track to the right, designated B4 is not used. There is no regular stairwell exit from this platform to the revenue service platform above. Were a train to lay-up on B4, the crew would have to walk through a train standing on the center track to exit on the Western platform. Viewed (this week/total): 16 / 663 (image 1266) (89 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: City Hall Lower Level (BMT Broadway) Line: BMT Broadway Subway Photo by: Peter Dougherty Date: 1996 Notes: View of the stairway up to the upper level platform. Viewed (this week/total): 14 / 584

(image 1267) (126 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: City Hall Lower Level (BMT Broadway) Line: BMT Broadway Subway Photo by: Peter Dougherty Date: 1996 Viewed (this week/total): 18 / 828

Please e-mail comments and questions to the author, Peter Dougherty. All

photographs are © 1996 Peter Dougherty, and may not be used without the express permission of the author except for review purposes or as part of links from other internet locations. This work is intended for educational or recreational use only. No images or words may be taken from this site for any commercial or monetary purpose whatsoever.

Disused and Abandoned Stations

www.nycsubway.org > The BMT Division > BMT Broadway Subway Copyright © 1995-2002 New York City Subway Resources This site is not affiliated with any transit agency or provider. This page last modified on Friday, 17-Jan-2003 10:24:48 EST. http://www.nycsubway.org/bmt/bmtbway/bmt-broadway-lch.html (dreamland)

BMT Jamaica Line: Chambers Street

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www.nycsubway.org > The BMT Division > BMT Jamaica Line Overview Broad Street Fulton Street Chambers Street Canal Street Bowery Essex Street Williamsburg Bridge Marcy Avenue Hewes Street Lorimer Street Flushing Avenue Myrtle Avenue Kosciuszko Street Gates Avenue Halsey Street Chauncey Street Broadway/ East New YorkEastern Parkway Alabama Avenue Van Siclen Avenue Cleveland Street Norwood Avenue Crescent Street Cypress Hills 75th Street/ Elderts Lane 85th Street/ Forest Parkway Woodhaven Boulevard 104th Street 111th Street 121st Street Original End of Jamaica El Metropolitan Avenue Queens Boulevard Sutphin Boulevard 160th Street 168th Street (image 7505) (66 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: Chambers Street (BMT Nassau Street) Line: BMT Jamaica Route: Fan Trip Car: BMT D 6095 Photo by: David Pirmann Date: 8/26/2001 Viewed (this week/total): 20 / 536 (image 1411) (62 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: Chambers Street (BMT Nassau Street) Line: BMT Jamaica Photo by: David Pirmann Date: 11/1995 Viewed (this week/total): 5 / 341 (image 1412) (60 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: Chambers Street (BMT Nassau Street) Line: BMT Jamaica Photo by: David Pirmann Date: 11/1995 Viewed (this week/total): 11 / 503 (image 1413) (75 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: Chambers Street (BMT Nassau Street) Line: BMT Jamaica Photo by: David Pirmann Date: 11/1995 Viewed (this week/total): 15 / 594
The Chambers Street station consists of four tracks, three island platforms, and one remaning side platform (originally two). This large station was used as a terminal station for various services from the north and south via the Nassau Street Subway. As originally built (1915), the north end of the station connected to the Williamsburg Bridge and the Manhattan Bridge. Initially Chambers St. served as a terminal station which explains some of its size and platform complexity. In 1931, the Nassau Street subway loop was completed, making Chambers St. a through station south to the Montague Street tunnel to Brooklyn. It was about this time that the center platform and the side platforms were closed as excessive. The west side platform was walled up and partly destroyed when the IRT station was rebuilt on the other side of the wall in 1960-1962. All of these areas are still visible in plain sight from the open platforms. (See the photos below.) The Manhattan Bridge connection was severed in 1967 as part of the Chrystie Street construction project, which reduced the importance of and number of trains served at Chambers St. If the extra platforms weren't needed in 1931, they certainly weren't needed after 1967. Plans have been floated to reconfigure the station here and at Canal Street to reduce the line to two tracks with single island platforms serving them. For detail of the track configuration in this area, past and present, see the City Hall Area and Canal St. Area track maps. Currently, only two of the three island platforms are in use. The "J" train uses the outer or "local" track on each of the open island platforms while the mid-day M uses the "express" or inside track. The abandoned center island platform could serve trains in either direction. On weekends, the "J" service terminates here, and no trains continue south along Nassau Street. During this time, all trains use the southbound platform and cross over to the northbound track between Chambers St. and Canal St. stations. The lack of weekend service along Nassau St. is alleviated by transfers here to the IRT East Side/Lexington Avenue Brooklyn Bridge station, and further north at Canal St. to the BMT Broadway Subway. (Thanks to Brennan's Guide to Disused Subway Stations for part of this description.)

(image 25748) (77 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: Chambers Street (BMT Nassau Street) Line: BMT Jamaica Car: R42 4862 Photo by: Christopher Sattler Date: 6/28/2003 Viewed (this week/total): 21 / 770

(image 25489) (99 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: Chambers Street (BMT Nassau Street) Line: BMT Jamaica Route: Fan Trip Car: R7 1575 Photo by: Brian Weinberg Date: 6/8/2003 Viewed (this week/total): 18 / 897

(image 12928) (117 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: Chambers Street (BMT Nassau Street) Line: BMT Jamaica Car: SBK Steeplecab 6 Photo by: Joe Testagrose Date: 9/22/2002 Viewed (this week/total): 12 / 547

(image 1418) (95 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: Chambers Street (BMT Nassau Street) Line: BMT Jamaica Photo by: Richard Panse Date: 2002 Notes: Street entrance Viewed (this week/total): 18 / 904

(image 1414) (57 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: Chambers Street (BMT Nassau Street) Line: BMT Jamaica Photo by: David Pirmann Date: 11/1995 Viewed (this week/total): 5 / 233

(image 1415) (43 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: Chambers Street (BMT Nassau Street) Line: BMT Jamaica Photo by: David Pirmann Date: 11/1995 Viewed (this week/total): 10 / 513

(image 1416) (32 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: Chambers Street (BMT Nassau Street) Line: BMT Jamaica Photo by: David Pirmann Date: 11/1995 Viewed (this week/total): 8 / 296

(image 1417) (69 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: Chambers Street (BMT Nassau Street) Line: BMT Jamaica Photo by: David Pirmann Date: 11/1995 Viewed (this week/total): 7 / 343

(image 4479) (112 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: Chambers Street (BMT Nassau Street) Line: BMT Jamaica Route: J Car: R27 8095 Photo by: Doug Grotjahn Collection of: Joe Testagrose Date: 11/23/1979 Viewed (this week/total): 13 / 548

(image 6377) (111 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: Chambers Street (BMT Nassau Street) Line: BMT Jamaica Route: Fan Trip Car: BMT Std. 2390 Collection of: Joe Testagrose Date: 3/23/1979 Viewed (this week/total): 6 / 302

(image 8132) (128 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: Chambers Street (BMT Nassau Street) Line: BMT Jamaica Route: Fan Trip Car: Low-V 5443 Photo by: Joe Testagrose Date: 3/23/1979 Viewed (this week/total): 11 / 395

(image 24086) (109 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: Chambers Street (BMT Nassau Street) Line: BMT Jamaica Route: Fan Trip Car: BMT D 6095 Photo by: Doug Grotjahn Collection of: Joe Testagrose Date: 3/23/1979 Viewed (this week/total): 5 / 406

More Images: 1-16 17-22
www.nycsubway.org > The BMT Division > BMT Jamaica Line Copyright © 1995-2002 New York City Subway Resources This site is not affiliated with any transit agency or provider. This page last modified on Friday, 17-Jan-2003 10:23:44 EST. http://www.nycsubway.org/bmt/jamaica/bmt-jamaica-chambers.html (dreamland)

IND 8th Avenue: 42nd Street/Port Authority Bus Terminal

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www.nycsubway.org > The IND Division > IND 8th Avenue Line

207th Street Dyckman Street 190th Street 181st Street 175th Street/ GWB Bus Terminal 168th Street 163rd Street 155th Street 145th Street 135th Street 125th Street 116th Street 110th Street 103rd Street 96th Street 86th Street 81st Street 72nd Street 59th Street 50th Street 42nd Street- Port Authority Bus Terminal 34th Street- Penn Station 23rd Street 14th Street West 4th Street Spring Street Canal Street Chambers StreetWorld Trade Center BroadwayNassau Street High StreetBrooklyn Bridge Jay StreetBorough Hall

The station at 42nd Street/Port Authority Bus Terminal consists of four tracks, with two island platforms. The Times Square/42nd Street complex is the busiest in the system and consequently the platforms here are extra wide to accommodate passenger volume. The platforms are offset north/south; the southbound platform extends between 40th and 42nd Sts. and the northbound between 42nd and 44th Sts., approximately. The mezzanine of this station extends from 40th to 44th Street. Ramps are in place for access to the mezzanine, which is somewhat unique in that there are retail stores within the fare control (including a record store), as well as various NYCT offices. The tile color is dark purple with black border and there is no IND-style tile name tablet. The 42nd Street/Times Square station complex provides transfer to the IRT Flushing (7) Line, IRT West Side/7th Ave. (1/2/3) Line, BMT Broadway (N/R) Line, and the Times Square-Grand Central Shuttle. Some relative depths of stations in the Times Square complex are as follows, +/- 10 feet.
q q q q q

7th Ave./West Side IRT, 40 feet below street Flushing/#7 IRT, 60 feet below street Broadway BMT, 50 feet below street Shuttle, 20 feet below street 8th Ave. IND, 30 feet below street

In addition to the platforms described above, there is an abandoned lower platform on the southbound side (one track, underneath the downtown local track on the upper level, and one side platform underneath the island platform above). The lower level platform was built along with the rest of the station in 1932, but it was only used from 1959 to 1981 for odd services like the Aqueduct Racetrack special fare trains, and for rush hour E trains for a period during the 1970s. For many years, a crossunder was open between the upper level platforms using a passageway at the northern end of the lower level. Rearrangement of the mezzanine a few years ago allowed passengers to crossover using the mezzanine within the fare control. It isn't really clear why this lower level was even built. It can only be used by trains running from Queens via 53rd Street (today's E service). Heading downtown on the track from the lower level of 50th Street, switches allow access to the downtown local, downtown express, or lower level of 42nd St. Departing 42nd Street on the lower level, trains can become local or express prior to entering 34th Street; however, trains departing 42nd Street on the upper level cannot cross over until reaching Canal Street. It is likely, therefore, that the extra platform was built to allow some operational flexibility, by permitting trains from 53rd Street to have access to both downtown local and express. Perhaps there was no other suitable location for a crossover switch, or it was thought an extra platform face could allow increased dwell time or time for switches to line up. An oft-repeated story offers this as a reason the lower level was built: The Independent subway was being built by the city to compete directly with routes owned by the IRT and BMT companies. The #7 crosstown IRT line terminates at Times Square; it is said that the bumper blocks of the #7 are directly against or very close to the eastern wall of the lower level of the 42nd St. IND station. The construction of the lower level therefore blocked any potential extension of the #7 line to the west side of Manhattan. (If this is true, it would have been done only in the spirit of crushing the competition, for the IND had no plans to construct a competing crosstown line.) Service is currently operated with downtown "C" trains using the upper level at 50th Street, downtown "E" trains using the lower level, and merging together in between 50th and 42nd so that they both arrive on the downtown local track at 42nd. In 1998 and 1999 all but one remaining entrance to the lower level was sealed (the remaining one is under a lift-up trap door at the south end of the southbound platform). A report in the September, 1999 Bulletin of the New York Division ERA reports that the lower level track D-3 from north of 42nd St. all the way to 34th St. is now permanently out of service. Occasionally the existance of the lower level is mentioned as an excuse for why the IRT #7 cannot be extended westward; this new development now renders the lower level useless and it should not pose a problem to run the #7 extension directly through the lower level. A detailed track map of this area is available, which shows the lower level track and switches described above quite

clearly.

The Upper Level

(image 3395) (61 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: 42nd Street/Port Authority Bus Terminal (IND 8th Avenue) Line: IND 8th Avenue Route: C Car: R110B Photo by: Trevor Logan Date: 9/2000 Viewed (this week/total): 14 / 748

(image 4936) (59 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: 42nd Street/Port Authority Bus Terminal (IND 8th Avenue) Line: IND 8th Avenue Route: C Car: R32 3893 Photo by: Robert Marrero Date: 1/19/2000 Viewed (this week/total): 11 / 518

(image 784) (67 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: 42nd Street/Port Authority Bus Terminal (IND 8th Avenue) Line: IND 8th Avenue Photo by: Wayne Whitehorne Date: 8/14/1999 Notes: Wall tile Viewed (this week/total): 5 / 207

(image 785) (69 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: 42nd Street/Port Authority Bus Terminal (IND 8th Avenue) Line: IND 8th Avenue Photo by: Wayne Whitehorne Date: 8/14/1999 Notes: Local platform Viewed (this week/total): 8 / 219

(image 786) (84 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: 42nd Street/Port Authority Bus Terminal (IND 8th Avenue) Line: IND 8th Avenue Photo by: Wayne Whitehorne Date: 8/14/1999 Notes: Stairways Viewed (this week/total): 12 / 287

(image 787) (76 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: 42nd Street/Port Authority Bus Terminal (IND 8th Avenue) Line: IND 8th Avenue Photo by: Wayne Whitehorne Date: 8/14/1999 Viewed (this week/total): 7 / 254

(image 783) (47 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: 42nd Street/Port Authority Bus Terminal (IND 8th Avenue) Line: IND 8th Avenue Photo by: Peter Dougherty Date: 1997 Notes: Southbound platform facing south Viewed (this week/total): 6 / 360

(image 24696) (60 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: 42nd Street/Port Authority Bus Terminal (IND 8th Avenue) Line: IND 8th Avenue Car: R44 Collection of: David Pirmann Viewed (this week/total): 13 / 589

The Lower Level
(image 770) (107 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: 42nd Street/Port Authority Bus Terminal (IND 8th Avenue) (Lower Level) Line: IND 8th Avenue Photo by: Peter Dougherty Date: 1997 Notes: Looking Southbound along this long-disused platform. The Southbound 8the Ave. local track is immediately above this special track, designated D3 - the same designation as the Southbound E tracks from 53rd St. The Southbound E once stopped at this platform before rising and continuing it's Southward journey, either on track A1 or A3, depending if it was in local or express service. Today the E uses a crossover just North of the station to switch to the 8th Ave local tracks. Viewed (this week/total): 17 / 827 (image 5037) (83 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: 42nd Street/Port Authority Bus Terminal (IND 8th Avenue) (Lower Level) Line: IND 8th Avenue Route: E Car: R38 4001 Photo by: Joe Testagrose Date: 11/27/1970 Viewed (this week/total): 12 / 498

(image 1998) (85 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: 42nd Street/Port Authority Bus Terminal (IND 8th Avenue) (Lower Level) Line: IND 8th Avenue Route: E Car: R6 1123 Photo by: Joe Testagrose Date: 11/27/1970 Viewed (this week/total): 18 / 376 (image 2055) (95 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: 42nd Street/Port Authority Bus Terminal (IND 8th Avenue) (Lower Level) Line: IND 8th Avenue Route: E Car: R6 1370 Photo by: Joe Testagrose Date: 11/27/1970 Viewed (this week/total): 12 / 310 (image 26345) (73 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: 42nd Street/Port Authority Bus Terminal (IND 8th Avenue) (Lower Level) Line: IND 8th Avenue Car: BMT D Collection of: David Pirmann Viewed (this week/total): 13 / 177 (image 763) (134 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: 42nd Street/Port Authority Bus Terminal (IND 8th Avenue) (Lower Level) Line: IND 8th Avenue Photo by: Peter Dougherty Notes: Wow is this ever one long station: 8 blocks in 10 feet! This station was once used fairly heavily for movie shoots, and to make it seem like "different" stations (depending on the placement of the camera inside the car) different station indicators were applied to the sides of the platform. The movie or TV show for which these modifications were made is unknown. Note, also, that these numbers are in reverse order: "50th St" here would be South of "47th St," which in turn would be South of 42nd Street! Viewed (this week/total): 17 / 536

(image 764) (144 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: 42nd Street/Port Authority Bus Terminal (IND 8th Avenue) (Lower Level) Line: IND 8th Avenue Photo by: Peter Dougherty Notes: This passageway and escalator-carcass are about 2/3rds the way down the platform. Note the heavy pall of dust and grime which coats everything. Viewed (this week/total): 17 / 831 (image 765) (117 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: 42nd Street/Port Authority Bus Terminal (IND 8th Avenue) (Lower Level) Line: IND 8th Avenue Photo by: Peter Dougherty Notes: Another view of the escalator carcass. Nothing remains of it on the upper-level platform. Viewed (this week/total): 10 / 430 (image 766) (103 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: 42nd Street/Port Authority Bus Terminal (IND 8th Avenue) (Lower Level) Line: IND 8th Avenue Photo by: Peter Dougherty Notes: Descending one of several plain-sight staircases from the Southbound platform at 8th Ave/42nd street into another era. Viewed (this week/total): 9 / 412 (image 767) (120 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: 42nd Street/Port Authority Bus Terminal (IND 8th Avenue) (Lower Level) Line: IND 8th Avenue Photo by: Peter Dougherty Notes: View of the stairway from lower level platform to the upper level platform. Only the escalator went directly to the mezzanine. Viewed (this week/total): 13 / 455 (image 768) (151 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: 42nd Street/Port Authority Bus Terminal (IND 8th Avenue) (Lower Level) Line: IND 8th Avenue Photo by: Peter Dougherty Notes: Looking North, about 200' from the North end of the platform. There is ample evidence that this station is used by New York's homeless, although the "aroma" is far less noxious than in many other public areas of the system! There is also a fairly healthy rodent population on this platform as well. In the foreground is the second of the two remaining fare control gates from the days of the Aqueduct Special. Viewed (this week/total): 15 / 682

(image 769) (138 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: 42nd Street/Port Authority Bus Terminal (IND 8th Avenue) (Lower Level) Line: IND 8th Avenue Photo by: Peter Dougherty Notes: Looking South on this debris-strewn platform, located immediately beneath the Southbound 42nd St. station platform. The once-gateprotected door at the left is a maintenance/storage area. Viewed (this week/total): 15 / 580

More Images: 1-12 13-15
Please e-mail comments and questions regarding the lower level to the photographer, Peter Dougherty. Photographs of the lower level are © 1996 Peter Dougherty, and may not be used without the express permission of the author except for review purposes or as part of links from other internet locations. This work is intended for educational or recreational use only. No images or words may be taken from this site for any commercial or monetary purpose whatsoever.

www.nycsubway.org > The IND Division > IND 8th Avenue Line Copyright © 1995-2002 New York City Subway Resources This site is not affiliated with any transit agency or provider. This page last modified on Friday, 17-Jan-2003 10:10:20 EST. http://www.nycsubway.org/ind/8thave/ind-8th-42.html (dreamland)

BMT Culver: Ninth Avenue Lower Level

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www.nycsubway.org > The BMT Division > BMT Culver Line Coney Island/ Stillwell Avenue West 8th Street Neptune Avenue Avenue X Avenue U Kings Highway Avenue P Avenue N Bay Parkway Avenue I 18th Avenue Ditmas Avenue Continue: IND Crosstown Line
The Ninth Avenue station served the original BMT Culver and West End Lines from 1919 to 1954. The IND connection to the Culver Line was made at Ditmas Avenue in 1954, rerouting Culver trains via the new IND subway. The section of track along 39th Street between Ninth Avenue and Ditmas Avenue operated as a shuttle, using the lower level platforms at Ninth Ave. These lower platforms have been disused since the shuttle operation was terminated on May 13, 1975. The lower level is rarely used for passengers. It was used in the movie Crocodile Dundee where it posed as the 59th Street subway station.

Culver Shuttle Ditmas AvenueShuttle Platform 13th Avenue Fort Hamilton Parkway 9th Avenue Demolition of the Culver Shuttle

(image 12924) (57 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: 9th Avenue (BMT Culver) Line: BMT Culver Car: SBK Steeplecab 6 Photo by: Joe Testagrose Date: 9/22/2002 Viewed (this week/total): 9 / 630

(image 7545) (38 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: 9th Avenue (BMT Culver) Line: BMT Culver Route: Fan Trip Car: R30 Photo by: Mark S. Feinman Date: 5/30/1993 Viewed (this week/total): 23 / 610

(image 7539) (38 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: 9th Avenue (BMT Culver) Line: BMT Culver Photo by: Mark S. Feinman Date: 5/30/1993 Notes: Old-style sign reading on the lower level platforms, undamaged by vandalism or graffiti Viewed (this week/total): 6 / 239

(image 7540) (40 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: 9th Avenue (BMT Culver) Line: BMT Culver Photo by: Mark S. Feinman Date: 5/30/1993 Notes: Stairway leading up from lower level of 9th Avenue (Culver Line) to upper level (West End Line) Viewed (this week/total): 8 / 321

(image 7546) (48 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: 9th Avenue (BMT Culver) Line: BMT Culver Photo by: Mark S. Feinman Date: 5/30/1993 Notes: Looking down the tracks to the old Culver Line; this is the inbound local track looking toward 9th Avenue Viewed (this week/total): 12 / 338

(image 7541) (45 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: 9th Avenue (BMT Culver) Line: BMT Culver Photo by: Mark S. Feinman Date: 5/30/1993 Notes: Lower level of 9th Avenue. View is facing the southbound platform Viewed (this week/total): 14 / 422

(image 7542) (48 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: 9th Avenue (BMT Culver) Line: BMT Culver Photo by: Mark S. Feinman Date: 5/30/1993 Notes: Boarding R30 train at 9th Avenue, lower level.Note the large gap between train and platform. Viewed (this week/total): 8 / 261

(image 7543) (43 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: 9th Avenue (BMT Culver) Line: BMT Culver Route: Fan Trip Car: R30 8317 Photo by: Mark S. Feinman Date: 5/30/1993 Viewed (this week/total): 19 / 505

(image 7544) (46 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: 9th Avenue (BMT Culver) Line: BMT Culver Photo by: Mark S. Feinman Date: 5/30/1993 Notes: Another view of R30

(image 24051) (180 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: 9th Avenue (BMT Culver) Line: BMT Culver Route: Fan Trip Car: BMT D 6019 Photo by: Doug Grotjahn

(image 24091) (125 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: 9th Avenue (BMT Culver) Line: BMT Culver Route: Fan Trip Car: BMT D 6095 Photo by: Doug Grotjahn

(image 24059) (129 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: 9th Avenue (BMT Culver) Line: BMT Culver Route: Fan Trip Car: BMT D 6019 Photo by: Steve Zabel

train Viewed (this week/total): 11 / 262

Collection of: Joe Testagrose Date: 5/9/1976 Viewed (this week/total): 17 / 663

Collection of: Joe Testagrose Date: 5/18/1975 Viewed (this week/total): 9 / 511

Collection of: Joe Testagrose Date: 3/23/1974 Viewed (this week/total): 12 / 359

More Images: 1-12 13-24 25-27
www.nycsubway.org > The BMT Division > BMT Culver Line Copyright © 1995-2002 New York City Subway Resources This site is not affiliated with any transit agency or provider. This page last modified on Friday, 17-Jan-2003 10:24:05 EST. http://www.nycsubway.org/bmt/culver/bmt-culver-9.html (dreamland)

IRT West Side: South Ferry

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www.nycsubway.org > The IRT Division > IRT West Side Broadway/7th Ave.

South Ferry Branch South Ferry Rector Street Cortlandt StreetWorld Trade Center Brooklyn Branch Wall Street Fulton Street Park Place IRT 7th Avenue / West Side Line Chambers Street Franklin Street Canal Street Houston Street Christopher StreetSheridan Square 14th Street 18th Street 23rd Street 28th Street 34th StreetPenn Station 42nd StreetTimes Square 50th Street 59th StreetColumbus Circle 66th StreetLincoln Center 72nd Street 79th Street 86th Street 91st Street 96th Street 103rd Street 110th Street 116th Street 125th Street 137th Street 145th Street 157th Street 168th Street 181st Street 191st Street Dyckman Street 207th Street 215th Street Broadway Bridge 225th Street 231st Street 238th Street 242nd Street
The Outer Loop
South Ferry Station is a unique two-track loop station. The outer loop platform was built in 1905 as part of the original IRT Brooklyn Extension and was served by this line until the IRT West Side/7th Ave. Subway reached South Ferry in 1918. The platform is extremely short (only five cars fit), and passengers wishing to exit at this station must be in the first five cars. It is also extremely curved, requiring the use of gap fillers to bridge the spaces between platform and middle door on the cars. On the platform itself is an active tower which includes indicator lights for the gap filler signal at the front end of the platform. The gap filler signal is a one-tiered signal lit up red when the filler is extended. Under the signal a sign reads "GF Signal" which is lit in white when the signal is clear and the gap fillers are fully retracted. The gap fillers retract via a proximity sensor that detects the car moving against the edge of the gap filler. While not harsh like 14th Street on the Lexington line, there is an announcement to "stand clear of the moving platform." For an announcement it was a rather pleasant one. Station Decoration The platform is quite ornate with large "South Ferry" mosaic name panels and terra-cotta sailing ship plaques by Heins & La Farge. The inner platform has small "SF" tile mosaics. There are fancy rosettes around removed old light fixtures and along the ceiling. A new ceramic tile art installation located on the stairway landing is called South Sails, by Sandra Bloodworth, and was installed in 1990.

(image 246) (81 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: South Ferry Outer Loop (IRT West Side) Line: IRT West Side Photo by: Wayne Whitehorne Date: 2/27/1999 Viewed (this week/total): 33 / 1294

(image 243) (98 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: South Ferry Outer Loop (IRT West Side) Line: IRT West Side Photo by: Wayne Whitehorne Date: 1998 Viewed (this week/total): 35 / 1517

(image 244) (88 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: South Ferry Outer Loop (IRT West Side) Line: IRT West Side Photo by: Wayne Whitehorne Date: 1998 Viewed (this week/total): 20 / 574

(image 245) (86 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: South Ferry Outer Loop (IRT West Side) Line: IRT West Side Photo by: Wayne Whitehorne Date: 1998 Notes: South Sails by Sandra Bloodworth, 1990. Viewed (this week/total): 16 / 456

(image 2888) (118 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: South Ferry Outer Loop (IRT West Side) Line: IRT West Side Route: 5 Car: R15 6204 Photo by: Doug Grotjahn Collection of: Joe Testagrose Date: 2/12/1977 Viewed (this week/total): 36 / 1198

(image 3233) (116 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: South Ferry Outer Loop (IRT West Side) Line: IRT West Side Route: 5 Car: R21 7101 Photo by: Doug Grotjahn Collection of: Joe Testagrose Date: 2/12/1977 Viewed (this week/total): 41 / 1152

(image 3267) (101 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: South Ferry Outer Loop (IRT West Side) Line: IRT West Side Route: 1 Car: R21 7259 Photo by: Doug Grotjahn Collection of: Joe Testagrose Date: 2/12/1977 Viewed (this week/total): 32 / 1130

(image 247) (103 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: South Ferry Outer Loop (IRT West Side) Line: IRT West Side Collection of: David Pirmann Notes: Heins & La Farge ferry mosaic on outer loop platform Viewed (this week/total): 16 / 586

(image 6134) (144 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: South Ferry Outer Loop (IRT West Side) Line: IRT West Side Route: 1 Car: R62A 2419 Photo by: Richard Brome Viewed (this week/total): 35 / 1269

The Inner Loop

Essentially a separate station, the South Ferry inner loop platform was built in 1918 for IRT Lexington service when the IRT West Side service was given the outer loop. The inner loop platform was used up till 1977, mostly by a shuttle to the Bowling Green station on the Lexington/Brooklyn IRT. Because of the sharp curve (even sharper than the outer loop), trains could open only their center doors at the inner loop station, and so instead of a full platform face, slightly arched openings were cut into the old walls only where the center doors would be. This also probably simplified the engineering problem compared to removing all of the old wall. Starting in the late 1950s, when the new R-type cars displaced most of the original IRT rolling stock, trains arriving from the Lexington line on nights and weekends were rerouted to share the outer loop, because on the new cars it was not possible to selectively open only the center doors. The weekday shuttle used specially modified cars that opened only center doors, and continued using the inner loop until service ended in 1977. The track past the inner loop is still used to turn the #5 train when it is terminating at Bowling Green and not running to Brooklyn. The inner loop track at South Ferry is now used for crew quarters, offices, storage, etc. and has a separate entrance from the fare zone upstairs. There was no free transfer between trains on the two platforms.

(image 249) (91 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: South Ferry Inner Loop (IRT West Side) Line: IRT West Side Photo by: David Pirmann Date: 2/1997 Notes: View of an archway in the inner platform wall Viewed (this week/total): 30 / 836

(image 251) (126 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: South Ferry Inner Loop (IRT West Side) Line: IRT West Side Photo by: David Pirmann Date: 2/1997 Notes: South Ferry mosaic tiling Viewed (this week/total): 18 / 391

(image 252) (119 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: South Ferry Inner Loop (IRT West Side) Line: IRT West Side Photo by: David Pirmann Date: 2/1997 Notes: View of an inner platform archway from the open outer loop platform Viewed (this week/total): 26 / 703

(image 250) (63 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: South Ferry Inner Loop (IRT West Side) Line: IRT West Side Photo by: Peter Dougherty Date: 2/1997 Notes: View down the inner platform Viewed (this week/total): 30 / 1001

Related Links
Disused & Abandoned Subway Stations FAQ The Brooklyn IRT

www.nycsubway.org > The IRT Division > IRT West Side Broadway/7th Ave. Copyright © 1995-2002 New York City Subway Resources This site is not affiliated with any transit agency or provider. This page last modified on Sunday, 19-Jan-2003 11:31:38 EST. http://www.nycsubway.org/irt/westside/irt-westside-sferry.html (dreamland)

BMT Jamaica Line: Myrtle Avenue

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www.nycsubway.org > The BMT Division > BMT Jamaica Line Overview Broad Street Fulton Street Chambers Street Canal Street Bowery Essex Street Williamsburg Bridge Marcy Avenue Hewes Street Lorimer Street Flushing Avenue Myrtle Avenue Kosciuszko Street Gates Avenue Halsey Street Chauncey Street Broadway/ East New YorkEastern Parkway Alabama Avenue Van Siclen Avenue Cleveland Street Norwood Avenue Crescent Street Cypress Hills 75th Street/ Elderts Lane 85th Street/ Forest Parkway Woodhaven Boulevard 104th Street 111th Street 121st Street Original End of Jamaica El Metropolitan Avenue Queens Boulevard Sutphin Boulevard 160th Street 168th Street (image 5647) (68 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: Myrtle Avenue (BMT Jamaica) Line: BMT Jamaica Route: J Car: R42 4934 Photo by: Richard Panse Date: 2002 Viewed (this week/total): 10 / 379 (image 1428) (91 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: Myrtle Avenue (BMT Jamaica) Line: BMT Jamaica Photo by: Peggy Darlington Date: 11/2000 Notes: View of artwork installation Viewed (this week/total): 5 / 201 (image 1429) (82 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: Myrtle Avenue (BMT Jamaica) Line: BMT Jamaica Photo by: Peggy Darlington Date: 11/2000 Notes: View of artwork installation Viewed (this week/total): 3 / 136 (image 1430) (89 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: Myrtle Avenue (BMT Jamaica) Line: BMT Jamaica Photo by: Peggy Darlington Date: 11/2000 Notes: View of artwork installation Viewed (this week/total): 6 / 183
The Myrtle Avenue station consists of three tracks, with two island platforms. Above the in-use platforms, crossing at an angle, is another platform formerly served by the Myrtle Avenue Elevated, which ran south of here to Myrtle Ave. and Jay St, and north to Metropolitan Avenue. The southern portion of the line was closed in 1969 and the upper level station was abandoned. The lower level mezzanine, along Broadway south of Myrtle, is one of the oldest in the system and provides access to both platforms. The Broadway mezzanine has stairs to the street on the northwest corner of the intersection. A second mezzanine on Myrtle Avenue, south of Broadway, is currently being rebuilt. In the past, this mezzanine had stairs from the street on both sides (east and west) of Myrtle Avenue on the south side of Broadway. It had one very long set of stairs that went directly up to the Myrtle Avenue El station, and a passage/platform that went under and up to both Jamaica line platforms. The closed upper level had two tracks and one island platform, and stairways to both of the lower level platforms. The platform was used as a crossover for passengers after abandonment of the Myrtle El service but this has long been discontinued. A tower for the Myrtle El and junction was on the upper level but this too has been closed. A connection to the remaining portion of the Myrtle Ave. El branches off immediately east of the lower level platforms. For detail of the track configuration in this area see the Myrtle Avenue Area Track Map. (Portions of the above description from Brennan's Guide to Disused Elevated Stations.)

The Lower Level

(image 25747) (87 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: Myrtle Avenue (BMT Jamaica) Line: BMT Jamaica Car: R143 Photo by: Christopher Sattler Date: 6/28/2003 Viewed (this week/total): 20 / 913

(image 12927) (138 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: Myrtle Avenue (BMT Jamaica) Line: BMT Jamaica Car: SBK Steeplecab 6 Photo by: Joe Testagrose Date: 9/22/2002 Viewed (this week/total): 8 / 303

(image 5434) (58 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: Myrtle Avenue (BMT Jamaica) Line: BMT Jamaica Route: J Car: R42 4627 Photo by: Richard Panse Date: 2002 Viewed (this week/total): 8 / 272

(image 5453) (70 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: Myrtle Avenue (BMT Jamaica) Line: BMT Jamaica Route: M Car: R42 4651 Photo by: Richard Panse Date: 2002 Viewed (this week/total): 5 / 274

(image 1431) (100 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: Myrtle Avenue (BMT Jamaica) Line: BMT Jamaica Photo by: Peggy Darlington Date: 11/2000 Notes: View of artwork installation Viewed (this week/total): 3 / 163

(image 1432) (96 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: Myrtle Avenue (BMT Jamaica) Line: BMT Jamaica Photo by: Peggy Darlington Date: 11/2000 Notes: View of artwork installation Viewed (this week/total): 4 / 143

(image 1433) (89 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: Myrtle Avenue (BMT Jamaica) Line: BMT Jamaica Photo by: Peggy Darlington Date: 11/2000 Notes: View of artwork installation Viewed (this week/total): 3 / 120

(image 1434) (86 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: Myrtle Avenue (BMT Jamaica) Line: BMT Jamaica Photo by: Peggy Darlington Date: 11/2000 Notes: View of artwork installation Viewed (this week/total): 3 / 118

More Images: 1-12 13-24 25-36 37-48
The Upper Level

(image 6831) (51 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: Myrtle AvenueUpper Level (BMT Myrtle) Line: BMT Myrtle Car: BMT Q 1622 Collection of: David Pirmann Date: 9/20/1965 Viewed (this week/total): 6 / 212

(image 26331) (53 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: Myrtle AvenueUpper Level (BMT Myrtle) Line: BMT Myrtle Car: BMT Q 1624 Collection of: David Pirmann Date: 2/10/1963 Viewed (this week/total): 6 / 134

(image 26333) (68 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: Myrtle AvenueUpper Level (BMT Myrtle) Line: BMT Myrtle Car: BMT Q 1627 Collection of: David Pirmann Date: 2/10/1963 Viewed (this week/total): 7 / 166

(image 6860) (69 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: Myrtle AvenueUpper Level (BMT Myrtle) Line: BMT Myrtle Route: MJ Car: BMT Q Viewed (this week/total): 12 / 270

(image 6863) (93 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: Myrtle AvenueUpper Level (BMT Myrtle) Line: BMT Myrtle Car: BMT Q 1627 Collection of: David Pirmann Notes: Train at Broadway/ Myrtle Upper Level prior to abandonment Viewed (this week/total): 23 / 448

(image 6638) (127 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: Myrtle AvenueUpper Level (BMT Myrtle) Line: BMT Myrtle Car: BU 1349 Collection of: David Pirmann Viewed (this week/total): 12 / 289

(image 6639) (56 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: Myrtle AvenueUpper Level (BMT Myrtle) Line: BMT Myrtle Car: BU 1349 Collection of: David Pirmann Viewed (this week/total): 10 / 262

(image 1436) (87 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: Myrtle AvenueUpper Level (BMT Myrtle) Line: BMT Myrtle Photo by: Peter Dougherty Notes: View of northbound trackway (looking north) on upper level Viewed (this week/total): 11 / 571

More Images: 1-8 9-14
www.nycsubway.org > The BMT Division > BMT Jamaica Line Copyright © 1995-2002 New York City Subway Resources This site is not affiliated with any transit agency or provider. This page last modified on Friday, 17-Jan-2003 10:23:44 EST. http://www.nycsubway.org/bmt/jamaica/bmt-jamaica-myrtle.html (dreamland)

The 9th Avenue Elevated

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www.nycsubway.org > The IRT Division

A Brief History
An overview by David Pirmann (contact) and Mark S. Feinman (contact) The 9th Avenue El in Manhattan and the Bronx, the first elevated rapid transit line in the world, dates back to 1867, when on October 10th, the first columns were erected in lower Manhattan. On December 7th, 1867, Charles T. Harvey's cable-pulled elevated line was demonstrated successfully on Greenwich Street. On July 1st, 1868, the West Side Elevated (Patent) Railway Company was opened between Cortlandt Street and Battery Place, and according to the New York Times, reached a speed of 10 mph in a trial run. A single track, cable-pulled operation opened for passenger service on February 14, 1870 between Dey Street and 29th Street, with no intermediate stops. This proved inefficient and troublesome, so by April 20th, 1871, motive power was provided by steam engines. By 1877, the single tracked El had been extended to 59th Street. The single track line south of 59th Street was rebuilt in 1880 adding two tracks on either side, and by 1891, the rebuilding was extended all the way north to 116th St. This created Manhattan's first three-track elevated, although center-track express service did not begin until 1916. In upper Manhattan, the line had to accommodate the changing landscape; the 9th Ave El was over 100 feet above the street at "Suicide Curve", the portion of the El that made a 90-degree turn from 9th Ave onto 110th St. and another from 110th St. onto 8th Avenue. The 9th Ave. El would extend all the way to 155th Street and terminate adjacent to the southern terminal of the New York and Northern Railroad (later the New York Central's Putnam Division). This junction would allow suburbanites an easy transfer to the 9th Ave El for points in downtown Manhattan. Eventually, the Polo Grounds would be built at that location as well. Behind the Polo Grounds was the 159th Street Yard, the largest elevated yard of the Manhattan Elevated Railroad Company. The 9th Avenue El played host to various tests of electric operation between 1885 and 1900. In 1900, a test of "Sprague"-style MU cars was performed on the 6th Avenue El, prompting electrification of the whole system. Electric trains operated along the 9th Ave. El beginning on February 18, 1903. On April 1, 1903, the entire Manhattan Elevated system was leased to the IRT Company for 999 years. Subway system construction was planned to connect with the Els at various points. By June 25th, 1903, the last steam-powered elevated train was operated in passenger service on the 9th Ave El. On July 1, 1918 the 6th and 9th Avenue Els extended operation to 167th St. station of the IRT Woodlawn line over a bridge built by the New York and Northern Railroad, which terminated operations at 155th Street on January 6th of the same year. The opening of the extension coincided with the cutback of the Putnam Division back to Sedgwick Avenue on the Bronx side of the Harlem River. The 155th Street terminal had two island platforms serving four tracks (plus one bypass track); the eastern platform served through trains to the Bronx, the western platform served trains terminating at 155th Street. Although the terminal was elevated, there were stairways leading down to the street and up to the 155th Street viaduct, connecting the Macombs Dam Bridge with "Coogan's Bluff". By January 2, 1919, 9th Ave. El service was extended to the Woodlawn station of the IRT. On August 26th, 1932, the IRT went into receivership one month short of its 28th birthday. The 5 cent fare had taken its toll. Unification of the privately owned transit lines with the Independent City-Owned Rapid Transit Railroad (IND System) occurred in June of 1940. Municipal operation of the IRT would begin on June 12th, 1940, two weeks after the City of New York took over the BMT. As part of the Unification deal, the 2nd Ave. El north of 59th Street and the 9th Ave. El in Manhattan would close forever at 12:01am on June 12th, 1940. There were no special ceremonies held for the closing of these lines. The last train on the 9th Ave. El, a 7 car train filled with 500 people, left South Ferry at 11:14pm, arriving at 155th Street at 12:06am. Free transfers at 155th St, Manhattan, and 161st St. in the Bronx, were made available to the Independent's Concourse line when the El closed. The only remaining portion of the 9th Ave El, the "Polo Grounds Shuttle" to Burnside Ave (later 167th Street), closed for about 1½ hours at the close of 9th Ave. El service, to prepare this portion of the line for its new service pattern. The "Polo Grounds Shuttle", as it was called, saw little patronage because of the redundant IND Concourse Line running so closely nearby. In addition, the New York Central's Putnam Division stopped running, and in 1957, the Giants played their last season in the Polo Grounds. With so little ridership, the "Polo Grounds Shuttle" ceased operation at 11:59pm on August 31st, 1958. Sources:
q

Electric Railroads #25: New York's El Lines, 1867-1955, December 1956, Electric Railroader's Association. New York Times, June 12th, 1940 Unpublished NYCTA Facts and Figures Document, 1977

q

q

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The Tracks of New York Number 3: Manhattan and Bronx Elevated Railroads, by Alan Paul Kahn and Jack May, 1977, Electric Railroader's Association

Polo Grounds Shuttle - Walking Tour
Report compiled by D. Pirmann from SubTalk Posts, and assisted by Mark Feinman

(Group photo at the 155th St / 8th Ave entrance to the IND Concourse Line. Photo by Mark Feinman.)
The 9th Avenue El ran north from Manhattan across the 155th St. Bridge into the Bronx, connecting to the existing #4-Jerome Ave. IRT elevated line near 162nd St. and Jerome Avenue. The line opened as far north as 155th St. in 1879, and was extended to meet the Jerome Ave. IRT in 1918, which itself had opened a year earlier. In 1940, the line was cut back to a shuttle operating between the Polo Grounds at 155th St. Station and the Jerome Ave. IRT. This shuttle ceased operation in 1958.

Map by Michael Calcagno
(Street Map)

Track Map, 1920

Sedgwick Avenue The Sedgwick Avenue station is under the Major Deegan Expressway but above the level of the Metro-North tracks. In order to get to the station, we had to climb down the embankment that supports the southbound Major Deegan. Once we climbed down this steep hill, we were able to climb up onto the Sedgwick Ave platform. The portion of the Sedgwick Avenue station that was above today's Metro-North tracks was wooden; none of it remains. The portion that was on the embankment and under the Major Deegan, was built of concrete and much of this structure remains, although there are no signs identifying the station at all. The wooden portions of the structure ended about 50 feet from the small stairway onto the concrete catwalk seen below. Evidence of two subway-type entrances could be seen on the eastern portions of both the uptown and downtown side platforms. A picture below shows that the bricked-up entrance was partially broken into, and a peek inwards revealed the standard yellowish station tiles that can still be seen in many subway stations today. Picture below is the remains of part of the uptown platform, where the staircases leading up to the pedestrian overpass once stood. The outlines of the tunnel portals could easily be seen. There was an opening in the "wall" covering the entrance to the "eastbound" trackway. It was a

rectangular opening, basically a double doorway with no door.

(image 8271) (20 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: Sedgwick Avenue (9th Avenue El) (Abandoned) Photo by: Mark S. Feinman Date: 12/19/1999 Notes: Downtown platform. Foreground area where the Putnam Division Sedgwick Ave stationhouse once stood. Picture faces Sedgwick Ave and the tunnel portal Viewed (this week/total): 19 / 685

(image 8272) (22 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: Sedgwick Avenue (9th Avenue El) (Abandoned) Photo by: Mark S. Feinman Date: 12/19/1999 Notes: Trackways in the foreground. Small staircase leads onto catwalk between the tracks. Picture taken on uptown platform. Viewed (this week/total): 14 / 620

(image 8273) (25 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: Sedgwick Avenue (9th Avenue El) (Abandoned) Photo by: Mark S. Feinman Date: 12/19/1999 Notes: Picture taken standing on the uptown trackway. Some members of the field trip are taking pictures Viewed (this week/total): 18 / 644

(image 8274) (29 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: Sedgwick Avenue (9th Avenue El) (Abandoned) Photo by: Mark S. Feinman Date: 12/19/1999 Notes: Standing on the catwalk betwen the trackways. The tunnel portals can barely be seen. Viewed (this week/total): 12 / 431

(image 8275) (28 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: Sedgwick Avenue (9th Avenue El) (Abandoned) Photo by: Mark S. Feinman Date: 12/19/1999 Notes: Standing on the catwalk between the trackways, facing the downtown platform. Some of the original steel support beams are rusted through; the newer beams (painted blue) are more recent and were not part of the original structure. Viewed (this week/total): 14 / 544

(image 8276) (26 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: Sedgwick Avenue (9th Avenue El) (Abandoned) Photo by: Mark S. Feinman Date: 12/19/1999 Notes: Standing on the downtown platform, facing the uptown platform. The pile of dirt in the background is where the subway-style entrance remains are. Viewed (this week/total): 14 / 512

(image 8277) (32 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: Sedgwick Avenue (9th Avenue El) (Abandoned) Photo by: Mark S. Feinman Date: 12/19/1999 Notes: Remains of the uptown platform. This area once supported a pair of staircases leading up to a pedestrian overpass. One staircase started at the second arch from the left; the other would be to the left, out of the picture. Viewed (this week/total): 13 / 567

(image 8278) (26 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: Sedgwick Avenue (9th Avenue El) (Abandoned) Photo by: Mark S. Feinman Date: 12/19/1999 Notes: The field trip enters the tunnel. The wall sealing the tunnel does not extend to the tunnel roof; gratings were built in the top 1/4 of the wall to allow for ventilation. Similar consturction exists at the other end of the tunnel, at Jerome Avenue Viewed (this week/total): 14 / 537

More Images: 1-8 9-12
The Sedgwick / Jerome Ave. Tunnel After viewing the Sedgwick Ave. station, the group proceeded into the tunnel, walking on the ballast where the eastbound track had been. The westbound tunnel was sealed at this end. Several wrecked automobiles were found in the tunnel right-of-way near the Anderson Ave. station end of the tunnel. They must have been brought there before the walls over the tunnel ends were installed. There were

eight signals counted, six of them were still where they were when service ended, the other two were lying on the trackbed. All were in various states of rust-through, with no bulbs and broken lenses. One greeted us as soon as we entered the tunnel. The control box from one of them was found on the tunnel floor. A couple of them still had the signal plates loosely attached, although the enamel had worn off to the point that only tiny patches remained on the bare metal. All rail and ties had been removed, except for one, which was nearly buried by the ballast, which still exists in both tunnels. The westbound tunnel suffers greater water damage than the eastbound tunnel. Worker "escapes" along the outside walls were found at the usual intervals, and access between the tunnels was available every 20 feet or so. What was odd was that there were ladders leading up to the tunnel catwalk (along the center wall) every 10 feet, which seemed "extravagant".

(image 8253) (18 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: Tunnel bet. Sedgwick & Anderson Ave. Stations-9th Avenue El Photo by: Mark S. Feinman Date: 12/19/1999 Notes: Mark W. and his official NYC Transit reflective vest lead the way towards Anderson Avenue, seeing the light at the end of this tunnel Viewed (this week/total): 9 / 333

(image 8254) (15 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: Tunnel bet. Sedgwick & Anderson Ave. Stations-9th Avenue El Photo by: Mark S. Feinman Date: 12/19/1999 Notes: We're a short way in from Sedgwick Avenue Viewed (this week/total): 8 / 232

(image 8255) (21 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: Tunnel bet. Sedgwick & Anderson Ave. Stations-9th Avenue El Photo by: Mark S. Feinman Date: 12/19/1999 Notes: We're a short distance from the Anderson Avenue platform. Picture was taken from the tunnel catwalk Viewed (this week/total): 10 / 313

(image 8256) (20 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: Tunnel bet. Sedgwick & Anderson Ave. Stations-9th Avenue El Photo by: Mark S. Feinman Date: 12/19/1999 Notes: Westbound tunnel Viewed (this week/total): 10 / 199

(image 8257) (19 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: Tunnel bet. Sedgwick & Anderson Ave. Stations-9th Avenue El Photo by: Mark S. Feinman Date: 12/19/1999 Notes: Facing the Sedgwick Avenue uptown platform. The shadow of the doorway is seen, as well as debris along the trackway Viewed (this week/total): 12 / 363

(image 8258) (24 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: Tunnel bet. Sedgwick & Anderson Ave. Stations-9th Avenue El Photo by: Hank Eisenstein Date: 12/19/1999 Notes: Remains of a signal, left where it was since abandonment on August 31st, 1958 Viewed (this week/total): 12 / 340

(image 8260) (24 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: Tunnel bet. Sedgwick & Anderson Ave. Stations-9th Avenue El Photo by: Hank Eisenstein Date: 12/19/1999 Notes: Sign for Woodycrest Avenue, painted onto the tunnel wall, surprisingly in good shape. Viewed (this week/total): 17 / 727

(image 8259) (23 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: Tunnel bet. Sedgwick & Anderson Ave. Stations-9th Avenue El Photo by: Jodi Levine Date: 12/19/1999 Notes: That's Hank Eisenstein in the foreground and Mark Feinman holding his camera up in the background Viewed (this week/total): 8 / 300

Jerome / Anderson Avenue At Anderson Ave., we were able to climb up on the platform and view what had been the station from the inside. We had viewed this station from outside on the street but could see virtually nothing. There was a definite doorway in the wall that once sealed off the

tunnel, again no door in the doorway. We could look out to the street from behind the black fence. Along the downtown side, the fence had a door in it, but that, too, was missing. Had we decided to climb up the rock wall on Jerome Avenue, we would have been pleasantly surprised in seeing that there would be access in this direction, too. The station was littered with garbage and tires from "Rocky's Chop Shop". The area of the platform that serves as the roof of the awning shop was clean, and evidence of recent roof work could be seen. A hatch was drilled into the platform that serves as the awning shop's access for its "roof". We wonder if the shop's owner even knew that 9th Ave El train service once ran on his roof; with all the garbage, it was hard to make out where the trackways were. And like the Sedgwick Avenue side, the sealed tunnels were not entirely encased in concrete; the top 1/4 was grating left open for ventilation. Half of the remains of this station were outside in the "cut" between the apartment buildings, and the other half was underground. The former fare control area for the underground portion of the station is now occupied by a laundromat. Evidence of a failed break-in to this laundromat could be seen at the top of a staircase leading to the fare control area. Jerome Ave. & 162nd St., Street Level Not much has changed since these pictures were taken (at Jerome Ave. & 162nd St., the site of the Jerome/ Anderson "subway" station). The ad for Israel Ruiz is, for the most part, painted over, save for the words "state senator" and part of his image from the glasses on up. To the right of this picture is a rock "wall", which looks like it is climbable on its right side. As a large group, we decided not to climb it, knowing full well that there was "guaranteed" access under the Major Deegan Expressway at Sedgwick Avenue. Had we climbed this rock wall, we would have seen that there was an opening in the fence where a door (a locked door, presumably) was missing, providing easy access to the Sedgwick Ave platform. The station canopy, at one time, extended from the tunnel portal all the way across Jerome Avenue; there was no evidence of the canopy structure anywhere on the platform remains. The folks living in the adjacent apartment buildings have a great view of this area, and probably have no idea that 9th Ave El trains once ran through the mysterious tunnel that's partially blocked. To the left of the pictures below is a distingushing feature of the IRT that is also seen in plain sight along the Queens Blvd. viaduct of the Flushing Line - green tile along the wall. It is partially painted over, but clearly visible. The tilework extended along the concrete structure that once crossed Jerome Avenue. The doors at the bottom of the wall, I presume, were station entrances, and there was no evidence of station entrances on the sidewalk (different concrete on the ground, for example). This area is occupied by a sign and awning business, and a quick peek in yielded no evidence that a station was ever there. If you walk back far enough on 162nd St. between Jerome & River Avenues, you can see part of the Manhattan bound tunnel. (If it were summer, you wouldn't be able to see a thing). You can't tell whether or not it is sealed, even if you looked through a camera's zoom lens. There was no evidence of station entrances on Sedgwick Ave. itself - just a solid rock/brick wall forming the foundation for an apartment house. The Sedgwick Ave. platform is clearly visible from a pedestrian overpass over the Major Deegan Expressway at 162nd St. & Summit Ave. Cross the Major Deegan and you can see the edge of the plaform under the expressway, and remnants of another concrete structure that once held the foundation of a pedestrian overpass across the tracks. On the other side of the overpass is a closed staircase that one time connected to a pedestrian bridge that crossed over what is now Metro-North, for access to the 9th Ave El; it is fenced off. If you continue down the ramp of this overpass, towards the Macombs Dam Bridge, it leads to some brush, and you can easily walk through this brush and step onto these platforms. (Between the time of my walking tour and the actual field trip, either DOT or the Parks Department was through there; all the brush was cleared).

(image 8261) (36 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: Anderson Avenue (9th Avenue El) Photo by: Mark S. Feinman Date: 12/19/1999 Notes: Facing Andersen Avenue, standing on the platform. It's difficult to make out the former trackways because of all of the garbage. That doorway in the middle is how we exited the tunnel. Viewed (this week/total): 15 / 523

(image 8262) (31 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: Anderson Avenue (9th Avenue El) Photo by: Mark S. Feinman Date: 12/19/1999 Notes: Facing Jerome Avenue, standing on the platform. The downtown trackway is in the foreground. To the left of the photographer, out of the picture, is a missing door in the fence that would give you access from the ridge down to Jerome Avenue Recent roofing material applied to

(image 8263) (31 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: Anderson Avenue (9th Avenue El) Photo by: Mark S. Feinman Date: 12/19/1999 Notes: Standing in the downtown trackway, facing Anderson Avenue Viewed (this week/total): 8 / 343

(image 8264) (29 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: Anderson Avenue (9th Avenue El) Photo by: Mark S. Feinman Date: 12/19/1999 Notes: Standing in the doorway from the tunnel, facing Jerome Avenue The uptown trackway is completely filled with junk. Viewed (this week/total): 10 / 378

the platform can be seen. Viewed (this week/total): 21 / 822

(image 8265) (22 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: Anderson Avenue (9th Avenue El) Photo by: Mark S. Feinman Date: 12/19/1999 Notes: In the underground portion of the station, we're facing the downtown trackway. Behind the photographer, tires are piled up to the grating. Mark W.'s vest reflects a flash photo. Viewed (this week/total): 12 / 285

(image 8266) (25 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: Anderson Avenue (9th Avenue El) Photo by: Mark S. Feinman Date: 12/19/1999 Notes: On the platform facing the uptown tunnel. The abandoned automobiles we saw were just a few feet beyond the portal. Note the narrow stairs leading up to the fare control area for Andersen Avenue, now the site of a laundromat. Viewed (this week/total): 15 / 453

(image 8267) (19 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: Anderson Avenue (9th Avenue El) Photo by: Mark S. Feinman Date: 12/19/1999 Notes: On the platform facing the uptown trackway, looking towards Jerome Avenue The trackway is fairly clean here, but tires are piled up to the grating in the tunnel 'seal'. Viewed (this week/total): 11 / 294

(image 8268) (22 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: Anderson Avenue (9th Avenue El) Photo by: Mark S. Feinman Date: 12/19/1999 Notes: Facing the downtown trackway, looking towards Jerome Avenue A better view of the tires. Viewed (this week/total): 13 / 393

More Images: 1-8 9-16 17
Back to the Tunnel Many of us walked back through the "westbound" trackway - no automobiles blocking the way, but we had to cross back over to the "eastbound" side on the Sedgwick Ave. end through one of the crossover holes spaced at intervals throughout the tunnel in order to get back out. A painted sign indicating the location of Woodycrest Avenue was found in the westbound tunnel. We didn't see any emergency exits in the tunnel at all (but there were "ladders" leading up to the catwalk every 10 feet, something that we felt was unusual). Many of us expressed surprised that there was absolutely no evidence of homeless people in either tunnel. Some of us joked that we were fully expecting to find a body. And unlike some of the currently opened stations along the NYC Subway, there were no track rabbits (rats) anywhere. Jerome Avenue & 163rd St, Street Level. The girders of the connection at 163rd St. are still there. In fact, the railroad ties remain over 163rd St. At the end of the structure, you can see some more ties and about 20 feet of guardrail, where it ends abruptly by IRT substation 44, built in 1917 and apparently still in use. The space where the el ran to Jerome Ave. along 162nd Street is occupied by a parking lot for a tennis club. The former fare control area on the east side of Jerome Avenue and 162nd Street is now occupied by the entrance to the tennis club.

(image 8249) (39 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: IRT Substation #44

(image 8250) (84 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: Jerome Avenue-9th

(image 8251) (105 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: Jerome Avenue-9th

(image 8252) (98 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: Jerome Avenue-9th

Photo by: Hank Eisenstein Date: 12/19/1999 Notes: IRT Substation #44 Viewed (this week/total): 13 / 492

Ave El Turnout Photo by: David M. Rosenthal Date: 2/12/1987 Notes: View of the turnout from the Jerome Avenue El. This view is underneath the structure. Viewed (this week/total): 14 / 456

Ave El Turnout Photo by: David M. Rosenthal Date: 2/12/1987 Notes: Another view of the turnout from the Jerome Avenue El Viewed (this week/total): 12 / 395

Ave El Turnout Photo by: David M. Rosenthal Date: 2/12/1987 Notes: Another view of the turnout from the Jerome Avenue El Viewed (this week/total): 13 / 438

More Images: 1-4 5
155th Street, Manhattan Returning to Sedgwick Ave., the group walked across the Macombs Dam Bridge to the site of the Polo Grounds, and stopped to look at the old El stairways on the155th Street viaduct. We tried looking for remnants of the 159th Street yard; there were none. We tried viewing the Sedgwick Ave station from the Harlem River Drive at the end of 8th Ave; the view was obstructed by the recently built exit ramp from the Major Deegan Expressway for the Bronx Terminal Market and Yankee Stadium. In the Polo Grounds Housing complex, there was a plaque commemorating the Polo Grounds stadium, identifying the approximate location of home plate. At the end of the field trip, the group posed for its group photo.

(image 8285) (37 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: Macombs Dam Bridge Photo by: Mark S. Feinman Date: 12/19/1999 Notes: Stairs to 9th Avenue El at Macombs Dam Bridge Viewed (this week/total): 8 / 344

(image 8286) (291 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: Macombs Dam Bridge Photo by: Timothy Todd Date: 1998 Notes: Stairs to 9th Avenue El at Macombs Dam Bridge Viewed (this week/total): 15 / 589

(image 8287) (212 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: Macombs Dam Bridge Photo by: Timothy Todd Date: 1998 Notes: Stairs to 9th Avenue El at Macombs Dam Bridge Viewed (this week/total): 11 / 296

(image 8288) (260 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: Macombs Dam Bridge Photo by: Timothy Todd Date: 1998 Notes: Stairs to 9th Avenue El at Macombs Dam Bridge Viewed (this week/total): 9 / 388

Photos Historical Views

(image 8289) (32 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: 110th Street (9th Avenue El)

(image 8290) (26 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: 110th Street (9th Avenue El)

(image 8291) (29 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: 110th Street (9th Avenue El)

(image 8292) (33 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: 110th Street (9th Avenue El)

Line: 9th Avenue El Photo by: Detroit Publishing Co. Collection of: Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division Viewed (this week/total): 15 / 420

Line: 9th Avenue El Photo by: Detroit Publishing Co. Collection of: Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division Viewed (this week/total): 16 / 637

Line: 9th Avenue El Photo by: Detroit Publishing Co. Collection of: Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division Viewed (this week/total): 13 / 340

Line: 9th Avenue El Photo by: Detroit Publishing Co. Collection of: Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division Viewed (this week/total): 12 / 438

(image 8293) (31 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: 110th Street (9th Avenue El) Line: 9th Avenue El Photo by: Detroit Publishing Co. Collection of: Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division Viewed (this week/total): 12 / 631

(image 26127) (159 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: 110th Street (9th Avenue El) Line: 9th Avenue El Viewed (this week/total): 16 / 621

(image 26126) (91 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: 110th Street (9th Avenue El) Line: 9th Avenue El Viewed (this week/total): 14 / 450

(image 26120) (60 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: 110th Street (9th Avenue El) Line: 9th Avenue El Collection of: David Pirmann Viewed (this week/total): 13 / 308

More Images: 1-8 9-16 17-22
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Forgotten New York: Polo Grounds Shuttle (Many different views of the areas visited above)

Disused and Abandoned Stations

www.nycsubway.org > The IRT Division Copyright © 1995-2002 New York City Subway Resources This site is not affiliated with any transit agency or provider. This page last modified on Friday, 25-Jul-2003 12:51:30 EDT. http://www.nycsubway.org/irt/9thave/index.html (dreamland)

Roosevelt Avenue Terminal Station

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www.nycsubway.org > The IND Division > IND Queens Boulevard Line Overview Station by Station 50th Street 7th Avenue 5th Avenue Lexington Avenue 23rd Street/ Ely Avenue Queens Plaza 36th Street Steinway Street 46th Street Northern Boulevard 65th Street Roosevelt Avenue/ Jackson Heights Roosevelt Avenue Terminal Station Elmhurst Avenue Grand Avenue/ Newtown Woodhaven Boulevard/ Queens Mall 63rd Drive/ Rego Park 67th Avenue 71st Avenue/ Continental Avenue/ Forest Hills 75th Avenue Union Turnpike/ Kew Gardens Briarwood/ Van Wyck Boulevard 179th Street Branch Sutphin Boulevard Parsons Boulevard
The Winfield Spur, planned as part of the IND Second System in 1929, was designed to provide through service to the Rockaways from midtown, and to serve the neighborhoods of Maspeth and Ridgewood. It would have been a two-track line from Roosevelt Avenue to a connection with another newly planned line, the Myrtle/Central Avenue line. It would have run as subway to 45th Avenue, elevated to Fresh Pond Road, and again as subway to the connection with the Myrtle/Central Ave line. In anticipation of this line being built, trackways measuring 750 feet long and a completed station with full tile work were built that connect to today's IND Queens Blvd line at Roosevelt Avenue -- Jackson Heights. The Great Depression and later World War II stopped all these grand expansion plans, and no further construction was ever done. The station and trackways remain, serving not passengers, but as a storage area and maintenance-of-way offices. The IND Second System Joe Brennan notes: There is an unused trackway for westbound local trains beginning at outer wall just east of station, rises up to same level as 2 trackways mentioned above making 3 trackways on upper level. At 78th St, 3 trackways on upper level curve to south, ending at "temporary" wall at edge of constructed subway. On lower track level in use, a fourth local trackway for eastbound local trains is seen also curving to south and similarly ending at a wall. The 4-track subway running south was a plan for a line to the Rockaways and south Jamaica proposed in 1929. Get out the atlases: via private property at 78th St now used as a playground, west in Garfield Ave, south in 65th Place, private property, Fresh Pond Road, then east in the LIRR, etc. Below are 26 video-snapshots of the IND Second System Roosevelt Avenue taken on a tour sponsored by the New York Transit Museum, by Mark S. Feinman. A video of this tour is also available.

169th Street 179th Street Jamaica Center Branch Jamaica/ Van Wyck Sutphin Boulevard Jamaica Center/ Parsons- Archer

(image 1073) (20 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: Roosevelt Avenue Terminal Station Line: IND Queens Photo by: Mark S. Feinman Notes: Standing on (what would have been) the Rockaway-bound trackway, Roosevelt Ave terminal station. The island platform, to the right, is so filled with "stuff" that it is nearly impossible to make it out. Note the outside wall in the left of the picture; it is fully tiled with a blue band across the upper third of it. It looks grey because of the years of dust that have accumulated on it. Viewed (this week/total): 18 / 717 (image 1074) (10 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: Roosevelt Avenue Terminal Station Line: IND Queens Photo by: Mark S. Feinman Notes: A similar view to the first picture, trying to look at more of the island platform. Viewed (this week/total): 11 / 392

(image 1075) (10 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: Roosevelt Avenue Terminal Station Line: IND Queens Photo by: Mark S. Feinman Notes: A close up of the wall. Above each escape is the word "Roosevelt" in black tile with white lettering, standard IND style. Viewed (this week/total): 9 / 374 (image 1076) (9 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: Roosevelt Avenue Terminal Station Line: IND Queens Photo by: Mark S. Feinman Notes: It's very dark in the trackway. We have left the terminal area and are standing where a scissors crossover would have been placed just outside of the terminal. Not visible to the right is the turnout that would have enabled Queens Blvd trains to run to Rockaway. We're looking southbound (to Rockaway). Viewed (this week/total): 6 / 255

(image 1077) (9 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: Roosevelt Avenue Terminal Station Line: IND Queens Photo by: Mark S. Feinman Notes: The tour group walking along the northbound (from Rockaway) trackway. Viewed (this week/total): 6 / 210 (image 1078) (10 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: Roosevelt Avenue Terminal Station Line: IND Queens Photo by: Mark S. Feinman Notes: A good view of the northbound trackway. To the right is the southbound trackway from the terminal station. To the left is the ramp connecting the IND Rockaway Line to the IND Queens Blvd Line. Viewed (this week/total): 9 / 420 (image 1079) (10 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: Roosevelt Avenue Terminal Station Line: IND Queens Photo by: Mark S. Feinman Notes: The southbound trackway, which at this point is over the IND Queens Blvd Line. A peek into one of those escapes on the right would have shown you a high ceiling and the Queens-bound IND local track below. Viewed (this week/total): 9 / 242

(image 1080) (8 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: Roosevelt Avenue Terminal Station Line: IND Queens Photo by: Mark S. Feinman Notes: Looking south, this is the ramp that would have connected the IND Rockaway Line to the IND Queens Blvd Manhattanbound local track. The small dot in the background is a signal on the IND Queens Blvd line, the larger dot is the Roosevelt Ave / Jackson Heights express station. Viewed (this week/total): 7 / 199 (image 1081) (8 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: Roosevelt Avenue Terminal Station Line: IND Queens Photo by: Mark S. Feinman Notes: Same view as before but a little closer to the IND Queens Blvd Line. Viewed (this week/total): 5 / 187 (image 1082) (8 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: Roosevelt Avenue Terminal Station Line: IND Queens Photo by: Mark S. Feinman Notes: Standing near the end of the connecting ramp, the foreground trackway is the northbound trackway into the Roosevelt Ave terminal; the background trackway would have served Rockaway-bound trains.

Viewed (this week/total): 6 / 186 (image 1083) (8 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: Roosevelt Avenue Terminal Station Line: IND Queens Photo by: Mark S. Feinman Notes: Same view as before. Viewed (this week/total): 6 / 162 (image 1084) (10 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: Roosevelt Avenue Terminal Station Line: IND Queens Photo by: Mark S. Feinman Notes: From the connecting ramp facing Rockaway, the tour group walks on the northbound trackway. Viewed (this week/total): 9 / 287 (image 1085) (7 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: Roosevelt Avenue Terminal Station Line: IND Queens Photo by: Mark S. Feinman Notes: Near the "end of the line". The connecting ramp to the IND Queens Line in the foreground and the northbound trackway to the Roosevelt Ave terminal is on the right. Viewed (this week/total): 6 / 200

(image 1086) (9 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: Roosevelt Avenue Terminal Station Line: IND Queens Photo by: Mark S. Feinman Notes: The "end of the line", an emergency exit, on the connecting ramp. Viewed (this week/total): 8 / 238 (image 1087) (6 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: Roosevelt Avenue Terminal Station Line: IND Queens Photo by: Mark S. Feinman Notes: Standing on the northbound trackway, looking towards the Roosevelt Ave terminal. Viewed (this week/total): 7 / 170 (image 1088) (7 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: Roosevelt Avenue Terminal Station Line: IND Queens Photo by: Mark S. Feinman Notes: Standing on the northbound trackway, walking towards the Roosevelt Ave terminal. Viewed (this week/total): 5 / 148

(image 1089) (7 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: Roosevelt Avenue Terminal Station Line: IND Queens Photo by: Mark S. Feinman Notes: Standing on the northbound trackway, even closer to the Roosevelt Ave terminal. Viewed (this week/total): 5 / 155 (image 1090) (7 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: Roosevelt Avenue Terminal Station Line: IND Queens Photo by: Mark S. Feinman Notes: Back at the scissors crossover, getting ready to cross over to the Rockaway-bound trackway. Viewed (this week/total): 6 / 177 (image 1091) (7 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: Roosevelt Avenue Terminal Station Line: IND Queens Photo by: Mark S. Feinman Notes: Approaching the Roosevelt Ave terminal. What appears as a tunnel wall in the back of the picture is really sheets of steel supporting the "closet" for storage inside the station. Viewed (this week/total): 7 / 225

(image 1092) (8 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: Roosevelt Avenue Terminal Station Line: IND Queens Photo by: Mark S. Feinman Notes: Entering the terminal. The standard IND tunnel construction and catwalk is evident in this photo. Viewed (this week/total): 8 / 259 (image 1093) (10 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: Roosevelt Avenue Terminal Station Line: IND Queens Photo by: Mark S. Feinman Notes: Back inside the terminal on the Rockawaybound trackway. The white area in the tile is the actual tile color - the rest is covered with years of dust! Viewed (this week/total): 5 / 218 (image 1094) (10 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: Roosevelt Avenue Terminal Station Line: IND Queens Photo by: Mark S. Feinman Notes: Approaching the center of the station. The steps in the background lead to the island platform. Viewed (this week/total): 10 / 257

(image 1095) (11 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: Roosevelt Avenue Terminal Station Line: IND Queens Photo by: Mark S. Feinman Notes: Standing on the island platform facing the Rockaway-bound trackway. This is as close to imagining a train entering this terminal as you'll get. The platform was so strewn with stuff that it was impossible to determine if any hanging signs saying "Roosevelt Ave" were put up. There were no such signs on the station pillars. Viewed (this week/total): 6 / 282 (image 1096) (10 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: Roosevelt Avenue Terminal Station Line: IND Queens Photo by: Mark S. Feinman Notes: A somewhat brighter view of the platform. Viewed (this week/total): 8 / 279 (image 1097) (12 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: Roosevelt Avenue Terminal Station Line: IND Queens Photo by: Mark S. Feinman Notes: While this looks like a service corridor leading back to the fare control area of the Roosevelt Ave / Jackson Heights station, it is in reality the rear of the Roosevelt Ave IND Second

System platform. On both sides of this corridor, maintenance of way offices were built on part of the platform and over the Rockaway-bound trackway. The platform leads out to the station area, but outside of the fare controls. Viewed (this week/total): 8 / 399 (image 1098) (12 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: Roosevelt Avenue Terminal Station Line: IND Queens Photo by: Mark S. Feinman Notes: The end of the second system platform. The platform's ceiling changes as you get nearest to the gate. Outside this area, there is a ramp downwards leading to the fare controls for the IND Queens Blvd line. The station configuration was not intended to look this way; this would have been a transfer corridor between the IND Queens Blvd and Rockaway Lines. Viewed (this week/total): 11 / 475

www.nycsubway.org > The IND Division > IND Queens Boulevard Line Copyright © 1995-2002 New York City Subway Resources This site is not affiliated with any transit agency or provider. This page last modified on Friday, 17-Jan-2003 10:25:45 EST. http://www.nycsubway.org/ind/qblvd/ind-qblvd-roosterm.html (dreamland)

BMT Brighton: Dean Street

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www.nycsubway.org > The BMT Division > BMT Brighton Line Overview DeKalb Avenue Atlantic Avenue 7th Avenue Prospect Park Parkside Avenue Church Avenue Beverley Road Cortelyou Road Newkirk Avenue Avenue H Avenue J Avenue M Kings Highway Avenue U Neck Road Sheepshead Bay Brighton Beach Ocean Parkway West 8th Street Coney Island/ Stillwell Avenue Franklin Shuttle Botanic Garden Park Place Dean Street Franklin Avenue Continue: Malbone St. Wreck
Dean St. (Opened 6/19/1899, Closed 1996) This station was closed in 1996 partly because of its decrepit condition (although it seemed that the concrete portion of the platforms were in better shape than Park Place) and partly because of its low fare collection (many riders simply jumped the turnstiles). The stairs to the street have been removed along with the fluorescent lights that were once in use here before it was closed.

(image 4523) (132 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: Dean Street (BMT Franklin) Line: BMT Franklin Route: Franklin Shuttle Car: R27 8189 Photo by: Steve Zabel Collection of: Joe Testagrose Date: 6/20/1982 Viewed (this week/total): 21 / 512

(image 4459) (135 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: Dean Street (BMT Franklin) Line: BMT Franklin Route: Franklin Shuttle Car: R27 8047 Photo by: Steve Zabel Collection of: Joe Testagrose Date: 6/13/1982 Viewed (this week/total): 28 / 635

(image 4511) (132 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: Dean Street (BMT Franklin) Line: BMT Franklin Route: Franklin Shuttle Car: R27 8159 Photo by: Steve Zabel Collection of: Joe Testagrose Date: 9/8/1981 Viewed (this week/total): 17 / 362

(image 4556) (138 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: Dean Street (BMT Franklin) Line: BMT Franklin Route: Franklin Shuttle Car: R27 8246 Photo by: Doug Grotjahn Collection of: Joe Testagrose Date: 8/22/1981 Viewed (this week/total): 19 / 477

(image 8197) (118 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: Dean Street (BMT Franklin) Line: BMT Franklin Route: Fan Trip Car: BU 1404 Photo by: Steve Zabel Collection of: Joe Testagrose Date: 8/30/1980 Notes: With 1273 & 1407 Viewed (this week/total): 19 / 447

(image 8213) (166 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: Dean Street (BMT Franklin) Line: BMT Franklin Route: Fan Trip Car: BU 1407 Photo by: Steve Zabel Collection of: Joe Testagrose Date: 8/30/1980 Notes: With 1273 & 1404 Viewed (this week/total): 11 / 260

(image 2631) (167 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: Dean Street (BMT Franklin) Line: BMT Franklin Route: Franklin Shuttle Car: R11 8017 Photo by: Doug Grotjahn Collection of: Joe Testagrose Date: 10/27/1975 Viewed (this week/total): 11 / 337

(image 4502) (168 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: Dean Street (BMT Franklin) Line: BMT Franklin Route: Franklin Shuttle Car: R27 8143 Photo by: Doug Grotjahn Collection of: Joe Testagrose Date: 4/15/1973 Viewed (this week/total): 15 / 308

(image 5005) (156 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: Dean Street (BMT Franklin) Line: BMT Franklin Route: Franklin Shuttle Car: R38 3962 Photo by: Joe Testagrose Date: 3/24/1973 Viewed (this week/total): 31 / 790

(image 1887) (121 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: Dean Street (BMT Franklin) Line: BMT Franklin Route: FT; R11 on FS Car: R1 103 Photo by: Joe Testagrose Date: 10/30/1971 Notes: With R11 on Franklin Shuttle Viewed (this week/total): 16 / 349

(image 1892) (106 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: Dean Street (BMT Franklin) Line: BMT Franklin Route: Fan Trip Car: R4 484 Photo by: Joe Testagrose Date: 10/30/1971 Viewed (this week/total): 11 / 249

(image 6531) (161 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: Dean Street (BMT Franklin) Line: BMT Franklin Route: Fan Trip Car: BMT D 6019 Photo by: Joe Testagrose Date: 9/20/1970 Viewed (this week/total): 16 / 279

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FAQ: Early New York City Tunnels

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The Interborough Rapid Transit subway, which broke ground in 1900 after many years of political manovering, was not the first attempt at transit tunneling in New York City. Several other groups attempted to build tunnel lines with varying degrees of success.
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Atlantic Avenue Tunnel, Brooklyn Beach Pneumatic Transit Beach Pneumatic Transit Bibliography The Hudson Tunnel Railroad Company The Steinway Tunnel Contributors to this Page

Atlantic Avenue Tunnel, Brooklyn The Brooklyn, Flatbush and Jamaica Railroad (later to become the Long Island Rail Road) had built a two track railroad on the surface from the East River waterfront at Atlantic Avenue to Jamaica, circa 1830. They quickly found out that the weak locomotives of that era were incapable of climbing the slight grade west of Boerum Place, about a half mile or from the river. Seeking a level right-of-way, the builders of the Croton Aqueduct water tunnel was commissioned to build a railroad tunnel. Construction began in 1844, and the tunnel was designed as a two track line in a cut-and-cover, brick arch structure on a sand invert. The grade was a gentle 1% down to the waterfront so it would be self-draining. A terminal station was located on a pier next to the ferry, and another station was built inside the portal of the tunnel near Hicks Street and Atlantic Avenue. About 1859, the railroad was forced to close the tunnel and relocate its right-of-way to Jamaica through Richmond Hill, Woodside, Sunnyside and Long Island City to a new ferry terminal on the East River opposite East 34th Street. This became the new main line, and the old main line in Brooklyn fell into disuse for many decades. The tunnel on Atlantic Avenue was stripped of rail and ties, and an old locomotive was left at the west end of the tunnel near Hicks Street, perhaps because it derailed and was not worth salvaging. This is all based on fragmentary evidence, such as old newspaper accounts of the closing. The tunnel was mostly forgotten until 1916, when, as the story goes (does anyone have a cite?), during the early months of the World War in Europe, an explosion destroyed the "Black Tom" munitions depot in New Jersey on the other side of the Upper New York Bay. It was assumed that the explosion was the work of enemy agents, rumored to be hiding out at the Atlantic Avenue Tunnel. Not finding any, workers resealed the tunnel. In 1981, Brooklynite Bob Diamond heard a news broadcast in which the subject of abandoned tunnels was mentioned. Asking at the Borough President's Office, Topographical Bureau engineers allowed him to inspect the blue prints for the Atlantic Avenue Tunnel. Subsequently, he founded the Brooklyn Historic Railway Association, and is now digging behind the stone wall that was put up in 1859. Tours of the tunnel are occasionally sponsored by Bob and the New York Transit Museum. You can call him for more information, and perhaps you will volunteer to help him. Contact: Bob Diamond, Brooklyn Historic Railway Association, 599 E. 7th St., Brooklyn, NY 11218. http://wt.mit.edu/Subway/Tunnel/mar14.html - Saul Blumenthal has assembled a selection of photos from tours of the

Tunnel.

Beach Pneumatic Transit Probably the most well known of these early attempts, at least in terms of subway lore, was an 1870 demonstration line, the Beach Pneumatic Transit. Alfred Ely Beach, inventor and editor of Scientific American, had designed a pneumatic (air-driven) system which he demonstrated at the American Institute Fair in 1867, and he thought it viable for transit operation in underground tunnels. He applied for a permit from the Tammany Hall city government, and after being denied, decided to build the line in secrecy, in an attempt to show that subterranean transit was practical. (He actually did receive a permit to built a pneumatic package delivery system, originally of two small tunnels from Warren St. to Cedar St., later amended to be one large tunnel, to "simplfy construction" of what he really intended to build.) The Beach tunnel was constructed in only 58 days, starting under Warren Street and Broadway, directly across from City Hall. The station was under the south sidewalk of Warren Street just west of the Broadway corner. The single track tunnel ran east into Broadway, curved south, and ran down the middle of Broadway to Murray Street, a distance of one block, about 300 feet in all. The subway opened to the public on February 26, 1870. Operated as a demonstration from 1870 to 1873, the short tunnel had only the one station and train car. While frequently mentioned as an important early development in New York City's transit history, it was merely a curiosity. It is unclear that such a system could have been practical on a large scale. Smaller tube systems are used in buildings for mail delivery, but a rail-car sized system has never been developed. The perfection of electric multiple-unit traction and electric locomotives came about so quickly after this experiment that it wasn't deemed worthwhile to even try an expanded pneumatic system. In 1912, construction workers on what is now the BMT Broadway subway (N and R trains) took possession of the tunnel, and found the original shield at the south end of the tunnel, as well as the wooden remains of the car. The successor company to Beach Pneumatic Transit even sued the city for destroying their property! (The outcome of this lawsuit is unknown.) So what remains now? Probably nothing. The tunnel under Broadway was almost definitely destroyed during the BMT subway construction. A report in the New York Times in 1912 describes the tunnel, but the station had probably been destroyed when the building at Broadway & Warren was torn down and rebuilt. During the replacement of the building, the station, which was essentially a basement vault under the sidewalk, may have been incorporated into the new basement. Gratings in the sidewalk on Warren Street indicate some vault or ventilation areas are down there today. Beach Pneumatic Transit Bibliography
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http://www.columbia.edu/~brennan/abandoned/beach.html http://www.multimania.com/fdelaitre/Beach.htm http://www.klaatu.org/klaatu11.html http://home.nycap.rr.com/useless/subway/subway.html "The Pneumatic Tunnel Under Broadway." Alfred Ely Beach, Scientific American (March 5, 1870, page 154)

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"Under Broadway," Harper's Weekly (March 12, 1870, p.164.) "New York's First Subway", Waldemar Kaempffert, Scientific American, February 24, 1912 (volume 106, pages 176-177). "New York's Secret Subway", by Oliver E. Allen, American Heritage of Invention & Technology, Winter 1997, (pages 44-48). "First Subway 40 Years Ago: Started in Lower Broadway and Trains Were to Run by Air Pressure", New York Times (Februaury 4, 1912, page 15, column 1). "Broadway Tube Proposed in '49: Alfred Ely Beach, Who Devised Shield Method of Subway Building, Sponsored the Project Then", New York Times (September 12, 1926, Section VIII, page 12, column 1). "Plaque in City Hall Station to Mark First Subway Site", New York Times, (September 15, 1932, page 23, column 5). "The First Subway", New York Times (September 17, 1932, page 14, column 3). "New York's First Subway", New York Times (February 27, 1940, page 20, column 3). "First Subway Here Was Like A Popgun: Opened 80 Years Ago, It Shot Its Car, Full of Passengers, With Compressed Air", New York Times (February 25, 1950, page 19, column 1). Illustrated description of the Broadway underground railway, New York: Beach Pneumatic Transit Co., 1872. New York Public Library.

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The Hudson Tunnel Railroad Company Two other tunnels pre-date the groundbreaking of the IRT subway, both of which are still in use today although neither one of them opened in time to beat the IRT. Discounting the Beach Pneumatic demonstration line, the earliest subway construction with the intention of rail service was the effort of the Hudson Tunnel Railroad Company, who on November 17, 1874, began construction on a trans-Hudson River line from lower Manhattan to Hoboken. Delays totaled some 15 years (1882-87 and 1892-1902). After the second delay, the company was reorganized as the New York and New Jersey Tunnel Company. The eventual operator of the service, the Hudson and Manhattan Railroad Company, was incorporated in 1904. Finally, on February 25, 1908, service through the tunnel began, between 28th Street and Hoboken. The H&M's downtown service between Jersey City and their own Hudson Terminal started the following year. This rail system is now operated as the PATH. A detailed photographic account of the construction of this line can be found in the book Illustrations of Incidents in Tunnel Construction, H&M R.R. Co..

The Steinway Tunnels After the Hudson Tunnel construction began, it was nearly 20 years before another attempt was made. The East River Tunnel Railroad Company was incorporated on February 25, 1885, but was reorganized shortly thereafter (July 22, 1887) as the New York and Long Island Railroad Company. From almost the very start, the company was controlled by William Steinway, the piano manufacturer and streetcar magnate of Long Island City. The intent was to construct a streetcar tunnel under the East River, to connect Steinway's streetcar routes with New York City (Long Island City was a separate city from 1870 until 1898). Construction started on June 3, 1892, but half a year later, an explosion in Long Island City resulted in the suspension of construction on December 28; the tunnel was boarded up a month later on February 2. Some 11 years later, January 1, 1904, the IRT acquired both the New York and Long Island City as well as the New York and Queens County Railway (the successor to Steinway's streetcar routes). Construction resumed the following year (July 12, 1905), but, even after several extensions, the deadline for completion of the tunnel specified in the franchise was not met, and the New York and Long Island City was turned over to a trustee for dissolution. Construction continued, and on September 21, 1907, the tunnel was completed. The first streetcar made a trip through the tunnel on that day; the official opening was on September 24. It was an unusual tunnel because the power supply came from an overhead third rail, suspended from the roof of the tunnel. For a short time, the company continued to operate the service, but without a valid franchise, revenue service could not be operated, nor could the tunnel be connected to the New York and Queens County. By October, 1907, the tunnel operation was closed up again. Rapid Transit construction contract #3 was signed by the City and the IRT on March 19, 1913. This contract would include the conversion of the streetcar tunnel to a rapid transit tunnel. On July 24, 1913, the trustees of the New York and Long Island assigned their interest in the tunnel to the IRT, and on April 3, 1914, the IRT assigned this interest to the City. Finally, on June 22, 1915, the tunnel opened for a second time, this time as a rapid transit tunnel connecting Grand Central with Jackson Avenue. A detailed history of this tunnel can be found in The Steinway Tunnels.

Contributors
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Editor: David Pirmann Atlantic Avenue Tunnel: Thanks to Neil Wotherspoon Steinway Tunnel: Thanks to Lawrence Hughes (misc.transport.urban-transit on 12 Dec 1994)

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IRT East Side: Worth Street

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www.nycsubway.org > The IRT Division > IRT East Side/Lexington Ave.

Bowling Green Wall Street Fulton Street City Hall Brooklyn Bridge Worth Street Canal Street Spring Street Bleecker Street Astor Place 14th Street- Union Square 18th Street 23rd Street 28th Street 33rd Street Grand Central 51st Street 59th Street 68th Street 77th Street 86th Street 96th Street 103rd Street 110th Street 116th Street 125th Street

The next stop along the line was Worth Street, abandoned in 1962. This station was closed due to the platform lengthening at Brooklyn Bridge. In fact, from 1962 to 1995, Brooklyn Bridge/City Hall was named Brooklyn Bridge/Worth Street on platform signs. This station underlies the sidewalk on the west side of Foley Square. When the Federal Plaza building was planned it was found that due to the station it could not extend all the way to the normal building line fronting Foley Square. So the structure is set far back from the street (well beyond the station) and right over the station is the building's plaza and fountain.

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The Manhattan Bridge FAQ Sheet

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In this section...
The Manhattan Bridge Track Maps Canal Street Station DeKalb Avenue Station Myrtle Avenue Station The Future

The Manhattan Bridge
The Manhattan Bridge serves as the main connection between the BMT subway lines of Brooklyn and the 6th Avenue and Broadway subway lines in Manhattan. There are four tracks on the bridge: two on the east (North) side and two on the west (South). There are three motor vehicle lanes between the sets of tracks, and two lanes above each set of tracks. The upper level lanes were originally four additional railway tracks, and in fact were once used for streetcar services over the bridge; use by elevated trains had been considered. The bridge thus was designed primarily for rail service. The Manhattan side of the subway tracks originally were connected as follows: The north side tracks to the BMT Broadway Subway at Canal Street; the south side tracks to the BMT Nassau Street subway north of Chambers Street. The south side tracks were used mostly during rush hour for services provided via the Nassau Street loop (which connected the BMT 4th Avenue and BMT Brighton Line to Manhattan via the Manhattan Bridge on the north end and the Montague Street tunnel on the south end). The configuration of the tracks at the Manhattan side was changed in 1967 as part of a large project known as the Chrystie Street connection. This project severed the connection to the under-used Nassau Street line on the south side. The south side tracks were then connected to the BMT Broadway Line, and the north side tracks connected via new construction to the IND 6th Avenue Line. The north side always had much more subway service, both when it carried Broadway trains (to 1967) and since, carrying 6th Ave. trains. The flexing caused by heavy trains, never desirable on a suspension bridge, has thus also been much greater on one side. The Manhattan Bridge is owned by the City of New York, and the ongoing reconstruction is being funded and managed by the City and State. The original estimated total cost for the project was $314 million, the cost of rehabilitating the entire bridge, roadways and transit stuructures included. The actual cost has approached $500 million. The bridge and construction projects are not under the control of MTA New York City Transit. None of the $12.7 billion committed to capital projects by the MTA between 1982 and 1993 (or since) has gone to the bridge project. The original long disruption in subway service was required to overhaul the eastern third of the bridge, during which time both the subway and roadway traffic were terminated on that portion. The Transit Authority had to cope with the halving of it's Manhattan Bridge capacity, and thus the N train service was moved to the Montague Street Tunnel, and the Q train to the north side, operated via 6th Avenue. Currently, the western third of the bridge is being reconstructed, requiring the subway and roadways to be closed, just as was done for the eastern work. Travelling across the Manhattan Bridge results in about a 140-foot change in height/depth relative to the ground. The Grand Street station is approximately 50 feet below the street, while the peak of the bridge is approximately 90 feet above the water. DeKalb Avenue station is about 40 feet below the street. The bridge has been under perpetual construction for 20 years and subway service patterns had to change over this time to allow for this construction. In the summer of 2001, the NYC DOT completed the installation of steel braces on the south side of the bridge, designed to reduce the train-induced twisting and prevent cracking of various structural elements. Broadway Express service then resumed over the south side, and the north side was closed to repeat the process there, forcing 6th Avenue trains using the bridge to terminate at 34th Street Station. The F train was unaffected, however, as it continued into Brooklyn via the Rutgers tunnel. The patterns typically employed as of 2001 have been as follows: Bridge Side

Service

Manhattan Side

Brooklyn Side

Before Construction - Both Sides Open

IND 6th Avenue Subway IND 6th Avenue Subway

BMT 4th Avenue Subway / BMT West End Line

North

BMT Brighton Line - Local

North

BMT Broadway Subway

BMT 4th Avenue Subway / BMT Sea Beach Line BMT Brighton Line Express

South

BMT Broadway Subway

South

Service with North Side Open IND 6th Avenue Subway IND 6th Avenue Subway IND 6th Avenue Subway BMT 4th Avenue Subway / BMT West End Line North

BMT Brighton Line - Local

North

BMT Brighton Line Express

North

Service with South Side Open BMT Broadway Subway BMT Brighton Line - Local South

BMT Broadway Subway

BMT Brighton Line Express BMT Brighton Line / BMT West End Line /

South

BMT Broadway Subway

South

During periods when the south side are the only tracks in service, there is no connection from the IND 6th Avenue subway to Brooklyn via the Bridge. Therefore, services that would normally operate to Brooklyn, namely the "B" and "D" trains, are operating a split service, with the Bronx/ Manhattan half terminating at 34th St. where transfer can be made to the Broadway Bridge services. Former south side operations used the "B" and "D" indicators for both north and south halves of the service. For the 2001-2004 south side operations, the MTA decided to rename the Brooklyn services to "Q" and "W" in an attempt to minimize confusion.

(image 24637) (114 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: Manhattan Bridge Photo by: Trevor Logan Date: 7/15/2001 Viewed (this week/total): 20 / 772

(image 5853) (83 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: Manhattan Bridge Route: D Car: R68 2567 Photo by: Trevor Logan Date: 7/2001 Viewed (this week/total): 28 / 950

(image 5865) (88 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: Manhattan Bridge Route: D Car: R68 2688 Photo by: Trevor Logan Date: 7/2001 Viewed (this week/total): 18 / 713

(image 5906) (93 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: Manhattan Bridge Route: B Car: R68A 5176 Photo by: Trevor Logan Date: 7/2001 Viewed (this week/total): 29 / 669

(image 1663) (47 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York Location: Manhattan Bridge Route: B Photo by: Gary Chatterton Date: 8/4/1999 Viewed (this week/total): 12 / 484

(image 1664) (41 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York Location: Manhattan Bridge Route: Q Photo by: Gary Chatterton Date: 8/4/1999 Viewed (this week/total): 16 / 542

(image 7189) (84 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: Manhattan Bridge Car: SOAC Collection of: David Pirmann Date: 7/1974 Viewed (this week/total): 29 / 1221

(image 24701) (51 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: Manhattan Bridge Car: R44 Collection of: David Pirmann Viewed (this week/total): 20 / 348

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Track Maps
The Chrystie Street Connection - Williamsburg Bridge-6th Avenue Manhattan Bridge Tracks Post-Chrystie St. Manhattan Bridge Tracks Pre-Chrystie St. Brooklyn Side - DeKalb Avenue

BMT Canal Street
What's that unused platform at Canal Street, when you transfer between the J/M/Z and the N/R? As of July 22, 2001, that "unused platform" is no longer unused but since it was closed for so much of the 1990s the question still comes up. When the Manhattan Bridge's south side tracks are closed for construction, the lower level station at Canal Street remains unused. If you were to ride across the Manhattan Bridge on the south side from Brooklyn, the first stop on the south side bridge tracks in Manhattan is this lower level station at Canal Street. After leaving Canal Street, the bridge tracks join the BMT Broadway Subway as the express tracks along the line until 57th Street, where the tracks diverge to the 60th and 63rd Street Tunnels to Queens. The express tracks visible at the N/R local station at Canal Street are not actually express tracks and have never been used in regular service. They originate at the unused lower level of City Hall Station, run past Canal Street, and then dead end, just before the bridge tracks rise in their place. This is a remnant of changes made when the Manhattan Bridge was included in subway service plans in the Dual Contracts era. Originally it was intended for Broadway local service to originate at City Hall upper level and proceed north on the local tracks. The tracks coming from Brooklyn via the Montague Street Tunnel were to run though the lower level of City Hall, and then continue as the express service up Broadway. The North Side of the Manhattan Bridge was to stop at the (currently unused) Canal Street bridge line platform, and then proceed crosstown on Canal Street to the Hudson River, while the South Side tracks were terminated at Chambers Street on the Nassau Street line. As it was finally built, the north side tracks connected to the Canal Street Bridge Line, the south side tracks to the Nassau Street line, the upper level of City Hall was connected to the Montague Street Tunnel line, and the lower level of City Hall was left as a three track terminal station, currently used only for train storage and never used by passengers. Then, the Chrystie Street connection construction in 1967 realigned the Manhattan Bridge approaches into what they are today (north side to 6th Avenue Subway, south side to Broadway subway via Canal Street Bridge line). For a short time in 1997, while the station was unused, an art exhibit known as the Canal Street Canal, by artist Alexander Brodsky, was installed on the northbound trackway. It involved installation of a large waterproof tub filled with water, with Venetian canal boats floating inside.

(image 24874) (55 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: Canal Street Bridge Line (BMT Broadway) Photo by: Richard Panse Date: 2/5/2003 Viewed (this week/total): 10 / 857

(image 24080) (108 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: Canal Street Bridge Line (BMT Broadway) Route: Fan Trip Car: BMT D 6095 Photo by: Doug Grotjahn Collection of: Joe Testagrose Date: 5/13/1973 Viewed (this week/total): 8 / 602

(image 2602) (153 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: Canal Street Bridge Line (BMT Broadway) Route: Fan Trip Car: R11 8012 Photo by: Steve Zabel Collection of: Joe Testagrose Date: 10/21/1972 Viewed (this week/total): 16 / 514

(image 26381) (51 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: Canal Street Bridge Line (BMT Broadway) Route: Fan Trip Car: BMT D Collection of: David Pirmann Date: 10/17/1965 Viewed (this week/total): 12 / 157

(image 1656) (123 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York Location: Canal Street Bridge Line (BMT Broadway) Photo by: Richard Brome Viewed (this week/total): 19 / 713

(image 1657) (58 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York Location: Canal Street Bridge Line (BMT Broadway) Photo by: Richard Brome Viewed (this week/total): 16 / 512

(image 1658) (71 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York Location: Canal Street Bridge Line (BMT Broadway) Photo by: Peggy Darlington Notes: Empress Voyage 2/27/1784 by Bing Lee, 1998 Viewed (this week/total): 11 / 303

(image 1659) (84 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York Location: Canal Street Bridge Line (BMT Broadway) Photo by: Peggy Darlington Notes: Empress Voyage 2/27/1784 by Bing Lee, 1998 Viewed (this week/total): 13 / 256

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DeKalb Avenue Station
At the Brooklyn end of the bridge, both sets of bridge tracks (and those from the Montague Street Tunnel) feed into the massive DeKalb Avenue Station, which opened as part of the BMT Brighton Line subway construction on September 6, 1915. DeKalb Avenue is a six-track station, in an unusual configuration of local-express-super express tracks. There are two island platforms, with a track on each side, plus two more tracks down the middle, which do not have a platform face here at DeKalb Avenue. Service south of DeKalb Ave. is operated via the Brighton Line and the BMT 4th Avenue Subway. Currently, the Q/Q-Express services operating on the Brighton Line via the Manhattan Bridge use the local-side tracks, and the N/R services operating on the 4th Avenue line via the Montague Street tunnel use the express tracks (with platform). Rush hour express "W" service to the BMT West End Line use the center bypass tracks. There are north and south mezzanines with fare control and an active interlocking tower in the center platform crossover. Mosaics are limited to a large "DeKalb" name tablet. The mezzanine also features an old black on white wood sign for the Department of Health. The north end of both platforms are split with the "express" portion being lower than the "local" portion as the tracks descend to the Montague St. tunnel. As described above, DeKalb Avenue is a major transfer point between many services. Brooklyn-bound services include the Q/Q-Express serving the

BMT Brighton Line, the W/M serving the BMT West End Line, the N serving the BMT Sea Beach Line, and the R providing local service along the BMT 4th Avenue Subway. Manhattan-bound services include the Q/Q-Express/W/N/R BMT Broadway Subway, and the M BMT Nassau St./ Broadway Brooklyn El. For detail of the track configuration in this area see the DeKalb Area track map.

(image 5500) (109 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York Location: DeKalb Avenue Route: D Car: R42 4754 Photo by: Doug Grotjahn Collection of: Joe Testagrose Date: 6/11/1977 Viewed (this week/total): 15 / 437

(image 2981) (125 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: DeKalb Avenue Route: M Car: R16 6388 Photo by: Doug Grotjahn Collection of: Joe Testagrose Date: 1/17/1977 Viewed (this week/total): 10 / 352

(image 4627) (105 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: DeKalb Avenue Route: B Car: R30 8372 Photo by: Doug Grotjahn Collection of: Joe Testagrose Date: 1/4/1977 Viewed (this week/total): 11 / 279

(image 4933) (105 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: DeKalb Avenue Route: D Car: R32 3888 Photo by: Doug Grotjahn Collection of: Joe Testagrose Date: 12/26/1976 Viewed (this week/total): 11 / 369

(image 5712) (101 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: DeKalb Avenue Route: D Car: R44 370 Photo by: Doug Grotjahn Collection of: Joe Testagrose Date: 12/26/1976 Viewed (this week/total): 13 / 407

(image 4541) (86 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: DeKalb Avenue Route: B Car: R27 8209 Photo by: Doug Grotjahn Collection of: Joe Testagrose Date: 12/5/1976 Viewed (this week/total): 14 / 285

(image 2968) (106 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: DeKalb Avenue Route: QB Car: R16 6375 Photo by: Doug Grotjahn Collection of: Joe Testagrose Date: 10/6/1976 Viewed (this week/total): 14 / 320

(image 4432) (81 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: DeKalb Avenue Route: M Car: R27 8020 Photo by: Doug Grotjahn Collection of: Joe Testagrose Date: 10/6/1976 Viewed (this week/total): 23 / 447

(image 24024) (94 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: DeKalb Avenue Route: M Car: R16 6371 Photo by: Doug Grotjahn Collection of: Joe Testagrose Date: 10/5/1976 Viewed (this week/total): 10 / 367

(image 4436) (122 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: DeKalb Avenue Route: RR Car: R27 8023 Photo by: Doug Grotjahn Collection of: Joe Testagrose Date: 1/11/1974 Viewed (this week/total): 18 / 389

(image 5677) (76 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: DeKalb Avenue Route: D Car: R44 112 Photo by: Doug Grotjahn Collection of: Joe Testagrose Date: 1/15/1972 Viewed (this week/total): 18 / 247

(image 2021) (127 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: DeKalb Avenue Route: QB Car: R6 1208 Photo by: Doug Grotjahn Collection of: Joe Testagrose Date: 12/2/1971 Viewed (this week/total): 16 / 487

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Myrtle Ave. Station
When travelling northbound on the bridge tracks, there seems to be an abandoned station on the right hand side just before the bridge. What's there? This station, at Myrtle Ave., was part of the original Manhattan Bridge line and was open from 1915 to 1956. It was closed in order to facilitate rebuilding of the junctions north of DeKalb Ave. leading to and coming from the bridge. The southbound platform at Myrtle Ave. was demolished completely (some wall tile remains). The northbound platform is mostly intact and during the 1980s hosted an artwork installation similar to a flat "zoetrope" (a series of drawings behind slits that when you rode past in the train appeared to animate the drawings). The artist, Bill Brand, recently opened a web site describing this project, entitled Masstransiscope.

The Future
The DOT's repair plan has proved successful, and in April 2003, following surveys the MTA conducted of travellers crossing the bridge into Manhattan, the agency began floating a plan to restore full four-track service to the Manhattan Bridge. This action would increase the number of trains per hour on the Manhattan Bridge from 27 to 40. As reported in the city's newspapers, the tentative plan, which will be subject to public hearings and may see changes, consists of the following:
q

q q

q q q q

Q: Q-diamond eliminated and replaced by the N in Manhattan and the B in Brooklyn. The Q itself may become a local train. MTA is not currently planning to extend it to Queens via the 63rd Street tunnel, though that option is always available in emergencies. N: Broadway via Bridge/Express instead of tunnel D: Restoration of West End Express service; the D will operate as an express in Manhattan, and continue into the Bronx as it does now B: will operate as the Brighton Express in Brooklyn; no change to service pattern in Manhattan or the Bronx W: Will operate as an Astoria Express via Broadway local from Whitehall Street S: Grand Street Shuttle eliminated, replaced by B and D M: Midday service between Chambers Street, Manhattan, and Brooklyn discontinued

Veteran observers have speculated that the reopening of the Manhattan Bridge's north side will allow the MTA to consider other changes which could prove popular with the riding public, such as extending the V train into Brooklyn. The MTA plans to restore full service to the Manhattan Bridge by February 2004, ahead of its original schedule.

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New York Transit Museum

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Here's some recent pictures of exhibits at the New York Transit Museum. A page of photos of the Transit Museum Annual BusFest is available. For more information, visit New York Transit Museum's official web site.

(image 404) (84 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: New York Transit Museum Photo by: David Pirmann Date: 6/18/2000 Notes: 3rd Ave-149th Street IRT mosaic now at Transit Museum Viewed (this week/total): 26 / 453

(image 210) (145 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: New York Transit Museum Line: IRT West Side Photo by: David Pirmann Date: 6/18/2000 Notes: Cortlandt Street IRT mosaic now at Transit Museum Viewed (this week/total): 25 / 550

(image 7454) (171 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: New York Transit Museum Photo by: David Pirmann Date: 3/12/2000 Notes: Interlocking display Viewed (this week/total): 28 / 661

(image 7455) (85 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: New York Transit Museum Photo by: Peggy Darlington Notes: Signage Exhibit Viewed (this week/total): 33 / 733

(image 7456) (96 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: New York Transit Museum Photo by: Peggy Darlington Notes: Signage Exhibit Viewed (this week/total): 35 / 768

(image 7457) (97 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: New York Transit Museum Photo by: Peggy Darlington Notes: Signage Exhibit Viewed (this week/total): 34 / 593

(image 7458) (58 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: New York Transit Museum Photo by: Peggy Darlington Notes: Signage Exhibit Viewed (this week/total): 21 / 370

(image 7459) (72 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: New York Transit Museum Photo by: Peggy Darlington Notes: Cortlandt Street IRT mosaic now at Transit Museum Viewed (this week/total): 24 / 442

(image 8311) (69 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: New York Transit Museum Photo by: David Pirmann Notes: Early IRT ticket choppers-fare collection exhibit at the New York Transit Museum Viewed (this week/total): 58 / 1536

(image 8308) (84 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: New York Transit Museum Photo by: David Pirmann Notes: 1950s stainless steel token turnstile-fare collection exhibit at the New York Transit Museum Viewed (this week/total): 48 / 1548

(image 8305) (70 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: New York Transit Museum Photo by: David Pirmann Notes: Current AFC Metrocard/token turnstilefare collection exhibit at the New York Transit Museum Viewed (this week/total): 44 / 1894

(image 8309) (88 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: New York Transit Museum Photo by: David Pirmann Notes: Early turnstiles-fare collection exhibit at the New York Transit Museum Viewed (this week/total): 44 / 1545

(image 8303) (65 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: New York Transit Museum Photo by: David Pirmann Notes: Token High Entry Turnstile aka Iron Maidenfare collection exhibit at the New York Transit Museum Viewed (this week/total): 45 / 1732

(image 8306) (66 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: New York Transit Museum Photo by: David Pirmann Notes: First AFC turnstile which took tokens and coinsfare collection exhibit at the New York Transit Museum Viewed (this week/total): 45 / 1498

(image 8310) (85 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: New York Transit Museum Photo by: David Pirmann Notes: Wooden paddle turnstile-fare collection exhibit at the New York Transit Museum Viewed (this week/total): 44 / 1243

(image 8307) (80 kbytes) Country: United States City: New York System: New York City Transit Location: New York Transit Museum Photo by: David Pirmann Notes: 1939 Worlds Fair payto-exit wooden turnstile-fare collection exhibit at the New York Transit Museum Viewed (this week/total): 39 / 1086

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www.nycsubway.org > Museum Collections Copyright © 1995-2002 New York City Subway Resources This site is not affiliated with any transit agency or provider. This page last modified on Wednesday, 26-Feb-2003 13:50:53 EST. http://www.nycsubway.org/mus/nytm.html (dreamland)