AUTOMATED FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS

BY

HIGIRO DAVIDSON 08/M/KAB/DIT/218/F

A Project Report Submitted to the Department of Computing and Information Technology in Partial Fulfillment for the Award of a Diploma in Information Technology of Kabale University

October 2009

DECLARATION
I, Higiro Davidson do here by declare that this project report is original and has not been published and or submitted for any other diploma award to any other University before. Signed..........................................................Date......................................... Higiro Davidson 08/M/KAB/DIT/218/F Department of Computing and Information Technology, Faculty of Science, Kabale University.

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APPROVAL
This project report has been submitted for examination with the approval of; Signed.......................................................Date................................................ Mr. Murangira Jones. Department of Computing and Information Technology, Faculty of Science, Kabale University.

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ACKNOWLEDGEMENT
I extend my sincere gratitude and appreciations to the entire staff and administration of Kabale University for their tireless and qualitative support and effort offered to me during the course. Special thanks to go my supervisor Mr. Murangira Jones (Director ICT Kabale University) and the entire ICT staff for their guidance during project development. On a special note, I would like to thank the staff in the finance department for the advice and compliance they gave when I was collecting data for this project. I cannot forget my lecturers; Mr. Murangira Jones, Mr. Birungi James, Mr. Nkurunungi Edison and Mr. Kimuli Julius, Mr. Shekonkubito Isaac for their tireless efforts in giving me help and guidance that made this project as well as the course a success. Great thanks are hereby conveyed to my Guardians; Mrs. Higiro (Grand Mum), Sr. Higiro Beatrice (Aunt), Nshemerierwe Felicia (Cousin Sister) and all my relatives for bringing me up, persistently encouraging me, and this is the time to say congratulations to them for having their efforts rewarded. Finally, I extend my gratitude to all my classmates (DIT) especially Mr. Mbabazi Davis, My friends Arinaitwe Emanuel, Ainembabazi Bolivia, the Wingersoft crew (Byamukama Match, Musimenta Agnes, Tukeikiriza Gemma) and others for their support, advice, and co-operation given to me as expected of them throughout the course. “May the good load reward you all for your efforts, and be blessed”

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DEDICATION
This work is dedicated to my late parents, Mr. Higiro Tharisis, and Mrs. Higiro Olive, who have not lived to see the fruits of their hard work/prayer, May their souls rest in internal peace. I dedicate this work to my beloved Guardians, Mrs. Higiro (Grand Mum), Sr. Higiro Beatrice (Aunt), Nshemerierwe Felicia (Cousin Sister) and all my relatives for bringing me up to this level. Not forgetting my beloved Brother Higiro Steven, cousin sisters and brothers who cared, encouraged, prayed and scarified in all forms while I laboured at the University.

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ABSTRACT
This project is made purposely as a report of an automated Financial Information Management System. A project undertaken by the researcher as partial fulfillment for the attainment of a Diploma in Information Technology of Kabale University, and it has been made within the Finance Department Kabale University as the case study and most of its functionality is thus based on the needs of these specific system users. Financial information management is a serious problem facing institutions of higher learning and developing countries as well. The rate of loss of financial information is higher than how it is managed, and this is due to inefficiency of the systems used being manual and depending largely on the human memory. The broad objective of this project was to develop an automated financial information management system that overcomes the challenges of financial information management system currently in use at Kabale University.

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TABLE OF CONTENTS
Declaration…………………………………………………………………………...…….i Approval…………………………………………………………………………………..ii Acknowledgement………………………………………………………………………..iii Dedication………………………………………………………………………………...iv Abstract……………………………………………………………………………………v List of acronyms …..……………………………………………………………………viii Definitions of some key words…………………………………………….......................ix 1. INTRODUCTION/BACKGROUND 1.1. Problem Statement……………………..………...……………...………………1 1.2. Objectives of the Study………………..……...……………………………….….3 1.2.1. General Objectives………………………………………………...………3 1.2.2. Specific Objectives……………….………………………….……………3 1.3. Scope of study…………………….....……………………………..……………3 1.4. Significance of the Study….………..……………..………………………...……4 2. LITERATURE REVIEW: 3. METHODOLOGY : 3.1. Data collection and techniques ….………………………………………7 3.1.1. Interviews…………………………………………………….……………7 3.1.2. Observation ……………………………………………………………….7 3.1.3. Review of the existing documents………………………………………...8 3.2. Feasibility study…………………………………………………………...8 3.2.1. Technical feasibility ………………………………………………………8 3.2.2. Operational feasibility …………………………………………………….8 3.2.3. Economic feasibility ……………………………………………………...8 3.3. 3.4. System implementation tools ……………………….…………………….9 System testing……………… …………………………………………….9 vi 5

4. SYSTEM STUDY, DESIGN AND IMPLEMENTATION 4.1. System Design………………….. ………………………………………10 4.1.1. Context diagram…... …………………………………………………….10 4.1.2. Report production system………………………………………………..12 4.1.2.1.System formats ……………………………..………………………..12 4.1.2.2.Input formats…………………………………………………………12 4.1.2.3. Data entry form attributes …………………...……………..……….12 4.1.2.4.Output specifications …………………..……………………………13 4.1.3. Data flow in the report production system…………………………….....13 4.2. System Requirements …………………………...……………………….14 4.2.1. Functional requirements………………………………………………….14 4.2.2. Non-functional requirements…………...………………………………..14 4.2.3. User requirements………………………………………………………..15 4.3. 4.3.1. 4.4. System implementation…………………………………………………..16 User interface screen shoots ……………………………………………..16 Data dictionary …………………………………………………………..19 4.4.1. Student’s ledger details entry table ……………………………………...19 4.4.2. Salary details entry table ………………………………………………...20 4.4.3. Financial income analysis entry table …………………………………...20 4.4.4. Financial expenditure entry table ………………………………………..23 5. EVALUATION, RECOMMENDATION AND CONCLUSION 5.1. 5.2. 5.2. 5.4. Evaluation …………………………………………………………….…26 Limitations ………………………………………………………………26 Recommendations ……………………………………………………….27 Conclusion ………………………………………………………………27

6. APPENDICES 6.1. 6.2. Appendix A ……………………………………………………………...28 Appendix B………………………………………………………………30

7. REFERENCES …………………………………………………..………………31

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LIST OF ABBREVIATIONS
PFM IFMIS FMIS AFMIS CSU Public Finance Management Integrated Financial Management Information System Financial Management Information System Automated Financial Management Information System California State University

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DEFINITIONS OF SOME KEY WORDS
System: this refers to a set of integrated components, working together for a common purpose. Information system: This means the organized collection, processing, transmission, and dissemination of information in accordance with defined procedures, whether automated or manual. Information systems include non- financial, financial, and mixed systems. A financial management information system: This is an information system that tracks financial events and summarizes financial information. In its basic form, an IFMIS is little more than an accounting system configured to operate according to the needs and specifications of the environment in which it is installed. Office Automation: This refers to a series of interrelated electronic office technologies in word and data processing; voice processing and image processing used with procedures and integrated to increase user productivity, efficiency, and control in working with information. (Joyce, 1987)

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Chapter 1

INTRODUCTION/BACKGROUND
This project was designed and implemented as a financial information management system for the finance department of Kabale university which is situated at about one and a half Km on the left of Kabale – Katuna high way. The university started in October 2002; it started with forty-two students all from the neighborhood. Currently the enrolment is about 900 Students from all over the region, country, and neighboring countries. Thus the gradual increase in the number of students in each intake directly leads to the increase of the financial information, hence the need for a FIMS to manage this increasing vital information. The Finance Department at Kabale University had no Automated Financial Record Keeping System but relied on paper records and human memory. Human may forget hence losing most of the important data. Also incase of change in staff with in the department, some records may be lost for good, which could lead to loss of financial equipment. Hence, the records that were in the financial department were therefore unreliable and hence needed to make them so. Although automating the Financial Management Information System has been an area of concern, no study had been carried out on the need for one at Kabale University. Ever since, paper file system had been and the major method used as the means in information collecting, processing, storing and retrieving in the Finance department and other department that deal in data entry, processing and retrieving like the student registration department among others. Whereas the cases of inefficiency and poor performance by the same system (file based databases) like; duplication of data items in multiple files, duplication would affect input, maintenance, storage and possibly data integrity problems were been discovered in other organizations that use the same system, Kabale University had not carried out any study to improve on the system. Over the past decade, developing, transition and post-conflict countries have increasingly embarked on efforts to computerize their governmental, nongovernmental organizational and 1

the institutions of higher learning’s operations, particularly with respect to public financial management (PFM). Most common among these have been efforts to introduce Integrated Financial Management Information Systems (IFMIS) that computerize and automate key aspects of budget execution and accounting operations across all the institutions. IFMIS can enable prompt and efficient access to reliable financial data and help strengthen organizational financial controls, improving the provision of organizational services, raising the budget process to higher levels of transparency and accountability, and expediting organizational operations. (Joyce, 1987)

“IFMIS is little more than an accounting system configured to operate according to the needs and specifications of the environment in which it is installed “(Leon, 1993).

Its mission is to maintain the University's fiscal integrity through accurate record keeping and adherence to State, CSU, and University procedures; to provide financial reports and analysis as required; to safeguard the assets of the University; and to deliver fiscal information and support services in a courteous and efficient manner to faculty, staff, students, and visitors. (California State University)

According to experts, the quantity of scientific and technical knowledge is now doubling every five and a half years. That rate is expected to jump appreciably so that information doubles in half the time, that and other reasons have led to the growth of office automation. (Joyce, 1987) With this background, the researcher being an information technology student got the impetus and ability to design, develop and implement a financial management information system for Kabale University finance department that overcomes the possible problems, inefficiencies and bottle necks that the finance department had been meeting with the system that was in use “file based database system’.

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1.1. PROBLEM STATEMENT:
The system employed at Kabale University as far as managing financial information is seen to have inefficiencies that include; duplication of data and data insecurity. The project therefore offers an automated system that meets these inefficiencies.

1.2. OBJECTIVES OF THE STUDY: 1.2.1. GENERAL OBJECTIVES:
To develop a Financial management Information System for Kabale University.

1.2.2. SPECIFIC OBJECTIVES:
1. To review the existing financial management information system employed by Kabale University. 2. 3. To design a financial management information system for Kabale University. To implement the financial management information system for Kabale University. University.

4. To test and validate the financial management information system for Kabale

1.3. SCOPE:
The study was focused on managing information/records in the department of finance, Kabale University. The study was aimed at improving on the current system that exhibits inefficiencies like, (duplication of data, data insecurity, had time during retrieval of data when need arises.) and this study was focused more on data entry, storage and retrieval in the finance department and the project was limited to Salaries, Students’ ledger, Income and Expenditure Analysis.

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1.4. SIGNIFICANCE OF THE STUDY:
The University Finance Department had no existing computerized FMIS and therefore, with the successful conduction of this study, the developed Financial Management Information System will solve the problems due to lack of an Automated Financial Record Keeping System. If the project output would implemented and put to use, then the finance department would manage its data, reduce on the processing time and generally reduce on its operational costs, promote data security, thus enjoying increased efficiency. If this new system would put in place, there would be proper book keeping of financial records, which would help new staff to note where to start from, therefore training costs, and errors made would be minimal. The system development constituted entirely of the information gathered from the research made, and this was inline with the system requirements according to the department of finance. This research would in one way or the other widen the research base for the future scholars who would wish to undertake the same or similar study.

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Chapter 2

LITERATURE RIVIEW
Kabale University financial department, used the paper work to take records of financial data, which data was later arranged and stored in files of paper, and when need raised, these files were revisited one by one in search of the required information. This system was not only tiresome but also rendered the information stored in this format vulnerable to loss or data duplication. There are six key characteristics of the financially healthy university; Short-term solvency, Retention of reserves, the effective management of long-term debt, the effective management of the estate, the ability to generate non-state funding, Consistency of budgetary strategy with mission. (Michael, 2004) The recent literature on IFMIS has addressed various aspects of IFMIS design, systems development, implementation and sustainability, but no one study has effectively synthesized all of these elements with actual organizational experiences to identify the most appropriate strategies with respect to IFMIS project design, management, monitoring and evaluation. Generally, the term “IFMIS” refers to the use of information and communications technology in financial operations (automating FMIS) to support management and budget decisions, fiduciary responsibilities, and the preparation of financial reports and statements. In the government realm, IFMIS refers more specifically to the computerization of public financial management (PFM) processes, from budget preparation and execution to accounting and reporting, with the help of an integrated system for financial management of line ministries/departments, spending agencies and other public/private sector operations. The principal element that “integrates” an IFMIS is a common, single, reliable platform database (or a series of interconnected databases) to and from which all data expressed in financial terms flow.1 Integration is the key to any successful IFMIS. In a nutshell, integration implies that the system has the following basic features:

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• • •

Standard data classification for recording financial events; Internal controls over data entry, transaction processing, and reporting; and Common processes for similar transactions and a system design that eliminates unnecessary duplication of data entry.

Integration oftentimes applies only to the core financial management functions that an IFMIS supports, but in an ideal world, it would also cover other information systems with which the core systems communicate, such as human resources, payroll, and revenue (tax and customs). At a minimum, the IFMIS should be designed to interface with these systems. (USAID,) Financial Management Information Systems (FMIS) is responsible for the implementation/upgrade and production support of automated systems, including PeopleSoft Financials, which are used within the Financial Management Division, namely the offices of the Bursar, Controller and Procurement and Support Services. FMIS is also responsible for the distribution of financial reports to the campus community and technical support to end users of the Departmental Copier Program.

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Chapter 3

METHODOLOGY
3.1. DATA COLLECTION TECHNIQUES
The project employed the following data collection techniques;

3.1.1 INTERVIEWS
These were planed meetings during which information was obtained from the users of the existing system orally; the interviews were in structured form consisting of well-defined questions to guide the interviewee. Interviews were essential for the most important and sensitive parts of the project that enabled the interviewer get full details about the required information. The questions that were asked include; how do you find the current system? What would you like changed in the current system? What would you want the new system to do if it was put in place?

3.1.2. OBSERVATION
This method allowed the researcher to know his own opinion on the study while on site. It involved direct observation of the respondents in general. Data collection through observation was to reinforce and validate the collected data by use of interviews.

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3.1.3. REVIEW OF THE EXISTING DOCUMENTS
This involved reading of documents or literature regarding the system that was used in the department. This documentation included financial books of records, forms, files, and regulation sheets. In addition, it included reading any information regarding the keeping of financial records in the financial record files that is where most of the records were got.

3.2. FEASIBILITY STUDY
The feasibility study of a system involves a detailed assessment of needs, values and practicality of a proposed system.

3.2.1. TECHNICAL FEASIBILITY.
A system development is regarded as technically feasible or practical for an organization if it has the necessary expertise and infrastructure to develop, install, operate and maintain the proposed system. This automated FMIS is technically feasible because all the software involved suit the development of such a system.

3.2.2. OPERATION FEASIBILITY
The system is operationally feasible for it has been tested and found to have mets the needs and expectations of the system users. System user acceptance is an important determination of operational feasibility.

3.2.3. ECONOMIC FEASIBILITY.
A system is said to be economically feasible if it is of appositive value to the organization for which it is designed. The FMIS is economically feasible in the way that the number of workers

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in the finance department is expected to reduce since most of the work is automated, the cost of buying stationary required for records management will be reduced.

3.3. SYSTEM IMPLEMENTATION TOOLS:
The financial information management system was implemented using Microsoft access and Visual basic platforms. VB 6.0 (Visual Basic 6.0) is the programming language that allows interface designers to create dynamic interfaces that interacts with databases and it is easily linked with Microsoft access. Microsoft access is a structured queried language that is very popular for database creation, adding data into database, accessing and processing is made easy. The above languages were chosen because of ability to work with multiple operating systems and worked well together.

4.3. SYSTEM TESTING
This activity, aimed at assessing the effectiveness of the proposed financial management information system, as later discussed in chapter 4.

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Chapter 4

SYSTEM STUDY, DESIGN AND IMPLEMENTATION
This chapter contains the results of the study, a description of the design and implementation of the FMIS. It also shows the various screen shots.

4.1. SYSTEM DESIGN 4.1.1. CONTEXT DIAGRAM
The context diagram that is illustrated below shows how data flows to and from the external entities of the system. Login

Data Entry System User Reports Query

Report Production System

Administrator

Save data Store/Database Retrieve Data

Logical specifications of the above diagram

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login
Get the use name; Capture the user name and the user intending to use the system Get the password; Capture the password of that particular username if the particular login information user name is invalid, then he/she is notified with an error message. If the log in is correct, the user is able to get to other interfaces according his/her choice and the appropriate page.

Student financial data registration
Student’s records/ details are entered into database

Salary, Students’ ledger, Income analysis and Expenditure analysis forms
The Salary, Students’ ledger, Income analysis and Expenditure analysis data is entered into the database through the provided forms/interfaces.

Data retrieval, add, modify and delete functions
The new record, modification of the existing record and deleting is done with the functions/ command buttons provided. Student details retrieval. The student’s first name or ID number, and the financial records are displayed when required. Security requirements, The system is designed with a restricted user access that has passwords for specific users with user names to grant access only to authorized users and the passwords is to be encrypted to prevent guesswork by hacking.

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4.1.2. REPORT PRODUCTION SYSTEM DATA FLOW SYMBOLS USED IN THE DATA FLOW DIAGRAM

Process: this represents the transformation of input data flows to output data flows in data flow diagram. Entity: this is a data entry point outside the scope of the system during the data flow. Data store: this is the data registration point/ the database of the system Data flow: this line shows the flow of the data between processes. Entities and data stores in the data flow diagram This explains the relationship between two or more entities.

4.1.2.1. System formats:
These are the input and output formats for data entry into the system for reporting purposes for data driven from the system respectively, these formats are based on the requirements driven from the present system.

4.1.2.2. Input formats:
Data entered includes student’s identification, details and financial records. All these are captured using the appropriate data entry screens.

4.2.2.3. Data entry form attributes:
These include

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I. Students ledger form: for entering student’s details. II. Salary form: for entering the Salary payment details III. Income analysis form: this is for capturing financial income details IV. Expenditure analysis form: for capturing financial expenditure details V. User login: for capturing the details of the user login, any one with authoritative rights to use system

4.1.2.4. Output specifications:
Output is in form of tables, forms, and by reports presented by viewing on the screen and by printing out hard copies of the reports. These reports show all the data necessary as required by the financial department.

4.1.3. DATA FLOW IN THE REPORT PRODUCTION SYSTEM

Administrator

User Manipulation

User Authentication

User

Data Processing

Data Storing and Retrieving

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The above diagram shows how different users’ login into the system, how data is entered into the system, processed, stored, manipulated, and reports generated when need arises.

4.2. SYSTEM REQUIREMENTS 4.2.2. FUNCTIONAL REQUIREMENTS
Users shall be able to look at all information stored in the database or select some information from it. The system shall be designed in a way that it is easy to update and easy to use. The users shall be able to get a summary of the reports about the finance at any given time. The system shall provide meaningful feedback whenever users make errors

4.2.3. NON-FUNCTIONAL REQUIREMENTS
The system shall allow only registered users to manipulate the database like deleting or updating. The system shall bring error messages for the invalid entries. The system shall not allow users to update the data already saved in the database without the system administrator. Only experienced users will be able to use the system.

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4.2.1. USER REQUIREMENTS
These are statements that explain the services users want the system to do for them in order to have an optimally efficient interaction environment between users and the system. For this particular case, the users want: A safe and well-arranged store for their data A user-friendly system that helps them to identify data entry errors by returning error messages to correct them there and then. A fast system that can accept data, process it and return results with in the expected period. A system with well-defined interfaces that allow users to freely and rightly interact with the system. A system that allows only authorized users to access information by providing a verification facility for privacy. A system, that responds with adequate details of information about a field when queried about by the user. A system that generates relevant and precise reports about selected fields from the database. A system that will appear simpler, effective and more securable than the old system. A system that will not require comprehensive training to use,, preferable not differing in terms of operation from the old system by a big margin. User requirements may be functional or non-functional. Functional requirements describe the desired functionality of the new system. I.e. what is expected of the system like in terms of behavior, take an example outputs and inputs of the system. Non-functional requirements have

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the efficient of limiting the designs; they can be eliminated and do not have to be accessed. They are constraints with which hardware, software, time and money.

4.3. SYSTEM IMPLEMENTATION:
This section, describes the implementation of the Financial Management Information System.

4.3.1. USER INTERFACE SCREEN SHOTS
SHOT 1

Figure 4.1: (User

Login Interface) Here the user is prompted to enter his/her name and

password, which if not valid, he/she is denied access for data security purposes.

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SHOT 2

Figure 4.2: (Student

Payment Details Entry and Retrieval Interface)

This form allows the user to View, Modify/Edit and Delete the Students’ payment details.

SHORT 3

Figure 4.3: (Staff

Salary Details Entry and Retrieval Interface) The user is able to

View, Add, Modify/Edit and Delete an entry using this Form/Interface.

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SHOT 4

Figure 4.4: (Income Database.

Analysis Form User Interface) The two screen shots above show

the Form/Interface used to View, Add, Modify and Delete a record with the Income Analysis

SHOT 5

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Figure 4.5: (Expenditure Database.

Analysis Form User Interface) Both forms show the

Expenditure Analysis Form used to View, Add, Modify and Delete the record from the

4.4. DATA DICTIONARY
Creation of data base structures

4.4.1. STUDENTS’ LEDGER DETAIL ENTRY TABLE
This table shows the students’ detail. Field name First name: Student’s Reg No. Particulars Date Details about the transaction Date of transaction MEMO Date/Time DESCRIPTION STUDENT’S NAME ID number DATA TYPE text 25 MEMO maximum size

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Debit Credit Lab balance

Amount owed Amount he/she owes Remaining balance

Currency Currency Currency

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4.4.2. SALARY DETAILS ENTRY TABLE
The table below shows the details of entering marks. FIELD NAME ID No. NAME Data Type Auto number Text MAX SIZE 3 25 Description Staff ID No. Staff Names

ACCOUNT No. BASIC SALARY. GROSS SALARY. PAYEE NSSF ADVANCE.

Number Currency Currency Currency

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Staff Account Number Payment Details Payment Details Payment Details

4.4.3. FINANCIAL INCOME ANALYSIS ENTRY TABLE:
The table below shows the details of entering financial income analysis data. Field name Maximum size ID 4 Auto number Record ID Number Data type Description

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INCOME DETAILS RECEIPT AMOUNT PAID TUITION FEE REGISTRATION FEE EXAMINATION FEE LIBRARY FEE

50 Long Integer -

Text MEMO Number Currency Currency Currency Currency Currency Currency Currency Currency Currency Currency Currency Currency Currency Currency Currency Currency

Payment Details Record Details Receipt Number Payment Details Payment Details Payment Details Payment Details Payment Details Payment Details Payment Details Payment Details Payment Details Payment Details Payment Details Payment Details Payment Details Payment Details Payment Details Payment Details

ACCOMMODATION FEE MEDICAL IDENTITY CARD STUDENT GUILD FEE SCHOOL PRACTICE FIELD WORK FEE SUPERVISION POST GRAD UNIVERSITY GOWN T-SHIRT FIELD EXCURSION DONATION FUNDRAISING -

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TRANSFER FROM A/C

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Currency

Payment Details

BACK OF (U) ECONOMIC CHAIR GRADUATION FEE DEBT RECOVERY (TUITION) APPLICATION FEE DEV’T COMPUTER LAB FEE MEALS GRADUATION BOOKLETS

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Currency Currency Currency Currency Currency Currency Currency Currency Currency Currency Currency Currency Currency Currency Currency Currency Currency

Payment Details Payment Details Payment Details Payment Details Payment Details Payment Details Payment Details Payment Details Payment Details Payment Details Payment Details Payment Details Payment Details Payment Details Payment Details Payment Details Payment Details

NON/REFUNDABLE BINDING RENT FROM CANTEEN PREPAID SALE OF OLD PROPERTY REFUNDABLE FEE OTHERS DEBIT PLEDGES RECOVERY TERM LOAN GRANT -

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4.4.4. FINANCIAL EXPENDITURE ENTRY TABLE:
The table below shows the details of entering financial expenditure analysis data.

Field name

Maximum size

Data type

Description

ID EXPENDITURE DETAILS CHEQUE AMOUNT ACADEMIC STAFF

4 50 -

Auto number Text MEMO Currency Currency Currency Currency Currency Currency Currency Currency Currency Currency Currency Currency Currency Currency

Record ID Number Record Details Record Details Amount spent on the item Amount spent on the item Amount spent on the item Amount spent on the item Amount spent on the item Amount spent on the item Amount spent on the item Amount spent on the item Amount spent on the item Amount spent on the item Amount spent on the item Amount spent on the item Amount spent on the item Amount spent on the item

ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF SUPPORT STAFF NON-ACADEMIC STAFF PART TIME VISITING LECTURES SALARY ARREARS NSSF SUNDRY CREDITORS TELEPHONE POSTAGE TRANSFER TO GUILD A/C ADVERTS OF PROMOTIONS LEARNING MATERIALS KAMPALA OFFICE RENT -

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MEMBERSHIP TO INTERNATIONAL BOOKS BANK CHARGES/INTERESTS FIELD WORK STAFF SUBSISTENCE ALLOW TRAVEL & FUEL NEWS PAPERS/ MAGAZINES AUDIT FEES MEDICAL DRUGS

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Currency Currency Currency Currency Currency Currency Currency Currency Currency Currency Currency Currency Currency

Amount spent on the item Amount spent on the item Amount spent on the item Amount spent on the item Amount spent on the item Amount spent on the item Amount spent on the item Amount spent on the item Amount spent on the item Amount spent on the item Amount spent on the item Amount spent on the item Amount spent on the item

STAFF SOCIAL WELFARE ELECTRICITY FUNCTIONS & PUBLIC RELATIONS OPERATIONS OF THE UNIVERSITY ORGANS ADDITIONAL RESPONSIBILITY ALLOW GROUND RENT STAFF & GOVERNING BODIES MEALS FOR STUDENTS GRADUATION GOWNS STOCKING LIBRARY -

Currency Currency Currency Currency Currency Currency

Amount spent on the item Amount spent on the item Amount spent on the item Amount spent on the item Amount spent on the item Amount spent on the item

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STATIONERY WATER & SANITATION LAWNMOWER COMPOUND CLEANING REPAIRS & SPARES ROAD LINKS IMPROVEMENT GAMES & SPORTS CLUBS ORGANIZATION SEMINARS & WORKSHOPS STAFF DEV'T CAPACITY BUILDING RENOVATION PUBLICATIONS FENCING/ LAND TITLES ICT ACCOUNT COMPOUND FINALIZATION OF PHYSICAL STATE GENERATOR INSTALLATION FURNITURE & EQUIPMENT CONSULTANCY & LEGAL EXPENSES LIBRALY, LECTUREHALL, HOSTELS OFFICE IMPREST

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Currency Currency Currency Currency Currency Currency Currency Currency Currency Currency Currency Currency Currency Currency Currency Currency Currency Currency Currency

Amount spent on the item Amount spent on the item Amount spent on the item Amount spent on the item Amount spent on the item Amount spent on the item Amount spent on the item Amount spent on the item Amount spent on the item Amount spent on the item Amount spent on the item Amount spent on the item Amount spent on the item Amount spent on the item Amount spent on the item Amount spent on the item Amount spent on the item Amount spent on the item Amount spent on the item

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Chapter 5

EVALUATION, RECOMMENDATION AND CONCLUSION
The research project has played a critical role in strengthening my research capabilities through data collection, compilation, analysis, report writing, system analysis, development, testing and implementation.

5.1. EVALUATION
The research project was successful in most areas that were tackled during two month of data collection, analysis and system development. The biggest shot in the project was putting the knowledge attained theoretically on the paper into hands on practice. It was a challenging experience putting together all forms and codes to the development of the system. Development of the system that can solve the stationary issue, storage space, ease data entry, processing, manipulation, and retrieval that has been of great importance and hence an achievement in information technology carrier.

5.2. LIMITATIONS
Due to the fact that had researcher had limited time to do research and develop a system , most features that would have made the program wide and easy to use by different institutions, higher schools of education and colleges were not included.

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Lack of necessary software to use in the system development, was yet another hump in the system development project. However, the developer was impressed to see the system working well and is promising to improve it to fit the needs of all institutions of education.

5.3. RECOMMENDATION
The researcher would like to make the following recommendations having studied the current report production system and compared it with automated one that uses computer applications. The system end users need to be sensitized on computer applications before using the system because without computer literacy, they will get wrong or no information at all from the system. Prompt and regular backup of the system, updates in the database behind the system and updating the system in case some advantageous changes need to be made. Proper use of the system should be necessary. The administrator password should not be accessible to every user because once the setting of the system are tampered with, it affects the whole system hence loss of financial details.

5.4. CONCLUSION
In conclusion, this research project has been a great step towards my carrier. It has proved my capabilities as Information Technology Student. With this report, the author expects it to act as a major contribution for his fellow academicians, in their struggle towards the computer globalization and the computer age.

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Chapter 6

APPENDIX
6.1 Appendices A
The code below was obtained during the implementation of the login user interface for the FIMS. Option Explicit Public LoginSucceeded As Boolean Private Sub cmdCancel_Click() 'set the global var to false 'to denote a failed login LoginSucceeded = False Me.Hide End Sub Private Sub cmdOK_Click() 'check for correct password If txtPassword = "password" Then 'place code to here to pass the 'success to the calling sub 'setting a global var is the easiest LoginSucceeded = True Me.Hide Else MsgBox "Invalid Password, try again!", , "Login" txtPassword.SetFocus SendKeys "{Home}+{End}" 28

End If End Sub

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6.2. Appendices B The questions that were asked include;
How do you find the current system? What would you like changed in the current system? What would you want the new system to do if it was put in place? How do you keep records about the students? What problems do you meet when using your system? Do you need a change in your system? Do you know how to use a computer? Do you think using a computer can make your work easy? Would you prefer a computer to manage your school records? What would you like the new system do for you?

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REFERENCES
1. David Hoyle – ISO 9000 quality systems handbook (2006) 2. Executive Office of the President of United States of America – Office of Management and budgeting, Circular No. 127 Revised – July 23, 1993. 3. Executive Office of the president of United States of America – Office of Management and budgeting, Washington DC. 20503 – M – 05 – 02, Circular No. (www.whitehouse.gov/omb/circulrs ). 4. A 127 revised Transmittal Memorandum No. 3 – Dec 2002. 5. George M. Piskurich – The AMA Handbook of E-learning – Effective Design and implementation (2003). 6. Jerome B. McKinney - Effective financial management in public and non-profit agencies (2004) 7. L. Joyce Arntson. - Word / Information processing 2nd Edition (1987) 8. Michael Shattock, financial management in universities, Higher education systems vary in the amount of financial data which they publish. 9. Ping Zhang and Dennis - Human – computer interaction and management information systems. (2008) 10. Patricia W. Ingraham, Philip G. Joyce, Any Kneedler Donahue – Government performance, why management matters (2003) 11. Robert. Kaplan and Robin cooper - Cost and effective using integrated cost systems to drive profitability (2003).

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12. Reference and research book news 9788170005025 – Role management information system for university administration. 13. University of Hawaii - Financial Management Information Systems (FMIS) on – line quick reference guide (April 2002). 14. USAID from the American people – Integrated financial management systems – A practical guide (Jan 2008). (p.d.fusaid.gov/pdf_doc/PNADK595.pdf)

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