WEATHER

Kelsie Nicole Gerhart
Fourth grade, New Hope
High 71 Low 46
Mostly sunny
Full forecast on
page 2A.
FIVE QUESTIONS
1 Whose birthday do the people of
Bermuda celebrate on the second
Monday in June?
2 Where in Beijing did Chinese stu-
dents build a Goddess of Democracy
in May 1989?
3 How many strings do most guitars
have?
4 What is the common name for the
fluid expelled from the body through
the process of lacrimation?
5 How many balls are normally racked
in the triangle in pocket billiards?

Answers, 10B
INSIDE
Classifieds 8B
Comics 7B
Obituaries 5A
Opinions 6A
DISPATCH CUSTOMER SERVICE 328-2424 | NEWSROOM 328-2471
ESTABLISHED 1879 | COLUMBUS, MISSISSIPPI
CDISPATCH.COM
F
R
E
E
!
WEDNESDAY | APRIL 30, 2014
CALENDAR
Thursday, May 1
■ Lowndes Day of Prayer: In conjunc-
tion with the National Day of Prayer, the
privately-funded Christian Community
Organization invites citizens of Colum-
bus and surrounding areas to join in an
observance outside the Lowndes Coun-
ty Courthouse at 502 Second Ave. N.
Friday and Saturday, May 2-3
■ Market Street Festival: Columbus’
annual festival kicks off May 2 at the
Riverwalk with a free evening concert
by Almost Famous of Memphis, Tenn.
Saturday features arts and crafts
vendors, live music and fun activities
all day downtown. Look for more infor-
mation soon at marketstreetfestival.
com or contact Main Street Columbus,
662-328-6305.
PUBLIC MEETINGS
May 5: Lowndes County
Board of Supervisors, Court-
house, 9 a.m.
May 5: Clay County Board
of Supervisors, Courthouse,
9 a.m.
May 5: Caledonia Board
of Alderman, town hall at 6
p.m.
May 8: Clay County Board
of Supervisors, Courthouse,
9 a.m.
May 9: Lowndes County
School Board, Central Office,
11 a.m.
May 12: Columbus Munic-
ipal School Board, Central
office, 6 p.m.
May 15: Lowndes County
Board of Supervisors, Court-
house, 9 a.m.
LOCAL FOLKS
Izzy Paros is in fifth grade at
Cook Elementary. She is the
daughter of Leslie Stratzves.
Mary Alice Weeks/Dispatch Staff
Casey Blair clears branches from Lonny and Wanda Nickoles’ home on Lacy Drive in New Hope on Monday morning following a bout of thunderstorms and tornadoes that
tore through northeast Mississippi on Monday night.
BY SARAH FOWLER
sfowler@cdispatch.com
COLUMBUS — The
Columbus Police Depart-
ment has an interim chief.
In a unanimous vote,
the Columbus City Coun-
cil put Tony Carleton
into the position during a
specially called meeting
Wednesday morning.
Former chief Selvain
McQueen retired earlier
this month after serving
as chief for less than three
years. He earned $70,000
a year in the position.
Assistant Chief Joe
Johnson has been in
charge of the department
since McQueen’s depar-
ture.
Carleton, an 18-year
law enforcement veteran,
has served
as assis-
tant chief
with CPD
since he
was hired in
November.
Before his
hiring, he
served as chief of police in
Tupelo. He resigned from
that position to come to
Columbus.
He was earning $65,000
as assistant chief. He will
earn $67,500 as interim.
A graduate of the Mis-
sissippi Law Enforcement
Training Academy, Car-
leton has a bachelor’s de-
gree in public administra-
tion with an emphasis in
criminal justice from the
University of Mississippi.
He graduated from the
FBI National Academy in
November.
Mayor Robert Smith
said he hopes the city will
AFTER THE STORM
Neighbors help neighbors in storm’s aftermath
BY NATHAN GREGORY
ngregory@cdispatch.com
COLUMBUS — Beverly Smith
lives with her 86-year-old mother, Alice
Nickoles, at the corner of Lacy and
Hutcherson roads in east Lowndes
County. On Tuesday afternoon, they
were approaching 24 hours without
power, but were in good spirits.
Carolyn Nickoles was helping
Smith clean up the yard. Wearing
gloves, they stacked limbs in a pile.
“This is nothing compared to
some folks,” Carolyn Nickoles said,
acknowledging the more extensive
damage half a mile away near Pleas-
ant Hill Road. “We’re blessed.”
Approximately, 1,009 4-County
Electric customers were still without
power Tuesday after Monday after-
noon’s severe weather hit particularly
hard in New Hope. 4-County commu-
nications specialist Brad Barr said all
of those are likely in Lowndes Coun-
ty. Seventy-two people are working
to restore power to those homes. It
is expected for a majority of them to
have power again this evening, Barr
said.
Columbus Lowndes Emergency
Management Agency Director Cindy
Lawrence said about 100 homes
county-wide received damage.
INSIDE
■ SOUTH: Storms cut devastating path through the South,
PAGE 3A.
■ ALABAMA: Damage minimal in Lamar County, PAGE 4A.
■ SLIMANTICS: East Columbus neighborhood rallies in
storm’s aftermath, PAGE 6A.
■ PARTIAL TO HOME: Rays ride out storm at Tabernacle
Road home, PAGE 6A.
■ LOUISVILLE: Search continues for missing boy; Louisville
ER doctor clings to patient in terrifying tug-of- war, PAGE 8A.
■ RACE TRACK: Destroyed race track will soon recover,
manager vows, PAGE 9A.
■ TUPELO: Noted Tupelo swimmer is lone fatality in Tusca-
loosa, PAGE 2B.
Columbus City Council names Carleton as Interim Chief
William Browning/Dispatch Staff
Rev. Robert
Gavin, the
pastor of
Springfield
M.B. Church
on Highway
45 South,
on Tuesday
looks at
what is left
of the church
following
Monday’s
storms.
Mary Gavin,
his wife,
came with
him to see
the damage.
Tornado levels Lowndes Co. church
BY WILLIAM BROWNING
wbrowning@cdispatch.com
A tornado completely
destroyed Springfield M.B.
Church on Monday.
It had stood for nearly
150 years in a field on the
east side of Highway 45
South, down toward Macon.
A small, old cemetery is be-
hind it. A large limb that had
snapped off of a nearby oak
tree laid through the head-
stones.
Where the church once
was is now only rubble. Ev-
erything seems to have fall-
en toward the north when
the storm came through.
Bricks and paneling are
strewn about.
The only thing left en-
tirely intact by the tornado’s
winds is a wooden cross
adorned with a purple sash
near where the front en-
trance once stood.
The Rev. Robert Gavin
has served as pastor for about
three years. It’s a small con-
gregation.
Gavin learned about the
destruction not long after it
happened around 6 p.m. Mon-
day. A church trustee knows
a Lowndes County deputy,
who happened to pass by and
saw what had happened, and
the word spread.
Pastor: ‘The church is flat’
See CHURCH, 10A
Carleton
See COLUMBUS, 9A
EMA: 12 mobile homes destroyed, 100 damaged
Has served as assistant chief since Nov.
See CARLETON, 9A
THE DISPATCH • www.cdispatch.com 2A WEDNESDAY, APRIL 30, 2014
DID YOU HEAR?
CONTACTING THE DISPATCH
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Published daily except Saturday. Entered at the post office at Columbus, Mississippi.
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Five-Day forecast for the Golden Triangle
Almanac Data National Weather
Lake Levels
River Stages
Sun and Moon Solunar table
Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.
City Hi Lo W Hi Lo W City Hi Lo W Hi Lo W
Weather(W): s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, i-ice, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms,
r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow
Yesterday 7 a.m. 24-hr.
Lake Capacity yest. change
The solunar
period schedule
allows planning days
so you will be fshing
in good territory or
hunting in good cover
during those times.
Temperature
Precipitation
Tombigbee
Yesterday Flood 7 a.m. 24-hr.
River stage yest. change
Columbus Tuesday
High/low ..................................... 82°/62°
Normal high/low ......................... 80°/54°
Record high ............................ 89° (1957)
Record low .............................. 40° (1965)
Tuesday ........................................... 0.02"
Month to date ................................. 8.56"
Normal month to date ...................... 4.65"
Year to date .................................. 20.83"
Normal year to date ....................... 20.40"
Thursday Friday
Atlanta 70 50 pc 71 50 pc
Boston 67 51 r 65 49 pc
Chicago 51 42 r 57 41 c
Dallas 73 48 pc 80 53 s
Honolulu 83 70 pc 84 72 pc
Jacksonville 84 64 t 73 54 r
Memphis 67 48 pc 70 53 pc
69°
45°
Thursday
Partly sunny
71°
46°
Friday
Intervals of clouds
and sun
77°
51°
Saturday
Mostly sunny and
pleasant
85°
56°
Sunday
Nice with plenty of
sunshine
Aberdeen Dam 188' 168.80' +0.30'
Stennis Dam 166' 138.51' +0.30'
Bevill Dam 136' 136.44' -0.02'
Amory 20' 11.86' -0.59'
Bigbee 14' 5.26' -2.25'
Columbus 15' 7.09' +0.73'
Fulton 20' 15.22' +6.96'
Tupelo 21' 4.00' +2.80'
New
May 28
Last
May 21
Full
May 14
First
May 6
Sunrise ..... 6:06 a.m.
Sunset ...... 7:36 p.m.
Moonrise ... 7:09 a.m.
Moonset .... 9:13 p.m.
Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. ©2014
Major ..... 2:09 a.m.
Minor ..... 8:22 a.m.
Major ..... 2:35 p.m.
Minor ..... 8:48 p.m.
Major ..... 3:05 a.m.
Minor ..... 9:18 a.m.
Major ..... 3:31 p.m.
Minor ..... 9:43 p.m.
Thursday Wednesday
Thursday Friday
Nashville 66 44 pc 67 47 c
Orlando 89 70 t 85 68 t
Philadelphia 76 53 pc 69 48 pc
Phoenix 90 68 s 93 72 s
Raleigh 78 54 t 69 50 pc
Salt Lake City 68 49 s 76 56 s
Seattle 87 51 s 74 49 pc
Tonight
Mainly clear
44°
Wednesday
‘Idol’ winner to help reopen
Washington Monument
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON —
“American Idol” winner
Candice Glover will help
reopen the Washington
Monument, which has
been closed since a 2011
earthquake.
Organizers say the
R&B singer will join the
Old Guard Fife and Drum
Corps, U.S. Navy Band
and boy and girl choris-
ters of the Washington
National Cathedral Choir
for the May 12 re-opening
ceremony. Glover will sing
“America, the Beautiful.”
The “Today” show’s Al Ro-
ker will host the event.
Interior Secretary Sal-
ly Jewell, National Park
Service Director Jonathan
Jarvis and philanthropist
David Rubenstein will help
celebrate. Rubenstein do-
nated $7.5 million to cover
half the restoration cost.
The 130-year-old me-
morial has been closed
since a 5.8-magnitude
earthquake caused dam-
age in August 2011. Work-
ers have repaired more
than 150 cracks in the 555-
foot obelisk.
Normally the monu-
ment draws about 700,000
visitors a year.
AP Photo/Susan Walsh, File
This 2013 file photo shows American Idol 2013 winner
Candice Glover on Capitol Hill in Washington. Glover
from “American Idol” will help reopen the Washington
Monument, which has been closed since a 2011 earth-
quake.
Scene&Seen
RELAY FOR LIFE
Weather was great for the Lowndes County Relay for Life
event for the American Cancer Society April 25 at Colum-
bus High School.
Pamela McKinney, Mary Wicks, Layne and Tommy Hall
Brenda Ferguson, Mary Coleman, Pamela Colvin, Cassandra Dent
Marie, Tommy and Priscilla Coggin, Ron, Jennifer and
Sammie St. John
Eliza Moore, Kayla, Lloyd, Makayla and Terrill Bell,
Eunice Harrison
Perry Watkins, Bontre McCray, Chris Craddieth Tim Denning, Tricia Cox, Rose and Lloyd Pate
No matter who You are...
What You’ve done, or what
You failed to do...
You are accepted!
A child of Almighty God!
C
O
M
E
!
Walk with
US
on this journey
called life.
Covenant
United Methodist Church
31st Avenue, Columbus • Behind K-Mart
Worship: Sunday 11am
1st & 3rd Sunday 6pm at Beans & Cream
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Site closed since 2011 earthquake
ONLINE SUBSCRIPTIONS
For less than $1 per month, print subscribers can get unlimited
access to story comments, extra photos, newspaper archives
and much more with an online subscription. Nonsubscribers can
purchase online access for less than $8 per month.
Go to www.cdispatch.com/subscribe
MSU SPORTS BLOG
Visit The Dispatch MSU Sports Blog for breaking
Bulldog news: www.cdispatch.com/msusports
@
WEDNESDAY, APRIL 30, 2014 3A
I n S p i n e S u r g e r y
NMMC’s neurosurgeons pictured (left to right): R. Hunt Bobo, M.D., Elbert White, IV, M.D., FACS,
Walter Eckman, M.D., Carl Bevering, III, M.D., Louis Rosa, III, M.D., FACS
Named a Blue Distinction
Center of Excellence
for spine surgery by
BlueCross BlueShield
of Mississippi
For you that means confidence that you’ll receive quality care
in a safe, efficient and cost-effective manner with
North Mississippi Medical Center’s Neurosurgical Services.
To learn more, visit nmhs.net/spine_center.php.
Spine Surgery
for Spine Surgery
Improving
outcomes
127 Airline Road, Columbus, MS 39702
FAIRVIEW
B A P T I S T C H U R C H
l o v e G o d • l o v e p e o p l e
55
+
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R
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Registration begins at 8:30am
Rally begins at 9:00am
Featuring:
Geraldine & Ricky, Paid in Full and
Mississippi State University Jazz Band
Love Offering will be collected.
Call the church ofce for more
information at 662-328-2924.
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May 1 at
BY ADRIAN SAINZ
AND JEFF AMY
The Associated Press
LOUISVILLE — Ruth
Bennett died clutching
the last child left at her
day care center as a tor-
nado wiped the building
off its foundation. A fire-
fighter who came upon
the body gently pulled the
toddler from her arms.
“It makes you just
take a breath now,” said
next-door neighbor Ken-
neth Billingsley, who
witnessed the scene at
what was left of Ruth’s
Child Care Center in this
logging town of 6,600. “It
makes you pay attention
to life.”
Bennett, 53, was among
at least 35 people killed
in a two-day outbreak of
twisters and other violent
weather that pulverized
homes from the Midwest
to the Deep South. The
child, whose name was
not released, was alive
when she was pulled from
Bennett’s arms and was
taken to a hospital. Her
condition was not known.
As crews in Mississippi
and Alabama turned from
search-and-rescue efforts
to cleanup, forecasters
began to downplay their
initially dire predictions
of a third round of deadly
twisters Tuesday. Mete-
orologists said the storm
system had weakened
substantially by evening,
although some tornado
watches and warnings
were still in effect for iso-
lated areas.
In North Carolina, the
National Weather Service
reported tornado touch-
downs in five counties
Tuesday, but the twist-
ers caused only moder-
ate structural damage to
homes and toppled some
trees. Two cities in the
state reported extensive
flooding from the storm
system. No injuries were
reported.
One of the hardest-hit
areas in Monday eve-
ning’s barrage of twisters
was Tupelo, where a gas
station looked as if it had
been stepped on by a gi-
ant.
Francis Gonzalez, who
also owns a convenience
store and Mexican restau-
rant attached to the ser-
vice station, took cover
with her three children
and two employees in
the store’s cooler as the
roof over the gas pumps
was reduced to aluminum
shards.
“My Lord, how can all
this happen in just one
second?” she said in Span-
ish.
On Tuesday, the growl
of chain saws cut through
the otherwise still, hazy
morning in Tupelo. Mas-
sive oak trees, knocked
over like toys, blocked
roads. Neighbors helped
one another cut away
limbs.
“This does not even
look like a place that I’m
familiar with right now,”
said Pam Montgomery,
walking her dog in her
neighborhood. “You look
down some of the streets,
and it doesn’t even look
like there is a street.”
By the government’s
preliminary count, 11
tornadoes — including
one that killed 15 people
in Arkansas — struck
the nation’s midsection
on Sunday, and at least
25 ravaged the South on
Monday, the National
Weather Service Storm
Prediction Center said.
Among those killed
was 21-year-old University
of Alabama swimmer and
dean’s list student John
Servati, who was taking
shelter in the basement of
a Tuscaloosa home when
a retaining wall collapsed
on him.
His death — and that
of at least two others in
Alabama — came the day
after the third anniversa-
ry of an outbreak of more
than 60 tornadoes that
killed more than 250 peo-
ple across the state.
In Kimberly, Ala.,
north of Birmingham, the
firehouse was among the
buildings heavily dam-
aged.
Four firefighters suf-
fered little more than
cuts and scrapes, but the
bays over the fire trucks
were destroyed, and the
vehicles were covered
with red bricks, concrete
blocks and pieces of the
roof.
The trucks were es-
sentially trapped, so the
town had to rely on near-
by communities for emer-
gency help.
Forecasters downplay 3rd-day dire predictions
‘It makes you pay attention to life’
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
JACKSON — A former
police chief in Mississip-
pi has been sentenced to
five years in federal pris-
on for conspiring to de-
mand money and property
from people in exchange
for dropping criminal
charges.
Former Mendenhall Po-
lice Chief Donald “Bruce”
Barlow pleaded guilty in to
one count in federal court
in January. Barlow, 50,
had been charged with 17
counts, including witness
intimidation.
He also was sentenced
Tuesday to three years’
supervised release. Pros-
ecutors say restitution will
be determined at a July 10
hearing.
Prosecu-
tors say Bar-
low some-
times made
people sign
over their
vehicles in
e x c ha nge
for him
dropping charges and also
demanded cash payments,
in one case $4,500.
Prosecutors say Barlow
tried to cover up his deal-
ings when he learned of
the federal investigation.
Former Mississippi police chief sentenced
Five year sentence for 17 counts,
including witness intimidation
Barlow
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
JACKSON — The
Southern Companies says
the expected startup date
of its coal gas-fired power
plant in Kemper County is
being pushed back to the
first half of 2015.
In a regulatory filing
Tuesday with the Securi-
ties and Exchange Com-
mission, the company also
says the plant’s cost is ex-
pected to rise by $196 mil-
lion to a total of about $5.4
billion.
The Atlanta-based com-
pany says it will take a pre-
tax charge of $380 million
— $235 million after taxes
— against its income for
the first quarter of 2014.
A spokesman for South-
ern-affiliate Mississippi
Power Company says the
utility will not seek to re-
cover the increased costs
from ratepayers.
Earlier this month the
company blamed poor
weather, unexpected turn-
over of construction em-
ployees and installation
inefficiencies for contrib-
uting to extra costs.
Kemper power plant will cost more
Start-up delayed until 2015 also
BY SETH BORENSTEIN
AP Science Writer
W A S H -
I N G T O N
— Weather
from nearly
all parts of
the country
combined to
brew this week’s killer tor-
nadoes.
To get tornadoes —
especially the big deadly
kind — everything has to
come together in just the
right way and it hadn’t
been doing that lately,
said meteorologist Greg
Carbin at the Storm Pre-
diction Center in Norman,
Okla.
Until the weekend,
there had been relatively
few significant twisters
this year across the Unit-
ed States — just 20 and no
deaths.
But the conditions were
right on Sunday in the cen-
tral U.S.
Dry, cool air swooped
off California’s Sierra
Madre and southern
Rocky mountains. That
sat on top warm, moist air
from the Gulf of Mexico,
creating thunderstorms.
And the jet stream brought
in wind shear, which helps
provide rotation.
Cook that all with day-
time heating and it makes
a tornado outbreak, mete-
orologists say.
What makes this out-
break unusual is that it is
essentially stalled, Carbin
said. The slow-moving jet
stream plunging from the
Northwest is keeping a
large, high-pressure sys-
tem off the East Coast.
And that’s preventing the
tornado-prone weather
from moving east and
weakening.
That could mean more
storms in across the South,
maybe into Wednesday.
In the past few decades,
the U.S. has averaged
about 1,250 tornadoes a
year. Last year, which also
had a slow start, ended
with 908 tornadoes that
killed 55 people.
“You expect to see one
or two outbreaks like this
each spring and certainly
we were due,” said Jeff
Masters, meteorology
director of the private
Weather Underground.
Right mix of conditions brewed tornado outbreak
Weather from nearly all parts of
the country combined to create this
week’s killer tornadoes
ONLINE:
■ Storm
Prediction
Center: spc.
noaa.gov/
Mary Alice Weeks/Dispatch Staff
Damaged vehicles are seen near the remains of East Main Automotive on Main Street in Louisville on Tuesday
morning after an EF-4 tornado tore through Winston County on Monday night.
THE DISPATCH • www.cdispatch.com 4A WEDNESDAY, APRIL 30, 2014
Where Will
You Go For
Safety?
We are here to help provide protection and Safety for you and your
family. Our precast concrete storm shelters are made with 4000
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Do You Need Estate Planning to
Protect You & Your Family’s Future?
Dunn & Hemphill, P.A.
214 Fifth Street South | Columbus, Mississippi
662.327.4211 | www.marketstreetlaw.com
Offering Peace of Mind, One Client at a Time.
*Background information is available upon request.
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Contact us at (662) 327-4211 (ext. #0) to make an appointment.
Mention this ad when you call to get a free 30 minute consultation
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WEST ALABAMA NEWS
BY DAVID MILLER
Special to The Dispatch
LAMAR COUNTY, Ala. — One
home was damaged and 12 roads
are currently impassable after
heavy rain and strong winds pound-
ed Lamar County Monday and
Tuesday nights.
A tree was uprooted and fell
onto a house, but the owner was
not home, Johnny Bigham, direc-
tor of emergency management for
the county, said. Close to 70 trees
or large branches were blocking
roads as of Monday might, partic-
ularly on County Road 49, north of
Crossville, and along Highway 96,
where most of the heavy rains and
wind occurred, Bigham said. And
though many have been cleared, 12
roads, mostly little-used dirt roads
will take another two or three days
to clear, Bigham said.
“We don’t have any major thor-
oughfares or bus routes (among
the roads currently impassable),”
Bigham added. “Right now, we have
six west of Vernon that are closed
and the rest around Millport.”
Volunteer fire firefighters from
across the county were on standby
Tuesday night.
Bigham said he was concerned
about flooding after the storm sys-
tem of April 27, 2011, washed out
culverts in the county, but as of
Tuesday evening he didn’t think
flooding would be a problem.
Storm damage limited in Lamar Co.
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
BIRMINGHAM —
The Alabama Emergency
Management Agency re-
ported three deaths from
strong storms and possi-
ble tornadoes that swept
through the state Monday
night and early Tuesday.
Limestone County
Coroner Mike West says
60-year-old Dorthy Jean
Hollis and her 33-year-
old son, Carlton Earl
Hollis, were killed about
5:15 p.m. Monday when
their mobile home was
destroyed in the Coxey
community 10 miles west
of Athens on U.S. 72.
Neighbors told report-
ers that the two were en-
couraged to go to a shelter
at the Billy Barbs mobile
home park, but declined.
A spokeswoman at
Athens-Limestone Hos-
pital said 17 people were
treated at the hospital for
storm injuries and two
were admitted.
Tuscaloosa officials
said University of Ala-
bama swimmer John Ser-
vati, 21, of Tupelo, Miss.,
was taking shelter in the
basement of a home when
a retaining wall collapsed
about 10:30 p.m. Monday.
He was pronounced dead
at DCH Regional Medical
Center.
3 killed in Alabama storms, many without power
University of Alabama swimmer dies
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
MONTGOMERY —
An Auburn man accused
of organizing high-stakes
dog fights in Alabama is
scheduled in federal court
to enter a guilty plea.
Donnie Anderson filed
paperwork saying he
wants to plead guilty. A
federal judge has sched-
uled a hearing this after-
noon in Montgomery.
Anderson was indicted
last year on charges ac-
cusing him of organizing
fights in Macon and Lee
counties where people bet
thousands per dog. Fed-
eral investigators seized
126 dogs from his prop-
erty.
Another man charged
in the case, Ricky Van Le
of Biloxi, has also filed pa-
perwork saying he wants
to enter a guilty plea
Wednesday. He’s accused
of participating in a dog
fight in Alabama.
Their pleas would
bring the number of
guilty pleas in the case to
nine.
2 more to plead guilty to dog fighting in Ala.
Auburn organizer’s plea brings
number of guilty pleas to nine
Senate ready to sink effort to boost minimum wage
BY ALAN FRAM
The Associated Press
WASHINGTON —
Hemmed in by solid Repub-
lican opposition, the Senate
seems ready to hand a fresh
defeat to President Barack
Obama by blocking an elec-
tion-year bill increasing the
federal minimum wage.
Democrats, aware that
the measure faces all but
certain rejection today in
the chamber they control,
plan to use the vote to but-
tress their campaign theme
that the GOP is unwilling
to protect financially strug-
gling families.
“Americans understand
fairness, and they know it’s
unfair for minimum-wage
workers to put in a full day’s
work, a full month’s work, a
full year’s work, and still live
in poverty,” the measure’s
sponsor, Sen. Tom Harkin,
D-Iowa, said Tuesday.
Harkin’s bill, an Obama
priority, would gradually
raise the $7.25 hourly min-
imum to $10.10 over 30
months and then provide
automatic annual increas-
es to account for inflation.
Democrats argue that if
fully phased in by 2016,
it would push a family of
three above the federal
poverty line — a level such
earners have not surpassed
since 1979.
They also say the mini-
mum wage’s buying power
has fallen. It reached its
peak value in 1968, when
it was $1.60 hourly but was
worth $10.86 in today’s dol-
lars.
Republicans say the
Democratic proposal
would be too expensive for
employers and cost jobs.
As ammunition, they cite
a February study by the
nonpartisan Congressional
Budget Office that estimat-
ed the increase to $10.10
could cost about 500,000
jobs — but also envisioned
higher income for 16.5 mil-
lion low-earning people.
Citing those job loss
figures, Senate Minority
Leader Mitch McConnell,
R-Ky., said Tuesday, “When
it comes to so many of their
proposals, Washington
Democrats appear to pri-
oritize the desires of the far
left over the needs of the
middle class.”
Democrats needed 60
votes today to begin Sen-
ate debate. To prevail, they
would need support from
at least six Republicans,
which seemed beyond
reach.
“I can’t give you a num-
ber, but I’m confident”
Democrats won’t suc-
ceed, Sen. John Cornyn,
R-Texas, his party’s
vote-counter, said after
GOP senators met Tues-
day.
Sen. Susan Collins of
Maine, one of the few Re-
publicans considered po-
tentially willing to let de-
bate begin, said Tuesday
she expected to oppose
the legislation, saying it
would hurt companies.
Bill would gradually raise the $7.25 hourly minimum
to $10.10 over 30 months and then provide automatic
annual increases to account for inflation
THE DISPATCH • www.cdispatch.com WEDNESDAY, APRIL 30, 2014 5A
Columbus
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GHA082LES
Your local
insurance solution
• Dental
• Health
• Life
• Supplemental
• Vision
• Final expense
Benjamin Baker
662-597-4177
9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday - Friday
bbaker5@humana.com
GHA082LES
Your local
insurance solution
• Dental
• Health
• Life
• Supplemental
• Vision
• Final expense
Benjamin Baker
662-597-4177
9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday - Friday
bbaker5@humana.com
GHA082LES
Your local
insurance solution
• Dental
• Health
• Life
• Supplemental
• Vision
• Final expense
Benjamin Baker
662-597-4177
9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday - Friday
bbaker5@humana.com
GHA082LES
Your local
insurance solution
• Dental
• Health
• Life
• Supplemental
• Vision
• Final expense
Benjamin Baker
662-597-4177
9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday - Friday
bbaker5@humana.com
GHA082LES
Your local
insurance solution
• Dental
• Health
• Life
• Supplemental
• Vision
• Final expense
Benjamin Baker
662-597-4177
9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday - Friday
bbaker5@humana.com
Benjamin Baker
662-364-3952
9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday - Friday
bbaker5@humana.com
Dora Fromm
Services:
Monday, May 5 • 10 AM
Memorial Gardens Cemetery
gunterandpeel.com
Lori Kesler
Visitation:
Saturday, May 3 • 5-7 PM
Gunter and Peel Funeral Home
Services:
Sunday, May 4 • 2 PM
Episcopal Church of the Good
Shepherd
Graveside Services:
Sunday, May 4 • 4 PM
Haughton Memorial Park
gunterandpeel.com
Compliments of
Lowndes Funeral Home
www.lowndesfuneralhome.net
Irene Pounders
Eunice Irene Pounders, 91, of Caledonia,
MS passed away Tuesday, April 29, 2014 at her
residence.
Visitation will be Thursday, May 1, 2014
from 11:00 am – 1:00 pm at Lowndes Funeral
Home, Columbus, MS. A funeral service will
follow at 1:00 pm in the Chapel with Bro.
Byron Harris, Bro. Jerry Pounders, Jr. and
Bro. Don Hardin officiating. Interment will be
at McDuffie Cemetery in Hamilton, AL with
Lowndes Funeral Home directing.
Mrs. Pounders was born on July 4, 1922
in Fayette, Alabama to the late William
Monroe and Jessie Mae Belk Shepherd. She
was a member of Zion Assembly Church
of God and worked as an Inspector at both
Caledonia and Coy Manufacturing for over
37 years. Mrs. Pounders was a good mother
and grandmother. She loved flowers, loved to
pick butterbeans and loved to go to church.
In addition to her parents she is preceded in
death by her husband-Quinton “QR” Pounders
and sons-Norman Doyle “Moochie” Pounders
and Roger Lee Pounders.
Mrs. Pounders is survived by daughters-
Elaine (Dewitt) Ray, Steens, MS, Helen
(Jerry) Brackin, Brenda (Bill) Farley, Anna
Mae Tofsrud all of Caledonia, MS; sons-
Bobby (Cathy) Pounders, Kenneth (Diane)
Pounders, Junior (Sue) Pounders, Cecil
(Donna) Pounders, Jerry (Judy) Pounders,
Warren Pounders all of Caledonia, MS and
Harold (Debbie) Pounders, Columbus, MS;
44 grandchildren; 66 great-grandchildren; 9
great-great-grandchildren and a brother-Clay
Shepherd.
Pallbearers will be Lance Brackin,
Johnny Farley, Ashley Pounders, Calvin
Ray, Sam Pounders, Brian Pounders, Jacob
Pounders, Cody Pounders, Jason Pounders,
Josh Pounders, Gunner Wilson and Derrick
McBride.
Honorary Pallbearers will be Ladies of
Walt Willis Plaza, Walt Willis, Doc Perkins,
Tommy Clegg, Dr. Woodard, Dr. Stennet, Staff
of Camilla Hospice and Staff of Mississippi
Home Health.
Memorials may be made to Eunice Irene
Pounders Memorial Fund, c/o Lowndes
Funeral Home, 1131 N. Lehmberg Rd.,
Columbus, MS 39702.
AREA OBITUARIES
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OBITUARY POLICY
Obituaries with basic informa-
tion including visitation and
service times, are provided
free of charge. Extended
obituaries with a photograph,
detailed biographical informa-
tion and other details families
may wish to include, are
available for a fee. Obituaries
must be submitted through
funeral homes unless the
deceased’s body has been
donated to science. If the de-
ceased’s body was donated
to science, the family must
provide official proof of death.
Please submit all obituaries
on the form provided by The
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Monday through Thursday;
and on Friday by 3 p.m. for
Sunday and Monday publica-
tion. For more information,
call 662-328-2471.
Patricia Smith
COLUMBUS — Pa-
tricia Ann Smith, 62,
died April 29, 2014, at
Baptist Memorial Hos-
pital-Golden Triangle.
Carter’s Funeral
Services of Columbus
is entrusted with the
arrangements.
Mrs. Smith was
born May 19, 1951, in
Columbus to the late
Mary Alice Edwards.
She was formerly
employed as a logistics
officer for the Depart-
ment of Defense.
In addition to her
mother, she was pre-
ceded in death by her
siblings, Annie Lorene
Edwards and Jesse
Edwards.
She is survived by
her son, John Smith
III of Orlando, Fla.;
siblings, Valarie Rich-
ardson, Carol Lyne
Edwards and James
Edwards, all of Colum-
bus, Fred Edwards
of St. Louis; and two
grandchildren.
Willie Gibson
STARKVILLE —
Willie D. “Son Dee”
Gibson, 77, died April
24, 2014.
Services are Thurs-
day at noon at West
Memorial Funeral
Home Chapel in
Starkville with the
Rev. Dr. Charlie F.
Barnes Sr. officiating.
Burial will follow at
Mt. Peiler Cemetery in
Starkville. Visitation is
today from 1- 6 p.m. at
the funeral home.
He is survived by
his sisters, Callie M.
Gibson and Louise
Page; brothers, Archie
L. Gibson and Jim
Gibson.
Benji Livingston
COLUMBUS —
Benjiman “Benji” Alan
Livingston, 37, died
April 26, 2014, at UAB
Hospital in Birming-
ham.
Services are Thurs-
day at 2 p.m. at Chan-
dler Funeral Home
with Tony Lawrence
officiating. Burial
will follow in Bethel
Church Cemetery in
Vernon, Ala. Visitation
is today from 5-8 p.m.
at the funeral home.
Mr. Livingston was
born Oct. 11, 1976,
in Homewood, Ala.,
to Patsy Buster and
Ricky Livingston. He
was formerly employed
as an office manager
and foreman for Nick-
oles Electrical.
He was preceded in
death by his brother,
Alan Warren Living-
ston.
In addition to his
parents, he is survived
by his wife, Brenda
Livingston; and sister,
Stacy Turk of Tuscalo-
osa, Ala.
Pallbearers are
Mike Nichols, Chris
Chain, Charlie Grego-
ry, Bill Tomason, Neal
Johnson and Jeremy
Gullett.
Hazel Dahlem
ABERDEEN — Ha-
zel Atkins Dahlem, 81,
died April 29, 2014, at
Pioneer Community
Hospital in Aberdeen.
Services are Thurs-
day at 11 a.m. at Tis-
dale-Lann Memorial
Funeral Home Chapel
in Aberdeen with
Robert Earl Fowlkes
officiating. Burial will
follow at Lebanon
Cemetery. Visitation
is Wednesday from
4-7 p.m. at the funeral
home in Aberdeen.
Ms. Dahlem was
born Aug. 21, 1932,
in Monroe County to
the late William Lloyd
Atkins and Madge
Byrd Atkins. She was
a graduate of Green-
wood Springs School
and was formerly the
owner of Dahlem Sales
and Services.
In addition to her
parents, she was pre-
ceded in death by sis-
ters, Christine Randle
and Betty Jane Jones;
brothers, Gayle, John,
James, Sam Grady and
Bobby Lloyd Atkins.
She is survived by
her daughter, Judy
Cox of Aberdeen; sons,
Mike Dahlem of Tupe-
lo, Donald Dahlem of
Aberdeen and Ronald
Dahlem of Tupelo;
sister, Lucille West
of Aberdeen; three
grandchildren and one
great-grandchild.
Beatrice White
WEST POINT —
Beatrice Brown White,
78, died April 28, 2014,
at Darlington Oaks in
Verona.
Graveside services
are today at 11 a.m. at
Hebron Cemetery with
the Rev. Mike Smith
officiating. Robinson
Funeral Home in West
Point is in charge of
arrangements.
Ms. White was born
June 4, 1935, in Phe-
ba and was formerly
employed as a child
caregiver. She was
a member of Trinity
Baptist Church and the
VFW Ladies Auxiliary.
She is survived by
her sons, Bob Brown
and John Brown, both
of West Point; daugh-
ters, Connie Murray of
Montpelier and Jo Ha-
zlewood of West Point;
sisters, Arnell Smith of
Becker and Lena Mae
Naron of Houston; nine
grandchildren and
nine great-grandchil-
dren.
Pallbearers are
Mike Murray, Josh
Hazelwood, Jon Luke
Hazelwood, Robbie
Brown, Allen Brown
and Tyler Brown.
Memorials may be
made to Darlington
Oaks, 107 Skeet Drive,
Verona, MS 38879.
Alyssa Harris
CALEDONIA —
Alyssa Marie Macken-
zie Harris, died away
Wednesday, April 23,
2014, at her residence.
Arrangements are
incomplete and will be
announced by Lown-
des Funeral Home.
Bobby Brumfield
LAUREL — Bobby
Ray Brumfield, 75,
died April 18, 2014, in
Dallas.
Services are Mon-
day at 2:00 p.m. at the
Mississippi Veterans
Memorial Cemetery in
Newton. New Haven
Memorial Funeral
Home entrusted with
arrangements.
L.J. Little
COLUMBUS — L.J.
Little, 54, died April
29, 2014, at Baptist Me-
morial Hospital-Gold-
en Triangle.
Arrangements are
incomplete and will be
announced by Carter’s
Funeral Services.
Kelly Robinson
VERNON, Ala. —
Kelly Ray Robinson,
65, died April 28, 2014,
at UAB Hospital in
Birmingham, Ala.
Services are today
at 3 p.m. at Full Gos-
pel Worship Center
in Vernon with James
Godsey officiating. Vis-
itation is today from
1 p.m. until service
time at the church.
Otts Funeral Home is
in charge of arrange-
ments.
Mr. Robinson was
born June 28, 1948, in
Lamar County, Ala.,
to the late May and
Avis Leora Merchant
Robinson. He attended
Sulligent High School
and was formerly em-
ployed as a truck driv-
er. He was a member
of Full Gospel Worship
Center.
In addition to his
parents, he was pre-
ceded in death by his
wife, Brenda Murphy
Robinson; daughter,
Jessica Irvin; and son,
Donnie Robinson; and
stepdaughter, Angela
Rena Kelly.
He is survived by
his wife, Rena Robin-
son of Vernon; daugh-
ters, Jenny Turner of
Sulligent, Ala., Sonya
Turner and Amanda
Johnson, both of Ver-
non; stepdaughters,
Michele Griffin of
Caledonia and Morgan
Hartley of Vernon;
stepson, Scott Kelly of
Millport, Ala.; broth-
er, Odie Robinson
of Sulligent; sisters,
Lessie Holliday, Viola
Lowe, Dean Rhudy
and Billie Joyce Clif-
ton, all of Sulligent; 20
grandchildren and four
great-grandchildren.
Send in your church event!
email editorialassistant@cdispatch.com
Subject: Religious brief
6A WEDNESDAY, APRIL 30, 2014
Opinion
BIRNEY IMES SR. Editor/Publisher 1922-1947
BIRNEY IMES JR. Editor/Publisher 1947-2003
BIRNEY IMES III Editor/Publisher
PETER IMES General Manager
SLIM SMITH Managing Editor
BETH PROFFITT Advertising Director
MICHAEL FLOYD Circulation/Production Manager
DISPATCH
THE
PARTIAL TO HOME
By 10 o’clock Tuesday morn-
ing Bobby Ray had almost
finished picking up storm debris
in his yard on Tabernacle Road
when neighbor Ricky Ward
showed up. The two are old
friends, their friendship rooted
in their shared passion for dirt-
track racing.
Ward, a master mechanic,
helps his next-door neighbor,
race promoter Johnny Stokes,
put on races and Ray works pit
crew and serves as head cheer-
leader for his son, Lee, who is a
dirt-track driver.
Naturally, the topic of the
day was Monday night’s storm.
Ray and his wife Martha were
among 11 who took refuge in
their above-ground storm shel-
ter behind their house, a space
about the size of a spacious
broom closet.
“Four of them were small children,” Ray explained.
Ward, for his part, took cover at the home of his neigh-
bor, Stokes. Johnny and Barbara Stokes’ brick ranch-
style house is built into the side of a hill.
The men said two funnels passed through the area
about 20 minutes apart.
“It sounded like thunder that never stopped,” Ward
said.
When Ward commented on the sound at the time, his
friend Stokes said, “That ain’t thunder, that’s it!”
Ward’s wife Tamie refused to leave their trailer. When
the straight-line winds devastated the county in February
of 2001, Tamie got in a closet with a Bible and the family’s
dachshund. There she rode out the storm reading aloud.
“The Lord’s blessed this house,” she told Ward when
time came to take cover, “and I ain’t leaving.”
“I couldn’t make her leave,” Ward said. “So I got Max
(the dachshund) and went to Johnny’s.
“When I came back to the trailer, she said, ‘I told
you.’”
When conversation waned, Ward headed up to Ray’s
shop, where he spends a lot of his spare time tinkering
with cars. Ray, who had been cruising his property in
a Kawasaki Mule picking up storm debris in the com-
pany of his constant companion, Molly, a small, light-
haired dog of indeterminate linage, took a visitor to his
backyard to meet his wife Martha and tour their storm
shelter.
“It was all right,” Martha said of the experience.
As the storm was threatening, a neighbor with three
children stopped by and asked if they could get in the
Ray’s shelter, thus the crowd.
The Rays have lived at this bend in the road since
1965. They share their large well-cared-for lot with the
home of their son, his wife Christi and their granddaugh-
ter Rylee. The Rays were lucky, other than limbs in their
yard and one out-of-the-way tree snapped in two, their
compound received little damage. The buckeyes growing
in their backyard still had their red blooms.
The storm upended huge trees — many of them old
oaks — all along Tabernacle and Lee Stokes roads, how-
ever. A forester told Ray the already waterlogged ground
made the trees more susceptible to blowing over.
By mid-day Tuesday, families — men, women and
children — could be seen all along those thoroughfares,
cutting trees, dragging limbs and stacking wood. There
will be no firewood shortage in these parts this winter.
People appeared to be in good spirits, buoyed by the
novelty of the situation, the shared sense of purpose and
the simple fact there had been no injury or loss of life.
As I passed a house with its roof caved in at the inter-
section of Lee-Stokes and Lacy roads, four young boys
had just retrieved from a pile of debris four fishing rods
and reels that looked to be in perfect condition. The boys,
all grins, waved the rods in the air like swords.
Birney Imes is the publisher of The Dispatch. Email him
at birney@cdispatch.com.
SLIMANTICS
A couple of miles
down Lee-Stokes
Road, where Pleasant
Hill Baptist Church
sits on a hill above
a cluster of modest
brick homes where
Lacy Road runs into
Pleasant Hill Road,
church pastor Bill
Hurt wearily tended
his flock, scattered but
unharmed after a pair
of Monday tornadoes
plowed through East
Columbus.
“The flock is safe, the shepherd is … tired,”
Hurt said Tuesday afternoon, as he slumped
wearily into the seat of an ATV parked in the
debris-riddled yard of the church’s minister of
music. It was 2 in the afternoon, and Hurt had
been helped the folks in the little neighborhood
— most of whom are his congregants — clean
up.
He was hardly a gang of one, though. Men,
women and children of all ages swarmed
around the handful of houses that had received
the most damage. A crew dispatched by the
Mississippi Baptist Convention Disaster Relief
team, operating from a mobile trailer near the
road in front of the church, passed out equip-
ment. The crew came at Hurt’s request. Other-
wise, it was neighbor helping neighbor.
The good thing about life in a rural area
such as this is that almost everybody has the
kind of stuff you need in this situations —
chainsaws, ATVs, generators.
But not everybody has a massive excavator,
which is what made Jerry Nickoles, who lives
nearby, a most prominent person among the
little swarm of do-gooders.
Nickoles, who owns Jerry Nickoles Dirt Con-
struction, was giving directions on the ground
as one of his employers operated the enormous
machinery. By 1:30 p.m., the excavator was
making quick work of a massive oak that had
fallen in the storm, snapping off a large pine
tree before descending with a sickening crash
onto the southwest corner of Lonny Nickoles’
house.
The two Nickoles are distantly related, if
related at all. Disasters seem to make close
relations of even strangers, though, and Lonny
Nickoles watched appreciatively as the excava-
tor pulled the oak’s car-sized root-ball from the
earth, dumped it on the pile of debris near the
road, then pushed the rich brown earth over
the cavernous hole and smoothed it over with
the tracks of the excavator.
“Man,” Lonny said, smiling. “When I got
here this morning, I was thinking, ‘how in the
world am I gonna fix this?’ I got my chainsaw,
climbed up on the roof and started cutting the
smaller limbs on the house. Then, people start-
ed showing up.
“James Blair...” Nickoles said, choking
up and pausing for a couple of seconds as he
fought to keep his composure. “James Blair, he
was the first to come. We are old friends, used
to work together. He was the first one to show
up. It was just me and him, then....Well, just
look.”
A handful of people, some he didn’t know,
were busy turning the debris from the big oak
and pine tree into firewood.
“It’s something, huh?” Nickoles said.
Next door, Sybil Prather was trying to hold
down a blue tarp as her husband and other fam-
ily members tried to secure it a portion of the
house missing a roof, some of which dangled
high above them in the limbs of a big oak that
marks the boundary between her house on
Lonny Nickoles’ house.
The damage was not done by a falling tree,
however.
“The wind just came and picked up it,”
Prather said. “We were all in the bathroom, six
of us, when it hit. After a little while, my son
peeked out and said, ‘mom, the roof is gone.’”
The storm jerked out the utility box from
the home’s exterior. It also swept an old storage
building behind the house onto Nickoles’ prop-
erty, replacing it with Nickoles’ trampoline.
“I’m not sure who got the best of the deal,”
Prather said. “We were going to replace the
building anyway, my son said, but I said, ‘yeah,
but this isn’t what we had in mind.”’
By 2 o’clock, the excavator had left Nickoles’
house and moved across the street to the min-
ister of music’s house, where another large oak
had smashed the roof on the back half of the
house and punched through a big bay window.
The family, along with Pastor Hurt and sev-
eral other volunteers, had been cutting limbs
and dragging debris to a big pile near the road
for hours. The excavator would do in an hour
what all those folks could not do in a week.
Normally, Jerry Nickoles charges $125 per
hour for this kind of work.
He wasn’t making any money Tuesday,
though.
“I’m a deacon at the church. I go to church
with most of these people and know pretty
much everybody else,” Jerry Nickoles said.
“This is what you do. I’m happy I can help.”
The scene in this little corner of east Colum-
bus is both remarkable and typical — remark-
able in the sense that a small army of people
simply turned out to help each other, typical
in the sense that this scene played out every-
where along the tornado’s path.
The tornado hit early in the evening Mon-
day, but neither Lonny Nickoles or Sybil Prath-
er said they got much sleep Monday night. It
may have been a moment’s terror, but it was
a long, sleepless night of worrying how they
would manage to recover.
“You almost feel like giving up,” Lonny
Nickoles said.
“You feel helpless,” Prather admitted.
By Tuesday morning, though, the helpless-
ness have given way to a determination and
there is something empowering about it. Little
by little, tree limb by tree limb, Tuesday was a
day of recovery. Monday’s despair was losing
the fight against Tuesday’s grim resolve.
“The storm was overwhelming,” Pastor
Hurt said, watching a couple of little giggling
girls tugging at a tree limb, dragging into the
growing pile of debris. “The response is more
overwhelming.”
Slim Smith is the managing editor of The
Dispatch. His email address is ssmith@cdispatch.
com.
A community comes together
The morning
after, talk turns
to the night before
Birney Imes/Dispatch Staff
From left, Chad Creely, Joseph Savage and Canyon Boykin pause midday Tuesday during a clean-up
of Monday’s storm debris around the house Creely rents on Tabernacle Road.
Slim Smith
Birney Imes
Birney Imes/Dispatch Staff
Bobby Ray picks up storm debris in the front yard of his
Tabernacle Road home Tuesday morning. Accompanying Ray
on his rounds is the family dog, Molly.
Naturally,
the topic
of the day
was Monday
night’s storm
EDITOR/PUBLISHER
Birney Imes
ADVERTISING
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THE STAFF OF THE DISPATCH
THE DISPATCH • www.cdispatch.com WEDNESDAY, APRIL 30, 2014 7A
Vi l l age Cycl e Center
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NOLAND
A Winwholesale Company
601 18th Avenue N
Columbus, MS
662-327-9140
Home comfort
whatever
the weather.
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or Heat Pump with a new
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• Residential Plumbing
• Bathroom
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Come By Today To See
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Open to the Public
Monday - Thursday 7am - 5pm
Friday 7am - 4pm | Sat & Sun Closed
NEWS ABOUT TOWN
CLUBS
nAARP MEETING
AARP will meet May 7 at 10 a.m. in the
Community Room of Regions bank on
Main St. Members will vote on dining lo-
cation for the next meeting. Call Margaret
for information at 662-889-9496.
n FRIENDS AND NEIGHBORS
The Friends and Neighbors Club meets
second Wednesdays through May at 10
a.m. at Lion Hills Golf Club, Columbus (and
fourth Wednesdays June-August at various
restaurants). Contact Rhena Friloux, 662-
549-8800 or Twyla Summerford, 662-328-
3381.
n SENIOR CRAFTS
Senior Crafts meet at the Starkville
Sportsplex Tuesdays, 10-11:30 a.m. Crafts
are provided by the parks department. For
information, call Lisa Cox at 662-323-2294.
n TOPS
Take Off Pounds Sensibly No. 288 meets
every Monday at Community Baptist
Church, Yorkville Road East. Weigh-in
begins at 5:30 p.m. Contact Pat Harris,
662-386-0249.
n TOPS
Take Off Pounds Sensibly No. 266 meets
every Monday at the Episcopal Church
of the Good Shepherd, 321 Forrest Blvd.
Weigh-in begins at 5:15 p.m. Contact Mar-
garet Sprayberry, 662-328-8627.
n TOPS
Take Off Pounds Sensibly No. 270 meets
every Tuesday at the Church of Christ
Fellowship Hall, 900 Main St. in Caledo-
nia. Weigh-in begins at 5:15 p.m. Contact
Lorene Hawkins, 662-356-4838.
n QUILTING CLUB
Quilting Club meets in the activities room
adjacent to the multi-purpose facility at the
Starkville Sportsplex on Thursdays 10 a.m.-
noon. Bring your own project to work on. For
information, call Lisa Cox, 662-323-2294.
n GOLDEN TRIANGLE AA
Golden Triangle AA meets daily for support.
If you want to drink, that is your business. If
you want to stop drinking, that is our busi-
ness. For information, call 662-327-8941.
n AL-ANON MEETING
The Columbus Al-Anon Family Groups
meets Mondays and Thursdays at 5:30
p.m. When you don’t know where to turn
because someone drinks too much, we can
help. For information, call 888-425-2666 or
go to msafg.org.
HEALTH NOTES
n DIABETES SUPPORT
Diabetes Support Group classes (day and
evening classes available) are held each
month at Baptist Memorial Hospital-Golden
Triangle. For information, call 662-244-
1596 or email info.goldentriangle@bmhcc.
org
n NUTRITION EDUCATION
Nutrition Education Classes for conges-
tive heart failure meet the third Friday of
every month at 3 p.m., Baptist Memorial
Hospital-Golden Triangle Classroom 5 For
information, call 662-244-1597 or email
info.goldentriangle@bmhcc.org.
n PROSTATE SCREENING
Baptist Center for Cancer Care offers free
prostate PSA screenings the last Friday of
every month from 8 a.m.-2 p.m. Locations
rotate between Columbus and Starkville.
For appointments, call 662-244-4673.
n NUTRITION EDUCATION
Nutrition Education Classes for diabetes
meet the fourth Wednesday of every month
at 8:30 a.m., Baptist Memorial Hospi-
tal-Golden Triangle Outpatient Pavilion.
Physician referral required. For information,
call 662-244-1597 or email info.goldentri-
angle@bmhcc.org.
n ABUSE RECOVERY GROUP
Domestic Abuse Recovery Groups meet
every Thursday at 6 p.m., through Safe Ha-
ven Inc. Group counseling for rape recovery
is available. For information, call 662-327-
6118 or 662-889-2067.
n CHILDBIRTH CLASSES
Baptist Golden Triangle offers child-
birth classes on Tuesday nights at 6 p.m.
To register, call the Education Department
at 662-244-2498 or email info.goldentrian-
gle@bmhcc.org.
n CPR CLASSES
CPR Classes are offered at Baptist Gold-
en Triangle twice monthly, at 6 p.m. in the
Patient Tower. Preregistration is required.
Contact the Education Department at
662-244-2498 or email info.goldentrian-
gle@bmhcc.org.
n ALZHEIMER’S SUPPORT
The Alzheimer’s Columbus Chapter Care-
giver Support Group meets every fourth
Thursday, 6 p.m., at ComforCare, 118 S.
McCrary Road. For information, contact
Columbus Jones, 662-244-7226.
n MS SUPPORT
Multiple Sclerosis Support Group meets
the first Tuesday of every month at the
North Mississippi Medical Center, 835
Medical Center Drive in West Point.
nLOOK GOOD, FEEL BETTER
Baptist Cancer Center hosts class for
women actively undergoing chemother-
apy or radiation for cancer on May 12
at 9 a.m., room 4 PT. Volunteer beauty
professionals conduct the workshop. Call
662-244-2923 for information.
nALZHEIMER’S SUPPORT
Local Alzheimer’s support group will meet
May 15 at 6:30 at the henry Clay Retire-
ment Center Parlor, 133 Commerce St.
For information, contact Brenda Johnson
at 662-495-2339 or 1-800-843-3375.
nCHILDBIRTH CLASS
North Mississippi Medical Center in West
Point offers prepared childbirth class for
expectant parents from 6:30-8:30 p.m.
throughout the month of May. To register,
contact 662-495-2292 or 1-800-843-
3375.
OTHER EVENTS
nBLOOD DRIVE
Baptist Memorial Hospital-Golden Triangle
hosts a blood drive May 2, 11 a.m.-5 p.m.
at the Conference Center in the Outpa-
tient Pavilion. Register online at bloodhe-
ro.com, sponsor code: baptistgt.
nEMCC THEATER
East Mississippi Community College’s
theater department will perform Agatha
Christie’s “The Mousetrap” May 2-3 at
7:30 p.m. and May 4 at 2:30 p.m. at the
Lyceum on the Mayhew Campus. Call
662-476-8417 for information.
nTORCH RUN
Special Olympics MS hosts Law Enforce-
ment Torch Run May 6, 9:30 a.m. Raise
awareness and funds for Special Olympics
by purchasing a T-shirt and participating in
the run. Call 662-352-6795 for informa-
tion.
nSTAMP OUT HUNGER
USPS seeks help from community in food
drive. To help, leave non-perishable foods
next to your mailbox prior to regular deliv-
ery on Saturday, May 10.
n OCH SUMMER CAMP
Day camp for kids 8-13 years old to be
held 8 a.m.-noon June 23-26 and July 14-
17. Space is limited; call early, 662-323-
9355 to register or for information.
n SAFE SITTER
OCH hosts Safe Sitter Certification class
to train to teens in babysitting, To sign up,
contact Mary Kathryn Knight, 662-615-
3067 or mknight@och.org
n GRANT APPLICATION
Starkville Oktibbeha Achieving Results, a
non-profit community charitable organi-
zation, is receiving grant applications for
other non-profit organizations. Contact Jan
Eastman at jeastma1@bellsouth.net for
information.
nSENIOR GAMES
The Senior Center meets weekly at Propst
Park, Columbus, Tuesdays from noon-
4 p.m. for crafts, puzzles, quilting and
caning chairs. Seniors meet Wednesday
and Thursday for cards and games. For
information, call 662-364-6085.
nYOUNG AT HEART DANCE
Starkville Parks and Recreation hosts a
young-at-heart dance every second and
fourth Friday, 7-10 p.m. at the Sportsplex
Activities building. No alcohol, no smok-
ing. For information, call 662-312-9108.
Jeans and Jewels
Luisa Porter/Dispatch Staff
Dr. Paul Mack and his wife, Tommie, admire art on auction at the “Jeans and Jewels” 30th Annual Columbus Arts
Council & Gala on Saturday. The event was held in West Point at the Town Creek Pavilion.
THE DISPATCH • www.cdispatch.com 8A WEDNESDAY, APRIL 30, 2014
www.columbus-ymca.com
FOR YOUTH DEVELOPMENT
FOR HEALTHY LIVING
FOR SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY
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The YMCA is the starting point for many youth to
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 Basketball Clinic
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328-7696 for more information
BY CARL SMITH
csmith@cdispatch.com
LOUISVILLE — As
a last-second pivot posi-
tioned Winston Medical
Center directly in the path
of an EF-4 tornado Mon-
day, long-time emergency
room physician Mike Hen-
ry began running through
his unit and warning pa-
tients to immediately hun-
ker down and take cover.
Henry barely had time
to notify patients of the
storm’s sudden shift. He
received notice moments
earlier, Henry said, when a
man ran through the ER’s
outside doors, screaming,
“It’s here!”
WMC, a small, rural
health care facility in Lou-
isville, suffered extensive
damage Monday after-
noon after the tornado
ran a south-to-north path
through the town, demol-
ishing homes, leveling in-
dustrial areas, destroying
infrastructure and uproot-
ing trees.
Portions of the hospi-
tal’s walls collapsed, while
the tornado also caused
a gas leak and extensive
roof damage to the facility
and other nearby medical
buildings.
Search and rescue
operations continued in
Louisville through Tues-
day afternoon. Officials
reported nine fatalities
from Monday’s storm,
while search and rescue
operations for missing
people continued through
the next day.
Henry, who has worked
at the hospital for about 20
years, was finishing a day
shift Monday afternoon
when storm cells strength-
ened and approached Win-
ston County. The emer-
gency and waiting rooms
neared capacity as the
weather bore down on the
facility. Hospital officials
moved patients to the hall-
way as a precaution, he
said.
“We kept getting re-
ports and updates on the
storm, but we thought we
had a really good idea that
it would miss us. All of a
sudden, this thing turned,
pivoted and came right at
us,” Henry said.
The ER’s back wall was
blown out when the tor-
nado hit, Henry said, and
winds began whipping
through the facility. With-
in moments, the storm be-
gan pulling a handcuffed
female inmate’s hospital
gurney through the hall-
way and toward the hole.
Henry and another person
grabbed her and pulled
her out of the vacuum to
safety.
“People always say
that tornadoes sound like
trains, and they’re right —
It sounds like a train mov-
ing right through you,”
he said. “It hit and shook
everything with an incred-
ible, powerful force; then,
it was done.”
Henry said the damage
was almost catastrophic:
small objects littered the
ER, the roof leaked wa-
ter and steel beams were
twisted with what seemed
to be minimal effort. Out-
side of the facility, power
lines were downed, while
cars in its parking lot were
hurled through the air like
toys to a nearby path of
grass.
Nearby neighborhoods
were leveled, and many
homes were severely dam-
aged by falling trees.
Doctors and nurses
began assessing in-house
patients immediately af-
ter the storm. No injuries
were reported from those
already at the facility.
Injured Louisville and
Winston County residents
then began trickling into
the hospital.
WMC officials setup a
makeshift triage unit to
deal with those injuries.
Henry said many arrived
with trauma-based inju-
ries, such as open frac-
tures, collapsed lungs
from rib fractures and
cuts and scrapes. Sever-
al of the severely injured
patients were stabilized
locally and evacuated to
area hospitals.
Jackson’s University
of Mississippi Medical
Center immediately dis-
patched a team of emer-
gency physicians and
medical supplies to sup-
port WMC, Henry said.
OCH Regional Medical
Center in Starkville and
Baptist Memorial Hospi-
tal-Golden Triangle also
prepared their facilities
for an influx of patients.
Hospitals from across the
state sent numerous am-
bulances to Louisville to
handle evacuations.
“How much help we got
was absolutely incredible,”
Henry said.
Henry worked through
his shift and treated pa-
tients through the early
morning hours Tuesday.
“Volunteers kept pour-
ing in; everybody really
stepped up to the plate,”
he said. “I never want to
experience anything like
that again.”
Louisville doctor clings to patient in terrifying tug-of-war
Physician recounts harrowing ordeal
Winston Med-
ical Center
sustained
significant
damage after
an EF-4 tornado
tore through
Winston County
on Monday
afternoon.
Search continues for missing Louisville boy
BY SARAH FOWLER
sfowler@cdispatch.com
LOUISVILLE — A bright,
cloudless sky Tuesday morning
provided a stark contrast to the
debris-littered streets of Louis-
ville.
The sounds of chainsaws and
the smell of fresh-cut pine trees
dominated the senses. Neigh-
bors spoke to each other softly
as emergency medical workers
searched for the missing.
Winston County Coroner
Scott Gregory confirmed that
nine people were killed after an
EF-4 tornado ripped from one
end of the county to another
Monday. The tornado wreaked
havoc on everything from
churches to daycare centers.
Volunteers said the names of the
deceased and of the missing in
prayer as rescue efforts contin-
ued Tuesday morning.
Tuesday evening Gregory
said rescue efforts focused on
finding 7-year-old Tyler Tucker.
The bodies of the boy’s moth-
er, Terri Tucker, and stepfather,
Sean Fowler, were discovered
in the area near the family’s de-
stroyed home off of Highway
379.
Before their bodies were dis-
covered, Fowler’s best friend,
Jaime Ainsworth, was standing
along the roadside watching.
Ainsworth lives a half-mile from
the Fowler residence. He said he
spoke with his friend less than
five minutes before the torna-
do hit. Fowler told Ainsworth
he was standing on his porch,
looking at a cemetery across the
street.
“He said, ‘I don’t see anything
but I’m gonna keep eyes on it,’”
Ainsworth said. “And that’s the
last I heard of him.”
Fowler’s wood-frame home
is gone. Only a paved concrete
driveway remains. Rescue work-
ers used the driveway as a rest-
ing place for family photographs
they found.
The couples’ vehicles laid
against a tree less than 500 feet
from the house. By 8 a.m. Tues-
day, Ainsworth had lost hope
that his friend was alive. Fowl-
er’s body was found hours later.
“We came over here last night
looking for him and there’s noth-
ing here anymore,” Ainsworth
said. “I think all we found last
night was a dead dog of theirs
and then a live dog of theirs. Vir-
tually nothing else.”
While rescue workers
searched for the missing fami-
ly, neighbors a street over were
thanking God for their safety.
Steven and Clara Hampton
have lived on Jefferson Street for
30 years. Clara Hampton’s elder-
ly mother lives across the street.
Steven Hampton is a minister.
He said he feels God’s grace is
what kept his family safe.
“I know there wasn’t nobody
but God who kept us,” he said.
“Because just me, myself per-
sonally, the human side of me, at
one point I felt like we was gone.
I really did. I just thank God that
He looked beyond our faults and
His grace and mercy kept us.”
During the storm, the Hamp-
tons hid under a mattress. Their
home is demolished.
Next door, Ariel Thomas was
walking around in her front yard
in her pajamas Tuesday. Her
house is a pile of twisted beams.
Thomas was at the home with
her parents and her 3-year-old
child. The family gathered in a
closet once they heard “the whis-
tle sound,” Thomas said.
“All four of us smushed in that
closet and held a mattress over
us,” she said. “Didn’t no debris
hit us or nothing. Glass is broken
and we heard things throwing
around but I’m so happy we’ve
got our life. Those are material
things. I’m so happy that it didn’t
suck us up.”
Across from Jefferson Street
is Memorial Park Cemetery.
Tombstones laid toppled over
and pine trees were on their
sides.
What remains of Eiland Ave-
nue is at the foot of the hill.
Linda Love and her husband,
Shirley Lee, were trapped after
their home collapsed around
them. Lee is wheelchair-bound.
Before the tornado hit, Love was
outside tending to her chickens.
She said she rushed inside when
she saw the tornado approach-
ing.
“I pushed (Lee) into the hall-
way, just before I could get from
my door to the hallway and that
was it,” Love said. “It hit my
house, throwed my husband out
his wheelchair and then throwed
me into him and then he was on
top of me. Next thing I remem-
ber they were pulling me out.”
Love said Lee is in the hospi-
tal being treated for his injuries.
The couple’s son, who is also
named Shirley Lee, was stand-
ing several feet from what re-
mained of his parents’ house. He
and several friends were loading
chickens into a truck. They
stopped to take a break and
began complaining about what
they felt was lack of help from
fellow community members and
emergency services.
“People was coming over
here to be nosey instead of help-
ing these people out,” he said.
“You see people with bones
sticking out, chunks of meat
missing on them, wood sticking
through them and they ain’t do-
ing nothing to help? Man, we’ve
been helping these people all
night.”
The group said they had each
dug through rubble to find peo-
ple. Taking a deep drag from his
cigarette, the younger Lee esti-
mated he and his friends pulled
half a dozen people from a de-
molished apartment complex.
The Revival, formerly known
as Eiland Plaza, housed ap-
proximately 20 adults and nu-
merous children, the men said.
Moments earlier, another body
had been discovered among the
building’s rubble.
Those who had been dis-
placed were being directed to
First Baptist Church and First
Methodist Church.
In addition to the demolition
in the south side of Louisville,
the Winston Medical Center on
the north side of town sustained
substantial damage. A daycare
there was demolished. The own-
er, Ruth Bennett, is among the
dead.
Reached this morning, Greg-
ory said the search for Tyler
Tucker continues.
Gregory said once the miss-
ing have been found, Louisville
will heal and rebuild.
“We’re going to be all right,”
he said. “We’ll rise up from this
and we’re going to be good.”
Parts of Winston County demolished
by EF-4 tornado Monday
Mary Alice Weeks/Dispatch Staff
Mary Alice Weeks/Dispatch Staff
A sign of gratefulness is displayed outside a home on Main Street in Louisville on
Tuesday morning after an EF-4 tornado tore through Winston County on Monday night.
THE DISPATCH • www.cdispatch.com WEDNESDAY, APRIL 30, 2014 9A
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Columbus
Continued from Page 1A
Twelve mobile homes
on Beck Road were de-
stroyed.
The National Weather
Service is assessing the
damage to determine the
severity of the tornado that
touched down near the
intersection of Highways
82 and 45 South, as well as
other possible tornadoes
that went through East
Lowndes County.
Columbus Light and
Water General Manager
Todd Gale said he hopes
to have the majority of
the 300 residences still
without power this morn-
ing back on the grid by
Thursday evening.
Carolyn Nickoles said
she was in the Pleasant
Hill Baptist Church base-
ment when the storm was
overhead. The church had
roof and water damage
from the excess winds.
She wasn’t able to get to
her house because fallen
trees and debris blocked
the road.
“We had about 20
people and five dogs just
chillin’ under the church,”
she said.
More cleanup was on-
going at Pleasant Hill and
Lacy roads. Lisa Brewer,
another Pleasant Hill Bap-
tist Church member, was
one of a dozen people in
the yard picking up limbs
and patching up the house
of the church’s minister
of music, Wylie Dilmore.
Brewer said she was in the
laundry room in her house
at the time the storm
reached her area and was
safe. Her yard received
a few fallen limbs, she
said. When she found out
about the damage to many
houses on Lacy Road, she
became one of countless
people in that area pitch-
ing in to get debris on the
side of the road.
Somewhere behind an
old, giant cedar tree that
had fallen victim to the
storm, Jason McCool and
Carl Veazey were running
their chainsaws, splitting
another tree that had
fallen down in front of a
neighbor’s mobile home
on Lacy Road into smaller
chunks. The mobile home
was spared, just a few visi-
ble dents on its front right
side. They had been out
there since 8 a.m. Tuesday.
McCool declined to
repeat what he said when
he first saw the damage.
“I haven’t seen it this
bad in eight or nine years,”
he said.
Lawrence encouraged
anyone needing assistance
to call the Columbus
Lowndes Emergency
Management Agency at
662-329-5110.
Nathan Gregory/Dispatch Staff
The Columbus Speedway on Hutcherson Road suffered extensive damage, but track manager Joe Ables said he
expects for it to be cleaned up in time for a May 17 race.
BY NATHAN GREGORY
ngregory@cdispatch.com
The races will go on at Columbus
Speedway. Just not this weekend.
Wind damage from Monday’s se-
vere weather outbreak turned a ma-
jority of the three-eighths-of-a-mile
race track on Hutcherson Road
into a field of debris. Bleachers and
raised viewing areas for spectators
suffered extensive damage. But
track manager Joe Ables said he
has the equipment to clean up the
“Baddest Bullring of the South” in
two days’ time.
Ables said family and friends
come first, though, and he will be
helping them get back to normal be-
fore moving the cleanup operation
to the track.
The races that were planned for
this weekend have been canceled,
but Ables said he’s confident that
the track will be ready for a weekly
racing series event scheduled for
May 17.
“We’ve got two power lines down,
and other than that we’re ready to
go racing,” Ables said. “We’ve just
got several hours of cleanup.”
Track promoters refurbished the
facility, which plays host to numer-
ous races each year from March to
September, in 2012.
Ables said his concern when the
track is cleaned up is safety.
“We’ll be making sure all the de-
bris is up to try to protect the driv-
ers’ tires and make sure there’s no
glass or nails laying around for kids
to get on,” he said. “I’ll check all the
rest of the towers out for safety be-
fore we let anybody in.”
Columbus Speedway suffers major damage
Track manager says races will resume soon
Carleton
Continued from Page 1A
have a permanent chief in
the next 30 days.
The city will do an in-
house search for the new
chief with current CPD per-
sonnel having five working
days to apply. A committee
made up of Smith, Human
Resources Director Pat
Mitchell, Chief Operations
Officer David Armstrong,
and councilmen Joseph
Mickens and Bill Gavin
will vet the applicants.
Smith declined to say
why they choose Carleton
as interim. The decision is
effective immediately.
THE DISPATCH • www.cdispatch.com 10A WEDNESDAY, APRIL 30, 2014
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Church
Continued from Page 1A
“They said, ‘The
church is flat,’” Gavin said.
On Tuesday just after
lunch he came to see what
was left. His wife, Mary
Gavin, came along. They
hoped to retrieve from
the destruction, if noth-
ing else, Robert Gavin’s
preaching license, which
he said he got in 1989,
and his ordination license,
which he said he got in
2004.
They parked out front.
They walked around
the south side of the
church looking at the de-
struction.
They took it as well as
they could.
Robert Gavin got to the
back of the church, where
his office once stood, and
a picture of Martin Luther
King Jr. that had hung on
a wall was laying there. He
got it. He also picked up a
tiny plaque inscribed with
The Lord’s Prayer. And an
unframed and dog-eared
picture of he and his wife.
He looked hard at the
church’s rear. He took in
how complete the dam-
age was and said to his
wife, “I don’t think we got
a chance of getting those
licenses.”
Gavin explained how
the church originated in
the hands of freed slaves.
He hopes enough money
can be raised to rebuild.
He has told his congrega-
tion to find another church
in the meantime. And he
mentioned how the church
only meets on the first
and third Sunday of each
month.
Then he looked toward
the darkening sky and
said they should not stay
long, as bad weather was
expected again.
Mary Gavin said, “We
just didn’t know Easter
would be our last service.”
Robert Gavin said his
message on that Sunday,
like on every Easter, was
on the Resurrection.
William Browning/Dispatch Staff
Springfield M.B. Church on Highway 45 South is pictured Tuesday.
Luisa Porter/Dispatch Staff
Neighborhood children walk across Brown Street Tuesday in East Columbus to inspect two trees that hit a home
during Monday’s storms. From left, Allizon Reyes, Cristian Flores and Mariana Reyes. Their mother is Wendy
Garcia of Columbus.
Storm damage
Mary Alice Weeks/Dispatch Staff
Damage
caused by
several fallen
trees is seen
in Charlie and
Michelle Gar-
dener’s home
in New Hope
on Tuesday
morning
following a
bout of thun-
derstorms
and torna-
does that
tore through
Columubus
on Monday
night.
BY ADAM MINICHINO
aminichino@cdispatch.com
Ever since the beginning of the
season, Laura Trenor believed the
New Hope High School girls golf
team could win a state title.
The first-year coach did her best
whenever she could to boost the
confidence of her players and to
convince them they were ready to
take the next step after finishing
fourth in their past two trips to the
state’s biggest stage.
But Trenor couldn’t help feel
nervous Tuesday when the Lady
Trojans were finally ready to tee off
at the Class II state championships
in Holly Springs after rain forced
Monday’s opening round to be post-
poned. Her players made sure they
did their best to make Trenor feel
at ease.
“They were focused and ready to
play,” Trenor said. “Once we started
to play they said, ‘We got this,’ but I
was more nervous than them. They
didn’t show any emotion as far as be-
ing nervous. I think it finally sunk in
that they knew they had a good shot
(at winning the state title).”
Buoyed by a round of 86 by ju-
nior Mary Grace Caldwell and a 90
by freshman Belle Keopraseut, the
New Hope girls golf team realized
the dream Trenor said was within
their grasp and won the Class II
state championship at Kirkwood
National Golf Club. New Hope won
the title with a 179, edging New
Albany (179) and George County
(184). Caldwell’s round tied for sil-
ver medalist honors, and was three
shots better than her best round last
year at the Class II state champion-
ship at Sunkist Country Club in Bi-
loxi. Keopraseut’s round was 22 and
23 shots better than the rounds she
fired last year. Junior Taylor White
rounded out New Hope’s threesome
with a round of 113. The rain Mon-
day forced the 36-hole champion-
ship to be shortened to 18 holes.
By The Associated Press
OKLAHOMA CITY — It took a fraction
of a second for the Memphis Grizzlies to
take control of their first-round series with
the Oklahoma City Thunder.
With 2.9 seconds remaining in overtime,
Oklahoma City’s Kevin Durant missed a
long 3-point attempt. Teammate Serge Iba-
ka tipped the ball in on the rebound, sending
the crowd into a celebration.
The shot was reviewed, however, and
it was determined that it was released just
after the buzzer, giving Memphis a 100-99
victory Tuesday night and a 3-2 lead in the
series.
“I had a good look at it and I thought it
was good when it left my hand,” Durant, the
NBA’s scoring champion, said. “And then
Serge’s follow shot was just late. It was a
tough finish, but we’ve got to come back.”
It was a record fourth straight overtime
game in the series, and Memphis has won
BY MATTHEW STEVENS
mstevens@cdispatch.com
STARKVILLE — Mississippi State
fans love to manage John Cohen’s base-
ball team more than any other sport on
campus.
With so many unpaid coaches in the
stands and watching from home, Cohen
normally sounds like he is justifying his
moves to fans who aren’t at practice, ar-
en’t watching film of previous games,
and haven’t seen what he has seen in
more than 20 years as a coach.
So when Cohen is asked why his team
hasn’t been able to deliver extra-base
BY TIM REYNOLDS
The Associated Press
MIAMI — Jose
Fernandez got booed for
not running out a ground-
er, and felt a tiny twinge of
disappointment about not
getting a chance to finish
off what could have been
his first complete game.
Everything else for
the Miami
Ma r l i n s ’
young ace
went per-
fectly once again Tuesday
night.
Fernandez allowed
two hits in eight stellar
innings, Giancarlo Stan-
ton hit a two-run homer
and the Marlins opened
a homestand by beating
the Atlanta Braves 9-0 on
Tuesday night.
“Jose did a great job,”
Marlins manager Mike
Redmond said. “We need-
ed him to go out there and
log some big innings, and
that’s back-to-back great
starts against a great of-
fensive team.”
Jarrod Saltalamacchia
also homered for Miami,
SECTION
B
SPORTS EDITOR
Adam Minichino: 327-1297
SPORTS LINE
662-241-5000
Sports
THE DISPATCH n CDISPATCH.COM n WEDNESDAY, APRIL 30, 2014
RESULTS
TUESDAY’S GAMES
nWashington 75, Chicago 69,
Washington wins series 4-1
nMemphis 100, Oklahoma City 99, OT,
Memphis leads series 3-2
nL.A. Clippers 113, Golden State 103,
L.A. Clippers leads series 3-2
CLASS II STATE
CHAMPIONSHIP
AT KIRKWOOD NATIONAL GOLF CLUB,
HOLLY SPRINGS
Team Scores
nNew Hope ............................. 176
nNew Albany ........................... 179
nGeorge County ....................... 184
Individual Scores
nCarlee Nanney Itawamba AHS ... 84
nM.G. Caldwell New Hope .......... 86
nBretlyn Phillips Cleveland ......... 86
nLucy Martin New Albany ........... 89
nLauren Dunlap New Albany ....... 90
nBelle Keopraseut New Hope ..... 90
Prep Golf
Major League
Baseball
College Baseball
Marlins 9,
Braves 0
Prep Football
See GOLF, 3B
See MEMPHIS, 3B
See MARLINS, 4B See MSU BASEBALL, 4B
Contributed
The New Hope High School girls golf team poses for a
picture Tuesday after winning the Mississippi High School
Activities Association Class II state championship at
Kirkwood National Golf Club in Holly Springs. From left:
coach Laura Trenor, Belle Keopraseut, Mary Grace
Caldwell, and Taylor White.
David Miller/Special to The Dispatch
Patrick Plott gives a high five to one of his assistant
coaches in the final moments of the Pickens County
High School football team’s 38-18 victory against
Maplesville in the Alabama High School Athletic
Association Class 1A state title game at Bryant-Denny
Stadium in Tuscaloosa, Ala.
Fernandez
rolls again
in shutout
David Miller/Special to The Dispatch
Mississippi State baseball coach John Cohen feels shortstop Seth heck should be
hitting 30-40 points higher but is having bad luck making hard contact and hitting
balls right at fielders.
Cohen hopes Heck can deliver at top
TODAY
n Jacksonville State at Mississippi State,
6:30 p.m. (WKBB-FM 100.9, WFCA-FM 107.9)
Basketball: NBA Playoffs
INSIDE
n MORE NBA: Commissioner
Adam Silver banned Los
Angeles Clippers owner
Donald Sterling, left, for life
and fined him $2.5M for his
racist comments. Page 3B
Call in OT gives
win to Grizzlies
New Hope girls take Class II state title
BY ADAM MINICHINO
aminichino@cdispatch.com
The Pickens County
High School football team
will have to defend its Class
1A state title without its
head coach.
On Monday, Patrick
Plott started work as the
new football coach and ath-
letic director at Greenville
(Ala.) High. Plott accepted
the job offers April 17 and
was approved by the school
board that day. The timing
was designed to put Plott in
place for the start of spring
football, which he kicked
off Tuesday with more than
100 players.
“It was the right fit,”
Plott said. “There are great
people in place and it is a
great place to work.”
Plott earned The Dis-
patch’s West Alabama
All-Area Coach of the Year
honors for leading Pickens
County to a 38-18 victory
against Maplesville in the
Alabama High School Ath-
letic Association state title
game. The victory capped a
15-0 season, the program’s
first in school history. The
Tornadoes also had four
players earn first-team All-
State recognition on the Al-
abama Sports Writers As-
sociation Class 1A squad.
Greenville High, a
Class 5A school, is in But-
ler County, and is about
30 minutes south of Mont-
gomery. Plott said his wife
is from Greenville, which
makes the move that much
easier. He said his wife
and son would relocate at
the end of the school year.
Plott, who played foot-
ball at Carrollton High
and went on to play for Bill
Burgess at Jacksonville
State, returned to Pickens
County High in 2011 for his
second stint as a coach at
the school. A certification
issue and the lack of a cer-
tified teaching position at
the school resulted in Plott
leaving the school after one
season leading the football
program. He also coached
the boys basketball team at
Pickens County and served
as athletic director. Plott
also has coached at Bullock
County and Demopolis.
Plott said the jobs at
Greenville High were ap-
pealing because he wanted
to move to a higher level in
the state’s coaching ranks.
The state of Alabama will
move to seven classifica-
tions for 2014.
Last season, Green-
ville went 2-8 and 1-6 in
Class 5A, Region 3. It won
10 games in 2011 and last
won state titles in 1987
and 1994.
Plott leaves Pickens County for 5A Greenville
BY GENE PHELPS
Northeast Mississippi Daily Journal
TUPELO — Hannah Wilson talk-
ed by phone Monday with her “best
friend” — John Servati. The focus
of the conversation was their torna-
do-damaged hometown of Tupelo.
“I talked with him yesterday,
checking to make sure
his family was OK in
Tupelo,” said Wilson,
from Tallahassee, Fla.,
where she is a swim-
mer for Florida State
University.
Servati, a swimmer
for the University of
Alabama, assured her
his family was fine.
Hours later, however, Servati, 21,
died Monday night as strong storms
and a tornado passed through Tusca-
loosa, Ala. The former Tupelo High
School swimmer was killed when a
retaining wall collapsed on him in the
basement of a home.
“He was my best friend,” an emo-
tional Wilson said. “We used to train
together. I wouldn’t be the swimmer
I am today without him. My heart
breaks for his family.”
According to news reports and
Twitter accounts, Servati saved the
life of his girlfriend by keeping the
wall from collapsing on her.
Servati’s swim coach at Tupelo
High, Lucas Smith, believes his for-
mer pupil was capable of such a heroic
effort.
“He was a young man passionate
about his Christian faith. You could
tell from the way he lived,” Smith said.
“He died serving ... He pushed his
girlfriend out of the way, saving her
life.”
Servati’s Alabama swim family re-
acted with great sadness.
“John Servati was an extraordi-
nary young man of great character
and warmth who had a tremendously
giving spirit,” Alabama coach Dennis
Pursley said in a statement.
Crimson Tide team captain Phil-
lip Deaton remembered Servati for a
“genuine heart” and carefree spirit.
“He was my training partner for
three years, and I can tell you that
while he liked to goof around and
have fun, when he stepped up on the
block he was intensely focused . he
was a competitor and an amazing
teammate,” Deaton said in a universi-
ty release.
A shoulder injury and subsequent
surgery ended Servati’s college swim-
ming career earlier this year. Wilson,
who had lunch with him this spring in
Tuscaloosa, said it was a tough deci-
sion to give up swimming.
“No athlete wants to be told he
can’t do it anymore,” she said. “I was
proud of him. He made that decision
to step away and do what was best for
his health.”
Servati became the state-record
holder in the 100-yard backstroke and
200 freestyle during his Tupelo High
career. He helped lead the Golden
Wave boys team to four consecutive
state titles and earned 10 individu-
als state titles. Not bad for the once
reluctant 6-year-old who hated swim
practice.
“My mom would take me kicking
and screaming,” he told the Northeast
Mississippi Daily Journal in a 2010 in-
terview. “I hated it, but I’m glad I stuck
with it.”
Smith, who watched Servati grow
up in the pool, battled with his emo-
tions over the tragic news.
“This is hard,” the coach said. “I
know he’s a man, but he’s a kid, a kid.”
Prep Baseball
Today’s Game
Mississippi Association of Independent Schools
Class AAA, Division II Playoffs
Oak Forest Academy (La.) at Heritage Academy,
6 p.m.
Thursday’s Games
Mississippi High School Activities
Association
Class 6A North State Playoffs
Columbus at Clinton, 6 p.m.
Class 5A North State Playoffs
Center Hill at New Hope, 6 p.m.
Prep Softball
Today’s Games
Wednesday’s Game
Mississippi High School Activities
Association
Class 5A North State Playoffs
New Hope at Lewisburg, 5 p.m.
MHSAA Class 1A North State Playoffs
St. Joe at Hamilton, 4:30 p.m.
Thursday’s Games
Mississippi High School Activities
Association
Class 5A North State Playoffs
Lewisburg at New Hope, 6 p.m.
Class 1A North State Playoffs
Hamilton at St. Joe, TBD
College Baseball
Today’s Games
Alabama at Samford, 6 p.m.
Jacksonville State at Mississippi State, 6:30 p.m.
Southern Miss at Ole Miss, 6:30 p.m.
College Softball
Thursday’s Game
Alabama at Missouri, 7 p.m.
Today
GOLF
10 a.m. — Asian Tour, Indonesian Masters, final
round, at Jakarta, Indonesia (same-day tape),
TGC
HORSE RACING
4 p.m. — Thoroughbreds, Kentucky Derby Draw,
at Louisville, Ky., NBC Sports Network
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
12:30 p.m. — Regional coverage, Milwaukee at
St. Louis or Detroit at Chicago White Sox
(1 p.m.), MLB
1 p.m. — Detroit at Chicago White Sox, WGN
6 p.m. — Atlanta at Miami, SportSouth
6 p.m. — Tampa Bay at Boston, ESPN
NBA
6 p.m. — Playoffs, first round, game 5, Dallas at
San Antonio, TNT
7 p.m. — Playoffs, first round, game 5, Brooklyn
at Toronto, NBATV
8:30 p.m. — Playoffs, first round, game 5,
Portland at Houston, TNT
NHL
6 p.m. — Playoffs, conference quarterfinals,
game 7, Philadelphia at New York Rangers (if
necessary), NBC Sports Network
8:30 p.m. — Playoffs, conference quarterfinals,
game 7, Minnesota at Colorado, CNBC
9 p.m. — Playoffs, conference semifinals, game
7, Los Angeles at San Jose, NBC Sports Network
SOCCER
1:30 p.m. — UEFA Champions League, semifinal,
second leg, Atletico de Madrid at Chelsea, FS1
Today
BOXING
8 p.m. — Welterweights, Roberto Garcia (34-3-0)
vs. Victor Manuel Cayo (32-4-0), at Hialeah, Fla.,
ESPN2
COLLEGE BASEBALL
6:30 p.m. — Kentucky at Tennessee, ESPNU
COLLEGE SOFTBALL
7 p.m. — Alabama at Missouri, ESPN
GOLF
8 a.m. — European PGA Tour, The Championship
at Laguna National, first round, at Singapore
(same-day tape), TGC
11:30 a.m. — LPGA, North Texas Shootout, first
round, at Irving, Texas, TGC
2 p.m. — PGA Tour, Wells Fargo Championship,
first round, at Charlotte, N.C., TGC
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
Noon — L.A. Dodgers at Minnesota, MLB
6 p.m. — Atlanta at Miami, SportSouth
6 p.m. — Regional coverage, Tampa Bay at
Boston, MLB
NBA
6 p.m. — Playoffs, first round, game 6, Indiana
at Atlanta, NBATV
7 p.m. — Playoffs, first round, game 6,
Oklahoma City at Memphis, TNT
9:30 p.m. — Playoffs, first round, game 6, Los
Angeles Clippers at Golden State, TNT
NHL
6:30 p.m. — Playoffs, conference semifinals,
Montreal at Boston, NBC Sports Network
SOCCER
2 p.m. — UEFA Europa League, semifinal,
second leg, Benfica at Juventus, FS1
CALENDAR
ON THE AIR
BRIEFLY
Local
Caledonia High School sets baseball camp
The Caledonia High School baseball program will hold a summer
baseball camp for students in grades kindergarten through six begin-
ning Tuesday, May 27. The camp will run through Thursday, May 29.
The camp will run from 8:30-11:30 a.m. at the Caledonia High
baseball field. Caledonia High baseball coach John Wilson and mem-
bers of his coaching staff and his current and former players will serve
as camp instructors. The cost is $70. If you have more than one child,
the cost will be $55 for the second child and $40 for the third child. The
cost covers insurance, T-shirts, and lunch for the campers Thursday.
Campers will be grouped by age and ability. Campers will receive
instruction on hitting, throwing, fielding, pitching, and game situations.
Instruction will last until 10:45 a.m. each day. The final 45 minutes will be
devoted to game play and situations.
Each camper will need to bring a hat, glove, cleats, and bat, if
they have one. In case of inclement weather, the camp will move to the
school’s indoor facility, which is adjacent to the baseball field.
Early registration is encouraged so camp staff can determine the
number of participants. Late registration will begin at 7:45 a.m. Tuesday,
May 27. Registration should be sent to John Wilson, c/o Caledonia High
School, 111 Confederate Dr., Caledonia, MS 39740. Please make the
checks out to the Caledonia Dugout Club.
For more information, contact Wilson at 356-2001 or 889-1015.
MSU
Men’s tennis team will face Louisiana-Lafayette in NCAA
tournament
STARKVILLE — The No. 17 Mississippi State men’s tennis team
will take on No. 62 Louisiana-Lafayette at 10 a.m. Friday, May 9, in the
first round of the NCAA Championship at Texas’ Penick-Allison Tennis
Center in Austin, Texas.
This is the fourth-straight year the Bulldogs (18-10, 7-5 South-
eastern Conference) have advanced to the NCAA tournament. It also
is MSU’s 23rd appearance in the NCAA Championship in program
history, and its 19th bid in the past 24 years.
No. 7 and No. 9 national seed Texas will battle Marist at 1 p.m.
Friday, May 9. The winners of those matches will face each other in
the second round matchup at 1 p.m. Saturday, May 10, for the right to
advance to the NCAA round of 16 on May 15 in Athens, Ga.
n Women’s track and field team 12th in latest rankings: At
Starkville, Jumping 13 spots from last week’s standings, the women’s
track and field team lands at No. 12 in the latest USTFCCCA Team
Rankings released Tuesday.
For the first time this year, only marks from this season were used
to determine the rankings.
Rochelle Farquharson remains at No. 4 in the women’s long jump
(21 feet, 3 1/4 inches), while Cornelia Griesche keeps her spot at fifth in
the women’s 3,000-meter steeplechase with a school-record time of 10
minutes, 4.05 seconds. Rhianwedd Price also ranks fifth this week in
the women’s 1,500 (4:16.11).
While the MSU men aren’t ranked as a team, Dudley’s squad
maintains individual rankings in selective events. Brandon McBride
is the NCAA leader in the men’s 800 after a lifetime-best 1:45.35 at
Mt. SAC Relays. Javon Davis rounds out the top-20 in the men’s 400
hurdles (51.27).
MSU will host its only home meet of the season, the Jace Lacoste
Invitational, on Saturday. Alabama, Florida State, Missouri State,
Oklahoma, and Virginia Tech will participate.
Golf
Johnson, Georgia Tech win Chick-fil-A Challenge;
Mullen, Mississippi State tie for second
GREENSBORO, Ga. — Mississippi State football coach Dan
Mullen and former Bulldog Fred McCrary teamed up to claim $70,000
in scholarship winnings for the school after the two-day Chick-fil-A Bowl
Golf Challenge at Reynolds Plantation.
Mullen and McCrary shot 9-under par to finish second overall and
tops among all Southeastern Conference teams.
Georgia Tech’s Paul Johnson and Jon Barry earned the top prize
of $125,000 with a 13-under final score.
The Alabama team of Nick Saban and Mark Ingram and the
Auburn team of Gus Malzahn and Bo Jackson tied for fifth and earned a
$30,000 share of the scholarship purse.
The Chick-fil-A Bowl Challenge is annually the country’s premier
head coach and celebrity charity golf event featuring NCAA head
coaches and former athletes and celebrities from the same school com-
peting against their rivals for a share of a $520,000 scholarship purse.
Junior Colleges
No. 8 EMCC baseball team will play host to East
Central in playoffs
SCOOBA — On the heels of clinching the school’s first MACJC
North Division baseball title since 1998, the No. 8 East Mississippi
Community College baseball team will play host to East Central C.C.
this weekend in a best-of-three Mississippi Association of Community
and Junior Colleges playoff series.
First pitch for Friday’s opening game of the EMCC-ECCC baseball
playoff series will be 7 p.m. at Gerald Poole Field. Game 2 will be at
2 p.m. Saturday. A third and deciding game, if necessary, will follow
immediately Saturday. All games this weekend will be video-streamed
live on www.EMCCAthletics.com/live.
Owners of a 15-3 home record this season, the Lions (31-11)
secured the school’s first division baseball title in 16 years with their
14-11 comeback victory against Northeast Mississippi C.C. in the first
game of this past Saturday’s regular-season finale. With the program’s
most overall wins since 1994, this year’s 18-6 division record matches
EMCC’s 1986 division mark when former head coach Bill Baldner’s
Lions went 37-16 and claimed the NJCAA Region 23 baseball title after
earning state runner-up team honors.
ICC to host MACJC Softball tournament
FULTON — Itawamba Community College will be the site for the
2014 Mississippi Community and Junior Colleges (MACJC) Softball
tournament on Friday through Sunday at the ICC Softball Complex.
No. 11 ICC (37-11) will meet Mississippi Gulf Coast C.C. (33-16) at
4 p.m. Friday in the opening game of the three-day, double-elimination
tournament. No. 2 Jones County Junior College (43-2) and Pearl River
C.C.(26-16) will play at 6 p.m.
The winners will play at 1 p.m. in the first of three games Saturday.
The losers from Friday will play in an elimination game at 3 p.m., with
the winner playing the loser from the winner’s bracket at 5 p.m. in the
day’s second elimination game.
Sunday’s championship game will start at 1 p.m. The if-needed
game is scheduled for 3 p.m.
The Lady Indians earned the right to host this year’s MACJC
tournament after winning their third-straight MACJC North Division
championship and winning their best-of-three series against East
Central C.C. (33-16). Tournament t-shirts will be on sale for $15 and
admission will be $5 per day.
In addition, ICC will take donations at the concession stand
throughout the tournament to go toward relief efforts and victims of the
tornadoes that moved through Tupelo and other North Mississippi areas
Monday.
n In related news, ICC sophomore second baseman Cat Carver,
of Hernando, was named MACJC Player of the Week. Carver went
5-for-8 with two walks, three runs, an RBI, a stolen base, and a sacrifice
fly to help the No. 11 Lady Indians (37-11) advance to the MACJC
tournament.
National
Babe Ruth watch given by Yankees to be auctioned
LAS VEGAS — The grandson of Babe Ruth is auctioning off the
watch given to the baseball legend in his last appearance at Yankee
Stadium in 1948, a few months before he died of cancer.
Tom Stevens was given the watch by his grandmother — Ruth’s
wife, Claire — when he graduated from college in 1974, and has kept it
in a safe deposit box ever since.
“It’s difficult to part with because I feel like I’m liquidating a legacy
in a way,” Stevens said. “I almost feel like it belongs in the family. But I
think now would be a good time to put it to use.”
The watch was presented to Ruth on June 13, 1948, when he
appeared in pinstripes for the last time as his No. 3 was formally retired
on the 25th anniversary of Yankee Stadium. A clearly ailing Ruth
leaned on a bat loaned to him by Cleveland pitcher Bob Feller, a scene
immortalized in a famous photo showing Ruth from behind.
The watch given to Ruth by the Yankees is a 14-karat Longines
pocket model with an engraving on the back that reads: “Babe Ruth
— Silver Anniversary — Yankee Stadium 1923-1948 ‘The House That
Ruth Built.’”
Stevens, a civil engineer who is the son of Ruth’s only surviving
daughter, Julia, said he has always been proud to be Ruth’s grandson.
Ruth memorabilia normally draws big prices, including a 1920
jersey that sold for more than $4.4 million in 2012. A watch that was
part of a set given Ruth and his teammates for winning the 1923 World
Series went for $717,000 this year.
The watch will be auctioned online by SCP Auctions, with final bids
on May 17. SCP estimated it would go for at least $750,000.
— From Special Reports
THE DISPATCH • www.cdispatch.com 2B WEDNESDAY, APRIL 30, 2014
Colleges
Former Tupelo, UA athlete dies in storm
Servati
American League
East Division
W L Pct GB
New York 15 11 .577 —
Baltimore 12 12 .500 2
Boston 13 14 .481 2½
Toronto 12 14 .462 3
Tampa Bay 11 16 .407 4½
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Detroit 13 9 .591 —
Minnesota 12 11 .522 1½
Kansas City 13 12 .520 1½
Chicago 14 14 .500 2
Cleveland 11 16 .407 4½
West Division
W L Pct GB
Oakland 17 10 .630 —
Texas 15 12 .556 2
Los Angeles 13 13 .500 3½
Seattle 11 14 .440 5
Houston 9 18 .333 8
Tuesday’s Games
Seattle 6, N.Y. Yankees 3
Pittsburgh at Baltimore, ppd., rain
Boston 7, Tampa Bay 4
Oakland 9, Texas 3
Detroit 4, Chicago White Sox 3
Kansas City 10, Toronto 7
Washington 4, Houston 3
L.A. Dodgers at Minnesota, ppd., rain
L.A. Angels 6, Cleveland 4
Today’s Games
Detroit (Scherzer 2-1) at Chicago White Sox
(Noesi 0-1), 1:10 p.m.
Cleveland (McAllister 3-1) at L.A. Angels
(C.Wilson 3-2), 6:05 p.m.
Pittsburgh (Morton 0-3) at Baltimore
(Tillman 3-1), 6:05 p.m.
Seattle (Elias 1-2) at N.Y. Yankees (Phelps
0-0), 6:05 p.m.
Tampa Bay (Archer 2-1) at Boston
(Doubront 1-3), 6:10 p.m.
Oakland (J.Chavez 1-0) at Texas (Ross Jr.
1-1), 7:05 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers (Greinke 4-0) at Minnesota
(Gibson 3-1), 7:10 p.m.
Toronto (Hutchison 1-1) at Kansas City
(Ventura 2-1), 7:10 p.m.
Washington (Zimmermann 1-1) at Houston
(Oberholtzer 0-4), 7:10 p.m.
Thursday’s Games
L.A. Dodgers (Haren 3-0) at Minnesota
(Pelfrey 0-2), 12:10 p.m., 1st game
Pittsburgh (Cumpton 0-1) at Baltimore
(B.Norris 1-2), 6:05 p.m.
Seattle (F.Hernandez 3-1) at N.Y. Yankees
(Kuroda 2-2), 6:05 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers (Beckett 0-0) at Minnesota
(K.Johnson 0-0), 6:10 p.m., 2nd game
Tampa Bay (C.Ramos 1-1) at Boston (Peavy
1-0), 6:10 p.m.
Toronto (Buehrle 4-1) at Kansas City
(Guthrie 2-1), 7:10 p.m.
National League
East Division
W L Pct GB
Atlanta 17 8 .680 —
New York 15 11 .577 2½
Washington 15 12 .556 3
Philadelphia 13 13 .500 4½
Miami 12 14 .462 5½
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Milwaukee 20 7 .741 —
St. Louis 14 14 .500 6½
Cincinnati 12 14 .462 7½
Pittsburgh 10 16 .385 9½
Chicago 8 17 .320 11
West Division
W L Pct GB
San Francisco 16 11 .593 —
Colorado 16 12 .571 ½
Los Angeles 14 12 .538 1½
San Diego 13 15 .464 3½
Arizona 8 22 .267 9½
Tuesday’s Games
N.Y. Mets 6, Philadelphia 1
Pittsburgh at Baltimore, ppd., rain
Miami 9, Atlanta 0
Cincinnati 3, Chicago Cubs 2
Washington 4, Houston 3
L.A. Dodgers at Minnesota, ppd., rain
Milwaukee 5, St. Louis 4, 11 innings
Colorado 5, Arizona 4
San Francisco 6, San Diego 0
Today’s Games
Milwaukee (Garza 1-2) at St. Louis (S.Miller
2-2), 12:45 p.m.
N.Y. Mets (Colon 2-3) at Philadelphia
(K.Kendrick 0-2), 6:05 p.m.
Pittsburgh (Morton 0-3) at Baltimore
(Tillman 3-1), 6:05 p.m.
Atlanta (Harang 3-1) at Miami (Eovaldi 1-1),
6:10 p.m.
Chicago Cubs (E.Jackson 1-2) at Cincinnati
(Cingrani 2-2), 6:10 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers (Greinke 4-0) at Minnesota
(Gibson 3-1), 7:10 p.m.
Washington (Zimmermann 1-1) at Houston
(Oberholtzer 0-4), 7:10 p.m.
Colorado (Lyles 3-0) at Arizona (Collmenter
1-2), 8:40 p.m.
San Diego (Erlin 1-3) at San Francisco
(Hudson 3-1), 9:15 p.m.
Thursday’s Games
L.A. Dodgers (Haren 3-0) at Minnesota
(Pelfrey 0-2), 12:10 p.m., 1st game
Pittsburgh (Cumpton 0-1) at Baltimore
(B.Norris 1-2), 6:05 p.m.
Atlanta (E.Santana 3-0) at Miami (H.Alvarez
1-2), 6:10 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers (Beckett 0-0) at Minnesota
(K.Johnson 0-0), 6:10 p.m., 2nd game
Milwaukee (Estrada 2-1) at Cincinnati
(Bailey 1-2), 6:10 p.m.
N.Y. Mets (Wheeler 1-2) at Colorado
(Nicasio 2-1), 7:40 p.m.
From Special Reports
STARKVILLE — The annual
Mississippi State Road Dawgs Tour,
featuring athletic department and uni-
versity officials, will kick off Monday
with stops in Hattiesburg and Biloxi.
The event will feature MSU foot-
ball coach Dan Mullen, who begins
his sixth season after leading the Bull-
dogs to four consecutive bowl games
for the first time in school history.
Mullen will be joined by men’s bas-
ketball coach Rick Ray on the May 5-6
tour stops. Women’s basketball coach
Vic Schaefer will make the May 7-8
stops in Huntsville, Memphis, and
Philadelphia.
Details of each tour stop are below.
The tour will stop first at Southern
Oaks on 1246 Richburg Road in Hat-
tiesburg for lunch from 11:30 a.m. to
1 p.m. The cost is $15 per person and
includes a buffet lunch.
Those interested in attending can
RSVP to missstatesealum@gmail.
com or call 662-801-6380.
From there, the tour will move on
to the Hard Rock Cafe at 777 Beach
Blvd. in Biloxi, where there will be
a buffet dinner from 6-8 p.m. on the
pool deck. The cost is $10 per adult,
$5 per student, and free for children
ages 8 and younger.
The price includes a buffet dinner.
There also will be a cash bar.
Those interested in attending can
RSVP to CoastDawgs@gmail.com,
call Jeff Ellis (228-697-4347), or call
Cammie Bullock (228-216-0939).
The tour will hit Vicksburg and
Greenwood on Tuesday and move
on to Huntsville, Ala., and Memphis,
Tenn., on Wednesday. It will wrap up
its stops Thursday at the Neshoba
County Coliseum in Philadelphia.
For more information, visit
ht tp://www.alumni.msstate.edu/
roaddawgs.
Road Dawgs Tour begins Monday
From Special Reports
MAYHEW — East Mississippi
Community College’s second na-
tional football championship season
in three years was celebrated Satur-
day night in a ring presentation ban-
quet in the Lyceum auditorium on
EMCC’s Golden Triangle campus.
EMCC players, coaches, and
administrative and support staff
personnel from last year’s national
championship team were recog-
nized in the 90-minute ceremony in
which they were presented separate
rings honoring the 2013 NJCAA
National Championship team mem-
bers as well as the program’s third
MACJC State/NJCAA Region 23
Championship in five years. Players
in attendance, including many of
whom have started their senior col-
lege careers, also received gift bags
that included the players’ actual
game jerseys from the Mississippi
Bowl/NJCAA National Champion-
ship Game, championship T-shirts,
and the comprehensive DVD set of
“Inside the PR1DE: The Complete
Second Season.”
Along with the presentation of
championship rings, members of
the Lions’ football coaching staff
handed out individual awards and
certificates to EMCC players for
their All-American, NJCAA All-Re-
gion 23, and MACJC All-State rec-
ognition from this past season. With
EMCC football radio play-by-play
announcer and WFCA-FM sports
director Jason Crowder serving as
the master of ceremonies, banquet
attendees also were treated to a sea-
son highlight video presentation as
well as speeches from EMCC Pres-
ident Dr. Rick Young, Vice Presi-
dent/Director of Athletics Mickey
Stokes, and EMCC football coach
Buddy Stephens.
In addition to becoming just
the third school affiliated with the
Mississippi Association of Commu-
nity and Junior Colleges (MACJC)
to have claimed multiple NJCAA
National Championships in foot-
ball through the years, EMCC also
earned the school’s fifth MACJC
North Division regular-season
crown during Stephens’ six-year
head coaching stint in Scooba by
going unbeaten in division play for
the fourth time since 2008.
EMCC football team celebrates title season
Auto Racing
By The Associated Press
CHARLOTTE, N.C. — NASCAR
punished Marcos Ambrose and
Casey Mears on Tuesday for their
post-race altercation in the garage
at Richmond International Race-
way that led to Ambrose punching
Mears in the face.
Ambrose was fined $25,000 and
placed on probation through May
28. Mears was fined $15,000 and re-
ceived the same probation.
NASCAR said in a statement
both drivers were penalized for ac-
tions detrimental to stock car rac-
ing, and received a “Behavioral Pen-
alty” because they were “involved
in an altercation in the garage area
after the race.”
The two had been racing for a
top-20 finish Saturday night when
something occurred on the track
to anger Mears. He confronted
Ambrose in the garage area after
the race, and shoved the Australian
as Ambrose seemed to be walking
away.
Ambrose responded with a right
hook to Mears’ eye that drew blood.
He has not commented on the inci-
dent, but Richard Petty Motorsports
issued a statement saying Ambrose
would not appeal the penalty.
“Marcos Ambrose accepts the
penalties levied by NASCAR after
his actions at Richmond Interna-
tional Raceway,” the statement said.
NASCAR penalizes Ambrose, Mears for RIR fight
THE DISPATCH • www.cdispatch.com WEDNESDAY, APRIL 30, 2014 3B
College Football
BRIEFLY
Ole Miss
No. 11 baseball team will play host to Southern Miss
OXFORD — The No. 11 Ole Miss baseball team will play
host to Southern Mississippi at 6:30 tonight at Oxford-University
Stadium/Swayze Field.
Ole Miss (33-12) moved up five spots in this week’s latest
Baseball America poll following a three-game weekend sweep of
Kentucky.
Freshman left-hander Evan Anderson (1-0, 0.79 ERA) is
scheduled to start tonight for the Rebels.
Senior right-hander Cameron Giannini (3-2, 4.13) is scheduled
to start for Southern Miss (26-19), which is coming off a series loss
to then-No. 11 Rice in Hattiesburg.
Southern Miss beat Ole Miss 5-3 on March 25 in Pearl.
n In related news, several Rebels have earned national awards
or attracted national attention.
Junior outfielder Auston Bousfield was tabbed for weekly
honors Tuesday when he was named the national offensive Player
of the Week by the National Collegiate Baseball Writers of America.
Bousfield was also named the Southeastern Conference Player
of the Week when the conference office announced its weekly
honors, marking the second time this season an Ole Miss player
was honored for his offensive performance.
The junior center fielder hit a blistering .714 for the weekend
series at No. 17 Kentucky as the Rebels posted series sweep of the
Wildcats on the road. It marked the first series sweep of a national-
ly-ranked team on the road since a sweep of No. 16 Arkansas in the
2009 season to clinch a share of the SEC Championship.
nAlso, Right-hander Chris Ellis and left-hander Christian
Trent were recently named to the watch list for the College Baseball
Foundation’s Pitcher of the Year.
The duo are a group of nine players from the Southeastern
Conference to be named to the list and Ole Miss is one of only two
schools in the league to have more than one pitcher on the initial
47-man watch list.
The Pitcher of the Year Award, sponsored by Diamond, will
be presented during the National College Baseball Hall of Fame’s
annual Night of Champions on June 28 in Lubbock, Texas.
Ellis is 6-0 with a 1.81 ERA through 11 starts. In five of those
starts, Ellis hasn’t allowed an earned run.
Trent also is 6-0 with a 2.25 ERA as the Saturday starter for the
Rebels. He has nine quality starts.
nAlso, Freshman shortstop Errol Robinson recently was
named one of 32 members of the 2014 Brooks Wallace Award
watch list honoring the nation’s top shortstop when the College
Baseball Hall of Fame.
The annual award is presented by Mizuno will be presented
during the National College Baseball Hall of Fame’s Night of Cham-
pions on June 28 in Lubbock, Texas.
This season, Robinson is hitting .290, has scored 15 runs, and
added 11 RBIs.
Robinson is one of five players from the Southeastern
Conference named to the initial list and is one of only five freshmen
nationally named to the initial list.
n Men’s tennis team earns 21st-straight NCAA bid: At
Oxford, the men’s tennis team earned its 21st-consecutive NCAA
Championship bid and will continue its season in South Bend,
Ind., for the NCAA first and second rounds, as the field of 64 was
revealed Tuesday.
Ole Miss will face Northwestern in the first round at a time to be
announced May 9 or 10. Notre Dame is the No. 13 overall seed, and
will meet Green-Bay in the first round. The winners will meet in the
second round for the right to advance to the NCAA Sweet 16 May
16-21 in Athens, Ga.
This marks the 23rd overall appearance for Ole Miss, all
coming under coach Billy Chadwick, who announced his retirement
at the end of the season. The Rebels have made it every year since
1994.
n Women’s tennis team grabs sixth-consecutive NCAA
berth: At Oxford, the women’s tennis team earned its sixth-con-
secutive and 17th NCAA Championship bid and will travel to Los
Angeles for the first and second rounds. Ole Miss will face Texas
Tech in the first round at noon Friday, May 9.
UCLA will meet Sacramento State in the other first round
match. The winners will play at 5 p.m. Saturday, May 10, for the right
to advance to the NCAA Sweet Sixteen May 16-21 in Athens, Ga.
n Three Rebels make NFF Hampshire Honor Society: At
Irving, Texas, Football players Tyler Campbell, Chris Conley and
Andrew Ritter were recognized Tuesday as members of the 2014
NFF Hampshire Honor Society, announced by the National Football
Foundation & College Hall of Fame (NFF).
The NFF Hampshire Honor Society is comprised of college
football players from all divisions of play who each maintained
a cumulative 3.2 grade point average or better throughout their
college career. A total of 838 players from 267 schools qualified for
membership in the society’s eighth year, setting a new record for
the number of members in the history of the program, which began
in 2007.
Campbell, Conley and Ritter comprised the majority of the
Rebels’ kicking units in 2013. Campbell was the team’s starting
punter and Conley the holder, while Ritter handled kickoff and field
goal duties.
In the classroom, Campbell and Ritter both boast 4.0 GPAs in
their master’s degree studies while pursuing an MBA. Conley owns
a 3.5 GPA and is also pursuing a master’s in business administra-
tion. All three graduated with bachelor’s degrees and 3.2+ GPAs
during their time in Oxford.
n Track and field team’s England named SEC Freshman of
the Week: At Birmingham, Ala., Distance runner Mary Alex England
was named Southeastern Conference Women’s Freshman of the
Week Tuesday after her record-breaking performance at the Drake
Relays last week.
Running in her first competitive 10,000-meter race, England
broke the school record and captured the event title at the presti-
gious track & field meet.
England crossed the finish line first in 34:48.66 to defeat a
field of 26 runners. Her time broke the previous school record of
34:59.20 by more than 10 seconds. She earned the fifth Drake
Relays title in Ole Miss women’s program history and the first since
2009 (sprint medley relay). She ranks eighth in the SEC overall and
fourth among freshmen in the 10K.
n Women’s golf team’s Newton to play at NCAA East
Regional: At Tallahassee, Fla., Sophomore women’s golfer Abby
Newton was selected to participate as an individual in the 2014
NCAA Championships it was announced Monday. Newton is one
of 18 individuals who will compete at the NCAA Regionals. Newton
will head to Tallahassee, Fla. to play in the East regional. The East
regional will be at Southwood Golf Club in Tallahassee, Fla., and will
be hosted by Florida State.
Newton is one of 378 participants selected for regional com-
petition. Of these players, 126 will advance to the championships
finals, which will be May 20-23 in Tulsa, Okla. Eight teams and two
individuals will advance from each regional to the championships.
n Rifle team signs Sroka: At Oxford, the women’s rifle team
bolstered its future with the signing of Sarah Sroka, coach Valerie
Boothe announced. Sroka will join the Rebels beginning in the fall.
Sroka, a native of Somerset, Pa., won the Gold medal with her
team at Frazier Simplex for the NRA Smallbore Regionals. Last sum-
mer, Sroka also competed with Ole Miss team member Nicolle Thiry
in the 4H National Shooting Sports competition in Grand Island, Neb.,
where they captured second place team nationally in 3P smallbore.
National
Clemens in NY court for settlement talks
NEW YORK — Former baseball pitcher Roger Clemens and his
onetime strength coach came face-to-face on Tuesday in a bid to settle
their long-running legal dispute, but they emerged from a closed-door
meeting without a deal.
A judge had summoned Clemens and Brian McNamee to federal
court in Brooklyn for settlement talks aimed at heading off a trial in the
defamation case. McNamee’s lawyer emerged saying an agreement
wasn’t likely.
“I think this is a case where the lines are deeply drawn in the sand,”
said attorney Richard Emery. “I certainly expect there’s going to be a
trial in this case.”
It was the first time Clemens and McNamee had been in a private
setting opposite each other at a conference table since at least 2007,
Emery said. His client, he added, has struggled in recent years with
health and financial problems.
Clemens and his attorneys left the courthouse on Tuesday without
speaking to reporters.
Sony making a sports version of ‘Jeopardy!’
NEW YORK — “Jeopardy!” is starting a sports version of the popu-
lar game show, with Dan Patrick taking the Alex Trebek role as host.
Sony Pictures said Tuesday that “Sports Jeopardy!” will begin this
fall on Crackle, a Sony-owned digital service available on mobile devic-
es and services such as PlayStation, Xbox, Apple TV and Roku. Crack-
le general manager Eric Berger says the sports-themed game show will
diversify programming on the service, best known for the Jerry Seinfeld
comedy shorts series “Comedians in Cars Getting Coffee.”
Crackle also will offer an app through which people can play along
with the game on a second screen.
— From Special Reports
Memphis
Continued from Page 1B
three of them. The seventh-seeded
Grizzlies can close out the second-seed-
ed Thunder on Thursday night at home.
“Nothing comes easy for us,” Griz-
zlies forward Zach Randolph said. “We
get it out of the mud, we grind and we’re
underdogs. It’s what we do.”
Before the final overtime sequence,
Durant made the first of two free throws
with 27.5 seconds left to cut Oklahoma
City’s deficit to 100-99. Before his sec-
ond shot, referee Joey Crawford took
the ball from Durant and walked over to
the scorer’s table. Moments later, Craw-
ford was screaming at the scoreboard
operator, asking him to make a change.
After the delay, Durant, an 87 per-
cent free throw shooter during the reg-
ular season, missed the second attempt.
“I’m not sure what happened, but I’ve
got to focus and I’ve got to make that
foul shot,” Durant said.
The Grizzlies didn’t understand what
was going on, either.
“We just looked at Joey and we were
like, ‘What is Joey doing?’ ” Memphis
guard Mike Conley said.
Mike Miller scored 21 points, Ran-
dolph had 20 points and 10 rebounds
and Conley added 17 points for the Griz-
zlies.
Russell Westbrook had 30 points, 13
assists, and 10 rebounds for the Thun-
der, but he made just 10 of 31 shots from
the field.
Durant scored 26 points on 10-for-24
shooting. He has struggled throughout
the series, but Thunder coach Scott
Brooks said he’s not worried.
“He’s going to get his shots and he’s
going to make his share,” Brooks said.
“He’ll get himself ready for the next
game.”
The Thunder shot just 39 percent.
The Thunder, one of the league’s most
potent offensive teams in the regular
season, have shot below 40 percent in
four of the five games in the series.
“We understand this team very
well,” Memphis guard Tony Allen said.
“We’ve been playing against this team
the last four years with this group. We
understand their plays, we understand
who they’re trying to run their offense
through. We know Kevin Durant is go-
ing to take his shots and Russell West-
brook is going to take his shots. We
have to contest those shots and stick
to our defensive coverages for 48 min-
utes.”
Committee won’t dictate number of conference games
By The Associated Press
IRVING, Texas — The College Foot-
ball Playoff selection committee does
not want to dictate how many conference
games leagues play.
Playoff executive director Bill Han-
cock and the Football Bowl Subdivision
conference commissioners are meet-
ing this week at the Four Seasons Hotel
Resort of Dallas to work out remaining
details of the four-team playoff that will
replace the Bowl Championship Series
this season.
The first championship game in the
new postseason format will be played at
AT&T Stadium in Arlington.
The Southeastern Conference recent-
ly announced it will stay with an eight-
game league schedule instead of going to
nine games. The Pacific-12 Conference
and the Big 12 Conference play nine
games, while the Big Ten Conference is
moving to a nine-game conference slate.
The Atlantic Coast Conference plays
eight league games, plus five of its teams
will play Notre Dame each season.
“The (selection) committee will not
be in the business of dictating to confer-
ences their scheduling,” Hancock said.
Hancock said the “totality” of a team’s
schedule will be evaluated by the selec-
tion committee for its difficulty.
“Every game that everybody plays
will be taking into consideration,” Han-
cock said. “To the committee it won’t
matter whether you played an eight- or
nine-game conference schedule. But it
will matter who you played for your 12
or 13 games. And, of course, how you did
against them.”
Big 12 Commissioner Bob Bowlsby
said he has been talking to athletic direc-
tors and coaches in his conference about
how best to schedule if the school has
playoff aspirations — and knows similar
conversations are going on in the other
leagues.
“We don’t have to play a murderer’s
row (out of conference),” Bowlsby said.
“You don’t have to play three top-20
teams. But you also, if you want to be able
to have the tiebreaker between being
fifth and being fourth in the playoff selec-
tion, you want to have played a represen-
tative nonconference schedule.”
Hancock also said how a conference
determines its champion will not influ-
ence the committee. The Big 12, with 10
teams, is the only one of the five power
conferences that does not have a cham-
pionship game. NCAA rules state a con-
ference must have 12 teams to hold a
football championship game, but the Big
12 and the Atlantic Coast Conference are
in the process of petitioning the NCAA
to deregulate how conferences decide a
football champion.
Bowlsby said the conference still has
no plans to hold a championship game,
but would like to at least have the option
down the road. The ACC is interested in
eliminating the NCAA-mandated divi-
sional format for conferences that play a
championship game.
Basketball: NBA
BY JESSE WASHINGTON
The Associated Press
Donald Sterling is being
exiled for racist views shared
in private.
America cherishes its
freedom of thought and
speech. But Sterling’s com-
ments were so nakedly bigot-
ed that demands intensified
for the Los Angeles Clippers
owner to pay a heavy price
for his views, even though
they were taped during a
private conversation with his
girlfriend.
NBA Commissioner
Adam Silver heeded the de-
mands and delivered one of
the harshest penalties in the
history of U.S. sports: a life-
time ban from the league and
a $2.5 million fine. Despite
Sterling’s donations to black
causes and the rich contract
he gave the game’s top black
coach, Silver also promised
to convince owners to force
a sale of the Clippers over
the 80-year-old Sterling’s
“hateful” demands for his
31-year-old girlfriend not to
broadcast her association
with black people.
“He has a right to his be-
liefs, to his thoughts. He has
a right to free speech. He
doesn’t have a right to be an
owner of an NBA franchise,”
said Dr. Harry Edwards, a
scholar of race and sports
who has worked as a consul-
tant for several professional
teams.
“We can’t remove racism
from American society any
more than we can remove
murder,” Edwards said. “But
just because we can’t remove
it, that doesn’t mean we
shouldn’t fight it.”
Wayne Embry fought rac-
ism for decades, by refusing
to let it defeat him. Drafted
into the NBA in 1958, when
quotas limited the number
of black players, he was the
only African-American on
the Cincinnati Royals, and
later became the NBA’s
first black general manager.
He wrote the book “Inside
Game: Race, Power and Pol-
itics in the NBA.”
He thinks that Sterling’s
punishment is appropriate,
and sends a powerful state-
ment: “Such ignorance can-
not and will not be tolerated.”
“Not just in the NBA,”
said Embry, who now works
in the Toronto Raptors’ front
office, “but it’s an important
message to send throughout
society.”
“Sterling’s mentality sets
us back 150 years,” Embry
continued. “We are not going
back there. So yes, action
needed to be taken. It sends
a clear message that as a
league, and as a society for
a diverse people, we are not
going back there.”
Racist views exile Clippers owners Sterling from league
Golf
Continued from Page 1B
The title is the first for the team,
which is only in its third season.
“It was incredible,” Trenor said. “I
knew if we could come into it and have
all three of them play a great round of
golf we had a great shot of doing well
and possibly winning it. I knew there
were a lot of great teams in it, but I
knew they could do it if they came to
play and played as good as they played
(this season), especially in the Oxford
tournament and the Starkville tourna-
ment.”
Trenor said the team was supposed
to tee off at 8 a.m. Monday, but it
rained until about 11 a.m. Tournament
officials watched weather reports and
saw reports of tornadoes in the area,
so Trenor said the teams were told
to return to their hotels. Fortunate-
ly, Trenor said the Lady Trojans were
nearly able to complete an 18-hole
practice round on the course Sunday
and were able to work on the driving
range and to practice their putting and
chipping Monday. She said the work
both days helped put the players in the
right frame of mind that they could
compete with the best teams in that
classification.
On Tuesday, Trenor said the day
was filled with back-and-forth play in
all three groups. While she followed
Keopraseut, she said she received up-
dates from Caldwell’s father, Andy, so
she was able to monitor the players’
progress. Still, she said she wasn’t sure
how the teams would stack up until late
in the round when Andy Caldwell in-
formed her Mary Grace was up by five
strokes on the second to last hole. She
realized on the final hole with Cald-
well holding a three-stroke lead in her
group that the team had a shot to take
home the crown.
“For Mary Grace to be mentally
tough in that situation was really great,”
Trenor said. “She knew it was up to her
on that last hole and that she had to do
good for us to win it. ... For it to come
together at the end was amazing.”
Caldwell parred the final hole while
Keopraseut kept pace with the New
Albany and George County players to
ensure New Hope would take home the
winner’s trophy and medals. Trenor
said Keopraseut’s growth from 2013
to this season was a key to the title.
A year ago, Trenor said Keopraseut’s
confidence lapsed during the two-
round event. On Tuesday, though, she
said she never had to pump the fresh-
man up to get her re-focused.
“She had more confidence than I
have seen her have,” Trenor said. “It
is crazy that she was 22 strokes better
than she was last year. With her being
a ninth-grader, she could have easily
broken down, but she kept her compo-
sure the whole day and did great.”
After an early start to the day and
a back-and-forth round of golf, Trenor
said it was satisfying to see the Lady
Trojans mature from their fourth-place
finish last year at the Class II state
championship and climb all the way to
the top.
“I would remind them to be confi-
dent and to stay positive,” Trenor said.
“I could see it all week last week when
we worked on 100-yard-and-in shots
and chipping and putting. Our biggest
strength in the tournament came from
us working on that the past two weeks.
We worked on that a whole lot more
because we knew it was our weakness
and it gave us confidence in those
shots. They had a lot of those shots
that needed to work out well, and that
is what happened and allowed us to get
to the top, our short game.”
Follow Dispatch sports editor Adam
Minichino on Twitter @ctsportseditor.
Horse Racing
BY BETH HARRIS
The Associated Press
LOUISVILLE, Ky. —
Wicked Strong has a built-in
fan base for the Kentucky
Derby: The city of Boston.
The colt named in honor
of the victims of last year’s
Boston Marathon bombings
figures to be among the fa-
vorites for Saturday’s race. He
has the credentials, having
impressively won the Wood
Memorial at 9-1 odds.
Wicked Strong is owned by
a Boston-based partnership
that has pledged to donate 5
percent of any money won by
the bay colt during the Triple
Crown series to the fund set
up for the bombing victims.
“It’s a neat thing,” trainer
Jimmy Jerkens said. “Might
be an extra force that will help
us, if you believe in that kind
of stuff.” Does Jerkens?
“Sometimes you do,” he
replied. “Things seem to hap-
pen like that for some unex-
plained reason.”
Wicked Strong began rac-
ing with the name Moyne
Spun. Donald Little Jr., who
heads the Centennial Farms
partnership, didn’t like that
moniker and decided to re-
name the horse with the mar-
athon bombings in mind.
His first thought was Bos-
ton Strong, but the name was
taken. So the new name be-
came Wicked Strong — giv-
ing it a linguistic Boston twist.
It seems to fit the colt,
which got away from his han-
dlers a couple times early in
his career. That’s why Jerkens
keeps a pony waiting to escort
Wicked Strong back to the
barn after a trip to the track.
The colt ranked fourth on
the points leaderboard that
determines the maximum
20-horse field for the 1 ¼-mile
Derby. The victory in the
Wood — his first in a stakes
race — and the 100 points that
went to the winner put him in
the Derby picture.
Wicked Strong will run for Boston in Kentucky Derby
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BRIEFLY
Alabama
No. 12 baseball team will play
Samford
BIRMINGHAM, Ala. — Coming off
a Southeastern Conference series loss
at South Carolina, the No. 12 Alabama
baseball team (29-15) will take on Sam-
ford (26-18) at 6 tonight at Joe Lee Griffin
Field on the Samford campus.
The Tide is slated to start freshman
right-hander Geoffrey Bramblett (3-1,
3.77 ERA). Bramblett will make his third
start and 13th appearance of the season.
Samford will also start a freshman, as
right-hander Cody Pugh (3-3, 5.24 ERA)
will make his second start against the
Tide this season. Pugh has made 10 ap-
pearances with seven starts this season.
For the fifth straight week, Alabama
is ranked in all five national polls, but after
a 1-3 week, the Tide dropped slightly
in every national ranking. This week,
the Tide is ranked No. 12 by Baseball
America, No. 14 by Perfect Game USA,
No. 16 by Collegiate Baseball and No.
20 by the NBCWA and in the USA Today
Coaches Poll.
n Women’s tennis team No.
2 Seed in NCAA tournament; Will
play host to first, second rounds:
At Tuscaloosa, Ala., the women’s
tennis team raised yet another bar in this
historic season, earning the No. 2 seed
in the NCAA Championship, which was
announced Tuesday. Alabama will play
host to Arizona State, Jackson State, and
Princeton in the first and second rounds
May 9-10.
Alabama, hosting for the third-
straight year and third overall, will take on
Jackson State in its first-round matchup
at 4 p.m. Friday, May 9. Arizona State will
play Princeton at 1 p.m. Friday, May 9.
The winners will then meet in the second
round at 1 p.m. Saturday, May 10.
n Softball team jumps to fifth and
sixth in week 12 polls: At Tuscaloosa,
Ala., the softball team secured its fifth
SEC Championship last weekend with
two victories against Georgia, which
helped propel the Crimson Tide to No. 5
in the ESPN.com/USA Softball poll and
No. 6 in the USA Today/NFCA poll.
Alabama jumped two spots in the
ESPN.com/USA Softball poll, moving
to No. 5 this week from No. 7 last week.
Oregon and UCLA remain in the top two
spots, while Arizona State and Florida
State sit at third and fourth, respectively,
as Michigan and Florida dropped out
of the top five with a pair of losses last
weekend.
Alabama moved up one spot in the
USA Today/NFCA poll No. 6 this week.
Oregon is the unanimous No. 1 pick for
the third-straight week with UCLA in the
No. 2 spot. Florida dropped two spots
to No. 5 after losing the weekend series
over Missouri and Michigan dropped
down to No. 7 after upset losses to
Purdue and Illinois. Arizona State and
Florida State took advantage of the va-
cancy, sliding into the No. 3 and 4 spots,
respectively.
Nine SEC teams are ranked in the
top 25, the most of any conference:
Alabama (5/6), Florida (7/5), Tennessee
(9/8), Kentucky (11/10), Missouri (15/13),
Georgia (18/16), Auburn (20/20), LSU
(23/25), and Texas A&M (25/24). Missis-
sippi State is receiving votes in both polls.
n Men’s track and field team
ranked No. 8: At Tuscaloosa, Ala., the
men’s track & field team is ranked No. 8
in the latest edition of the U.S. Track &
Field and Cross Country Coaches Asso-
ciation (USTFCCCA) Division I National
Team Computer Rankings released
Tuesday. The Crimson Tide remains third
in the men’s rankings for the NCAA South
Region while the women maintained their
No. 5 rank in the regional rankings.
The national team rankings are
compiled by mathematical formula based
on national descending order lists and
data taken from previous seasons. The
purpose and methodology of the rankings
is to create an index that showcases
the teams that have the best potential of
achieving the top spots in the national
team race. Rankings points do not equate
with NCAA Championships team points.
n Women’s golf team seeded
third at NCAA Central Regional: At
Tuscaloosa, Ala., the women’s golf team
was awarded the No. 3 seed at the NCAA
Central Regional Championship at Okla-
homa State’s Karsten Creek Golf Club in
Stillwater, Okla., the NCAA announced
Monday evening.
The NCAA Central Regional will be
May 8-10 on the par-72 Karsten Creek
layout that measures 6,200 yards for the
women and has hosted the 2003 and
2011 NCAA Men’s Golf Championships.
It is the ninth straight invitation to post-
season competition for the Crimson Tide,
which captured the program’s first NCAA
Championship in 2012 at the Legends
Club in Franklin, Tenn.
The top-eight finishers at the NCAA
Central Regional will advance to the
NCAA Championships at Tulsa Country
Club on May 20-23 in Tulsa, Okla., and
join the teams that have advanced from
the NCAA East and West Regionals.
Alabama finished tied for fourth at the
Fall Preview in Tulsa in September, with a
16-over total of 856.
Since Potter’s arrival at the Capstone
prior to the 2005-06 season, the Crimson
Tide has qualified for the NCAA Region-
als each season and advanced to the
NCAA Championships eight consecutive
years. The 2014 selection is the 16th
NCAA appearance in school history.
For Potter, the regional berth marks
the 21st-consecutive appearance by
a team under his direction. The Hall of
Fame coach has now led a team to a
regional bid in each season since the for-
mat came into existence in 1993. Joining
Alabama in the NCAA Central Regional
is No. 1-seed UCLA, No. 2 Arkansas,
No. 4-seed Arizona, No. 5 LSU and No. 6
seed and host Oklahoma State.
Along with the Crimson Tide,
Razorbacks and LSU Tigers, the 24-team
NCAA Central Regional boasts two other
SEC foes, including Florida (No. 6 seed
and Mississippi State (No. 11 seed). The
remainder of the region includes No. 8
North Carolina, No. 9 Ohio State, No. 10
Miami (Fla.), No. 12 California, No. 13
Kent State, No. 14 Kansas, No. 15 Texas,
No. 16 UNLV, No. 17 Colorado, No. 18
SMU, No. 19 Minnesota, No. 20 Harvard,
No. 21 Lamar, No. 22 Wichita State, No.
23 LIU-Brooklyn and No. 24 Siena.
Last season Alabama won the NCAA
East Regional Championship before
posting a two-shot win over Southern
California at the NCAA Championships.
— From Special Reports
Marlins
Continued from Page 1B
which had its third-highest run output of the season in a
game that took 2 hours, 7 minutes. It was the fastest one
in the majors this season, according to STATS.
Miami second baseman Ed Lucas had three hits in
his season debut after recovering from a broken left
hand, and Marcell Ozuna hit a two-run single for the
Marlins.
Fernandez (4-1) was dominant against the NL East
leaders for the second time in a week, lowering his ERA
to 1.59. He struck out eight and walked two, and hasn’t
allowed an earned run in 23 innings over his last three
starts.
The right-hander’s numbers are eye-popping going
back to early in his rookie season. Fernandez is 14-4
with a 1.52 ERA in 24 starts since June 1, with 190 strike-
outs against 45 walks in 160 innings.
“Same as last time — he’s good every time,” Atlanta’s
Freddie Freeman said.
Braves starter Alex Wood (2-4) allowed seven runs
and 10 hits, leaving after facing four batters without
getting an out in the sixth. Wood and Fernandez had a
memorable duel last week, combining for 25 strikeouts
and no walks in what became a 1-0 Miami win that lasted
2 hours, 8 minutes.
This time, Fernandez — who got booed by some in
the crowd after not running out a sharp grounder to
shortstop leading off the third — needed only one run
again. Miami just happened to give him eight more for
good measure. The runs came in bunches during the
rematch, with Miami scoring three in the third and five
more in the sixth to blow it open.
“We have to figure out how to beat Fernandez,”
Braves manager Fredi Gonzalez said. “Not everybody
is Cy Young, and you still have to beat Cy Young every
once in a while.”
Stanton went the opposite way for a two-run homer to
right in the third inning, and Ozuna’s single in the sixth
was enough to chase Wood. Fernandez even added a
run-scoring single later in the sixth, and Saltalamacchia
connected off Braves reliever Anthony Varvaro in the
seventh.
The Braves had only three right-handed batters in
the starting lineup against Fernandez, looking for any
way to break through against him.
It was evident early that little was going to work. Fer-
nandez needed 17 pitches to get his first seven outs, and
ended two innings with a pair of knee-buckling 83 mph
off-speed offerings.
Fernandez was even solid in the field, keeping the
game scoreless with a nifty play to end the third. He
came hard off the mound to field Ramiro Pena’s chopper
that stopped halfway up the third base line, then faked
a throw to first — which baited the Braves’ Tyler Pastor-
nicky into taking off from third base.
Fernandez simply flipped the ball to Saltalamacchia,
who put the tag on a sliding Pastornicky and kept the
game scoreless. By the time Fernandez returned to the
mound, he had a 3-0 lead and was rolling.
Fernandez said he and Saltalamacchia had a quick
pregame meeting to go over strategy and came up with
the following plan: Whatever Miami’s catcher called,
Fernandez would throw.
Redmond said he considered letting Fernandez fin-
ish the game, but with a nine-run lead the manager
didn’t want to take any risks in the ninth.
MSU baseball
Continued from Page 1B
hits, he knows the answer is going to
sound like an excuse.
“Our kids know what’s at stake at
this point in the season,” Cohen said
Tuesday in a phone interview. “We’re
tracking their at-bats in practice and in
games and, for the most part, they’re
not getting rewarded for hitting balls
hard.”
Leadoff hitter Seth Heck is Cohen’s
primary example. Heck, a junior col-
lege transfer from Tacoma, Wash., is
hitting .278 with six doubles in 37 hits.
Those aren’t the eye-popping numbers
you would expect from someone hitting
at the top of a Southeastern Conference
lineup. However, that’s where the short-
stop will be at 6:30 tonight when MSU
(28-17) plays host to Jacksonville State
(23-19) at Dudy Noble Field. Cohen
feels Heck’s average should be 30-40
points higher based on the contact he is
making. Heck has reached base safely
in a season-high 12-straight games. He
has scored seven runs, seven RBIs, and
five walks in that span. Heck has mul-
tiple hits in seven of his last 11 games.
“I wish somebody, or anybody for that
matter, could sit in the film room with
us and watch Seth Heck repeatedly line
out to an outfielder on an absolute bul-
let right to the defender,” Cohen said.
“Maybe then would they know how I feel
about our offense. I’ve never felt worse
in a long time than I feel for that young
man. His numbers should be better, and
he’s doing everything we ask.”
Cohen is talking about Heck’s bat-
ting average on balls in play (BABIP), a
sabermetric statistic that tracks the fre-
quency at which a batter reaches base
after putting in play. A significant dif-
ference in the average means the hitter
is striking out too much, which isn’t the
case for Heck , who has 16 strikeouts,
or is unlucky for a long stretch of time.
“Based off what he’s produced at the
plate, he should be among the league
leaders in doubles and should be scor-
ing more runs because he’s opening in-
nings in scoring position,” Cohen said.
“He’s just not getting rewarded, and
that’s got to be frustrating for a player.”
Heck is one reason why MSU is
failing to drive in runners on base and
ranks 10th in slugging percentage and
runs scored, 13th in doubles and home
runs, and 12th in total bases.
“The extra-base hit is something we
struggle with, especially at our ballpark
where finding the power alleys are just dif-
ficult,” Cohen said. “You look around our
league and I don’t know how many schools
are pleased with their offensive numbers,
but I know our ballpark can have a depres-
Southeastern Conference
Eastern Division
Team SEC Pct. Overall Pct.
Florida 15-6 .714 30-15 .667
S. Carolina 12-9 .571 34-11 .756
Vanderbilt 11-10 .524 33-12 .733
Kentucky 9-12 .429 27-17 .614
Tennessee 8-13 .381 26-16 .619
Georgia 7-13-1 .350 21-22-1 .488
Missouri 6-15 .286 20-24 .455
Western Division
Team SEC Pct. Overall Pct.
Ole Miss 13-8 .619 33-12 .733
Alabama 13-8 .619 29-15 .669
LSU 12-8-1 .600 34-11-1 .756
Mississippi St. 11-10 .524 28-17 .622
Arkansas 10-11 .476 29-18 .617
Texas A&M 10-11 .476 28-18 .609
Auburn 9-12 .429 25-20 .556
Tuesday’s Games
Texas A&M 9, Texas State 2
LSU 9, Alcorn State 7
Missouri 6, Southeast Missouri State 5
Arkansas 4, Missouri State 1
Today’s Games
Alabama at Samford, 6:05 p.m.
Jacksonville State at Mississippi State, 6:30 p.m.
Southern Miss at Ole Miss, 6:30 p.m.
Thursday’s Game
Kentucky at Tennessee, 6:30 p.m. (ESPNU)
sive feel to a hitter over time.”
Frustration isn’t an emotion Cohen
sees from his team despite a stretch in
which it has lost three of its past four
SEC weekend series.
“I know I say this too often, but I’m
being honest when I say (Tuesday’s)
practice was the best practice I’ve ever
seen at Mississippi State,” Cohen said.
“You talk about focus throughout and
getting stuff accomplished this late in
the year, both happened and at high lev-
els of competitiveness.”
The Bulldogs have won eight-
straight midweek games and are 19-1 in
regular-season midweek games since
the beginning of last season. MSU is
11-0 against Jacksonville State dating
back to 1996.
After Tuesday’s practice, most of
Cohen’s players turned their attention
to serving their community. MSU fifth-
year senior Ben Bracewell led a large
contingent of players that set up porta-
ble tents around the Palmeiro Center
for emergency personnel assisting tor-
nado victims in the area.
“They all got together and decided
to make a difference,” Cohen said. “We
get credit as coaches when our kids do
things like this, but the credit goes to
their parents for bringing them to us
like this. I’m really proud. I’ve said this
before, but it’s not magic of ours our
players are great people. They have
wonderful parents.”
Follow Matt Stevens on Twitter
@matthewcstevens.
Food THE DISPATCH n CDISPATCH.COM n WEDNESDAY, APRIL 30, 2014
LIFESTYLES EDITOR
Jan Swoope: 328-2471
BY SARA MOULTON
The Associated Press
A
s the weather gets
warmer, I cook
lighter. And in The
Husband’s taxonomy of
food, crabcakes are rela-
tively light. So I thought
I’d employ of couple of
seasonal stars — peas
and radishes — to put a
spring spin on them.
I blithely went shop-
ping for fresh crabmeat
at my local market, but
found to my horror that
it’s almost unafford-
ably pricey — and that
pasteurized refrigerated
crabmeat isn’t much
cheaper. In search of an
ingredient with which
to stretch the crab (I
thought of it as Crab
Helper), I settled on
boiled shrimp, which are
readily available, but not
astronomically expensive.
Happily, the crab and the
shrimp played very nicely
together.
As this also is the
season for fresh peas, I
added some of them to
the crab/shrimp mix.
Their natural sweetness
chimes in well with the
shellfish, and they add a
little crunchy pop to the
texture of the cakes.
Flavor and texture
aside, I used to discount
the nutritional value of
peas, until I finally scruti-
nized the data and discov-
ered that the little fellers
are packed with protein,
fiber and micronutrients.
If you find fresh peas at
the farmer’s market, by
all means scoop them up.
But keep in mind that the
sugar in fresh peas starts
turning to starch the
minute they’re harvested,
so be sure to bring them
A springtime take on the classic crabcake
AP Photo/Matthew Mead
This Mar.
31 photo
shows
spring crab
and shrimp
cakes with
double
radish
sauce in
Concord,
N.H.
See CRABCAKE, 6B
St. Paul’s May luncheon – generation to generation
Luisa Porter/Dispatch Staff
Three generations of the same family — from left, Bethea Smith, her 16-year-old daughter Kirby Smith, and her mother, Beth Jones — decorate cakes and cookies Mon-
day in preparation for the annual St. Paul’s Episcopal Church Women’s May Luncheon set for Thursday, May 8.
Rite
of spring
BY JAN SWOOPE
jswoope@cdispatch.com
I
f you ask longtime Columbians to list
some local rites of spring, chances are
you’ll hear mention of the St. Paul’s
Episcopal Church May Luncheon. The
event, after all, has its roots in the 1800s.
Except for a brief period during World
War II when supplies were scarce, church
members have faithfully served a chicken
salad (and now barbecue, too) feast for
the community each and every May.
The Episcopal Church Women fund-
raiser takes place this year on Thursday,
May 8, at St. Paul’s Parish Hall, located
at 318 College St. in downtown Colum-
bus. The dine-in luncheon is 11:30 a.m.
until 1:30 p.m. Takeout orders may be
picked up from 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
An accompanying bake sale is 10:30 a.m.
to 1:30 p.m.
For many congregation members,
the longstanding tradition — previously
known as the Eight O’ May luncheon —
is a family ritual.
Beth Jones married in February 1961
and, as a young bride in the congrega-
tion, was quickly recruited by St. Paul’s
luncheon organizers into the ranks of
volunteers who cook hens, chop cel-
ery, boil eggs, cook salad dressing, set
tables, plate meals — and any number of
other tasks involved in making the day a
success.
In the 53 years since, she has served
in practically every capacity. This year
she will create floral arrangements,
among other things.
It’s all part of a legacy, one might say,
handed down from generation to genera-
tion. For Jones, that means the pleasure
of watching her own daughter, Bethea
Smith, and now her granddaughter, Kir-
by Smith, taking part as well.
Coming of age
“I guess my earliest memories of
the luncheon are of being at the church
watching my mother working,” said Bet-
hea Smith. When she was old enough,
Bethea was assigned to the takeout team,
and the rest is history. Like her mother,
she has since helped in many capacities.
As president today of Quality Products
school supply company, Smith has a
demanding job — but will still prepare 15
See ST. PAUL’S, 6B
THE DISPATCH • www.cdispatch.com 6B WEDNESDAY, APRIL 30, 2014
For complete details contact Main Street Columbus at
662-328-6305 or visit www.marketstreetfestival.com
hands on market
Saturday, May 3rd, 9 am until 5 pm
5th Street North
Yarn Buddies/Dolls Kids will make their own yard dolls
Origami
Inspiration Wall A project involving writing on large sticky
notes and putting them on the Columbus Arts Council window.
“If I could not fail I would...” (You complete.)
No Coolers or Pets Please
Watch for the festival guide in the
Friday, May 2nd edition of The Dispatch
19th Annual
May 2 & 3, 2014
Another great production of
Crabcake
Continued from Page 5B
home, shell them and boil
them right away.
And if your only option
is frozen peas, don’t
despair. Those guys
are picked at the height
of their ripeness and
blanched immediately in
water, which sets their
flavor and texture.
We bind up the cakes
with eggs, mayonnaise
and panko breadcrumbs,
then season them with
tarragon, which always
teams up nicely with both
shellfish and peas. If
you’re not a fan of tarra-
gon, which is unpleasant-
ly reminiscent of licorice
to some folks, substitute
some dill, chives or
parsley. The panko does
double duty, thickening
the interior of the cakes
and adding crunch to
their crust. And as long
as you brown the cakes
in a nonstick or stick-re-
sistant skillet, you won’t
have to use much oil.
The cakes are topped
off with a peppery cream
flavored by both horse-
radish and red radishes.
Kissing cousins from the
same family — Brassica-
ceae — the radishes add
a little kick to the other-
wise bland shellfish. The
sour cream is a moist and
tangy complement to the
panko crust. The Hus-
band was very happy with
my springtime rendition
of one of his faves!
SPRING CRAB AND
SHRIMP CAKES WITH
DOUBLE RADISH SAUCE
Start to finish: 30 minutes
Makes 4 servings
1/2 pound peeled and dev-
eined cooked shrimp
1 large egg, plus 1 egg yolk
1 cup cooked English peas or
thawed frozen peas
1/2 cup finely chopped scal-
lions
1 2/3 cups panko bread-
crumbs, divided
1/4 cup light mayonnaise
1 to 2 tablespoons chopped
fresh tarragon, or to taste
Kosher salt and ground black
pepper
1/2 pound lump crabmeat,
picked over for any shells
2 tablespoons vegetable oil,
divided
1/4 cup plus 2 tablespoons
light sour cream
1 cup coarsely shredded red
radishes
1 tablespoon bottled horserad-
ish (do not drain)
n Heat the oven to 300 F.
n In a food processor, pulse
the shrimp until very finely
chopped, but not reduced to
a paste. Transfer the chopped
shrimp to a medium bowl and
add the egg and egg yolk,
peas, scallions, 2/3 cup of
the panko, the mayonnaise,
tarragon, 1/2 teaspoon of salt
and 1/4 teaspoon of pepper.
Stir well, then gently fold in the
crabmeat. Divide the mixture
into 8 portions, shaping each
into a patty. Coat the patties
with the remaining panko.
n In a large, nonstick skillet
over medium-high, heat 1
tablespoon of the oil. Reduce
the heat to medium, then add
4 of the patties and cook until
golden, about 4 minutes per
side. Transfer the patties to
a rimmed baking sheet and
place them in the oven to
keep warm. Repeat with the
remaining patties, using the
remaining 1 tablespoon of oil
in the skillet.
n Meanwhile, in a small bowl
whisk together the sour cream,
radishes and horseradish.
Season with salt and pepper.
n To serve, arrange 2 patties
per plate and top with the
radish sauce.
Nutrition information per
serving: 450 calories; 170
calories from fat (38 percent
of total calories); 19 g fat (4 g
saturated; 0 g trans fats); 250
mg cholesterol; 38 g carbohy-
drate; 2 g fiber; 5 g sugar; 32
g protein; 900 mg sodium.
Luisa Porter/Dispatch Staff
Beth Jones takes a batch of cookies from the oven to contribute to the May Lun-
cheon bake sale.
St. Paul’s
Continued from Page 5B
cups of cooked and chopped chicken for
the made-from-scratch chicken salad.
Everyone at St. Paul’s pitches in for this
annual red letter day.
“Even though you work, you’re going
to get something to do,” said Jones.
“They try to include everybody — wom-
en, men and teenagers.”
One of those teens is 16-year-old
Kirby, who helps make cakes and other
treats for the bake sale. It’s a popular
feature of the luncheon, a source of
sweets and savories that tend to disap-
pear quickly. Kirby, a junior at Heritage
Academy, also bakes cookies for the
Loaves and Fishes Soup Kitchen.
“She knows she’s following in the
footsteps,” said Smith. “It’s fun that the
three of us get to share the experience
— exciting that my mother, my daugh-
ter and I are helping with it.”
The luncheon is much more than a
delicious occasion and fellowship. It
allows the Episcopal Church Women
to help Loaves and Fishes, Habitat for
Humanity and HEARTS After School
Tutoring in the community. In the
diocese, it helps support State ECW,
Honduras Medical Mission, Congrega-
tions for Children and Prison Ministry,
as well as the world Episcopal Relief
and Development mission.
Remember when
Karen Frye is St. Paul’s current
ECW president and has her own lun-
cheon memories.
“I learned early on that apparently I
never learned the proper way to clean
and chop celery,” Frye began. “After a
luncheon one year, we were all sitting
down to eat and someone asked how
long does it take to cut seven bunches
of celery. Beth Jones and I answered at
the same time. My answer was two to
three hours; Beth’s was seven hours.
Needless to say, I was not doing some-
thing right!”
Last year, the kitchen crew inexpli-
cably ran low on deviled eggs. Frye
remembers the ensuing panic. The pre-
liminary egg math had been done, and
no one could fathom how the supply of
prepared eggs dwindled so fast.
“Within five minutes of the lun-
cheon starting, the worry sets in that
we will not have enough food anyway,”
said Frye. As the event was winding
down, “someone went looking in the
refrigerator for something and, lo and
behold, there were six pizza boxes full
of deviled eggs. If Jesus can feed 5,000
with five loaves of bread and two fish,
he can make deviled eggs appear, too,”
Frye said.
With so many church families, so
many volunteers, taking part in the
traditional luncheon for well more than
a century, there are enough stories
to fill more than a few books. They
will continue to accumulate, because
thanks to those who make it a rite of
spring to attend the gracious dine-in
luncheon — or support it by calling in
takeout orders — the event sees no end
in sight.
Luncheon details
Chicken salad plates include chick-
en salad, deviled eggs, potato chips,
crackers, sweet pickles and dessert.
Barbecue plates include smoked pork
barbecue (thanks to Tom Wolford and
his crew of skilled cooks), potato salad,
deviled eggs, potato chips, roll, dill
pickles and dessert.
The dine-in luncheon is $10, at the
door.
To place takeout orders, at a cost of
$8 each, email orders by 9:30 a.m. May
8 to secretarybb@stpaulscolumbus.
com. Include name, time of pickup,
number and type (chicken salad or
barbecue) plates desired, and a contact
phone number.
To place takeout orders by phone,
call 662-240-0187 or 662-328-6673 May
6 or 7, 9 a.m.-5 p.m., or May 8 from 8-10
a.m. Takeout orders may be picked up
from 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
99.336%
of our customers
receive their paper on time.
(Believe us. We track these things.)
If you are unhappy with your delivery
please let us know. Our goal is 100%
customer satisfaction.
Call customer support at:
662-328-2424
THE DISPATCH
THE DISPATCH • www.cdispatch.com WEDNESDAY, APRIL 30, 2014 7B
Comics & Puzzles
Dear Abby
DILBERT
ZITS
GARFIELD
CANDORVILLE
BABY BLUES
BEETLE BAILEY
MALLARD FILMORE
FOR SOLUTION SEE THE
CROSSWORD PUZZLE
IN CLASSIFIEDS
FAMILY CIRCUS
D
EAR ABBY:
My boy-
friend and I
have been dating
for two years. We
live together, and
his child from an-
other woman lives
with us. I love
my boyfriend and
his child, but one
thing prevents me
from imagining
us being married:
He has his child’s
mother’s name
tattooed on his
body.
The tattoo
bothers me for many reasons,
and I’d like him to have it cov-
ered up if we ever do marry. He
says he doesn’t want to get rid
of it. When the topic comes up,
we argue.
Am I unreasonable for
wanting him to get rid of the
tattoo? If that woman really is
in his past, why does he need a
constant reminder of her on his
body? — IN A STINK OVER INK
DEAR IN A STINK: You’re
asking the wrong person. Only
your boyfriend can answer that.
He may not want to go to the
expense, or to ex-
perience the pain
of having more
artwork done. Or
he may not like
the idea that you
are telling him
what to do.
However, if he
has been living
with you for two
years, I doubt it’s
because he’s still
carrying a torch
for someone
else. If you love
him and the two
of you want to
get married, my
advice is to accept him warts,
artwork and all, because re-
gardless of any romance in his
past, YOU have habeas corpus.
(That’s Latin for “you have the
body.”)
DEAR ABBY: I consider
myself a social person and
enjoy talking to friends on the
phone. My problem is, when
I talk to one of them, she will
never let me get off the phone.
Sometimes we’ll talk for sever-
al hours, but eventually I have
other obligations and have to
go. When I tell her that, she
often ignores me and keeps
right on talking.
I don’t want to be rude, but
sometimes I have to say good-
bye four and five times before
she finally acknowledges that
I must end the call. It irritates
me. I like talking to her, but I
can’t go on and on forever. How
can I make her let me off the
phone without hanging up on
her or upsetting her? — MR.
NICE GUY
DEAR MR. NICE GUY: The
person you’re describing obvi-
ously has less going on in her
life than you do. She may also
be a compulsive talker.
The next time you talk to
her, make the conversation
face-to-face and tell her that
as much as you like her, you
don’t have the amount of time
to spend on the phone that
she does. Explain that when
you tell her you must end the
conversation, if she doesn’t
stop talking within five minutes,
you will have to hang up. And
then do it.
Will she like it? No. But the
alternative is that she will con-
tinue to take advantage of you
— which she has been doing
because you have allowed it.
Horoscopes
TODAY’S BIRTHDAY (April
30). You feel free to experi-
ment this year and will have fun
trying on different behaviors
and styles of communicating.
You’ll acquire a cherished
possession in May, which will
play into a new social direction.
June brings family additions.
Business dominates in July
and August, and you’ll come up
with a winning strategy. Libra
and Leo people adore you. Your
lucky numbers are: 30, 1, 14,
26 and 15.
ARIES (March 21-April 19).
Consider that the same walls
you erect to keep yourself safe
will keep you isolated. Don’t
let your defenses separate you
from those to whom you most
need to be close.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20).
The attitude for tearing down
is very different from the frame
of mind needed to repair and
restore. It may be challenging
to shift gears, but that’s what
needs to happen to handle the
challenges of the day.
GEMINI (May 21-June
21). You have wanted certain
things from a relationship that
didn’t and won’t happen. These
expectations or demands were
simply ill placed. You can still
get what you need elsewhere.
CANCER (June 22-July
22). New faces will breathe
excitement into your scene.
You’re not worried that a new
star will come in and steal the
show, though others won’t be
as welcoming as you.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22).
When warnings are issued, you
do not stand back and ponder
whether the threat is idle. You
go on the alert, acting to se-
cure your position. Your quick
response will bring good luck.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22).
Paths converge. From your
point of view, it’s your road.
From the other person’s point
of view, it’s his. Letting each
other pass peaceably will be
better than putting up a fight.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23).
Reliability isn’t a flashy virtue,
and yet there will be an attrac-
tive aura of goodness around
the reliable person in your life
today. (You strive to fill this
role, and it’s entirely possible
that you are the most reliable
person you know.)
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov.
21). Everyone you deal with
is unique, and yet some will
stand out as more unique than
others. The right combination
of words will help you build rap-
port with this odd character.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-
Dec. 21). Mistakes can build
bonds. Consider that a smooth
operator may make mistakes
on purpose in order to give the
other person a more authori-
tative (and involved) stance in
the interaction.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19). Conflict is necessary.
Tension can be the best thing
that happens to a relationship,
producing a far better result
than the lackluster product of
constant agreement.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
18). Games can be fun, but
there’s a point at which playing
roles and executing moves
gets exhausting. Anyway, today
there’s no time to waste in
wondering who a person wants
you to be.
PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20). That posturing person will
stop bothering you once you
appease his or her overblown
need for attention. You’d like
to withhold your attention, but
that’s silly. Giving will take up
so little of your time.
BY ALISON LADMAN
For The Associated Press
M
any cream-based
chowders suffer
from the same
problem — it’s hard to taste
anything but the cream.
Admittedly, all that fat
is mighty delicious. But if
you’re going to go to the
trouble of making a chow-
der, wouldn’t it be nice to
taste some of the other
ingredients? So we set about
making a simple clam
chowder that draws on fresh
herbs to marry the various
flavors.
Fresh tarragon and the
lightly herbaceous flavor
of fresh fennel were the
right choice. Both play so
well with the flavors of the
cream, potatoes and clams.
The result is that this dish
has no one flavor star, and
that’s as it should be. The
ingredients are perfectly
harmonious together.
TARRAGON-FENNEL CLAM
CHOWDER
Start to finish: 45 minutes
Makes 8 servings
6 strips thick-cut bacon, diced
1 large yellow onion, diced
2 cloves garlic, minced
1 large or 2 small fennel bulbs,
bulb only, diced
2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
2 medium yellow potatoes,
peeled and diced
8-ounce bottle clam juice
12 ounces canned or frozen
clams, chopped
2 cups half-and-half
1 cup heavy cream
n Kosher salt and ground black
pepper
n 3 tablespoons chopped fresh
tarragon
n In a large heavy-bottomed
saucepan over medium-high heat,
cook the bacon until crisp and
it has rendered all its fat. Use
a slotted spoon to transfer the
bacon to a plate and set aside.
n Return the saucepan of bacon
fat to medium-high heat and add
the onion, garlic and fennel. Cook
for 6 to 8 minutes, or until the on-
ion is very tender. Stir in the flour,
coating the vegetables all over.
Add the potatoes, clam juice,
clams, half-and-half and cream,
then bring to a bare simmer.
n Cover and cook for 15 minutes,
or until the potatoes are tender.
Season with salt and pepper,
then stir in the tarragon. Serve
topped with the crispy bacon.
Nutrition information per serving:
350 calories; 240 calories from
fat (69 percent of total calories);
26 g fat (14 g saturated; 0.5 g
trans fats); 90 mg cholesterol;
19 g carbohydrate; 3 g fiber; 1
g sugar; 12 g protein; 410 mg
sodium.
Fennel and tarragon blend in a rich clam chowder
AP Photo/Matthew Mead
This March 24 photo shows tarragon fennel clam chowder in Concord, N.H.
Dear Abby
CALL
328-2424
to place an ad in the
How else are you
going to sell that
stuff in your
garage?
THE DISPATCH • www.cdispatch.com 8B WEDNESDAY, APRIL 30, 2014
ADOPT: A loving, estab-
lished couple with close
family dream of a home
filled with the sounds of
a child. Please contact
at 855-884-6080;
jennandjonadopt@gmail.
com; or www.jennandjon
adopt.info. Expenses
paid
Special
Notices 240
REWARD: LOST male
black dog with brown
around feet, Babe, from
Gaylane Dr. Looks like a
lab. Did have on green
collar. He may not go to
strangers. Fence
knocked down from
storm. Call 435-1132 or
497-2900
LET US HELP find your
lost pet. Email, fax, mail
or bring your information
by the office and we will
run your lost & found ad
in the Pet Finder for 6
days FREE!
Lost & Found 230
General Help
Wanted 320
~Fully Insured ~Big
trees ~Small trees
~Trees over house
~Storm cleanup ~
~Brush clearing~ FREE
QUOTES. Call today.
662-801-7511
J.R. BOURLAND
Tree & Stump
Removal. Trimming
w/bucket truck
Licensed & Bonded
Firewood 4 sale LWB
$100. 662-574-1621
J&A TREE REMOVAL
Work from a bucket
truck. Insured/bonded.
Call Jimmy for a
free estimate
662-386-6286
A&T TREE SERVICE.
Senior citizen & previ-
ous customer discounts
available for the month
of April. You tell us your
budget & we will work
with you. No job too big
or too small. Call Alvin
242-0324/241-4447
“We'll go out on a limb
for you!”
Tree Service 186
EXPERIENCED
CAREGIVER
seeks client. Reliable
with references.
8 years experience.
Call 662-630-5001
Sitting With
Elderly/Sick 178
PAINTING INC. Int/ext
painting, sheet rock re-
pair & pressure wash-
ing. Special prices on
wall paper removal. Free
est. Call Derek 662-
364-0048. Honest-Reli-
able-Insured
SULLIVAN'S PAINT
SERVICE
Certified in lead removal
Offering special prices
on interior & exterior
painting, pressure
washing & sheet rock
repairs. Free Estimates
Call 435-6528
Painting &
Papering 162
General Help
Wanted 320
SAM'S LAWN Service.
No lawn too large or too
small. Call 243-1694
LAWN CARE
Mow, trim, edge & blow
off hard surfaces. Free
est. 662-574-1225
JAYNES LAWN
MAINTENANCE
Free estimates
Call 662-364-6651
J&R LAWN SERVICE
Mowing & weed eating
reasonable rates & ex-
cellent service. Spring
cleanup. Call 662-574-
0786 for free estimate
BRYAN LAWN CARE
Complete Lawncare ser-
vice. Free estimates. Ex-
cellent work. 662-231-
5899
AVERAGE SIZE yard
mowed/trimmed $40.
Sewer drains cleaned
out $80/hr. Plumbing
fixtures installed $50
ea. AAA Sewer Service
574-7189
JESSE & BEVERLY'S
LAWN SERVICE. Fall
clean up, firewood, land-
scaping, tree cutting, &
clean-up. 356-6525
AAA TWINS Lawn Care.
Yard work, lawn mowing,
weed eating, mulching,
flower beds, limb re-
moval, you name it.
Call Will or Bryant 242-
2220 or 242-1968.
Free estimates
Lawn Care
Landscaping 147
A cut above the rest.
Cutting, edging, blowing,
weedeating, fertilizer ap-
plications. Will match or
beat all other prices.
251-0009
Lawn Care
Landscaping 147
TIRED OF cleaning your
house? Let me do it for
you. Reasonable rates.
References avail. Call
295-8758
Housecleaning 138
Piano Tuning & Repair
Featuring the Rayburn
Cyber -Tune Program.
Call for information
Bill Davis
662-323-1075
Reasonable Rates
SOUTHERN PRIDE
Painting & Home Re-
pairs, specializing in
residential painting,
faux painting, murals by
Betty Andel, your home
town artist, & for
plumbing, electrical &
all your handyman ser-
vices call Tim The
Handyman. Kudzu.com.
Handyman of year 2
years running, satisfac-
tion guaranteed & free
est. Tim, 404-328-8994
or Betty. 662-312-6775
SCRAPPER'S
Scrap Metal Removal.
Caledonia/Columbus
area. Tired of seeing
that old junk in your
yard? Call us. We will
come remove scrap
metal from your yard.
Examples:
Appliances, tin, water
heaters, lawnmowers
662-549-4541.
Brian & Justin
MR. PIANO. Best piano
& organ service. Sales,
rentals, moving, tuning
& service. Call 465-
8895 or 418-4097
RETAINER WALL, drive-
way, foundation, con-
crete/riff raft drainage
work, remodeling, base-
ment foundation, re-
pairs, small dump truck
hauling (5-6 yd) load &
demolition/lot cleaning.
Burr Masonry 242-0259
HILL'S PRESSURE
WASHING. Commercial/
residential. House, con-
crete, sidewalks & mo-
bile washing. Free est.
Call 662-386-8925
DO ALL SERVICE
Home roof, paint,
repair, p. wash, lawn
care, dirt, bushhog.
Any size job.
References.
Call for free est.
662-570-3877
C & P PRINTING
The one stop place for
all of your printing
needs. No job too large
or too small. Call today.
662-327-9742
General
Services 136
TOM HATCHER, LLC
Custom Construction,
Restoration, Remodel-
ing, Repair, Insurance
claims. 662-364-1769.
Licensed & Bonded
TODD PARKS
CONSTRUCTION
New Construction, Re-
modeling, Repairs, Con-
crete. Free est. Call or
email 662-889-8662 or
toddparks.construction
@gmail.com
Building &
Remodeling 112
PLEASE TAKE FURTHER NOTICE
that any objecting parties are re-
quired to attend the hearing and
that failure to appear may result
in relief being granted upon de-
fault.
FOR MORE INFORMATION OR TO
ACCESS THE SETTLEMENT
AGREEMENT AND RELATED
DOCUMENTS, please call (from
the U.S. and Canada) (877)
709-4747, or call (for remaining
international callers) (424) 236-
7228 or visit http://www.kccl
lc.net/TronoxKerrMcGeeSettle
ment.
[1]Provided, however, that as it
relates to Kerr-McGee Stored
Power Company LLC, subpart
(vii) is applicable only to the ex-
tent that such liability, if any, re-
lates to or arises from the
stored power or battery busi-
ness." It corresponds to "Power
Company LLC" in the final bold-
ed paragraph of the notice (first
line of the last page of the no-
tice PDF).
Publish: 4/20 – 5/5/2014
Legal Notices 001
Settlement Proceeds to be allo-
cated and distributed to the Liti-
gation Trust Beneficiaries con-
sistent with the LTA. The Litiga-
tion Trust succeeded to, as of
and after the Plan Effective
Date, any and all claims against
the Anadarko Released Parties
related to the claims, issues
and subject matter of the Adver-
sary Proceeding which were
held, owned and/or controlled
by one or more Debtors before
the Plan Effective Date. Since
the Plan Effective Date, the Liti-
gation Trust has not sold, as-
signed, transferred, encum-
bered, hypothecated, aban-
doned, conveyed or otherwise
disposed of any claims received
by the Litigation Trust from
Debtors pursuant to the Plan.
Proposed Permanent Injunction:
The movants have requested
that the following permanent in-
junction be issued by the District
Court: Pursuant to 28 U.S.C. §§
1367 & 1651, § 105(a) of the
Bankruptcy Code and Bankrupt-
cy Rules 7001 and 7065, (i) any
Debtor(s), (ii) any creditor of any
Debtor who filed or could have
filed a claim in the Chapter 11
Cases, (iii) any other Person
whose claim (A) in any way aris-
es from or is related to the Ad-
versary Proceeding, (B) is a
Trust Derivative Claim, or (C) is
duplicative of a Trust Derivative
Claim, and (iv) any Person acting
or purporting to act as an attor-
ney for any of the preceding is
hereby permanently enjoined
from asserting against any
Anadarko Released Party (I) any
Trust Derivative Claims or (II)
any claims that are duplicative
of Trust Derivative Claims,
whether or not held or controlled
by the Litigation Trust, or
whether or not the Litigation
Trust could have asserted such
claims against any Anadarko Re-
leased Party. The injunction
herein shall not apply to or bar
the following: (i) any criminal lia-
bility; (ii) any liability arising un-
der Title 26 of the United States
Code (Internal Revenue Code) or
state tax laws; (iii) any liability
arising under federal or state se-
curities laws; (iv) any action to
enforce a covenant not to sue,
release, or agreement not to
seek reimbursement contained
in the Settlement Agreement; (v)
any liability that an Anadarko Re-
leased Party might have that
does not arise from or through a
liability of a Debtor; (vi) any lia-
bility of an Anadarko Released
Party due to its status or acts or
omissions since November 28,
2005 as a/an (A) owner, (B) op-
erator, (C) discharger, (D)
lessee, (E) permittee, (F) li-
censee, (G) person in charge,
(H) holder of a right of use and
easement, (I) arranger for dis-
posal or treatment, (J) trans-
porter, or (K) person who gener-
ates, handles, transports,
treats, stores or disposes of sol-
id or hazardous waste; (vii) any
liability relating to the E&P Busi-
ness or the stored power or bat-
tery business (including, but not
limited to, as owned or operated
by U.S. Avestor LLC and Kerr-
McGee Stored Power Company
LLC ); and (viii) any liability that
any Anadarko Released Party re-
tained, received or assumed pur-
suant to the Assignment Agree-
ment or Assignment, Assump-
tion, and Indemnity Agreement.
For the avoidance of doubt, to
the extent that a liability of an
Anadarko Released Party exclud-
ed from the injunction herein by
the preceding sentence would
be a liability for which such
Anadarko Released Party would
be jointly and severally liable
with others, including but not
limited to one or more Debtors
or Reorganized Debtors, under
applicable law, nothing in this in-
junction is intended to alter any
such applicable principles of
joint and several liability where
otherwise provided by law. The
injunction herein does not apply
to the Litigation Trust and the
United States, which are provid-
ing releases and covenants not
to sue in the Settlement Agree-
ment.
PLEASE TAKE FURTHER NOTICE
that objections to the Motion, if
any, shall be in writing, shall
conform to the Federal Rules of
Bankruptcy Procedure and the
Local Rules of the Bankruptcy
Court for the Southern District of
New York, shall set forth the
name of the objecting party, the
basis for the objection and the
specific grounds thereof, shall
be filed with the Bankruptcy
Court electronically in accor-
dance with General Order M-242
(which can be found at www.nys-
b.uscourts.gov) by registered
users of the Bankruptcy Court's
case filing system and by all oth-
er parties in interest, and shall
be served upon: Jeffrey J.
Zeiger, Kirkland & Ellis LLP, 300
N. LaSalle, Chicago, IL 60654;
John C. Hueston, Litigation
Trustee, Irell & Manella LLP,
1800 Avenue of the Stars, Suite
900, Los Angeles, CA 90067;
Thomas Lotterman, Bingham
McCutchen LLP, 2020 K Street
NW, Washington, DC 20006-
1806; Kenneth Klee, Klee,
Tuchin, Bogdanoff & Stern LLP,
1999 Avenue of the Stars, 39th
Floor, Los Angeles, CA 90067;
and Robert Yalen, AUSA, U.S.
Attorney's Office - SDNY, 86
Chambers St., 3rd Floor, New
York, NY 10028, so as to be so
filed and received by no later
than May 15, 2014 at 4:00
p.m. (Prevailing Eastern Time).
PLEASE TAKE FURTHER NOTICE
that only those responses or ob-
jections that are timely filed,
served and received will be con-
sidered.
PLEASE TAKE FURTHER NOTICE
that the Honorable Allan L. Grop-
per of the U.S. Bankruptcy Court
for the Southern District of New
York has scheduled a hearing to
address this matter on MAY 28,
2014, AT 11:00 A.M., ONE
BOWLING GREEN, NEW YORK,
NY, 10004-1408.
continued next column
Legal Notices 001
UNITED STATES
BANKRUPTCY COURT
SOUTHERN DISTRICT OF
NEW YORK
In re: Chapter 11 TRONOX
INCORPORATED, et al., Jointly
Administered Reorganized
Debtors.
Case No. 09-10156 (ALG)
NOTICE OF MAY 15, 2014
DEADLINE FOR FILING OBJEC-
TIONS TO TRONOX/KERR-
MCGEE SETTLEMENT AGREE-
MENT
PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that, on
April 9, 2014, the Anadarko Liti-
gation Trust (the “ Litigation “
Trust”), as successor to Debtors
Tronox Incorporated, Tronox
Worldwide LLC, and Tronox LLC
in the above-captioned adversary
proceeding, and Anadarko
Petroleum Corporation, Kerr-
McGee Corporation, Kerr-McGee
Oil & Gas Corporation (n/k/a
Anadarko US Offshore Corpora-
tion), Kerr-McGee Worldwide Cor-
poration, KM Investment Corpo-
ration (improperly named as
Kerr-McGee Investment Corpora-
tion), Kerr-McGee Credit LLC,
Kerr-McGee Shared Services
Company LLC and Kerr-McGee
Stored Power Company LLC (col-
lectively, “Anadarko”), filed a
motion with the U.S. Bankruptcy
Court for the Southern District of
New York (the “Bankruptcy
Court”) seeking a report and rec-
ommendation (A) recommending
approval of the Settlement
Agreement between and among
the Anadarko Litigation Trust,
the United States of America,
and Anadarko resolving the
above-captioned adversary pro-
ceeding, and (B) recommending
issuance of an injunction enjoin-
ing certain persons from assert-
ing against any Anadarko Re-
leased Party (i) any Trust Deriva-
tive Claims, or (ii) any claims
which are duplicative of Trust
Derivative Claims (all capitalized
terms not otherwise defined
herein shall have the meaning
as defined in the Settlement
Agreement).
PURSUANT TO THE MOTION
FILED WITH THE COURT:
“THE DEADLINE TO FILE OBJEC-
TIONS TO THE TRONOX SETTLE-
MENT AGREEMENT IS MAY 15,
2014, AT 4:00 P.M. EASTERN
A HEARING ON THE MOTION
(AND ANY OBJECTIONS TIMELY
FILED) HAS BEEN SCHEDULED
FOR MAY 28, 2014 AT 11:00
A.M. EASTERN AT THE U.S.
BANKRUPTCY COURT FOR THE
SOUTHERN DISTRICT OF NEW
YORK (SEE ADDRESS BELOW)
Brief Recitation of Facts: On Jan-
uary 12, 2009, Tronox Incorpo-
rated and certain of its affiliates
(collectively, the “Debtors”) com-
menced chapter 11 cases (the
“Chapter 11 Cases”) in the
Bankruptcy Court. On November
30, 2010, the Bankruptcy Court
confirmed the Debtors' Plan. On
February 14, 2011, the Plan be-
came effective. In the Chapter
11 Cases, the United States,
other governmental entities, and
other Persons filed Proofs of
Claim against the Debtors on ac-
count of, among other things, al-
leged environmental claims, obli-
gations, and/or liabilities at cer-
tain of the Covered Sites. Vari-
ous tort claimants filed Proofs of
Claim against the Debtors on ac-
count of alleged tort liabilities,
including for personal injury and
property damage. Those claims
were or will be resolved pursuant
to the Plan, related tort and envi-
ronmental agreements, the Liti-
gation Trust Agreement (“LTA”),
and other prior proceedings of
the Bankruptcy Court.
There are two complaints
against Anadarko currently being
jointly litigated in Tronox Inc., et
al. v. Kerr-McGee Corporation, et
al. (In re Tronox Inc.), Adv. Proc.
No. 09-01198 (Bankr. S.D.N.Y.):
1. the Second Amended Adver-
sary Complaint [which is filed at
Case No. 09-01198 (ALG), Dkt.
No. 233]; and
2. the Complaint-in-Intervention
filed by the United States [which
is filed at Case No. 09-01198
(ALG), Dkt. No. 5-2]. The Plan,
LTA, and Environmental Settle-
ment Agreement assigned, as
provided in the Confirmation Or-
der and the LTA, all of the
Debtors' respective rights and
interests in the Adversary Pro-
ceeding (excluding the Com-
plaint-in-Intervention), which in-
cludes any claims or causes of
action of the Debtors related to
the Adversary Proceeding,
whether or not asserted in the
Adversary Proceeding, to the Liti-
gation Trust for the benefit of
the entities listed in Section 1(d)
of the LTA, which include the
Tort Claims Trust, the Cimarron
Environmental Response Trust,
the Multistate Environmental Re-
sponse Trust, the Nevada Envi-
ronmental Response Trust, the
Savannah Environmental Re-
sponse Trust (collectively, along
with the West Chicago Environ-
mental Response Trust, the “En-
vironmental and Tort Trusts”),
and certain governmental enti-
ties that had asserted Bankrupt-
cy Environmental Claims against
the Debtors (collectively, “Litiga-
tion Trust Beneficiaries”).
Pursuant to the Plan, LTA, Envi-
ronmental Settlement Agree-
ment, and Environmental and
Tort Trust Agreements (other
than the West Chicago Environ-
mental Response Trust Agree-
ment), the Litigation Trust Bene-
ficiaries and beneficiaries of the
Environmental and Tort Trusts
(together with the Litigation
Trust Beneficiaries, the “Benefi-
ciaries”) are entitled to have
paid, on account of their
Bankruptcy Environmental
Claims and Bankruptcy Tort
Claims, specified allocations of
a share of the net proceeds of
any recovery from the Adversary
Proceeding.
On December 12, 2013, the
Bankruptcy Court issued its
Memorandum Opinion, After Tri-
al, finding the Anadarko Trial De-
fendants liable under the Sec-
ond Amended Adversary Com-
plaint for actual and constructive
fraudulent conveyances, but not
liable for breach of fiduciary du-
ty. The Decision is not a final
judgment and the Bankruptcy
Court did not enter final judg-
ment.
On April 3, 2014, the Parties en-
tered into the Settlement Agree-
ment that resolves the Adver-
sary Proceeding and provides for
releases, covenants not to sue,
and the issuance of an injunc-
tion by a U.S. District Court en-
joining certain persons from as-
serting Trust Derivative Claims
and any claims that are duplica-
tive of such Trust Derivative
Claims (as defined in the Settle-
ment Agreement).
On April 3, 2014, the United
States lodged the Settlement
Agreement with the Bankruptcy
Court. On approximately April
14, 2014 the United States will
publish a notice for public com-
ment thereon in the Federal Reg-
ister. On April 9, 2014, the Liti-
gation Trust and Anadarko filed
a motion (the “9019 Recom-
mendation Motion”) with the
Bankruptcy Court, seeking the
Report and Recommendation.
The Settlement Agreement set-
tles, compromises, resolves and
closes the Adversary Proceeding
and settles, compromises, re-
solves, and extinguishes the
Trust Derivative Claims, any
claims that were asserted or
that could have been asserted in
the Second Amended Adversary
Complaint, and the claims as-
serted in the Complaint-in-Inter-
vention and the claims that
could have been asserted in the
Complaint-in-Intervention relating
to the subject matter of the Ad-
versary Proceeding, together and
on a global basis to the extent
provided in the Settlement
Agreement. Pursuant to the Set-
tlement Agreement, within two
Business Days after the Effec-
tive Date, Anadarko shall cause
to be paid to the Litigation Trust
$5.15 billion plus Interest. The
Litigation Trust shall cause the
continued next column
Legal Notices 001
RFP TO FURNISH FOOD SERVICE
FOR THE MS SUMMER FOOD
SERVICE PROGRAM
The Initiative CDC in collabora-
tion with the MDE is taking bids
for our 2014 Summer Food Ser-
vice Program. The Program will
operate from June 2, 2014 to
August 8, 2014 from 8am to
2pm. The Program address is
Charity Village, 806 Tarlton Rd.,
Crawford, MS 39743. We are
expecting 300 youths to be
served breakfast and lunch dai-
ly. Vendors are expected to pre-
pare the meals in bulk, serve on
plates, provide utensils, and pro-
vide milk with each meal. To see
a copy of the meal pattern re-
quired by the Mississippi Office
of Child Nutrition, go to
www.initv.org. Interested ven-
dors please submit your bids to
Charity Village, P.O. Box 174,
Crawford, MS 39743, Attention:
Robert Howze, no later than
12:00pm on April 30, 2014.
Publish: 4/17 – 5/2/2014
prior Staples deeds in Deed
Book 195 at page 115 and
page 125 in said land records)
to a point at the Southeast cor-
ner of said Owen property and
also being on the West line of
the former Burnette/Ayers et al.,
property (Deed Book 303 at
page 622 in said land records);
thence South along said West
line a distance of 66.0 feet
more or less, to a point on the
former Propst/Mitchell North
property line (Deed Book 250 at
page 421 in said land records);
thence West along said North
line a distance of 180.0 feet,
more or less, (165.0 feet in said
prior deeds) to a point at the
Southeast corner of said former
Waters property; thence North
along said Waters East line a
distance of 66.0 feet, more or
less, to the initial point of this
description.
It is the intent to describe and
convey all of that certain proper-
ty described in the above men-
tioned Staples deeds, including
any additional lands claimed
therein as shown on the county
tax map, Parcel No.
60W050005900, whether cor-
rectly described or not.
Legal Description:
Map/Parcel No. 60W05-00-
06000
A tract or parcel of land located
in the Southeast Quarter of the
Northeast Quarter of Section
17, Township 18 South, Range
18 West, Lowndes County, Mis-
sissippi, and being more particu-
larly described as follows, to wit:
Beginning at the Northwest cor-
ner of said quarter-quarter sec-
tion; thence South a distance of
20.0 feet to an iron pin on the
South right-of-way line of Ply-
mouth Road; thence East along
said South right-of-way line a dis-
tance of 557.0 feet; thence
South parallel with the West line
of said quarter-quarter section a
distance of 391.4 feet to an iron
pin on the Southern right-of-way
line of U.S. Highway 82 (Federal
Aid Project No. F-002-4(10), and
the INITIAL POINT of the property
herein described; thence South-
westerly along said Southern
right-of-way line (an existing
fence line) a distance of 181.9
feet to an iron pin; thence East
parallel to said South right-of-
way line of Plymouth Road a dis-
tance of 142.9 feet to an iron
pin; thence North parallel with
the West line of said quarter-
quarter section a distance of
112.6 feet, more or less, to the
initial point of this description,
containing 0.19 acre, more or
less.
Legal Description:
Map/Parcel No. 60W05-00-
06100
A tract or parcel of land located
in the Southeast Quarter of the
Northeast Quarter of Section
17, Township 18 South, Range
18 West Lowndes County, Mis-
sissippi, and being more particu-
larly described as follows, to-wit:
Beginning at the Northwest Cor-
ner of said quarter-quarter sec-
tion; thence South a distance of
20.0 feet to an iron pin on the
South right-of-way line of Ply-
mouth Road; thence East along
said South right-of-way line a dis-
tance of 557.0 feet; thence
South parallel with the West line
of said quarter-quarter section a
distance of 391.4 feet to an iron
pin on the Southern right-of-way
line of U.S. Highway 82 (Federal
Aid Project No. F-002-4(10), be-
ing the Northeast corner of the
Waters property (Deed Book
942 at page 542 in the land
records of said county) and the
INITIAL POINT of the property
herein described; thence South
along the East line of said Wa-
ters Property a distance of 46.6
feet, more or less, to the North
line of the Staples property
(Deed Book 195 at page 125 in
said land records); thence East
along said Staples North line a
distance of 180.0 feet to the
Northeast corner of said Staples
property; thence North a dis-
tance of 205.0 feet, more or
less, to said Southern right-of-
way line; thence Southwesterly
along said Southern right-of-way
line (an existing fence line) a dis- tance of 240.0 feet, more or
less, to the initial point of this
description. It is the intent to
convey all that certain property
described in the deed to Ben
Owen recorded in Deed Book
330 at page 294 in said land
records, less said right-of-way,
and any part of the above de-
scribed property lying South of
said right-of-way but outside the
boundary lines of said Owen
tract, as deeded, is hereby con-
veyed without warranty.
Legal Description:
Map/Parcel No. 60W05-00-
06300
That part of the East Half (E ½)
of the Northeast Quarter (NE
1/4 ) of Section 17, Township
18, Range 18 West in Lowndes
County, Mississippi, more partic-
ularly described as follows, to-
wit:
Beginning at the Northeast cor-
ner of said Section 17, Town-
ship 18, Range 18 West in said
county; thence run South along
the East section line a distance
of 1,322 feet to the centerline
of the Plymouth public road;
thence continuing South along
said East section line 20 feet to
the South side of said public
road and the initial point of this
description; thence run South
(South 06 degrees 15 minutes
East - magnetic) along said East
section line (being the West side
of the Old Aberdeen Road) a dis-
tance of 759 feet; thence run
South 83 degrees 00minutes
West (magnetic) along a fence
572 feet; thence run North 06
degrees West (magnetic) along
a fence 248 feet; thence run
North 04 degrees 20 minutes
West (magnetic) along a fence
(being the East side of a lane)
512 feet to the South side of
said Plymouth public road;
thence North 82 degrees 20
minutes East (magnetic) along
the South side of said road 562
feet to the initial point of this de-
scription
Publish: 4/30/2014
Legal Notices 001
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT
A PETITION HAS BEEN FILED
BY Lowndes County, Mississippi
Board of Supervisors TO
AMEND THE OFFICIAL ZONING
MAP OF THE CITY OF COLUM-
BUS, MISSISSIPPI;
IN PARTICULAR, MAP / PARCEL
NOS. 60W05-00-05900; 60-
WO5-00-06000; 60W05-00-
06100; AND, 60W05-00-
06300, at Highway 82 Bypass,
Lowndes County, Mississippi.
(Legal descriptions attached.)
(Each) From:
A-1 (General Agricultural) Zone
District To C-3 (Highway Com-
mercial) Zone District
A PUBLIC HEARING IN RELATION
TO THE ABOVE-DESCRIBED PETI-
TION WILL BE HELD ON June 9,
2014 BEFORE THE COLUMBUS
PLANNING COMMISSION, AT
CITY HALL, 523 MAIN STREET,
SECOND FLOOR, (OLD COURT
ROOM), AT 5:30 P.M. AT
WHICH HEARING ALL PARTIES
IN INTEREST SHALL HAVE AN
OPPORTUNITY TO BE HEARD.
A SUBSEQUENT HEARING OF
THE ABOVE PETITION WILL BE
HELD BEFORE THE MAYOR
AND CITY COUNCIL ON June 17,
2014 at The Municipal Complex
(Court Room), 1501 MAIN
STREET, COLUMBUS, MISSSIS-
SIPPI. THE COUNCIL MEETING
WILL BEGIN AT 5:00 P.M., AND,
AT WHICH HEARING ALL PAR-
TIES IN INTEREST SHALL HAVE
AN OPPORTUNITY TO BE HEARD.
WITNESS THE EXECUTION HERE-
OF AND OFFICIAL SEAL OF SAID
CITY THIS 23rd day of April,
2014.
THE MAYOR AND CITY COUNCIL
OF THE CITY OF COLUMBUS,
MS.

/s/ Robert E. Smith, Sr.
Robert E. Smith, Sr., Mayor
(SEAL)
ATTEST:
/s/ Milton E. Rawle, Jr.
CFO / Secretary-Treasurer
Legal Description:
Map/Parcel No. 60W05-00-
05900
A tract or parcel of land located
in the Southeast Quarter of the
Northeast Quarter of Section
17, Township 18 South, Range
18 West, Lowndes County, Mis-
sissippi, and being more particu-
larly described as follows, to-
wit:
Beginning at the Northwest cor-
ner of said quarter-quarter sec-
tion; thence South a distance of
20.0 feet to an iron pin on the
South right-of-way line of Ply-
mouth Road; thence East along
said South right-of-way line a dis-
tance of 557.0 feet; thence
South parallel with the West line
of said quarter-quarter section a
distance of 391.4 feet to an iron
pin on the Southern right-of-way
line of U.S. Highway 82 (Federal
Aid Project No. F-002-4(10), be-
ing the Northeast corner of the
former Waters property (Deed
Book 942 at page 542 in the
land records of said county);
thence South along the East line
of said Waters property, and the
West line of the former Owen
property (Deed Book 2008 at
page 1763 in said land records)
a distance of 46.6 feet, more or
less, to a point at the Southwest
corner of said Owen property,
and the INITIAL POINT of the
property herein described;
thence East along said Owen
South line a distance of 180.0
feet, more or less, (165 feet in
continued next column
MISSISSIPPI DEPARTMENT OF
ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY
OFFICE OF GEOLOGY
Mining and Reclamation Division
P. O. Box 2279
Jackson, MS 39225
(601) 961-5527
P U B L I C N O T I C E

Public Notice No. 1892
Date: April 11, 2014
Application No. A1892

TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN:

The Office of Geology has re-
ceived an Application for a Sur-
face Mining Permit pursuant to
Sections 53-7-27 and 53-7-29 of
the Mississippi Surface Mining
and Reclamation Act of 1977,
as described below:

APPLICANT: Curtis Brothers LLC,
Curtis Mine
PO Box 9099
Columbus, Mississippi 39705
LOCATION: Southeast ¼ of the
Southeast ¼ of Section 9,
Township 17 South, Range 17
West, Lowndes County.
DESCRIPTION: The operator pro-
poses to open pit mine 12.85
acres to a total depth of 25 feet
for clay gravel. Sediment and
erosion will be controlled by
drainage ditches. Reclamation
will consist of 3 to 1 slopes,
grass cover, and pine trees.
This public notice is being dis-
tributed to interested persons
and agencies to assist in devel-
oping facts on which a decision
by the Office of Geology can be
based. You are requested to
communicate the information
contained in this notice to any
other parties whom you deem
likely to have interest in the mat-
ter. All agencies and persons
shall have until April 27, 2014,
to submit comments, recom-
mendations, or evaluations to
the Office of Geology. Com-
ments by an agency shall in-
clude an enumeration of permits
or licenses required under the
agency's jurisdiction.

If further information is needed,
an agency may be furnished a
copy of the notice of intent or
permit application. Any person
may inspect the permit applica-
tion as specified in Section 104
of the Rules and Regulations.

In the event comments are not
received by April 27, 2014 the
Office of Geology will consider
that the agency has no com-
ments, recommendations
and/or evaluations that the
agency deems necessary and
proper based upon the effect of
the proposed operation on mat-
ters within the agency's jurisdic-
tion.
Publish: 4/23 & 4/30/2014
on May 14, 2014 offer for sale
at public outcry and sell within
legal hours (being between the
hours of 11:00 a.m. and 4:00
p.m.), at the Southeast Door of
the County Courthouse of Lown-
des County, located at Colum-
bus, Mississippi, to the highest
and best bidder for cash the fol-
lowing described property situat-
ed in Lowndes County, State of
Mississippi, to-wit: Lot Six (6)
of East Emerald Estates, Part
One, a subdivision in and to the
City of Columbus, Lowndes
County, Mississippi, as shown
by map or plat thereof of record
in Subdivision Plat Book 2 at
Page 99 in the office of the
Chancery Clerk of Lowndes
County, Mississippi; subject,
however, to restrictive
covenants and conditions as
shown by instrument dated
March 22, 1966, and recorded
in Book 371, Pages 533- 535,
land records of Lowndes County,
MS.
I WILL CONVEY only such title as
vested in me as Substituted
Trustee.
WITNESS MY SIGNATURE on
this 16th day of April, 2014.
Shapiro & Massey, LLC
SUBSTITUTED TRUSTEE
Shapiro & Massey, LLC
1080 River Oaks Drive
Suite B-202
Flowood, MS 39232
(601)981-9299
2103 Shannon Avenue
Columbus, MS 39702
14-008787BE
Publication Dates: April 23, 30
and May 7, 2014
Legal Notices 001
SUBSTITUTED TRUSTEE'S
NOTICE OF SALE
WHEREAS, on June 10, 2005,
Laketia Underwood, single, exe-
cuted a certain deed of trust to
Kirk Smith, Trustee for the bene-
fit of Mortgage Electronic Regis-
tration Systems, Inc., as nomi-
nee for SouthStar Funding, LLC,
a Limited Liability Company
which deed of trust is of record
in the office of the Chancery
Clerk of Lowndes County, State
of Mississippi in Book 2005 at
Page 16630 and re-recorded in
Book 2005 at Page 25214;
and
WHEREAS, said Deed of Trust
was subsequently assigned to
Deutsche Bank National Trust
Company, as Trustee Under the
Pooling and Servicing agreement
dated as of November 1, 2005,
GSAMP Trust 2005-HE5 by in-
strument dated January 7, 2009
and recorded in Book 2009 at
Page 702 of the aforesaid
Chancery Clerk's office; and
WHEREAS, Deutsche Bank Na-
tional Trust Company, as
Trustee for GSAMP Trust 2005-
HE5 has heretofore substituted
Shapiro & Massey, LLC as
Trustee by instrument dated
March 7, 2014 and recorded in
the aforesaid Chancery Clerk's
Office in Book 2014 at Page
5776; and
WHEREAS, default having been
made in the terms and condi-
tions of said deed of trust and
the entire debt secured thereby
having been declared to be due
and payable in accordance with
the terms of said deed of trust,
Deutsche Bank National Trust
Company, as Trustee for GSAMP
Trust 2005-HE5, being on and
the same as Deutsche Bank Na-
tional Trust Company, as
Trustee Under the Pooling and
Servicing, the legal holder of
said indebtedness, having re-
quested the undersigned Substi-
tuted Trustee to execute the
trust and sell said land and
property in accordance with the
terms of said deed of trust and
for the purpose of raising the
sums due thereunder, together
with attorney's fees, trustee's
fees and expense of sale.
NOW, THEREFORE, I, Shapiro &
Massey, LLC, Substituted
Trustee in said deed of trust, will
continued next column
NOTICE OF SUBSTITUTED
TRUSTEE'S SALE
STATE OF MISSISSIPPI
COUNTY OF LOWNDES
WHEREAS, on March 2, 2010,
ERNEST E SMITH and FLO-
RENCE E SMITH executed a
promissory note payable to the
order of Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. ;
and
WHEREAS, the aforesaid promis-
sory note was secured by a
Deed of Trust dated March 2,
2010, executed by ERNEST E
SMITH and FLORENCE E SMITH
and being recorded in Book
2010, at Page 5039 of the
records of the Chancery Clerk of
Lowndes County, Mississippi;
and which aforesaid Instrument
conveys to Jeffrey Wagner,
Trustee and to Wells Fargo
Bank, N.A., as Beneficiary, the
hereinafter described property;
and
WHEREAS, Wells Fargo Bank,
N.A. , having executed a Substi-
tution of Trustee to substitute
Floyd Healy as trustee in the
place and stead of Jeffrey Wagn-
er, the same having been
recorded in Book 2014, at Page
7072 of the records of the
Chancery Clerk of Lowndes
County, Mississippi; and
WHEREAS, default having oc-
curred under the terms and con-
ditions of said promissory note
and Deed of Trust and the hold-
er having declared the entire bal-
ance due and payable; and
WHEREAS, Floyd Healy, Substi-
tuted Trustee in said Deed of
Trust will on May 22, 2014, be-
tween the hours of 11:00 a.m.
and 4:00 p.m., offer for sale
and will sell at public outcry to
the highest bidder for cash at
the Southeast front door at the
Chancery Clerk`s Office, located
at 505 2nd Avenue, Columbus,
Mississippi, the following de-
scribed property located and sit-
uated in Lowndes County, Mis-
sissippi, to wit: The land re-
ferred to in this policy is situated
in the State of Mississippi,
County of Lowndes, and de-
scribed as follows: Property lo-
cated in Lowndes County, Mis-
sissippi described as follows:
Lot 26, Eastlane Subdivision, a
subdivision according to the
map or plat thereof on file and
of record in the office of the
Chancery Clerk of Lowndes
County, Mississippi, in Plat Book
2 at page 47; reference to which
is hereby made in and of and as
a part of this description.
APN#62W140403100 Being
the same property conveyed to
Ernest Smith, tenancy not stat-
ed by deed from Robert Roy Car-
rier and wife, Delores J. Carrier,
dated 02/12/93, filed
02/25/93 and recorded in Deed
in Book 982, Page 506 in Lown-
des County Records.
Indexing Instructions: Lot 26,
Eastlane Subdivision, Lowndes
County, MS. More commonly
known as: 421 WYNHURST CT,
COLUMBUS, MS 39702-6445
Subject to the rights of way and
easement for public roads and
public utilities, and to any prior
conveyance or reservation of
mineral of every kind and char-
acter, including but not limited
to oil, gas, sand and gravel in or
under subject property.
As the undersigned Substituted
Trustee, I will convey only such
title as is vested in me under
said Deed of Trust.
This 25th day of April 2014.
Prepared by:
/s/Floyd Healy Floyd Healy
Substituted Trustee 1405 N.
Pierce, Suite 306
Little Rock, Arkansas 72207
Publish: April 30, 2014; May 7,
2014; May 14, 2014; and May
21, 2014
* Thence run South 82 degrees
15 minutes 32 seconds West
for a distance of 172.93 feet to
the Point of Beginning.
The above described parcel of
land contains 0.02 acres (1057
square feet), more or less, and
is situated in, and is a part of
Block 6 of Fractional Section
30, Township 19 North, Range
18, East Lowndes County, Mis-
sissippi.
I will only convey such title as is
vested in me as Substitute
Trustee.
WITNESS MY SIGNATURE, this
25th day of April, 2014.
Michael Jedynak
Substitute Trustee
855 S Pear Orchard Rd., Ste.
404, Bldg. 400
Ridgeland, MS 39157
(318) 330-9020
lel/F14-0069
PUBLISH: 4.30.14/ 5.7.14/
5.14.14
Legal Notices 001
Substitute Trustee's
Notice of Sale
STATE OF MISSISSIPPI
COUNTY OF Lowndes
WHEREAS, on the 3rd day of De-
cember, 2004, and acknowl-
edged on the 3rd day of Decem-
ber, 2004, Echols Griffin, Jr. and
Bessie O. Griffin, husband and
wife, executed and delivered a
certain Deed of Trust unto
Lenders First Choice, Trustee for
Mortgage Electronic Registration
Systems, Inc. as nominee for
Home Loan Center, Inc., Benefi-
ciary, to secure an indebtedness
therein described, which Deed of
Trust is recorded in the office of
the Chancery Clerk of Lowndes
County, Mississippi, in Mortgage
Book 2005 at Page 6950; and
WHEREAS, on the 10th day of
February, 2014, Mortgage Elec-
tronic Registration Systems, Inc.
as nominee for Home Loan Cen-
ter, Inc., assigned said Deed of
Trust unto E*Trade Bank, by in-
strument recorded in the office
of the aforesaid Chancery Clerk
in Mort Book 2014 at Page
7280; and
WHEREAS, on the 30th day of
January, 2009, a Partial Release
of Deed of Trust was filed, by in-
strument recorded in the office
of the aforesaid Chancery Clerk
in Mortgage Book 2009 at Page
1697
WHEREAS, on the 4th day of
March, 2014, the Holder of said
Deed of Trust substituted and
appointed Michael Jedynak by in-
strument recorded in the office
of the aforesaid Chancery Clerk
in Mort Book 2014 at Page
7281; and
WHEREAS, default having been
made in the payments of the in-
debtedness secured by the said
Deed of Trust, and the holder of
said Deed of Trust, having re-
quested the undersigned so to
do, on the 21st day of May,
2014, I will during the lawful
hours of between 11:00 a.m.
and 4:00 p.m., at public outcry,
offer for sale and will sell, at the
south east front door of Lown-
des County Courthouse, 505
2nd Ave. North at Columbus,
Mississippi, for cash to the high-
est bidder, the following de-
scribed land and property situat-
ed in Lowndes County, Missis-
sippi, to-wit:
The following described property
Lowndes County, Mississippi, to-
wit:
South Lot - 1.0 acres, more or
less, lying in the Southwest 1/4
of Section 30, Township 19,
Range 18 East, Lowndes Coun-
ty, Mississippi, being described
as follows: commencing on the
North right of way of the Gulf,
Mobile and Ohio Railroad at a
point 3705.6 feet Southwest
from the intersection of said
North right of way and the East
line of aforementioned Section
30, said point being the South-
west corner of the Jimmie Davis
property, run thence Southwest-
erly along said North right of way
for 1277.4 feet to the South-
west corner of the John Jordan
property; thence North for 1501
feet; thence North 03 degrees
40 minutes West for 230 feet to
the Point of Beginning; thence
continue North 03 degrees 40
minutes West along a fence for
210 feet to the Northwest cor-
ner of the 4.0 acres deeded to
Echols Griffin and wife, Bulah
Mae Griffin, recorded in Deed
Book 299 at page 1-2 in the
land records of said County;
thence North 82 degrees 27
minutes East along the North
line of said Griffin tract for 210
feet to the Northeast corner
thereof; thence South 03 de-
grees 40 minutes East along a
fence for 210 feet; thence
South 82 degrees 27 minutes
West for 210 feet to the Point of
Beginning. Subject to a 20-foot-
wide access easement for
ingress and egress over the en-
tire West 20 feet of said Lot.
North Lot - 1.0 acre, more or
less, lying in the Southwest 1/4
of Section 30, Township 19
North, Range 18 East, Lowndes
County, Mississippi, being de-
scribed as follows; commencing
on the North right of way of the
Gulf, Mobile and Ohio Railroad
at a point 3705.6 feet South-
west from the intersection of
said North right of way and the
East line of aforementioned Sec-
tion 30, said point being the
Southwest corner of the Jimmie
Davis property, run thence
Southwesterly along said North
right of way for 1277.4 feet to
the Southwest corner of the
John Jordan property; thence
North for 1501 feet; thence
North 03 degrees 40 minutes
West 440 feet to the Point of
Beginning, said point being the
Southwest corner of the 1.0
acre deeded to Echols Griffin
and wife, Bulah Mae Griffin,
recorded in Deed Book 240 at
Page 45 in the land records of
said County; thence North along
the West line of said Griffin tract
for 210 feet to the Northwest
corner thereof, being on the
South right of way of Mississippi
Highway 182 West; thence
North 82 degrees 27 minutes
East along said South right of
way (50 feet from centerline)
and along the North line of said
Griffin tract for 210 feet to an
existing fence corner at the
Northeast corner thereof; thence
South along a fence on the East
line of said Griffin tract and
along the North line of the 4.0
acres deeded to said Echols and
Bulah Mae Griffin, recorded in
Deed Book 299 at Pages 1-2 in
the land records of said County,
for 210 feet to the Southeast
corner thereof; thence South 82
degrees 27 minutes West along
the South line of said Griffin
Tract for 210 feet to the Point of
Beginning. Subject to a 20-foot
wide access easement for
ingress and egress over the en-
tire West 20 feet of said Lot.
Source of title: Book 2003 Page
1563 (Recorded 02-13-2003)
Less and Except:
Commence at a number four
(1/2 inch diameter) rebar rod
marking the Southeast corner of
Fractional Section 30, Township
19 North, Range 18 East, Lown-
des County, Mississippi, and run
North 60 degrees 01 minutes
03 seconds West a distance of
5,491.18 feet to the present
Southern right-of-way line of Mis-
sissippi Highway No. 182 and
the Point of Beginning, said
point being located 50.00 feet
Southerly of, as measured per-
pendicularly from, the centerline
of State Project No.
(105220/201000) at station
1087+97.09 as shown on the
right-of-way acquisition maps for
said project.
* From said Point of Beginning
run along said present Southern
right-of-way line and along the
arc of a curve to the right, said
curve having a radius of
5,685.34 feet, an arc length of
174.11 feet and a long-chord
bearing North 78 degrees 31
minutes 45 seconds East for a
distance of 174.10 feet to the
East Boundary line of grantors“
property;
* Thence run South 03 degrees
40 minutes 00 seconds East,
along said East property line, a
distance of 11.35 feet;
continued next column
Legal Notices 001
CITY PLANNER
THE CITY OF STARKVILLE, MS
The City of Starkville, MS is accepting applications
for the position of City Planner. The City Planner
reports to the Community Development Director and
manages, coordinates and directs the City’s major
planning efforts, from current planning to long range
projects; assists the Director in organizing, integrating
and administering the department’s planning related
operations; consults with and advises professional
and technical departmental staff on planning related
activities; and performs related activities; and
performs related work as assigned.
Essential job functions include,
but are not limited to:
The City of Starkville, Mississippi, is an equal opportunity employer
and does not discriminate upon the basis of race, color, religion,
national origin, sex, age, disability, or veteran status.
The City of Starkville is a smoke-free working environment.
Required Qualifications:
· 0radaatlca |rca a |car-,ear ccllege cr aal·erslt, wlth
major course work in planning, public administration, law,
or a closely related field or graduation from a PAB approved
program.
· \t least h·e (5) ,ears c| prcgressl·el, respcaslble
experience in municipal planning/community development,
including significant project management experience or an
equivalent combination of training and experience.
· \i0| 0ertlhcatlca ls deslred. i| act \i0| certlhed, thea
prepare, ccaalt tc, aad lapleaeat a stractared, sel|-dlrected
program of continuing professional education that leads to
certlhcatlca b, the \aerlcaa iastltate c| 0ertlhed |laaaers,
fulfill other professional education obligations as the Director
aa, reqalre, sabscrlbe tc the \i0| 0cde c| lthlcs.
· \a ad·aaced degree la plaaalag ls deslrable.
· \alld :tate Drl·er`s Llcease cr ablllt, tc cbtala cae.
The above duties and qualifications are representative and are
not all inclusive. For a more detailed job description, please
visit the City of Starkville website at www.cityofstarkville.org
The salary for this position is $55,000.
Qualified persons are invited to apply for the job
·acaac,. \ppllcatlcas wlll be accepted thrcagh Ma, 5,
!01+. \ca aa, appl, ca-llae at www.clt,c|stark·llle.
org or submit applications along with resume
and cover letter to:
Randy Boyd, Personnel Officer
City of Starkville
101 Laapkla :treet, :tark·llle, M: 39¯59
|hcae. (oo!) 3!3-!5!5, ext. 1!+
laall. r.bc,dCclt,c|stark·llle.crg
· |er|cras ad·aaced le·el
professional planning work
relating to comprehensive
planning activities including
formulating
land use plans, development
policies and special planning
studies; identification
of goals and objectives;
formulation of
policy, plan and program
alternatives; evaluation of
alternatives; coordination
with related agencies,
departments and other
stakeholders; and
implementation of policies,
plans and programs,
including development
controls.
· 0ca|ers wlth aad prc·ldes
information to property
owners, contractors, design
professionals, and the public
regarding
conformance to standards,
plans
specifications and
codes; explains codes,
requirements and
procedures and evaluates
alternatives.
· 0cadacts ccaplex
planning research
projects, evaluating
alternatives, making sound
recommendations and
preparing effective technical
staff reports.
· 0cadacts zcalag stadles
and interprets City zoning
laws, regulations and codes.
· |repares |cr aad aaaages
input for Design Review
Committee, Planning and
Zoning Commission, Board
of Adjustments and Appeals,
Historic Preservation
Commission, and Board of
Aldermen meetings.
· Dra|ts aad prccesses
various municipal code
amendments.
· Jhrcagh da,-tc-da, wcrk
performance displays a
thorough understanding
and application of
comprehensive planning
actl·ltles (lacladlag
|cra-based ccdes) aad
keeps informed of current
trends in the planning field,
including legislation,
court rulings, annexation
laws, and professional
practices and techniques;
evaluates their impact
on City operations; and
recommends any needed
policy and procedural
improvements.
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.
p
u
b
l
i
c
n
o
t
i
c
e
a
d
s
.
c
o
m
/
M
S
/
LEGAL NOTICES
published in
this newspaper
and other
Mississippi
newspapers are
on the
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Ready to Rent!
772 Canfield Road
3 BR, 2.5 BA, Bonus Room, Garage,Wired Shop,
in New Hope School District, Lots of room,
Call Today!
21 Cedar Drive
3 BR, 2.5 BA, Garage, Mostly Furnished home,
Enclosed Patio, Short Term leases available,
Ready to rent!
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For more information call,
662-328-1123
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662-328-1123
robinsonrealestate.com
Real Estate Robinson
APARTMENTS & TOWNHOUSES
HOUSES (OVER 200 MANAGED)
DOWNTOWN LOFTS
COMMERCIAL PROPERTY
Houses for Rent!
THE DISPATCH • cdispatch.com WEDNESDAY, APRIL 30, 2014 9B
2 & 3 BR. No HUD ac-
cepted. Call 662-617-
1538 for more info
NEWLY REMODELED
3BR/2BA. Central h/a,
stove, d/washer, dbl.
garage. Exc. location.
Conv. to shopping.
$725/mo. $500 dep.
No HUD. 662-352-4776
HOUSE/APT. House:
2BR/3BA, c h/a, lg.
family rm. w/f. pl, DR,
LR, d/washer, fridge,
freezer, icemaker,
bkfast rm, lndry rm, sc.
porch, o/side storage,
fenced patio. Connected
Apt: kitch, BR/BA,
dinette. 323 13
th
St N.
Ref/app. req. No pets.
No HUD. 386-7506
COLONIAL TOWNHOUS-
ES. 2 or 3 bedroom w/
2-3 bath townhouses.
$575/$700. 662-549-
9555. Ask for Glenn or
leave message
5BR/3BA, 2 living
room. Large fully wired
shop. Available June 15.
$1000/month. Call for
sale price. 662-364-
6532
3BR/1BA. Enclosed
garage, big yard, nice
neighborhood. 3 min.
from airbase. 1058 S.
Perkins Rd. Near inter-
section of Ridge Rd. &
Perkins Rd. $675/mo.
Call 504-813-1200
2BR/2BA. Private loca-
tion convenient to CAFB.
$750/month. 1
St
& last
month payment. $500
dep. Ref. req. 574-1621
2BR/1BA. Central heat
& air. Call 228-234-
6848
2BR & 3BR/2BA. Red.
Nice neighborhood, cen-
tral h&a. No inside pets.
No HUD. $800/mo &
$600/mo. 662-328-
4719 or 329-3377
Houses For Rent:
Northside 711
EAST COLUMBUS.
30'X60' glass front
building. Formerly bar-
ber/dress/beauty shop.
Could be church or day-
care center. Good park-
ing lot. 301 North Mc-
Crary. Call 425-6505
Commercial
Property For Rent
710
OFFICE OR retail proper-
ty available in East
Columbus. Call 386-
7694 or 364-1030
Commercial
Property For Rent
710
Rivergate
Apartments
“Quiet Country Living”
• Studio,
1&2 Bedrooms
• Executive Units
• Water
Furnished
Monday - Friday
8a-5p
327-6333
300 Holly Hills Rd.
Columbus
© Commercial Dispatch
Chateaux
Holly Hills
Apartments
102 Newbell Rd
Columbus
Mon-Fri 8-5
328-8254
• Central Heat & Air
Conditioning
• Close to CAFB
• Onsite Laundry Facility
• All Electric/Fully Equipped
Kitchen
• Lighted Tennis Court
• Swimming Pool
Where Coming
Home is the
Best Part of
the Day
UPTOWN HISTORIC
Columbus. Large 1BR
apt. Secure, quiet & pri-
vate. No pets. Ref req.
$320 mo + $100 dep.
Call 662-386-6671 be-
fore 7pm
1, 2 & 3 BEDROOM
APARTMENTS &
TOWNHOUSES.
1BR/1BA Apt. $300
2BR/1BA Apt. $350-
$400. 2BR/2BA 3BR /
2BA Townhouses $550-
$800. No HUD allowed.
Lease, deposit, credit
check required. Cole-
man Realty. 329-2323
Apartments For
Rent: Other 708
SPRING SPECIAL. No
deposit req. 2BR/1BA.
North & Southside loca-
tions. Call 662-798-
4194
1 & 2BR apts. in North
& East. CH&A, all elec,
water & sewer furn, con-
venient to shopping.
$350/mo. Call 352-
4776
Apartments For
Rent: Other 708
NORTHSTAR PROPER-
TIES. 500 Louisville St.
1, 2 & 3BR avail. 662-
323-8610. 8-5pm, M-F.
northstarstarkville.com.
Basic cable included
Apartments For
Rent: Starkville
707
2BR/2BA Apts for rent.
Stove, fridge & dish-
washer. $750/mo. 356-
4700 or 386-4180
Apartments For
Rent: Caledonia
706
VIP
Rentals
Apartments
& Houses
1 Bedrooms
2 Bedrooms
3 Bedrooms
Unfurnished
1, 2 & 3 Baths
Lease, Deposi t
& Credit Check
viceinvestments.com
327-8555
307 Hospital Drive
Furnished &
Apartments For
Rent: West 705
Apartments For
Rent: Northside
701
2BR/1BA, newly remod-
eled, credit check, back-
ground check & rental
history required.
$750/mo. Call 662-
341-5664
Apartments For
Rent: South 704
1, 2, 3 BEDROOMS &
townhouses. Call for
more info. 662-549-
1953
Apartments For
Rent: East 702
NORTHWOOD TOWN-
HOUSES 2BR, 1.5BA,
CH/A, stove, fridge,
DW, WD hookups, &
private patios. Call
Robinson Real Estate
328-1123
***$99 1st Month***
Feels like home to me.
Clean 1-4BR remodeled
apts. Stove, fridge, w/d
hookups, mini-blinds.
HUD accepted. Call Mar-
lene. 662-630-2506
Apartments For
Rent: Northside
701
NICE RESTAURANT in
Bartahatchie Community
w/4 ac. of land &
ponds. Call 662-369-
0231 for more info
Business
For Sale 635
OWN YOUR OWN busi-
ness whether a busi-
ness or franchise oppor-
tunity...when it comes to
earnings or locations,
there are no guaran-
tees. A public service
message from The Dis-
patch and the Federal
Trade Commission
Business
Opportunity 605
FEMALE RABBIT. Black
& white . $20. Call 662-
386-5472
Pets 515
7 WEEK old kittens. Sol-
id gray & 2 charcoal
stripped. Adorable. 245-
1048
Free Pets 510
27 FT. above ground
pool. Pump, ladder,
chemicals & vacuum in-
cl. Needs new liner.
$500. Call 386-3036
12 X 20 METAL storage
shed, insulated, wired
for elec, ceiling fan, win-
dow unit, plywood
floors/walls & built in
tables. $2500 obo.
662-574-3027
General
Merchandise 460
662.329.2544 1/2 OFF ONE MONTHS RENT
& YOUR CHOICE OF MONTH!!!
625 31st Avenue North
(Behind K-Mart Off Hwy. 45 North)
329-2544
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Move-In Special Going
On Now!!!
NEW HOPE
GARDEN APARTMENTS
58 Old Yorkville Road • 327-8372
Monday & Wednesday 3pm-6pm
1 & 2 Bedroom Apartments
Next to New Hope Schools
Stove, Refrigerator, Central Heat & Air
Onsite Laundry Facility
Lots of household
items, clothes, toys,
baby bed & stroller, pic-
nic table w/umbrella/
chairs & much more!
Sat.-May 3rd. 6-9am.
1200 Pleasant Hill Rd
476 DONNA Ln. Friday
9am - 6pm. Saturday
6am - noon
135 VALLEYBROOK Dr.
Sat. May 3, 7-11am
Furniture, small appl,
toys, clothes & more
Garage Sales:
New Hope 453
ESTATE SALE:
Starkville, MS. Mrs. Kay
Hardy. Fairfield Com-
mons. 100 Fairfield Dr.
Original art work, vin-
tage furnishings, unique
items from military trav-
els, 2 tv cabinets, nice
screen, Ducan Phyfe ta-
ble, 6 chrs, 2 brk. tbls &
chrs, patio set, tea ser-
vices, sets of china, BR
furnishings, electronics,
hhold items, acces-
sories & smalls. 5/2 &
5/2 8am-5pm, 5/4
1pm -5pm. Antiques &
Collectibles 570-5686.
View at:estatesales.net
ESTATE SALE. 548 Hwy
45 N. Frontage Rd.25%
off Tue.-Sat. 10a-6p.
Sun. 1-4pm. Rest.
equip, art work, elec,
tools & furn. 352-4460
Estate Sales 449
GORDO INDOOR Flea
Market. Something for
everyone. Over 20 ven-
dors. Antiq. furn, jugs,
churns, glassware, vinyl,
knives, antiq. washing
machine, appliances,
bird houses. You name
it, we got it. Every Fri.
7a-4p & every Sat. 7a-
12p. 205-712-0465
Flea Markets 446
SPRAY LIQUID FERTIL-
IZER. STARTING @ $35
/AC. CHICKEN LITTER
$45/AC/ WAY MORE
EFFICIENT THAN GRAN-
ULAR FERTILIZER.
WORKS ALL SEASON
LONG. 662-386-9122
4230 JOHN Deere trac-
tor w/a 1210A grain
buggy. Gattman, MS.
Call 662-256-0951
Farm Equipment &
Supplies 442
LEGACY VINTAGE
HEART PINE
Buy a piece of MSU his-
tory. Heart pine flooring
& ceiling joint salvaged
from original mess hall.
Bulk orders only.
662-435-2305
Building
Materials 424
VIBRATOR MORFAM
Jeanie Rub single speed
like chiropractors use.
99. OBO. 574-9749
TONY LITTLE Gazelle
$75. Baby boy clothes
9-12 mo. $25 for all.
Call 327-8774
BOYS SHIRTS size 7/8,
8/10 & 10/12. 35
shirts all types. $25.
Call 662-549-3884
Bargain
Column 418
WE SELL used appli-
ances & haul off your
old ones. CALL 662-
549-5860 or 662-364-
7779
Appliances 409
Schneider
National Carriers
Needs Driver
Trainees Now!
Local CDL Training
No Experience Needed
Be trained &
based locally!
Call Today
1-888-540-7364
Truck Driving 370
ARCHITECTURAL
DRAFTER needed at
Shafer & Associates for
Starkville office. Req:
AutoCAD-2007 or later,
drafting Construction
Documents, 3-5 yrs exp.
in an architect's office.
Email cover letter & re-
sume to gshafer@
shafer-architecture.com
ACCOUNTANT
ASSISTANT
to CFO needed for grow-
ing construction comp.
Job offers potential to
become CFO. Job re-
quirements: Bachelors
degree in Accounting (4
year) from an accredited
university-required.
Experience in A/R, A/P,
payroll & financial state-
ments-required Profi-
cient in Excel, Word &
Outlook-required. Profi-
cient in QuickBooks Pro-
required. Job costing,
bank reconciliations &
journal entries-required
Construction experience
(5 years)-desired. Work-
ers comp insurance
knowledge-desired.
Benefits include health
insurance & retirement
plan. Salary DOE. Send
resumes with salary re-
quirements to fax-662-
329-7008 or e-mail
ralphw@lbconstllc.com
Professional 350
RN SUPERVISOR. Wind-
sor Place has a full time
position available for a
RN to work night shift
Monday through Friday
& 7P - 7A on weekends.
Apply at Windsor Place
81 Windsor Blvd Colum-
bus 39702. 662-241-
5518
Medical &
Dental 330
NEEDED
IMMEDIATELY:
LPN or RN for a medical
office position. Email
resume to jbwobg@
crawdat.com or mail to
PO Box 9458
Columbus, MS 39705
MEDICARE NURSE
CASE MANAGER. Req:
RN w/at least 2-3 yrs.
clinical exp, in acute
care, skilled or LTC set-
ting, MDS 3.0 exp. Pri-
or Medicare/Medicaid
exp. a +. Send resume
to: 505 Jackson St, Ab-
erdeen, MS 39730.
Attn: Abra Richardson,
RN DON. EOE
MEDICAL TECHNICIAN
needed for busy clinic.
Fax resume to 328-
9918
DENTAL OFFICE looking
for dental assistant.
Prefer experience & cur-
rent radiology permit.
Please submit resume
to Box 522 c/o The
Commercial Dispatch,
PO Box 511, Columbus,
MS 39703
Medical &
Dental 330
SHEET METAL Installer
needed in the Colum-
bus, MS trade area.-
Must have at least 2 yrs
exp. Salary commensu-
rate with experience. A
drug test will be admin-
istered. Send resume &
references to: Box 521
c/o The Commercial
Dispatch, PO Box 511,
Columbus, MS 39703
General Help
Wanted 320
COLUMBUS MUNICI-
PAL School District has
the following openings:
Elementary Teachers;
Secondary Teachers all
subjects; Spanish
Teacher; Speech Pathol-
ogists; Librarians; Assis-
tant Band Director; Cur-
riculum Coordinator;
Music Teacher; District
Literacy, Writing & Data
Coach; Food Service
Workers & Managers.
Please go to our web
site @ www.columbus
cityschools.org & com-
plete our online applica-
tion. For more informa-
tion, contact: Columbus
Municipal Schools, Per-
sonnel Office, 2630
McArthur Drive, P.O. Box
1308, Columbus MS
39703-1308 or call
662-241-7409. Any va-
cancies that occur as a
result of filling these po-
sitions may be filled
from this advertise-
ment. The district re-
serves the right to fill
these positions from the
applicant pool for previ-
ous openings. CMSD
does not discriminate
on the basis of race,
color, national origin,
disability, genetics, sex,
religion, or age in the
admission to & provi-
sion of educational pro-
grams, activities & ser-
vices, or employment
opportunities & benefits
General Help
Wanted 320
REFRIGERATION TECH
needed. 5 yrs. exp. or 2
yrs. trade school & EPA
cert. req. Salary based
on exp. Benefits: 401k,
health/dental/vision &
pd. time off. Must pass
drug test. Send
resume/ref. To Box 521
c/o Commercial Dis-
patch, PO Box 511,
Columbus, MS 39703
05 TEMP. workers.
Start date 07/01/2014
ends 10/15/2014.
$9.87 P/H. 7:00 am to
1:00 pm. 35 HRS. P/W.
Walk & hand plant sug-
arcane apply fertilizer &
pesticides transplant
weed by hand repair
fences remove debris
mow grass irrigate use
hand tools. Load & Un-
load trucks. Field &
shed sanitation duties.
Minor maint. & opera-
tion of farm equip. Must
be able to lift up 50 lbs
walk stoop bend reach
or kneel repetitively for
long periods of time.
Work is done in all kinds
of weather. Once hired
worker may be required
to take a random drug
test at no cost to work-
er. Shared housing is
avail. if outside the com-
muting area (at no cost
to worker). Tools, sup-
plies & equip. will be
provided at no cost to
worker. Transp. & sub-
sist. expenses to the
work site will be provid-
ed or paid upon comple-
tion of 50% of work con-
tract or earlier, if appro-
priate & ¾ guarantee
specified in USDOL Reg.
20 CFR 655.122(i) JOB
contract. Contact local
MS Job Center REF: Job
order #486502 Job of-
fered by Olivia Planta-
tion, Inc., Plaquemine,
LA 70764
03 TEMP. farm workers.
Job Start date
07/01/2014 ends
12/15/2014. $9.87
P/H. 7:00 am to 1:00
pm. 35 HRS. P/W. M- F
some weekends. Job
Duties: Cultivate, maint.
water/irrigate dig ditch-
es remove trash trees
bush cut grass repair
fence form rows fertilize
& weed by hand.
Plant/Harvest: wheat
hay cotton soybeans
corn. Repair fence form
rows using hand tools.
Walk behind bailer trac-
tor throwing bails by
hand & unload by hand.
Minor Maint. & opera-
tion farm equip. sanita-
tion duties. Load & un-
load trucks. Able to lift
up to 50lbs walk stoop
bend reach to ground
level or kneel repetitive-
ly. Work is done in all
kinds of weather. Once
hired worker may be re-
quired to take a random
drug test at no cost to
the worker. Shared
housing is avail. IF out-
side the commuting
area at no cost to work-
er. Tools, supplies &
equip. will be provided
at no cost to worker.
Transp. & subsist. ex-
penses to the work site
will be provided or paid
upon completion of 50%
of work contract or earli-
er, if appropriate & ¾
guarantee specified in
USDOL Reg. 20 CFR
655.122(i) JOB con-
tract. Contact Local MS
Job Center. REF: Job or-
der # 486537 Job of-
fered by Glaser Farms
Partnership work-sites
located Oscar, LA
70762, Fordouche, LA
70732 & Maringouin,
LA 70757
General Help
Wanted 320
ACCOUNTING
ASSISTANT
needed for growing con-
struction company. Job
requirements: Asso-
ciates degree from an
accredited college & 2
years experience in con-
struction industry, or 5
years experience in con-
struction industry in an
accounting environment-
required. A/P, job cost-
ing & payroll-required
Proficient in Excel, Word
& Outlook-required.
Assistance with project
management-desired
Benefits include health
insurance & retirement
plan. Hourly pay. DOE
Send resumes with
salary requirements to
fax-662-329-7008 or
e-mail ralphw@lbconstl
lc.com
Clerical &
Office 305
A local company has an immediate opening for a Safety Coordinator at
our site in Hamilton, MS. This individual will need to be self-motivated
and able to demonstrate tact and diplomacy in dealing with other
management personnel, as well as hourly employees.
Responsibilities will include:
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Sudoku
YESTERDAY’S ANSWER
Sudoku is a number-
placing puzzle based on
a 9x9 grid with several
given numbers. The object
is to place the numbers
1 to 9 in the empty spaces
so that each row, each
column and each 3x3 box
contains the same number
only once. The difIcul|y
level increases from
Monday to Sunday.
Easy money
WHATZIT ANSWER
ACROSS
1 Gaiters
6 Morning time
10 Humidor item
11 Tenor Lanza
12 Guinness and
Baldwin
13 Squashed circles
14 Take a breather
15 Clef type
16 Cool —
cucumber
17 Small rug
18 Utter
19 Prison, in slang
22 Sentence
subject, usually
23 Taj Mahal city
26 Wacko
29 Unrefined
32 Singer Tillis
33 Blend
34 Tooth coating
36 “— Lisa”
37 Peripheral
device
38 Column type
39 Coat of arms
40 Calendar entry
41 Final, for one
42 Greek sorceress
DOWN
1 Egyptian emblem
2 Enters en masse
3 Way back
4 Diplomatic skill
5 Fourth-yr.
students
6 Humorist Barry
7 Saudi natives
8 Writer Cather
9 Like a snoop
11 Canadian-born
comic
15 Letter after
sigma
17 Commemorative
statue
20 Center
21 Sense of self
24 Unconfirmed
25 Foolish
27 Salon stuff
28 Track bet
29 Gasp, say
30 Tennis star
Agassi
31 Walks in water
35 Largest amount
36 Chess turn
38 Rep.’s rival
What do you need to plant the seeds
for a successful business — office space, equipment,
transportation, employees, CUSTOMERS?
You can find it all in The Dispatch Classifieds!
Call to place your ad today.
from the ground up!
Grow
your business
662-328-2424 • cdispatch.com/classifieds
Five Questions
1 The
Queen’s
2 Tiananmen
Square
3 Six
4 Tears
5 15
REUSE
THE NEWS
Recycle
this
NEWSPAPER
THE DISPATCH • www.cdispatch.com 10B WEDNESDAY, APRIL 30, 2014
2009 ROCKWOOD Sig-
nature Series Ultra
Light. 2 slide-outs (BR &
kitchen), 29 ft.
$14,000. Call 356-
6149 or 574-1280
2006 HONDA 1300
(Harley style) 38,974
mi. Black & Silver,
w/lots of chrome, 2
sets of saddle bags.
$5,000 Call 328-4355.
Motorcycles &
ATV's 940
Autos For Sale 915
RV CAMPER & mobile
home lots. Full hookup
w/sewer. 2 locations
W&N from $75/wk -
$260/mo. 662-251-
1149 or 601-940-1397
2013 WINDJAMMER
34 ft. camper. 3 slides,
electric fireplace.
$26,500. Exc. cond.
Call 242-0126 after
6pm
Campers &
RV's 930
2003 FORREST River
Sierra. 30 ft, 5
th
wheel,
sup. slide, new tires,
awning, blinds. Price re-
duced. Ex. Cond.
$12,500. 364-1575 (c)
Campers &
RV's 930
1999 FORD Mustang
GT. Some body damage.
Good drive train.
$2000. Call 662-570-
3493
Autos For Sale 915
QUIET COUNTRY living.
1792 sq. ft. 3BR/2BA
mobile home on 20
acres in New Hope.
Needs repairs. As is.
$45,000. All offers con-
sidered. Call or text
662-574-8421
NICE 28X48 3BR/2BA
Southern Double wide .
Painted & new carpet
t/o. Must see! Delivered
& set up for $25,900.
Call 662-760-2120
I PAY top dollar for
used mobile homes.
Call 662-296-5923
3BR/2BA. 2002 40x32
Clayton mobile home.
For sale by owner. Must
be moved! Wood floors
& appliances included.
Call 662-574-3027
28X80 DOUBLEWIDE.
5BR/3BA. Home needs
few repairs, but tons of
space & ready to sell.
Home has fireplace, big
kitchen, & rooms every-
where. $23,500 for
home as is. Call 662-
397-9339
28X80 5BR/3BA vinyl
siding/shingle roof, new
cabinets, f.p. Home
needs a little TLC.
$21,500. Must be
moved. Call 662-296-
5923
Mobile Homes
For Sale 865
RIVERFRONT
PROPERTY
Camp Pratt
Call 574-3056
Ray McIntyre
Blythewood Realty
LOCATED IN desirable
Caledonia School Dis-
trict. 27.5 ac. +/-. Beau-
tiful land w/stream,
hardwoods, agriculture
& pasture land. Lg. barn
on property in good
cond. Ideal hunting
property or home-place.
Priced to sell.
$119,900. 662-574-
9190. Serious inq. only
SPRING SPECIAL. 2½
acre lots. Good/bad
credit. $995 down.
$197/mo. Eaton Land.
662-726-9648
SPRING SPECIAL. 2½
acre lots. Good/bad
credit. $995 down.
$197/mo. Eaton Land.
662-726-9648
BANK
APPROVED SALE
Smith Lake, AL. Deep
Water Dockable Year
Round! Very Gentle
Slope $69,900. Buy
pennies on the dollar,
open & wooded parcel
at the end of a cul de
sac. Surrounded by a
Natural Forest. Call
866-221-3747
68.5 ACRES close to
city limits. Timber, red
dirt, road frontage.
$550,000. Realtor
owned. 662-312-5184
Lots &
Acreage 860
39.5 AC. Mature pines.
Great hunting land. 5
min. East of MS line in
Pickens Co. AL. $88k.
Call 327-1402
35 ACRES in N.H. w/24
yr. old pines. $3500/
ac. Will divide into 10
ac. plots. 915 6
th
St. S.
$3500. 2.7 ac. on
Tiffany Ln. $13k. Owner
fin. avail. 386-6619
35 ACRES for sale
in Caledonia. Priced at
$110,000. Call Kimber-
ly Reed with Crye-Leike
662-364-1423 or 662-
328-1150
1.5 & 2.5 ACRES on
Ponderosa. Reasonably
priced. Call 662-328-
2207
Lots &
Acreage 860
WANTED TO BUY. All
types of real estate. In-
vestors pay CASH. Sell-
ers pay no fee. Call
Long & Long 662-328-
0770
BUILDING THAT can be
used for office or studio
apart. Fenced in back
yard. $39,000. On Jess
Lyons Rd. across from
golf course. 549-7495
BEAUTIFUL CUSTOM
3 story power plus
home in West Point.
Priced reduced on this
5BR/3BA on 5.7 ac. lot.
3700 sf, wrap around
porch, dbl car garage,
hardwood floors, family
room, DR, great room,
lots of storage & energy
efficient. 18 min. from
Severstal. Call Kimberly
@ Crye-Leike 364-1423
3BR/2BA. LR, formal
DR, kitchen, breakfast
rm, lg. den, fireplace, lg.
Sun room, 1 yr. old cen-
tral unit, new fridge,
beautiful hw floors, ½
basement, new roof,
completely remodeled.
2540 sf. 331 5
th
St NW
Vernon, AL. $159k. Call
662-574-2820
3-4BR/3.5BA, 2900 sf.
plus full basement, nice
wooded lot. $164k.
Neg. Vernon, AL. Call
205-695-5070
Houses For Sale:
Other 850
ALL AREAS. 3BR/2BA.
Low down pmt. WAC.
Call Randy 1-855-847-
6808
Houses For Sale:
Starkville 846
3BR/3.5BA. 3000 sq.
ft, 13 yrs. old. 2 mi.
from N.H. School on 2
ac. w/wired shop.
$234,900. Call for view-
ing appt. 662-386-7682
Houses For Sale:
New Hope 825
2BR HOUSE for sale
w/mother-in-law suite.
Vacant for several
years. $28,500. Call
251-3352
Houses For Sale:
East 820
LOVELY UPPER side
home. Very cozy & nice
older home in Bunker
Hills. Sits on 1.5 private
acres & close to shop-
ping, restaurants,
schools & entertain-
ment. 3BR/2BA, 2 living
areas, breakfast area &
dining room. Large
shop/storage building
w/drop shed. Lots of
storage. Owner is an
agent with Crye-Leike
Properties Unlimited

BUYING

OR

SELLING
For all your real estate
needs, call DJ Williams,
Century 21 Doris Hardy
& Assoc.,LLC. 662-386-
3132 or 662-327-8596
2 HOUSES off Military
Rd. @ reduced prices.
3BR/2BA/2200 sq ft. &
3BR/1BA/1400 sq ft. &
1.5 acres. Call Dean
662-328-8679
Houses For Sale:
Northside 815
OFFICE BUILDING for
rent. Great loc. on Blue-
cutt Rd. Lg. front recept.
area, 3 off. & conf. rm,
w/ ample parking. 662-
242-7547 for more info
Commercial
Property 805
1100 SF, corner of
Bluecutt Rd. & Chubby
Dr. Call 662-327-2020
1100 SF, corner of
Bluecutt Rd. & Chubby
Dr. Call 662-327-2020
Office Spaces 730
Houses For Sale:
Other 850
RENT A fully equipped
camper w/utilities & ca-
ble from $135/wk -
$495/month. 3 Colum-
bus locations. Call 601-
940-1397
MOBILE HOMES. By the
wk/mo. 2BR start @
$100/wk or $325/mo.
$99 move in special for
monthly rentals! Call
Shawnie 662-315-8595
3BR/2 BA, Double-
wide, wall air condition-
ing, natural gas heat;
Refrigerator, stove &
dishwasher provided.
Front porch & added
back storage room. Lo-
cated on one acre of
land on Wolf Rd. CMSD.
662-364-2799
2BR/1BA, 3BR/2BA
Bill Walker Dr. 3BR/
2BA Jess Lyons Rd.
2BR/1BA Gunshoot Rd.
$350-$500/mo. Lease
& Dep. No Pets. Open 8-
5 Mon-Fri. Weathers
Rentals 662-327-5133
Mobile Homes
For Rent 725
2BR/1BA. Front porch,
walking distance to
Caledonia schools.
$300/mo. plus dep. &
lease. Call 352-4776
Mobile Homes
For Rent 725
3BR. SEC. 8 accepted.
Ref. req. Call 662-425-
4491 or 327-6802 after
4pm
Houses For Rent:
Other 718
1/2BR. IDEAL for 2
people. Lg LR, dining
room carport, & kit/util.
rm w/ washer/dryer
hookup. Call 662-352-
1261
Houses For Rent
West: 715
Houses For Sale:
Other 850
EAST EMERALD Es-
tates. 3BR/2BA, double
carport, outside
storage, fenced back
yard. RENOVATED.
$850 mo. Lease, de-
posit, references. Avail-
able June 1. Call Long &
Long, 328-0770. NO
HUD
Houses For Rent:
East 712
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