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CIPS Australia 3rd Annual Conference

People powering contemporary high-performance supply chains


by

Prof. John Gattorna


Sydney October 2007

Fact, like it or not: all enterprises have multiple supply chains running through them

Narrow focus of traditional logistics

Suppliers

Manufacturers

Retailers/ Distributors

Inbound logistics

Information Internal Outbound operations logistics Materials

Internal interfaces Broad focus of integrated supply chain management

External interfaces Customer Demands


(by segment)

Figure 1.1: Operationalizing the concept of supply chains

Note: All figures referenced in this presentation refer to figure numbers in Living Supply Chains ( Gattorna, 2006 )

Supply Chains as Human Systems

Products and Services only move through supply chains as a result of human decision making
On the outside: It is customers who decide to buy, and how ( Buying Behaviour) On the inside: It is employees, management, and Boards who decide how to respond ( Cultural )

... everything else are simply enablers ( Technology, Processes, KPIs, Incentives, etc)

What is needed is an over-arching organizational concept to inform the design and management of supply chains

Adapted from Figure 1.2: Elements of the dynamic alignment framework

Aligning for success 4000m pursuit, Athens 04

A common metric is essential to compare and assess the degree of alignment across the 4 levels

Integration
g lin e e F

Development D
In t ui tio

Force for cohesion co-operation and relationships

Force for creativity change and flexibility

Behavioral Forces
Force for analysis, systems and control Force for energy action and results
g in k n hi T

S en si ng

A Administration
Source: Adapted from Figure 29.2 in Gattorna (1998)

Producer

Figure 1.3: General characteristics of the four dominant behavioral forces or logics

This will lead us to a new service-cost paradigm based on alignment the old one is flawed

Traditional Paradigm
Logistics Cost (% of Sales) Customer Satisfaction (%) Logistics Cost (% of Sales)

New Paradigm
Customer Satisfaction (%)

Time Cost Satisfaction

Time

Source: Adapted from Figure 1.1.1 in Gattorna ( 2003)

Figure 1.9: Paradigm shift to a best-of-both-worlds strategy

Customer service means different things to different customers

(I)

Integration Mature imminent change?? Loyalty and long-term relationships Brand loyalty Joint Venture mentality Quality emphasis Teamwork Consensus

Early / young market No clear patterns / traditions yet to be established New product / technology High level R&D (eg. CDs) Supplier-led risk Entrepreneurial Lower price sensitivity

(D)

Customer Service = Empathy, Understanding, Relationship

UNDERSTAN D ME

SURPRISE

Customer Service = Innovative, Creative response to unique needs

(A)

Stable market, patterns are established Commodity Drive for efficiency experience culture Value for money High price sensitivity Procedural Standards Structure

Patterns emerge - growth Customer led demand Sales, promotion, distribution important Strong commercial attitude antirelationship (eg. price sensitive); opposite to loyalty Hollywood syndrome only as good as your last performance Product differentiation

(P)

Customer Service = Reliability, Predictability, Consistency

BE CONSISTENT

RESPOND

Customer Service = Responsiveness in a commercial way

Figure 1.10: Primary customer service logics

You must identify the dominant buying behaviours evident in your marketplace normally 3 or 4 at most

Collaborative
Close working relationships for mutual gain

Efficient
Consistent low cost response to largely predictable demands

Dynamic (QR)
Rapid response to unpredictable supply and demand conditions

Innovative Solutions
Supplier-led development and delivery of new ideas

Ia Mostly predictable Regular delivery Mature or augmented products Primary source of supply Trusting relationship Teamwork/partner ship Information sharing Joint development Forgiving Price not an issue

A Predictable demand within contract Regular delivery Efficiency low cost focus Multiple sources of supply Little sharing of information More adversarial Standard processes Power imposed Transactional Very price sensitive

Pa Unpredictable demand Commodity relationship Time priority/urgency Opportunity focus Ad hoc source of supply Low loyalty, impersonal Fewer processes Outcome oriented Commercial deals based on pragmatism Price aware

Dp Very unpredictable demand Higher risk Flexible delivery response Innovation focus Rapid change Individual decision making Solutions oriented Management of IP Incentives/ego No price sensitivity

Source: Adapted from fieldwork at Fonterra, 2001

Figure 2.2: Four (4) most common dominant buying behaviors

You must identify the dominant buying behaviours evident in your marketplace normally 3 or 4 at most

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User Markets

User Segmentation
Needs Needs Needs Needs

The identified dominant buying behaviours in the user/consumer base

Service propositions Strategy


Service Propos. Service Propos. Service Propos. Service Propos.

The portfolio of different service strategies designed to respond to identified buying behaviours

Internal Capabilities Cultural Capability


Org../ Process Org. / Process Org./ Process Org./ Process

The distinctly different subcultures required to underpin the corresponding service propositions

Shape & create Leadership Styles


Leadership Leadership Leadership Leadership

The different leadership styles that are required to shape the corresponding subcultures

Figure 2.1: Multiple Supply Chain Alignment on the customer side

Four (4) generic supply chains have been identified and variations of these may exist

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Relationship with customer

Demand predicable, (e.g. from historic offtake), but the loose relationship does not necessitate an extreme service level. Focus on efficiency.

Loose

Fully Flexible Lean

Respond opportunistically & manage yield. Focus on providing creative solutions for premium price.

Predictable demand, easily managed through tight collaboration with customers. Focus on retention of customer relationships.

Continuous Replenishment

Agile

Unplanned or unforeseen demand, and a sometimes loose relationship with customers - almost always demands an agile response at higher cost-to-serve. Focus on the service-cost equation

Tight High

Predictability of demand

Low

Figure 2.3: Four (4) Generic supply chain types

These 4 supply chains co-exist, like laminar flow in a pipeline, and have to be de-constructed for clarity

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Figure 2.4: Flow types and matching supply chain types

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ILLUSTRATIVE

Small volumes Difficult delivery locations Merchandising support Limited space Tight finance Stable demand Certainty of Supply Regular orders Price sensitive Relationship important

Large volumes Standing orders Straight forward regular deliveries Relatively high stock levels Price sensitive Appropriate promotions

Small volumes Some unpredictable in demand Regular orders Difficult delivery locations Pack presentation important Premium/value-adds Price aware Variety important

Small volumes Special solutions Specific delivery arrangements Creative sales and logistics arrangements Small volumes Value-for-money

eg., suburban hotels, and bottle shops

eg., Major retailers; CML; Woolworths

eg., Fine dining restaurants; casinos; resorts; theme parks; 5star hotels

eg., Small & remote customers; not buying direct

*Segment names selected by Fosters

Figure 2.6: Fosters new behavioural-based segmentation in Australian beverage industry

Delivering Coca Cola in three (3) different ways

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ILLUSTRATIVE

Figure 2.7: The three (3) different supply chains at Coca-Cola Japan

Multiple supply chains in the Healthcare Industry

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WARDS Theatres

Labs Radiology

Stores Pathology

Office Engineering

Kitchen

Direct Large Volumes Lean Supply Chain

Flexible Deliveries (Mixed) Agile Supply Chain


a P

Direct Deliveries Small & Frequent Collaborative Supply Chain


I a

Scheduled Deliveries Major Items Fair Deal Supply Chain


i A

Supplier Warehouses

Wholesaler Cross-Docking

Pharmaceuticals

Medical Supplies

Food

Domestic Supplies

Maintenance

Capital Equipment

Appendix 2B: Multiple Supply Chains in the Healthcare Industry

and in a fmcg conglomerate

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ILLUSTRATIVE
Fast Food Chains Food service distributors Food processors Small Industrial Fresh Daily (Supermarkets, small retail and McDonalds

Supermarket DC s

Bulk Industrial

Flow

Flexibility
a P

Fresh
D p

Bulk
i A

Uncle Tobys

Meadow Lea

Milling & Baking


Business Units Factories

..

Appendix 2B: Multiple supply chains in processed food manufacturer Goodman Fielder

The ultimate solution is a logistics network optimization model aligned to major customer & supplier segments

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Inbound Transport

Outbound Transport

Suppliers

Mill

Mill Distribution Centre

Distribution Centre

Markets

Interfacility Transport

Suppliers

Mill

Mill Distribution Centre

Distribution Centre

Markets

MODELING VARIOUS COST-SERVICE SCENARIOS


Raw Material Intermediate Product Finished Product

Figure 2.10: Logistics network optimization at major New Zealand Pulp & Paper Manufacturer

Supply-side and demand-side alignments are the mirror-image of each other

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CUSTOMER MARKET

Forward Alignment

Enterprise

Reverse Alignment

Buyer Behaviours Collaborative Efficiency/consistency Demanding/quick response Innovative solutions SC Strategies Continuous replenishment Lean Agile Fully flexible Cultural Capabilities Group Hierarchical Rational Entrepreneurial Leadership Styles Coach Traditional Company Baron Visionary Procurement Strategies JIT Replenishment Scenario Transactional Volatile Supplier Behaviours Trusted & reliable partners Planned creativity Process driven Opportunistic

SUPPLIER MARKET

Source: Adapted from Figure 3.5.2 Gattorna (2003)

Figure 2.11: Supply side alignment, the mirror image of the customer side

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Executing a multiple supply chain strategy: working together with people to deliver the required responsiveness

Understanding the power of unseen cultural forces

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VISIBLE PATTERNS OF BEHAVIOUR


Structure Strategy Systems VISIBLE CONSCIOUS

VALUES AND BELIEFS


Goals of the enterprise Means used to accomplish these goals

UNDERLYING ASSUMPTIONS
Taken for granted assumptions about the organisational reality INVISIBLE UNCONSCIOUS

Source: Adapted from Figure 4.3.3 in Gattorna (2003)

Figure 3.1: The performance iceberg

4 basic types of sub-culture exist, and various combinations are possible

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I
Group
Means: Ends: Internal Focus Synergy, teamwork, co-operation Cohesion

Indirect Control

D
Entrepreneurial
Means: Ends: Innovation, flexibility, readiness Growth External Focus

Means:

Systems, measurements, controls Order

Means: Ends:

Action, objectives, energy Results

Ends:

Hierarchical

Direct Control

Rational

Source: Adapted from Figure 4.3.5 in Gattorna (2003)

Figure 3.2: The four (4) generic enterprise sub-cultures

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Group Culture
Emphasis on cohesion, teamwork, synergy and consensus.
Closed informal communication which is shared by way of cliques and membership of an inner circle Control achieved by commitment to Common Values Management support emphasises the internal climate and environment Individuals tasks are negotiated by consensus Rewards are based on informal standards and the ability to maintain internal cohesion good team players Deviant behaviour is tolerated provided it adheres to consensus values

Entrepreneurial Culture
Emphasis on individualism, creativity, fast response.
Open informal communication which is shared with whoever happens to be around at the time Control achieved by commitment to a common vision Management support emphasises leading and inspiring Individuals are empowered to perform their roles Rewards are based on creativity and entrepreneurial behaviour Deviant behaviour is tolerated provided it is goal directed

Emphasis on order, stability, information and control.


Closed, formal communication which is shared only on a need to know basis Control achieved by focus on processes Management support emphasises procedures Individuals tasks are established by precedence Rewards are based on formal standards and the ability to maintain internal cohesion good administration No deviation from approved processes

Emphasis on analysis, guidelines and sustained high levels of activity.


Open formal communication by way of committees and memoranda Control achieved by focus on results Management support emphasises planning Individuals are given structural authority to perform their roles Rewards are based on formal standards and relevant results analysis and action No deviation from plans or performance standards

Hierarchical Culture

Rational Culture

Figure 3.3: Details of each sub-culture

If you operate overseas, the respective Country culturesoverlay company cultures (1) and modify behavior
Low Power Distance
Austria Israel

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Finlan d

Denmark New Zealand Great Britain Norway Australia Germany USA Canada

Collective Orientation
Taiwan Thailand Hong Kong Greece Japan Spain Belgium France South Africa

Individual Orientation
Italy

Turkey Brazil Singapore India Mexico

High Power Distance

Source: Adapted from Hofstede (1980)

Fig 3.6: National Country Values

Country cultures overlay company cultures (2) and modify behavior

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Feminine
Sweden Norway Portugal Finland Thailand Taiwan Netherlands Denmark

Uncertainty Avoiding
Belgium Switzerland Germany Italy Japan

Singapore Canada India New Zealand USA Australia

Uncertainty Accepting
Hong Kong

Great Britain

South Africa

Masculine
Source: Adapted from Hofstede (1980)

Fig 3.7: National Country Values

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Leading from the front: converting customer insight into successful operational execution

In successful organizations, the leadership (at all levels) is always in close touch with customers

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COACH
Continue to:

Thinking

VISIONARY
Continue to:
Lead by inspiration Respond to turbulence Use information to create change

Lead by teaching Make decisions by consensus Get the best from people

Watch out for:


Slow response to sudden environmental change Market-related performance

Watch out for:


Tangential interests Short on the detail People policies Inefficient response to opportunities

Consensus

Individual

TRADITIONALIST
Continue to:
Lead by procedure Use information to maintain control Implement proven business tactics

COMPANY BARON
Continue to:
Lead by objectives Focus on what s important Plan for future profitability

Watch out for:


Inability to respond to environmental change Efficiency at the expense of effectiveness

Watch out for:


Paralysis by analysis Political in-fighting Effectiveness before efficiency

Doing

Figure 4.2: Leadership styles

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Continuous Replenishment supply chains: where relationships matter most

Continuous Replenishment supply chains demand side

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where relationships matter most


Focus Value Proposition Close relationship with selected customers Share information Strategic partnerships Long term stability Mutual trust

Collaboration Zone

Cultural Capability O.D Process IT KPIs Incentives Job Design Internal Coms. T&D Recruitment Leadership Style

Group sub-culture Relationship cluster Standard processes, eg. Customer Account Management CRM;SRM;VMI;ECR;CDP;CPFR Emphasis on loyalty and retention Encourage participative schemes Authority/autonomy negotiated by consensus Consultative; face-to-face Team building Recruit team players Coach Conscientious Leads by teaching Concerned for others Loyal; committed; politically astute Seeks agreement by consensus

Continuous Replenishment supply chains clusters, focused on loyal high-value customers

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COO

CEO

P P L F S/M P L S/M F P

Procurement

Production

Finance

Sales/Mktg

Logistics Customer A

Customer B
I a

P L S/M P F

Customer C

FUNCTIONS

Account Teams/clusters configured with a Relationship mindset bias


Note: Individual team members return to their respective Functions for training and other specialist matters

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Lean supply chains: Focusing on efficiency and lowest cost-to-serve

Lean supply chains demand side

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focusing on efficiency and lowest cost-to-serve


Focus Value Proposition High volume; Low variety; Low costs; MTF Seek economies of scale Low cost production & distribution Forecast demand; mature products; predictable lead-times Hierarchical sub-culture Organize clusters around core processes Standard processes; emphasis on cost L-T capital investment in ERP & other IT systems DIFOTEF; forecast accuracy; productivity ratios; Conformance to policies Centralized control rules and regulations apply Regular; structured; on need to know basis Emphasis on analysis and measurement Recruit players with analytical skills Traditional Leads by procedure; precedents essential Implements proven business practices Cost controller; efficiency focus Uses information to control Seeks stability Risk averse

Cultural Capability O.D Process IT KPIs Incentives Job Design Internal Coms. T&D Recruitment Leadership Style

Lean supply chain clusters focused on key processes that drive efficiency and routine for price sensitive customers

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SOURCING PM P L F S/M ORDER MGT PM L S/M F P

COO

CEO

Procurement

Production

Finance

Sales/Mktg

Logistics

FULFILMENT PM L S/M P F

Price Sensitive Customers

FUNCTIONS

PM = Process Manager Process teams configured with a cost improvement bias


Note: Individual team members return to their respective Functions for training and other specialist matters

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Agile supply chains: where quick response is paramount

Agile supply chains demand side

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where quick response is paramount


Focus Value Proposition Manage the enterprise for responsiveness; quick reaction ; MTO Fast decision-making Fast delivery Rapid response in unpredictable conditions Rational sub-culture Clusters designed for speed and focused on specific subsegments Process short-cuts; fast response Applications: Postponement; SCP; APS; Network Models; Absolute speed of response Achieve targets; cash and in-kind bonuses Authority /Autonomy established by clear and published limits Formal; regular; action-oriented Problem-solving; resource management Recruit personnel who are results- driven Company Baron Leads by objectives Embraces change Goes for growth Focuses on whats important Analytical; fact-based solutions

Cultural Capability O.D Process IT KPIs Incentives Job Design Internal Coms. T&D Recruitment

Leadership Style

Agile supply chain clusters designed to react fast to demanding customers in volatile markets

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COO
P P L F S/M

CEO

Procurement

Production

Finance

Sales/Mktg

Logistics
a P

P L S/M F a P

Sub-sets of Demanding customer segment

P L S/M F a P

FUNCTIONS

Clusters are focused on different parts of the same segment but possibly different product categories
Note: Individual team members return to their respective Functions for training and other specialist matters

Example of an Agile organization

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Fully Flexible supply chains: where nothing is impossible

Lean supply chains demand side

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where nothing is impossible


Focus Value Proposition Hedge and deploy resources Meet unplanned/unplannable demand Innovative solutions, delivered fast

Cultural Capability O.D Process IT KPIs Incentives Job Design Internal Coms. T&D Recruitment

Entrepreneurial Small multi-disciplinary cluster, usually on standby No standard processes; use local initiative at the time Low systems requirements; event management appls. Emphasis on finding creative solutions, very fast Reward individualism & risk-taking behaviour Autonomy through empowerment Spontaneous and informal Lateral thinking; brainstorming Recruit enterprising, resourceful personnel

Leadership Style

Visionary Leads by inspiration; authentic Informal Decisive Cares about ideas Values innovation

Fully Flexible supply chain cluster with embedded capacity to deliver innovative solutions to desperate customers, fast

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CEO

Special Services Desk (SSD)

Procurement

Production

Finance

Sales/Mktg

Logistics

FUNCTIONS
P

Single cluster made up of multi- disciplinary, multi-tasking, multi-talented individuals

S/M

L D p

Focus is on single events/emergencies at any one time

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Hybrid Supply Chain Combinations in Practice

Multiple combinations of supply-side and demand-side elements of enterprise supply chains

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Supplier Selling Logics


D p

Supply-side

Decoupling Point at Enterprise

Customer-side

Customer Buying Logics


D p

VOLATILE * (Fully Flexible)

FULLY FLEXIBLE
2

SCENARIO * (Agile)

AGILE
1

TRANSACTIONAL * (Lean )

LEAN

I
a

JUST-IN-TIME * REPLENISHMENT (Continuous replenishment)

CONTINUOUS REPLENISHMENT

I
a

EXAMPLES
1 2

GENERAL PARTS EGGED BUS COMPANY

Different names for supply-side component

Figure 8.4: Mixed Supply Chain Logics

Zaras design brings fashion to market, fast

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3. Textiles are sourced from global suppliers

Partners 3 Zara 1

1. Zara stores are digitally linked to headquarters; employees collect and share input from customers daily

Information flows Product flows 4. Zaras parent performs the capital-intensive production activities

Customers are young fashionable professionals

2 6

2. Zara designers sketch new styles based on customer input and hot spot trends

5. Local workshops perform final sewing/assembly

6. One distribution centre dispatches product to stores twice weekly

Source : Mercer Management Consulting

Multiple supply chain alignment in the Australian construction materials market

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Focused service offer and tailored operations to achieve alignment

DISTRIBUTION CENTRE

Logic: A
A

PICK CENTRE

Logic: Pa

Logic: Ia
TRADE CENTRE

I a

DISTRIBUTOR

COMMERCIAL RESIDENTIAL RESIDENTIAL COMMERCIAL PROJECT PROJECT SUPPORT SUPPORT

Source: Carpenter Ellis

Figure 6.4 Resultant Metropolitan Distribution Network

It all boils down to the ultimate challenge of managing different combinations of organizational configurations, co-incidentally

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COO

CEO

Cont. Repl. Cluster


Sales/ Mktg Logistics Customer A

F/Flexible Cluster
Consists primarily of small teams of specialists . Permanent or temporary teams. Emphasis on innovation and problem-solving. Loose structure with no hierarchy. Power balance, highly cooperative and contributive culture
Special Services Desk (SSD) Procurement Production

CEO

Finance

Sales/ Mktg

Logistics

P P L F S/M P L S/M F P

Procurement

Production

Finance

Emphasis on balancing the interests of both function and customer

Customer B
I a

High levels of communication and collaboration. Best for medium-sized companies. Dual authority and reporting.

FUNCTIONS
P _ Single cluster made up of P F

P L S/M F P

Customer C

multi - disciplinary, multi -tasking, multi -talented individuals

FUNCTIONS
Note: Individual team members return to their respective Functions for training and other specialist matters

S/M

L D p

Account Teams configured with a Relationship bias

Focus is on single events/emergencies at any one time

Lean Cluster
SOURCING PM P L F S/M ORDER MGT PM L S/M F Price Sensitive Customers P

Agile Cluster
Suitable for rapid response. Focus on the core competences required. Decentralized.
L P P L F S/M a P

COO

CEO

Employees organized around core


Finance Sales/ Mktg Logistics

COO

CEO

Procurement

Production

processes. Team-work is promoted for more


A

Procurement

Production

Finance

Sales/ Mktg

Logistics

efficient delivery of services. Uses cross-functional teams and processes. Sharing responsibilities and decisions by promoting team-work.

P a P

P S/M F

FULFILMENT PM L S/M P F

Small companies can use each others capabilities and resources.


L

Sub -sets of Demanding customer segment

P a P

FUNCTIONS
Note: Individual team members return to their respective Functions for training and other specialist matters

PM = Process Manager Process teams configured with a cost improvement bias

May be virtual Highly collaborative culture buy allows individual flair.

P S/M F

FUNCTIONS
Note: Individual team members return to their respective Functions for training and other specialist matters

Clusters are focused on different parts of the same segment but possibly different product categories

Multiple organization formats within an enterprise

A Final Word

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Stay close to your customers; know their businesses inside out, and understand their patterns of demand (behavioral segmentation) Make sure everyone in the company is working to the same customer demand data Gear up to respond rapidly to the volatile (unpredictable) component of your customers demands Recognize that you will simultaneously be part of multiple supply chains in and between your suppliers and customers Organize your people in ways that mirror the demand patterns of your customers Think alignment at every point along the supply chains you participate in Remember the future is about supply chains competing against each other; you should aim to be involved in only winning combinations Continue to grow successfully in a volatile world by.. Forecasting for capacity; and Executing to demand

Six (6) questions for you to consider

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1. Has your company/enterprise attempted to design/operate your supply chain network based on alignment principles?
YES NO

2.

Has your company/enterprise used behavioral segmentation of customers to inform the design/operation of its supply chains?
YES NO

3.

Has your company consciously attempted to shape various sub-cultures to execute the different types of supply chains it has running through the business?
YES NO

Six (6) questions for you to consider cont.

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4.

Does top management in your company treat logistics/supply chain management as a specialist function or as an integral part of the business?
YES NO

5.

Do you think top management in your company understands the role culture plays in powering corporate supply chains?
YES NO

6.

If no, are they in denial?


YES NO

Dr. John Gattorna


BE, Melb., MBA, Monash, PhD., Cranfield

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John Gattorna established and led Accentures supply chain practice in ANZ/Southern Asia for several years, and was one of the Firms most respected thought leaders. Previously, he operated his own consulting company, specializing in marketing, logistics, and channels strategy, servicing an international clientele. Indeed, John is generally regarded as a global thought leader in the supply chain management space, and continues to be much sought after as a speaker on the international conference circuit. John has authored/co-authored several books and numerous articles on marketing, marketing planning, pricing, customer service, channels strategy, logistics, and supply chain management. His latest book, Living Supply Chains: how to mobilize the enterprise around delivering what your customers want, was published by FT Prentice Hall in May 2006, and is written specifically for C-level executives in major global enterprises. A Chinese language edition is due in July 2007. The Gower Handbook of Supply Chain Management (5th edn), published in 2003, is the definitive work on supply chain management theory and practice; rights to Chinese and Russian language editions have been granted, and the former was published in March 2004. His previous book co-authored with Andrew Berger, Supply Chain Cybermastery, was published at the height of the e-commerce boom in 2001, and has since been translated into Chinese. An earlier book, Strategic Supply Chain Alignment, published in 1998, was the first publication to bring a behavioural dimension to the task of building high-performance supply chains. This book has since been translated into both Japanese and Chinese. Although John originally came from industry he has a strong academic pedigree having taught undergraduate, post-graduate, and executive programs at the University of New South Wales and Macquarie University in Sydney; Oxford and Cranfield universities in the UK; and Normandy Business School, Le Havre, France. He currently holds Visiting Professorships at Cranfield School of Management and Macquarie Graduate School of Management and is Chairman of the Advisory Board, Institute of Logistics & Supply Chain Management, Victoria University in Melbourne. In the early 1990s, John was one of the original co-developers of the Alignment concept, and since then has continued to research, develop, and apply this powerful framework to the design and management of enterprise supply chains. His work has evolved into the Dynamic Alignment concept that he is currently applying to enterprise supply chains, globally. Going forward, John intends to continue his research, teaching and writing in the supply chain space, and act as an independent adviser, mentor, coach, educator, thought leader, and point-of-view provider to C-level executives and Boards around the world. e:john@johngattorna.com | w: www.johngattorna.com | t. +61 2 9956 5046 | 08/06/07

Books authored and co-authored

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Gattorna, John, Living Supply Chains: how to mobilize the enterprise around delivering what your customers want, Published by FT Prentice Hall, London, 2006. Go to www.pearson-books.com Chinese language edition currently under preparation and due for publication late- 2007 by PHEI, Beijing Gattorna, John (ed) (2003), Gower Handbook of Supply Chain Management, Aldershot: Gower Publishing Chinese language edition published by Century-Wave Co./PHEI, Beijing in March 2004; Russian language edition to be released soo Berger, A.J. and Gattorna, J.L. (2001), Supply Chain Cybermastery, Aldershot: Gower Publishing Chinese language edition published in 2002 by Century-Wave Co./PHEI, Beijing Gattorna, J.L. (ed) (1998), Strategic Supply Chain Alignment, Aldershot: Gower Publishing Japanese language edition published in 1999 by Japan UNI Agency, Inc., Tokyo Chinese Language edition published in 2003 by Economic Management Publishing House, Beijin Gattorna, J.L. and Walters, D.W. (1996), Managing the Supply Chain: a Strategic Perspective, London: MacMillan Press