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855 • May 1-14, 2014 2 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com
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River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 21 No. 855 • May 1-14, 2014 3 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com
Pat Quinn barely won his last election against a
Republican candidate who had almost no field
operation. Every vote that Rauner can turn out at
the precinct level is a vote that gets him closer to
victory.
And that Rauner push could
have a significant trickle-down
effect on state-legislative races –
particularly in the Illinois House,
where there are more competitive
contests.
Even so, Republicans
shouldn’t expect any miracles this
November.
A study published earlier this
year by Washington University
in St. Louis took a look at
gerrymandering – deliberately
partisan drawing of congressional districts – and
found that examining the data in two different
ways produced the same result.
Every one-percentage-point increase in vote
share over 50 percent produced about a two-
percentage-point increase in the number of seats
the ruling party won. So winning 55 percent of
the vote will generally yield about 60 percent of
the seats.
Now compare that to the Illinois results. I
asked the Yes for Independent Maps coalition in
O
ut of power for a dozen years and hobbled
even before that by anti-patronage court
rulings, Illinois’ Republican-party infra-
structure has all but collapsed.
So part of GOP gubernatorial nominee Bruce
Rauner’s task is to try to somehow rebuild a
grassroots infrastructure.
It won’t be an easy job. Republicans have
never, in the modern age, been able to match
the Democrats’ ability to dispatch patronage
armies to the state’s distant corners because of the
Democrats’ Chicago and Cook County patronage
bases. The Republicans’ local organizations are
essentially hollow these days, and they have no
troops to speak of.
Before the primary, Rauner’s campaign had
ambitious hopes of opening as many as 50 field
offices throughout Illinois. Those plans were
scaled back as reality sank in. Finding enough
experienced people to staff those offices would be
next to impossible.
It’s unknown at this time, even apparently
to the Rauner campaign, just how many offices
it plans to open and where. The candidate has
enough cash to do pretty much whatever he
wants. The problem, as noted above, is finding
people to do the job.
But if his campaign can get this project off the
ground, it could be a game-changer. Governor
GOP Fighting Uphill Battle with Gerrymandered Districts
by Rich Miller
CapitolFax.com
ILLINOIS POLITICS
Rauner has
enough cash
to do whatever
he wants. The
problem is
finding people.
March to count up the number of votes that all
Democratic legislative candidates received so I
could compare that to the number of legislative
seats the Democrats won. The coalition is
attempting to place a constitutional amendment
on the ballot this November that
would try to take some of the
partisan politics out of the state’s
redistricting process. So while they
do have motives, the numbers are
the numbers.
The results were astonishing, as
first revealed in my Crain’s Chicago
Business column. They far exceed
that historic national trend.
According to the remap
coalition’s count, Democrats
received 53 percent of all the votes
cast in Illinois House races. Using the WashU
study, the House Democrats should historically
hope to receive 56 percent of the seats, but they
won 60 percent in 2012.
Of course, the Democrats completely control
the map process here. Nationally, the Republicans
don’t control every state’s remap process. So there
would be an expected bump here.
But the numbers in the Senate were even
more dramatic. Senate Democratic candidates
won a total of 52 percent of the vote. That would
translate historically into 54 percent of the seats,
but the party won 68 percent of all Senate seats.
Having President Obama at the top of the
ticket surely helped the Democrats last time
around. For example, Obama spent a king’s
ransom in Iowa, which drove Democratic turnout
way up in the district of Senator Mike Jacobs
(D-East Moline) – just across the Mississippi
River.
Obama’s success here even helped Democrats
win a district that was drawn to benefit a
Republican. The House Dems pulled their staff
out of the Kankakee-area’s 79th District after
Republican spending neared a million dollars, but
the drastically outspent Democrat Kate Cloonen
ended up pulling off a stunning upset, winning
by 91 votes.
So not all those 2012 wins can be attributed to
the map. The Republicans were fighting straight
uphill with Obama at the top shooting down.
However, Obama won’t be on the ballot this
year. Voter unrest is obviously quite high yet again
in the president’s second off-year election, so
we’ll soon see just how solidly Democratic those
district maps really are. My guess is they’ll hold
up pretty well.
Rich Miller also publishes Capitol Fax (a daily
political newsletter) and CapitolFax.com.
River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 21 No. 855 • May 1-14, 2014 4 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com
it had broad support in the Senate, and the
current House version of the amendment
has 38 sponsors – including Quad Cities-
area representatives Mike Smiddy and Pat
Verschoore.
But on April 29, it was declared all but
dead. Lacking the 71 votes necessary for
passage in the House, the constitutional
amendment wasn’t even called for a vote in
the Senate as its sponsor had planned.
In a sense, the legislative debate has died
before it even began. The constitutional-
amendment referendum is merely the
foundation for the substance of the
proposal – the actual rates that would
be imposed in a graduated-income-tax
system.
Proponents of the Fair Tax proposal
correctly believe that companion legislation
setting income-tax rates is essential; it’s
unrealistic to expect citizens to approve the
constitutional change without knowing its
exact effect on their pocketbooks.
As Kelly Steele, communications director
for A Better Illinois, said: “Voters are
going to know in November what they’re
voting on, in terms of ‘This will be my tax
rate.’” (A Better Illinois – a large coalition
encompassing organized labor, faith
organizations, liberal advocacy groups, and
social services – has spearheaded the push
for the Fair Tax.)
Illinois’ “Fair Tax” Plan Could – and Should – Have Been an Easier Sell
Creating a New Monster
H
ow would you like a cut in your
income taxes while protecting fund-
ing for education and public safety?
Or how would you like the Illinois
General Assembly to stick it to you by
making permanent the income-tax increase
of 2011 that is supposed to (mostly) expire
next year?
Lucky you: In a bizarre set of
circumstances, a “Fair Tax” proposal would
give you both! Ninety-four percent of
Illinois taxpayers would see their income
taxes drop in 2015, while lawmakers
wouldn’t have to make the tough budgetary
choices they promised to. Win-win!
Sound confusing? It is. Sound
impossible? It isn’t.
Bear with me, and I’ll explain how the
legislature – specifically Democrats faced
with two highly unattractive options in
an election year – devised a “third way”
that’s not really a third way at all. It’s
merely a variation on one of those highly
unattractive options, but it’s been cleverly
packaged on the assumption that voters
have short memories.
This gambit is technically still in play,
but on Tuesday it looked nearly certain
that it lacked the legislative votes to move
forward to a November referendum. If
it has indeed died for 2014, let this be a
cautionary tale about the perils of broken
pledges – and attempts at marketing them
as something positive.
And if the plan finds new life in the next
few days, it’s essential that lawmakers and
voters understand what it really is.
Fundamentally, the Fair Tax proposal
would make permanent the revenue from
the “temporary” income-tax increase of
2011 while using a graduated-rate structure
to shift more of the burden to higher
incomes. Whether it represents a tax cut is
less a matter of debate than definitions and
assumptions.
Think of it like this: Elected
representatives would take a bigger chunk
of your paycheck than they promised they
would, and then they would give a portion
of that amount back and ask you to thank
them for the tax cut.
A Trap of Their Own Making
The Fair Tax is admittedly a smart play,
yet it’s also full of hubris – which I expect
will be the source of its ultimate downfall.
Instead of trying to find some compromise
on revenue, the Fair Tax is an attempt by
Democrats to extract themselves from a
trap of their own making without paying a
price at the ballot box.
First, they positioned the debate on
taxation as a false binary choice: Allow the
income-tax rate to drop to its scheduled
3.75 percent next year and face deep budget
cuts, or continue the current 5-percent rate
and avoid the budget doomsday. Then they
disingenuously promoted the graduated-
tax-rate Fair Tax proposal as a painless
alternative: Nearly everybody gets tax
cuts (but don’t look too closely), while the
General Assembly avoids difficult decisions
on state spending.
This is a critical week for the proposal.
A constitutional amendment faces a
May 4 deadline to get a referendum on
the November ballot, and the General
Assembly’s schedule gives it an effective
deadline of May 1.
The constitutional amendment would,
by itself, have no effect on the income
taxes citizens and businesses pay. Rather,
it would eliminate the constitution’s
requirement of a flat tax applied to income
and instead allow graduated rates – in
other words, higher income-tax rates on
people and businesses with more income.
Proponents said last week that they were
cautiously optimistic about the prospects
of getting the required super-majorities
in both chambers of the legislature for the
constitutional amendment. They claimed
So the constitutional amendment needs
to be evaluated in conjunction with the
current rate-structure proposal by Senator
Don Harmon – which is the basis of claims
that 94 percent of taxpayers would see their
income-tax bills drop in 2015.
Regardless of what happens in the
legislature, the Fair Tax proposal – both
the constitutional amendment and
the proposed rate structure – is worth
exploring.
If both the amendment and rate-
structure bills somehow pass the General
Assembly, voters of course will need
to be able to cut through the spin and
understand what’s at stake before voting in
November.
If, on the other hand, the constitutional
amendment doesn’t make the November
ballot, the idea of a graduated income-tax
system in Illinois could certainly return.
But more importantly, it’s instructive to
see how a lack of imagination – or perhaps
a refusal to find middle ground on revenue
that would have required significant
budget-tightening – made the Fair Tax a
tougher choice than it needed to be. If the
5-percent and 3.75-percent tax options
are monsters lurking behind the doors,
the current Fair Tax plan represents yet
another scary beast.
Put simply, the “third way” should and
could have been far less terrifying to both
legislators and voters.
Avoiding Armageddon
In January 2011, the Illinois General
Assembly passed an income-tax hike that
raised the rate from 3 percent to 5 percent
retroactive to the first of the year. On
January 1, 2015, it’s scheduled to drop to
3.75 percent. The 5-percent rate was, they
promised, temporary. (Skeptics of this
pledge were plentiful.)
Now doomsday has arrived, and
Democrats didn’t plan well for it – even
though they knew it was coming the
moment they approved the tax hike.
If the income-tax rate is allowed to
drop to 3.75 percent, it’s Armageddon
for the Illinois budget. The change would
take effect at the midpoint of Fiscal Year
2015, and it would necessitate serious
budget cuts. In February, the House passed
revenue estimates for Fiscal Year 2015
showing a $2.2-billion hole compared to
the current fiscal year’s $36.7 billion in
revenue. In future fiscal years, of course,
the budget shortfall compared to the
current fiscal year would be even larger.
COVER STORY
Net income Pre-2011
3% Rate
Scheduled 2015
3.75% Rate
Fair Tax Current
5% Rate
$10,000 $300 $375 $290 $500
$20,000 $600 $750 $730 $1,000
$30,000 $900 $1,125 $1,220 $1,500
$40,000 $1,200 $1,500 $1,710 $2,000
$50,000 $1,500 $1,875 $2,200 $2,500
$100,000 $3,000 $3,750 $4,650 $5,000
$150,000 $4,500 $5,625 $7,100 $7,500
$200,000 $6,000 $7,500 $9,950 $10,000
$300,000 $9,000 $11,250 $16,850 $15,000
$400,000 $12,000 $15,000 $23,750 $20,000
$500,000 $15,000 $18,750 $30,650 $25,000
$1,000,000 $30,000 $37,500 $65,150 $50,000
Understanding the “Fair Tax” Proposal
Senator Don Harmon’s “Fair Tax” rate structure is being promoted as a tax cut
for 94 percent of Illinois taxpayers. But that’s only true compared to the current
5-percent income-tax rate – which is scheduled to drop to 3.75 percent on
January 1. Comparing the proposal to the current rate results in a tax cut for all
net-income levels below $202,632. However, comparing the proposal to the
scheduled rate results in a tax cut for only net-income levels below $21,739.
River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 21 No. 855 • May 1-14, 2014 5 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com
by Jeff Ignatius
jeff@rcreader.com
So if, as promised, the income-tax rate
drops, Democrats will have to make hard
budget choices, and then explain cuts
to state spending and services to their
constituents. Take this projected scenario
with a large grain of salt, but A Better
Illinois is warning voters that cuts could
include “laying off 13,400 teachers from
the classroom; taking 95,000 kids out of
early-childhood education; saying ‘no’ to
30,000 college students wishing to get a
MAP grant; closing 11 correctional centers
and releasing 15,000 inmates; laying off
3,000 correctional officers; and cutting
state police by 30 percent.” Proponents of
the Fair Tax also argue that property taxes
would likely increase across the state.
Alternatively, the Democrats who
control both chambers of the legislature
and the governor’s office could opt
to extend the current 5-percent rate
indefinitely or for a set period of time.
This would prevent spending cuts, but
it would also result in an uncomfortable
day of reckoning at the polls; Democratic
legislators would have some serious
explaining to do, and it would likely fall on
many deaf ears.
Enter the Fair Tax proposal and its two
core components.
First is the November referendum to
amend the state Constitution allowing the
state to levy a graduated income tax.
Steele said the issue is tax fairness:
“If Illinoisans decide they want to tax
millionaires at a higher rate than they tax
minimum-wage workers, that’s something
they’re allowed to do [under the proposed
amendment]. In the status quo, that
provision in the constitution prevents that.”
He added that the current constitutional
mandate of a flat income tax “puts an
economic straitjacket on legislators,
where they’re only able to give tax relief to
somebody who makes minimum wage or
even a middle-class family if also they give
large tax cuts – equal tax cuts – to someone
making a million or $50 million a year.
That’s not a taxation system that’s based
on one’s ability to pay. It’s fundamentally
unfair.”
The second element of the Fair Tax
proposal is the three-rate structure
proposed by Harmon: 2.9 percent applied
to the first $12,500 of net income, 4.9
percent applied to net income between that
and $180,000, and 6.9 percent applied to
net income over $180,000. (So a taxpayer
with $200,000 of net income would pay
2.9 percent on $12,500, 4.9 percent on
$167,500, and 6.9 percent on $20,000.)
Harmon’s rate structure, Steele said,
“generates stable and sustainable revenue
that would prevent the draconian cuts to
vital investments in things like education,
health care, [and] public safety that will
happen if we go over a fiscal cliff and just
allow the 2011 tax rates to expire.”
And therein lies the crux of the Fair Tax
problem. A key feature of Harmon’s rate
structure is that it’s essentially revenue-
neutral for the state – which is a major
selling point for legislators in this cash-
strapped state but which also makes it a
bitter pill for conscientious citizens. At
heart, Harmon’s structure would make
permanent the revenue from the temporary
tax hike, and sly marketing promoting tax
cuts for nearly everybody can’t erase that
simple fact. The income-tax burden would
be shifted to taxpayers earning north of
$200,000, but it wouldn’t be lessened.
Kristina Rasmussen, executive vice
president of the conservative Illinois Policy
Institute, called it a “bait and switch,”
and while that’s a loaded term, it’s also
technically true. Despite the tax-cut claims,
the Fair Tax plan’s core goal is to replace,
dollar for dollar, revenue from the income-
tax hike that is set to expire at the end of
this year. “They’re trying to get out of the
promise of tax relief for all Illinoisans next
year,” she said.
Underlying the Fair Tax plan, then, is the
hope that voters will see the amount they’re
paying next year as a reduction from 2014
levels – and forget that they were told in
2011 that they’d be paying significantly less
come 2015.
So the spin battle is between whether
the proposal should be considered in the
context of the current 5-percent rate or the
scheduled 3.75 percent. Depending on the
angle from which it’s viewed, it’s either a
modest tax cut compared to what the vast
majority of people are currently paying, or
it’s a tax hike for all but the lowest income
levels compared to what taxpayers were
promised they’d pay starting in 2015.
And it is a spin battle.
A May 2013 poll by A Better Illinois
showed 77-percent support for the
amendment ballot language: “Allow fair
tax for individuals and corporations where
higher rates apply to higher income levels
and lower rates to lower income levels.”
But that only takes into account one
element of the Fair Tax proposal. It doesn’t
deal with the scheduled 2015 income-
tax-rate reduction, the possibility that the
Continued On Page 16
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River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 21 No. 855 • May 1-14, 2014 6 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com
Vol. 21 · No. 855
May 1- 14, 2014
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O
n May 4, in an event co-
sponsored by the Jewish
Federation of the Quad
Cities, the Figge Art Museum will
host the screenings of a feature-
length documentary and seven
shorter works, all of them by
award-winning Israeli filmmakers.
Yet if the you enter the Video Art
from Israel: A One-Day Sensory
Experience presentation with
preconceived notions about the
films’ collective subject matter –
anticipating explorations of Israel’s
foreign policy, say, or the country’s
ongoing struggle with Palestine – you’re
likely to be in for a surprise or two. Or
eight.
You won’t, for example, be expecting
Ben Hagari’s Invert, a visually ravishing
short involving a man and his parrot in
which all of the film’s colors are replaced
with their complementary equivalents
– black for white, red for green, et
cetera – and all of the dialogue is spoken
backwards. Or Yael Efrati’s and Ayelet
Ben Dor’s Double Conspiracies Outside
My Doorstep, an entertaining black-
and-white piece – employing animation
and stop-motion photography – on the
proliferation of stray cats in Tel Aviv.
Or program curator Keren Shavit’s
Oryctolagus Cuniculus, which provides
a detailed look at the pressures and
prodding experienced by contestants in
a beauty pageant – a beauty pageant for
rabbits.
“I knew from the start,” said Shavit via
e-mail earlier this week, “that I wanted
to present works that deal with reality in
Israel in its various aspects, even if it is
an imagined reality. However, my intent
was to select works that don’t necessarily
carry a political statement or deal with
the ongoing conflicts we see and read
about in the news, as these are mostly the
types of works that receive international
exposure. I wanted people to get a new
and fresh experience in regards to Israeli
art.”
A 2002 graduate of the Bezalel
Academy of Arts & Design Jerusalem,
and a current faculty member at New
Parrots and Cats and a Pageant for Bunnies
by Mike Schulz
mike@rcreader.com
York’s School of Visual Arts, mixed-
media artist and Brooklyn resident Shavit
has had her own video art screened
at film festivals in countries including
Iceland, Norway, Germany, Canada,
and China, and one of her experimental
works was a 2013 prize winner at the
Jerusalem Film Festival.
Consequently, she said, “after several
visits abroad, I decided I would like to
curate programs of Israeli artists, as well
as organize international art programs
of collaboration and exchange between
different countries and cultures. The
responses [to my work] in other countries
always intrigued me, especially where
there seemed to be little knowledge, or no
knowledge at all, about Israeli art.”
If Shavit’s name and field of interest
seem familiar to local video-art
aficionados, it might be because one of
those programs, titled Pizza Face Eating
Falafel, was screened at Rock Island’s
Rozz-Tox venue last April.
Said Shavit of the presentation:
“It was a traveling program created
collaboratively with the production
manager of Haifa Museum of Art in
Israel, Michal Ribinstein. The two of us
curated an eclectic selection of video
works by several contemporary Israeli
artists, and the works we selected dealt
with ideas and forms of familiar domestic
environments, the alienation of daily
routine, conflicts of urbanism, and the
deconstruction of personal and collective
ideals.” (Adding a smiley-face emoticon
to the sentence’s end, Shavit added, “The
works were also full of dark humor.”)
During Shavit’s area visit as
curator of Pizza Face Eating Falafel,
she said, “I became curious about
the Jewish community in the Quad
Cities, and together with my host,
Benjamin Fawks, we went to the
Jewish Federation, where I met
[executive director] Allan G. Ross.
It really moved me to learn of the
Jewish community there, and I
was hoping to design a program of
Israeli art and bring it to the Quad
Cities.”
With Ross’ and the Jewish
Federation’s support, Shavit was
consequently asked to curate another
film presentation for the area, and she
said, “I was very happy and honored
when the Figge Museum agreed to host
the program.” She was also somewhat
intimidated, adding, “Curating is always
a complex job. The process of putting
together a collection of Israeli video art
and experimental films required a lot of
collecting and filtering.”
The centerpiece for Shavit’s Video
Art from Israel program wound up
being director Ran Tal’s 70-minute
documentary Children of the Sun, which
Variety magazine called a “crowd-pleaser”
and “a fascinating collage of archival
materials.” An exploration of the first
generation of kibbutz children separated
from their parents and raised under
the Israeli “communal child-rearing”
education program that prevailed
through the 1980s, Tal’s film was the
winner of Best Israeli Documentary
and Best Editing citations at the 2007
Jerusalem Film Festival, and received
Best Documentary laurels at the 2008
Ophir Awards (generally referred to as
“the Israeli Oscars”).
Yet the incredible diversity of Video
Art from Israel is best exemplified within
the program’s selection of short films.
Two of them – 2007’s Mother Economy
and 2011’s Black & White Rule – are by
Israeli filmmaker Maya Zack and boast
the sort of crystalline visual panache one
might associate with David Fincher, or
Video Art from Israel, May 4 at the Figge
Continued On Page 16
Ben Hagari's Invert
ART
River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 21 No. 855 • May 1-14, 2014 7 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com
W
ith the
Water
Liars’s
self-titled album
– the band’s third
record in as many
years – you could
be forgiven for
thinking that
you’re in for a
jarring ride based
on the song titles and the opening track’s
bleak but majestic riff. “Cannibal” is fol-
lowed by “War Paint” and “I Want Blood.”
You are in for a ride, although it’s
less the beat-down and carnage that the
titles suggest than a careening from loud
distortion to gentle Americana and back.
“Ray Charles Dream” is a hooky, punk-
tinged rock song sandwiched between
the slow-footed guitar lament of “Tolling
Bells” and the even-slower-footed piano
lament of “Vespers.”
“That’s always been sort of a point for
us,” said singer/songwriter/guitarist Justin
Kinkel-Schuster in a phone interview
last week, promoting the trio’s May
14 performance at Rozz-Tox. “Widely
shifting dynamics has always been an
important part of our sound ... both
live and on records. ... I just always am
intrigued by moving between those poles.
There’s something interesting about
taking a ride like that.”
It’s not merely a sonic roller coaster.
The title and sentiment of “I Want Blood”
(“I want blood all the time”) would seem
to lend themselves to a ravenous rock
treatment, but the song instead places
the lyrics in a warm and ethereal musical
context, making it a reverb-heavy anthem
to searching and soaring. “Tension is why
art exists,” Kinkel-Schuster explained of
the apparent contradiction. “Without
tension, I don’t think there’s a whole lot to
go on. ... Without tension you don’t have
a story; there’s nothing to resolve.”
By the light folk of the fourth song,
“Swannanoa,” it’s evident that the band
possess an unusual capacity to surprise
and confound without alienating
listeners. No matter what mode Water
Liars – which also features drummer
Andrew Bryant and bassist G.R.
Robinson – operates in, it’s able to craft
something convincing and unforced.
Part of that, surely, is because nothing
is forced. Kinkel-Schuster said the
band’s debut, 2012’s Phantom Limb, was
“essentially an accident,” the fruits of he
and Bryant getting together initially to
see what happened. Last year’s Wyoming
was also recorded
quickly, the result
of the duo crafting
detailed demos
before heading
into the studio.
The band spent
(relatively) more
time working
on Water Liars
– but it was still
recorded in three sessions and mixed in
another. “Compared to what we’d done
with the records before, it was at least
twice as long, but still altogether it was
only about 10 days of work,” Kinkel-
Schuster said. “Both Andrew and I, that’s
how we work best. We don’t really like to
mess around. ... I’m less cerebral about
the recording process than I think most
people are. ... It’s essentially still magic to
me.”
Unlike with Wyoming, Water Liars
went into the studio this time with
acoustic demos but no final arrangements
– which Kinkel-Schuster and Bryant
typically work on together. “We just
wanted to give ourselves more time
to think and work and see if there’s
some other places we can take the
arrangements of the songs,” the singer
said. “I was just at a point where I wanted
us to try a few different sounds and see
what exactly we could do with them.” The
process of Water Liars, he said, added “an
element of discovering the songs as we
got into them.”
PopMatters.com wrote that “taken as
a lone release, Water Liars is the band’s
strongest outing, formalizing their
distinct sound.” But it added: “Having
worked their sound across three albums,
this approach is bordering on the
formulaic.”
Kinkel-Schuster seemed to agree,
saying that fans shouldn’t expect a fourth
record to arrive early next year as Water
Liars’ career to this point would suggest.
“We’re definitely hanging back on it,” he
said. “Working so quickly, we’ve sort of
bypassed the opportunity to grow and
change the way the records sound. I think
it’s time to do that.”
Water Liars will perform on Wednesday,
May 14, at Rozz-Tox (2108 Third Avenue,
Rock Island; RozzTox.com). The show
starts at 8 p.m. and also features White
Zephyr. Admission is $7.
For more information on Water Liars, visit
WaterLiarsMusic.com.
No Messing Around
Water Liars, May 14 at Rozz-Tox
by Jeff Ignatius
jeff@rcreader.com
MUSIC
Photo by Daniel Drinkard
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River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 21 No. 855 • May 1-14, 2014 8 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com
David G. Smith, May 17 at the Redstone Room
Unexpected Light in the Darkness
by Jeff Ignatius
jeff@rcreader.com
I
n putting together his new
album One House, Blue
Grass, Iowa-based David
G. Smith “ended up with 10
issues-oriented songs,” he said
in an interview last week.
This was a bit of an
accident. Smith – who will
be celebrating the album’s
release with a May 17 show at
the Redstone Room – said he
brought 21 songs to producer
Blue Miller and “figured we’d
find an album out of that. ...
We ended up recording two
albums. ... We’ve got another
one on deck. It’s already been
mastered.”
And when Smith considered which songs to put
on which album, One House’s 10 tracks seemed to
naturally go together in the order they appear.
The title track asks the question “Can we live in
one house built on higher ground?” “Ivory” deals
with the illegal trade of elephant tusks. “Jesus Is in
Prison” is about a death-row inmate. “Angels Flew”
tells the story of a boat lift rescuing people on 9/11.
“Doesn’t Take Much Light” and “Ariel” are specific
narratives based on real people – with Parkinson’s
disease and the extremely rare Rett syndrome,
respectively. (The River
Music Experience concert
is also a platform to raise
money for the latter illness.)
It’s a heavy collection, and
for some tastes it will likely
be too on-the-nose, even
though it’s rarely preachy
– which Smith called “the
mortal sin of songwriting”:
“It’s a supreme challenge
to try to write something
that will strike a chord with
people and at least make
them pause and maybe think
a little bit.”
The subject matter and
directness are countered by folk arrangements that
are thoughtful and evocative, but more importantly
the album – Smith’s second studio effort – is also
filled with hope, conviction, earnest heart, and
lovely turns of phrase that elevate it. Smith is at his
best finding unexpected light in the darkness.
On “Jesus Is in Prison” (one of five songs that
Smith co-wrote instead of penning solo), he sings
that the inmate in question “never said he’s guilty”
– but there’s nothing in the song to indicate that
he’s not. There’s an empathy to the song, trying to
figure out what’s in the convict’s head and soul, and
Smith combines at least three ideas in one dense
sentence: “Evil’s loose and Jesus is in prison / And
he’s waiting for the truth to set him free.” Here he’s
talking about the wickedness of the world; invoking
the Christian idea of “inasmuch as you did it to one
of the least of these my brothers, you did it to me”;
and suggesting the peace that death can bring.
In the relatively simple love song “Made for
You,” there’s a cryptic, eloquent nugget that is at
once cheesy and wise, speaking matter-of-factly
to the ways relationships change people, and one
can infer that it can be for better or worse: “I wasn’t
born this way / I was made for you.”
With “Second Chances” – about people with
serious illnesses – there’s a touching insight that
cuts through the poignancy, articulating the
inherent value of a connection even when hope
is dim or lost: “Here’s to you givers and receivers /
Here’s to each of you who reaches for the other.”
Something similar happens with “Ariel,” which
seeks and finds the positive – and a lesson – in
a child who cannot communicate: “I see your
free spirit trapped inside an unrelenting body /
Teaching me the necessity of innocence.” Rather
than being an empty sentiment or projection,
Smith finds the crucial detail: “blinking rapid-fire
to music that you find to your liking.”
Regardless whether he’s telling one person’s
true story or a larger narrative, Smith said the
process and aims are the same: “‘Ariel’ is on one
end of the spectrum, ... along with ‘Doesn’t Take
Much Light,’ that you are naming names. Whether
you’re naming names or not, you’re looking for a
story that’s compelling,” and searching in that for
something that will resonate. “Telling the truth and
being honest about it. That’s how I approach every
song.”
It’s a lesson he also tries to teach. Shortly after
our interview, Smith had a songwriting workshop
in Nashville on teen pregnancy. “What will guide
us through hopefully are those components,” he
explained. “It’s a compelling story, and we’re going
to try to tell some of what’s not just our truth, but
what rings true. That’s tough to do.”
As for the finished third studio album, Smith
said it won’t be quite so topical: “I’ll get a little more
personal, and I think I’ll let people see a little more
of me,” he said. And he promised “a couple more
fun songs.”
David G. Smith’s record-release show for One House
will be held on Saturday, May 17, at the River Music
Experience (129 North Main Street, Davenport;
RiverMusicExperience.org). The performance begins
at 7 p.m., and tickets are $5.
For more information on David G. Smith, visit
DavidGSmithMusic.com.
MUSIC
Photo by Paul Schatzkin
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River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 21 No. 855 • May 1-14, 2014 9 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com
in the second half of Act II, when DiPietro gets
ensnared in his second playwriting trap: the need
to include a life lesson in an otherwise lighthearted
comedy. After Carol announces her gift to Ralph,
the play takes a heavy, dour turn as circumstances
that may prevent Ralph and Carol from moving
forward in their relationship are revealed. The
almost ever-present humor of the piece’s previous
three-quarters are dropped entirely at this point so
that DiPietro can make a comparison with opera,
with Ralph explaining that, in opera, characters
want to be in love, “but life always gets in the way.”
I will not deny the poignancy of this pair’s troubled
lives, but I do resent DiPietro for attempting to
turn his buoyant romantic comedy into a heavy-
handed tragedy.
Excluding these sour scenes, however, the
Richmond Hill Players’ A Last Romance cheered
my heart with its sincere performances, operatic
interludes sung by Jeff Utsinger as the younger
Ralph, and the play’s amusing, smile-inducing
story.
The Last Romance runs at the Richmond Hill
Barn Theatre (600 Robinson Drive, Geneseo)
through May 4, and more information and tickets
are available by calling (309)944-2244 or visiting
RHPlayers.com.
THEATRE
The Last Romance, at the Richmond Hill Barn Theatre through May 4
New Leash on Life
By Thom White
T
he Richmond Hill Barn Theatre’s The Last
Romance is, for the most part, a refreshingly
lighthearted romantic comedy. Watching
Friday’s performance, I was delighted not only
with much of playwright Joe DiPietro’s script, but
with the tempo of director Tom Morrow’s produc-
tion. The characters’ conversations are quickly
paced, though not unnaturally so, and maintain
the piece’s joyful energy, but Morrow also gives
his cast moments to breathe when appropriate,
allowing the play’s emotions and humor to sink in
before the fast-talking exchanges continue.
Most of The Last Romance takes place in a
dog park, where Tom Naab’s Ralph (who doesn’t
own a dog) waits for a chance to meet Stephanie
Naab’s Carol, a woman he saw when he altered
his routine and took a different path while on his
daily walk. Therein lies the heart of DiPietro’s play,
with the author insisting that changing norms can
open people up to new possibilities – in this case,
the possibility of romance for those in their 60s
resigned to dull and/or sad lives.
As Ralph, Tom Naab gets to display this theme
best. Prior to Carol’s arrival, Ralph is pestered by
his overprotective sister, Rose, portrayed by Jackie
Skiles in one of her best performances. (As Rose
attempts to entice Ralph to come home for dinner,
she says, “I made roast beef,” a line Skiles delivers
with a slight hope that it might tempt Ralph, but
also a
resignation
suggesting
it probably
won’t.)
And while
talking
with his
sister,
Ralph
carries
a defeated demeanor. Yet once Carol enters the
picture, he perks up with a new, youthful energy in
his step and a twinkle in his eye, as though Carol
has lit up his entire life.
The play continues with these dog-park
flirtations between Ralph and Carol as he works to
woo her, and there’s a charm in Tom’s playfulness,
and in Ralph’s forwardness and confidence,
hinting that Carol will succumb to him. Stephanie
Naab, meanwhile, walks a fine line between
aloofness and interest as her Carol initially holds
Ralph’s advances at arm’s length – but holds them
there, in part, to keep them coming. (At one point,
she says to Ralph, “You’re coming on to me” with
condescending moral superiority, but then follows
it with a meek, almost pleading, “Aren’t you?”)
The relationship between these actors is
ticklish fun, and the satisfying growth of Carol’s
and Ralph’s romance would be enough to drive
the plot. However, DiPietro falls into a couple
of playwriting traps that are unfortunate. He
ends his first act with a cliffhanger as Carol’s dog
escapes from the dog park and the audience is left
wondering if Ralph and Carol will find the pooch,
and this problem, for me, seemed contrived and
distracted from my interest in the blossoming
relationship. Personally, I would’ve wanted to
return after intermission just to see if Carol and
Ralph finally found love.
Thankfully, the beginning of Act II brings
Carol and the acerbic Rose together for what I
found to be the funniest scene in the play, in which
Rose – beginning to accept her brother’s new
romantic interest – talks with Carol in the park.
(With a dry delivery, Rose tells Carol, “Ralph is
quite a catch,” and when Carol asks, “How so?”,
Rose says, “He can still drive at night.”) And the
story continues with Ralph and Carol getting to
really know each other, building to a beautiful
moment in which Carol presents the opera-loving,
opera-star wannabe Ralph with a surprise gift, one
that seals the direction of their relationship and
creates a pleasing ending that allows the audience
to imagine this couple’s life together. Except that’s
not where DiPietro ends the play.
While the contrived cliffhanger ending is mildly
annoying, it’s nothing compared to what happens
Jackie Skiles (standing) and
Tom and Stephanie Naab
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River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 21 No. 855 • May 1-14, 2014 10 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com
River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 21 No. 855 • May 1-14, 2014 11 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com
by Mike Schulz • mike@rcreader.com by Mike Schulz • mike@rcreader.com
Movie Reviews
by Mike Schulz • mike@rcreader.com
– for reasons completely superfluous
to the plot – escapes his adversaries
by leaping down stairwells and over
rooftops and, frequently and literally,
running on walls. I later learned that
this was the practice of the acrobatic
martial art parkour, which Belle
helped originate, and its spectacular
employment here makes the first 10
minutes of Brick Mansions among the
10 most exhilarating movie minutes of
the year. Compact and muscular, and
pulling off his miraculous stunts with
no-sweat brio, Belle is a thrilling sight
to behold in this intro, and makes the
rest of Delamarre’s uninspired Escape
from New York clone look even shabbier
than it otherwise might’ve. (Sadly,
Belle’s co-star, the late Paul Walker,
proves unable to pull off his Belle-lite
feats without serious aid from his editor
and slow-motion photography.) Here’s
hoping the charismatic, funny, and
crazily gifted Belle lands future gigs in
more action flicks that deserve him,
and fewer in which hulking nemeses
get knocked unconscious while bird
whistles pepper the soundtrack, like
Sylvester getting conked on the noggin
by Tweety. There’s really only so much
cartoonishness this genre can stand.
For reviews of Heaven Is for Real, The
Quiet Ones, Transcendence, A Haunted
House 2, Bears, and other current
releases, visit RiverCitiesReader.com.
Follow Mike on Twitter at Twitter.com/
MikeSchulzNow.
THE OTHER WOMAN
Unduly high expectations, as we all
know, can sometimes ruin your movie-
going experience. Unduly low expectations,
on the other hand, generally yield nothing
but benefits, and so I’d like to thank film-
critic consensus for making me so fearful
of Nick Cassavetes’ The Other Woman.
This revenge comedy may be indefensibly
weak, but the unbridled and unwarranted
zeal with which so many people are
attacking it – The Dispatch/Rock Island
Argus used Richard Roeper’s description
“excruciatingly awful” as the review’s
headline – makes me feel that some defense
might be necessary.
Alas, you’ll be reading no defense of
Cassavetes’ labored and atonal direction,
nor of debuting screenwriter Melissa
Stack’s badly rigged storyline, which finds a
hotshot lawyer (Cameron Diaz), a wronged
spouse (Leslie Mann), and a profoundly
dim beach bunny (Kate Upton) getting
even with the skeezy lothario (Nikolaj
Coster-Waldau) who done them wrong.
Presentationally, The Other Woman is an
utter mess; Cassavetes lets the moronic
comic gambits run on way past their points
of exhaustion and the slapstick staging
is depressingly amateurish, and many of
the director’s more obvious choices, in
context, make no sense at all. (As might be
expected, famed swimsuit model Upton
makes her first appearance running in
slow-motion in a bikini – but exactly whom
is Cassavetes trying to turn on with this
entrance? Straight guys? Gay gals? ’Cause
while I hate to stereotype, I’m betting few
of either demographic are gonna bother
with this film.) And
the means by which
Stack’s women plot
and execute their
retaliation – Laxatives
in his wine! Estrogen
in his smoothies!
– are ridiculously
forced and sitcom-y
even for a genre that
hardly depends on
realism. By the time Costner-Waldau’s
heartless bastard is reduced to a shrieking,
blood-soaked lunatic at the finale, you
might find the sight of your impatiently
tapping foot more entertaining than
anything Cassavetes is putting on-screen.
Yet making crappy high-concept
comedies is one of the things Hollywood
does best (or at least with the most
regularity). So I find it rather strange that
The Other Woman’s negative reviews seem
so much more hostile than they were
for, say, That Awkward Moment or Ride
Along or Delivery Man, considering that
Diaz, Mann, and Upton are clearly doing
their damnedest to make this unworkable
project work. Unlike her character, Diaz
seems impervious to humiliation here;
she creates a sensibly sardonic figure
with a firm ethical stance, and even
amidst the stupidity, Diaz’s intelligence is
never in doubt. Mann is given a horrific
introduction in which her babbling
housefrau is so neurotic and shrill that you
think her hubby is right to cheat, but the
performer’s drunken hysteria is legitimately
funny, and several of her seemingly
improvised bits land with fizzy exuberance.
(Mann becomes more and more likable
as the movie
progresses.) And
while her role
would appear
to be little more
than an extended
visual gag, Upton
is so blithely daffy
– smiling bright-
eyed at her own
shallowness –
that she’s utterly irresistible, even scoring a
deserved laugh during her brief bit in which
she looks through binoculars the wrong
way. This trio, and the nicely tart turn
by Nicki Minaj as Diaz’s assistant, aren’t
enough to make Cassavetes’ comedy worth
your time, but while it’s only April, I’ve still
seen more than 20 titles in 2014 I’ve enjoyed
less than this one. “I’m glad she’s super-hot,”
says Mann, to Diaz, after seeing Upton on
the beach. “I think she brings up our group
average.” Agreed. And amazingly, though it
isn’t a high compliment, The Other Woman
brings up the film year’s group average, too.
BRICK MANSIONS
Upon reflection, director Camille
Delamarre’s Brick Mansions is more
reminiscent of a James Bond movie than
nearly any other recent action thriller I
can think of – but that’s only because its
pre-title sequence, as with most Bond
films, is the best thing about it. Before the
film dives headfirst into its aggressively,
amusingly lunatic premise involving a
rocket that’s going to blow Detroit off the
face of the Earth, there’s an extended chase
scene in which French star David Belle
Listen to Mike every Friday at 9am on ROCK 104-9 FM with Dave & Darren
Cheat Wave
Leslie Mann, Cameron Diaz, and Kate Upton in
The Other Woman
River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 21 No. 855 • May 1-14, 2014 12 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com
Theatre
Dinner with Friends
Playcrafters Barn Theatre
Friday, May 9,
through Sunday, May 18
I
am extraordinarily proud to say
that on May 18, my parents will
be celebrating their 51st wedding
anniversary. So I’ve decided to treat
them to a play for their special day,
and Sunday the 18th just happens to
be the last performance day for the
Playcrafters Barn Theatre’s Dinner
with Friends, which begins its run
on May 9. Let’s see what the show is
about, according to its online synopsis:
“Invited to dinner at the suburban
home of husband-and-wife food critics
Gabe and Karen, Beth reveals she’s
breaking up with her husband Tom
... .” Hmmm. Then again, maybe the
folks would enjoy flowers and a light
lunch ... ?
You shouldn’t, however, let Beth’s
and Tom’s situation prevent you from
catching Playcrafters’ latest offering,
considering that Dinner with Friends is
easily one of the most highly regarded
relationship dramedies of the past 20
years. Written by Time Stands Still’s
Tony-nominated Donald Margulies,
and the winner of the 2000 Pulitzer
Prize for Drama, the work does indeed
concern the incipient end of a formerly
stable marriage. But as Margulies’
offering toggles between past and
present, exploring
how its two pairs of
couples met and how
their relationships
are subsequently
altered over a 12-year
period, Dinner with
Friends delivers
not only heartbreak but humor and
thoughtfulness and empathy, resulting
in a play that New York Magazine
deems “a stunner,” and that the New
York Times insists “has the grace of a
watercolor and a stealthy emotional
undertow.”
The Barn Theatre’s presentation
is being directed by Fred Harris Jr.,
who recently helmed and appeared in
New Ground Theatre’s The Whipping
Man, and whose directing credits
at Playcrafters include Blues for an
Alabama Sky and A Raisin in the Sun.
Dinner with Friends’ four-person cast,
meanwhile, features a quartet of area-
theatre veterans who have all made
previous appearances on the Barn stage:
Don Faust, Lisa Kahn, Chris Zayner,
and Pamela Crouch – the latter two
of whom, in real life, are husband and
wife. Not here, however: Chris will be
married to Lisa, and Pamela to Don.
Heartbreak? Marital discord? Spousal
swapping? Sounds like every dinner
with friends I’ve ever gone to. But I
have some pretty funky friends.
Dinner with Friends runs Fridays and
Saturdays at 7:30 p.m. and Sundays at 3
p.m., and more information and tickets
are available by calling (309)762-0330
or visiting Playcrafters.com.
What’s Happenin’
Music
John Corabi
Rascals Live
Saturday, May 10, 9 p.m.
S
inger/songwriter and guitarist John Corabi will
perform a special intimate concert at Rascals
Live on May 10, and the artist’s recent solo release
Unplugged was praised by UberRock.co.uk for
its “lush harmonies to soothe the soul” and its
“slightly trippy, lazy-summer-day vibe.”
But if you began loving the musician during his
stint with Mötley Crüe and are now worried that
the guy has gone all soft on us, fear not: The album
also features a Corabi-penned tune titled “If I Had
a Dime,” which boasts the lyrics “If I had a
penny for every time she said goodbye / I could
buy me a mansion and still have enough to get
high.” So we’re good.
And for the past 20-plus years, the prolific
John Corabi – who can deliver powerhouse
rock anthems and haunting ballads with equal
skill – has proven awfully good, too. Though
perhaps best known for his 1990s tenure with
Mötley Crüe, whose credits with the group include
the band’s self-titled 1994 CD, Corabi has recently
re-emerged as a uniquely talented solo artist, with
Metal Forces Magazine calling Unplugged “Corabi
in his purest, rawest, and most soulful form.”
Yet few musicians can claim to have also
collaborated with quite so many bands over
a period of two decades, and in addition to
Mötley Crüe, Corabi has scored legions of fans
Art
Venus Envy Quad Cities
Bucktown Center for the Arts
Saturday, May 10, 6-10 p.m.
“H
ey, Shawn!”
“Well, hey there,
Mike. What do you need?”
“I thought I’d bring you
my article on 2014’s Venus Envy Quad Cities event, the
annual celebration of women in the arts that’s taking place
at Davenport’s Bucktown Center for the Arts on May 10. I
figured you and your graphic-design interns would want to
start laying it out in this week’s What’s Happenin’ section!”
“Oh ... well ... thanks.”
“This year’s Venus Envy, hosted by Bucktown’s artists
and Midcoast Fine Arts, promises to be one of the most
exciting and varied seen in our area since its 2005 debut!
In fact, the visual-arts talents of more than four dozen
Midwestern participants are set to be showcased at
Bucktown, with the displayed works encompassing all
media: oil on canvas, photography, acrylics, watercolors,
mixed media, ceramics, ink and colored pencil, charcoal,
wirework, jewelry, printmaking, stoneware ... .”
“That sounds amazing.”
“If you think that’s amazing, you should check out
this year’s featured artists! There’ll be demonstrations
in pyrography and wood staining by Milwaukee artist
Kat Hustedde, and performance artist Michelle Ladwig
blending movement and charcoal drawing in her Art in
Motion presentation, and lively folk music with the Galena-
based trio The Matriarchs ... !”
“Excellent.”
“You wanna talk excellent? Let’s talk about the
performers on Venus Envy’ two outdoor stages, such as
A n s w e r : N o n e o f t h e a b o v e – C o r a b i a c t u a l l y p l a y e d w i t h a l l e i g h t g r o u p s . U p s e t a b o u t t h e t r i c k q u e s t i o n ? T u f f . W h i c h , b y t h e w a y , i s a n o t h e r b a n d t h e a r t i s t h a s
p e r f o r m e d w i t h . T h e g u y d o e s g e t a r o u n d .
Pamela Crouch, Chris Zayner,
Lisa Kahn, and Don Faust
River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 21 No. 855 • May 1-14, 2014 13 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com
MUSIC
Thursday, May 1 – Kim’s Kabaret.
Fundraising event for local performer
Kimberly Kurtenbach Furness
following her cancer diagnosis,
with half the proceeds benefiting
the Norma Leah Foundation. Circa
’21 Dinner Playhouse (1828 Third
Avenue, Rock Island). 7 p.m. $25. For
tickets and information, call (309)786-
7733 extension 2 or visit Circa21.com.
Friday, May 2 – The Giving Tree
Band. Rock, folk, and bluegrass
musicians in concert, with an
opening set by The Dawn. The
Redstone Room (129 Main Street,
Davenport). 9 p.m. $12-14. For tickets
and information, call (563)326-1333
or visit RiverMusicExperience.org.
Saturday, May 3 – Mobb Deep.
Hip-hop musicians in concert, with
opening sets by Daggers & Gadema,
DJ GMJ, and DJ OMS. Rock Island
Brewing Company (1815 Second
Avenue, Rock Island). 8 p.m. $25
advance tickets. For information, call
(309)793-4060 or visit RIBCO.com.
Saturday, May 3 – Gordy &
Debbie. George Strait tribute artists
in concert. Ohnward Fine Arts Center
(1215 East Platt Street, Maquoketa).
7 p.m. $13-25. For tickets and
information, call (563)652-9815 or
What Else
Is Happenin’
What’s Happenin’
by Mike Schulz
mike@rcreader.com
Continued On Page 14
Music
The Blasters
Rock Island Brewing Company
Saturday, May 10, 8 p.m.
A
group of California-based
roots and blues rockers will be
playing the Rock Island Brewing
Company on May 10, and these guys are
gonna provide plenty of fun on Saturday
night. How do I know? Because the
group is The Blasters, and its most recent
album is titled Fun on Saturday Night.
Trust me, if it was titled Eh, Not the
Worst Way to Spend a Saturday, I Guess,
I’d let you know.
Originated by brothers Phil and
Dave Alvin in 1979, and with the band’s
musical output also encompassing
country, rockabilly, gospel, and even
punk rock, The Blasters were staples of
Los Angeles’ early-’80s club scene, and
frequently performed alongside such
bands as Black Flag, The Screamers, and
X. Yet by the middle of the decade, the
group’s popularity was hardly restricted
to southern California. The Blasters
released five albums by 1985 – three of
which landed on Billboard’s Hot 100
charts – and began touring with the
likes of Los Lobos and Dwight Yoakam,
the latter of whom scored a hit with
his cover of the Dave Alvin song “Long
White Cadillac.”
Although Dave left the band in 1986,
The Blasters have continued to tour and
record with frontman Phil ever since,
with releases
including
2002’s live
album
Trouble
Bound
and 2005’s
critically
acclaimed
4-11-44. The group has also found
itself showcased on some of the cooler
soundtracks of the past 30 years, with
their songs featured among the tracks
for Streets of Fire, To Live & Die in L.A.,
From Dusk ’Til Dawn, and Six Feet
Under.
And music critics have been effusive
in their praise. CoolAlbumReview.
com, for example, goes so far as to
say that The Blasters “should be right
there on the Mount Rushmore of
greatest American bands, mentioned
in the same iconic breath as The Beach
Boys, Creedence Clearwater Revival,
The Allman Brothers, or any other
band you would care to mention.”
BluesJunctionProductions.com reviewer
David Mac, meanwhile, states it more
simply: “I like to think that the blues,
country, gospel, and early R&B had a
baby and they named it The Blasters.”
Well, sure. Along with Jacob and Sophia,
that’s what everyone’s naming babies
these days.
The Blasters perform locally with
opening sets by Piñata Protest and 3
on the Tree, and more information is
available by calling (309)793-4060 or
visiting RIBCO.com.
via his association with Union, The Scream, and
numerous other outfits. Think you’re up-to-speed
on the man’s rock history? Let’s find out. Over the
years, which of the following groups has Corabi
not performed with?
For more information on John Corabi’s Moline
concert, call (309)797-9457 or visit RascalsLive.
com.
1) Angel City Outlaws
2) Angora
3) Brides of Destruction
4) E.S.P.
5) Liberty N’ Justice
6) RATT
7) Twenty 4 Seven
8) Zen Lunatic
Beth Ann Gavin, Mona Ritemon, Esme Haserber, Maureen
Carter, Erin Ebnet, Orenda, Speaking of Secrets, and
Somethin’ Else! Or the entertainment on the indoor Sophia
Stage by the likes of Kristy Owens and Dames du Burlesque
and the Knox College Dance Ensemble and the belly-dance
artists of Phoenix Qamar! Or the fact that the whole event
– drum roll please ... – is free! Free, I say!”
“That all sounds fantastic, Mike. But why are you
bringing me the article yourself? Why isn’t Jeff sending it
to me?”
“Um ... he won’t let me in the office.”
“It’s because you’re dressed up like Botticelli’s Venus,
right?”
“He said it reminded him of The Silence of the Lambs.”
Venus Envy 2014 artworks will also be on display at
Bucktown from May 7 through 23, and more information
and a full schedule of May 10 events at Venus Envy Quad
Cities is available by visiting VenusEnvyQC.com.
A n s w e r : N o n e o f t h e a b o v e – C o r a b i a c t u a l l y p l a y e d w i t h a l l e i g h t g r o u p s . U p s e t a b o u t t h e t r i c k q u e s t i o n ? T u f f . W h i c h , b y t h e w a y , i s a n o t h e r b a n d t h e a r t i s t h a s
p e r f o r m e d w i t h . T h e g u y d o e s g e t a r o u n d .
River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 21 No. 855 • May 1-14, 2014 14 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com
Second Street, Davenport). Saturday
10 a.m.-5 p.m., Sunday 10 a.m.-4 p.m.
Free admission. For information, e-mail
BeauxArtsFair@gmail.com or visit
BeauxArttsFair.com.
EVENTS
Friday, May 2, and Saturday, May
3 – LeClaire French Market Days.
Weekend celebration featuring a
French Flea Market, an art fair, classes,
art projects, book and plant sales,
and more. Downtown LeClaire. For
information, call (563)289-4242 or visit
VisitLeClaire.com.
Saturday, May 3 – Village in
Bloom. Second-annual event featuring
the fine art and performances by area
schoolchildren, a Eulenspiegel Puppets
presentation, arts activities, exhibits
of Isabel and John Bloom’s artwork,
and more. Village of East Davenport.
10 a.m.-4 p.m. Free admission. For
information, call (563)349-3167 or visit
VillageInBloom.com.
For a complete listing of area
happenings, visit the online events
calendars at RCReader.com/calendar.
visit OhnwardFineArtsCenter.com.
Sunday, May 4 – Quad City Youth
Orchestras Spring Concert. Concert
with students from second grade
through high school. Augustana
College’s Centennial Hall (3703 Seventh
Avenue, Rock Island). 3 p.m. $5-10. For
tickets and information, call (563)322-
7276 or visit QCSymphony.com.
Tuesday, May 6 – William
Fitzsimmons. Concert with the folk
singer/songwriter. Englert Theatre (221
East Washington Street, Iowa City). 8
p.m. $25. For tickets and information, call
(319)688-2653 or visit Englert.org. For a
2009 interview with Fitzsimmons, visit
RCReader.com/y/fitzsimmons.
Friday, May 9 – The Steepwater
Band and Edward David Anderson.
Touring rock musicians in concert.
The Redstone Room (129 Main Street,
Davenport). 7:30 p.m. $8-10. For tickets
and information, call (563)326-1333 or
visit RiverMusicExperience.org.
Friday, May 9 – Peter Yarrow.
Concert with the folk singer and former
member of Peter, Paul, & Mary. Englert
Theatre (221 East Washington Street,
Iowa City). 8 p.m. $25-27.50. For tickets
and information, call (319)688-2653 or
visit Englert.org.
Friday, May 9, and Saturday,
May 10 – Kenny Rogers. Grammy-
winning country and pop superstar
in concert. Riverside Casino Event
Center (3184 Highway 22, Riverside).
8 p.m. $39-59. For tickets and
information, call (877)677-3456 or visit
RiversideCasinoAndResort.com.
Monday, May 12 – The Lettermen.
Pop stars in their sixth decade of
performance. Circa ’21 Dinner Playhouse
(1828 Third Avenue, Rock Island). 11:30
a.m. doors, 11:45 a.m.-12:45 p.m. plated
lunch, 1 p.m. performance: $49.64.
5:45 p.m. doors, 6-7 p.m. buffet, 7:15
p.m. performance: $55.91. For tickets
and information, call (309)786-7733
extension 2 or visit Circa21.com.
Tuesday, May 13 – Tommy Castro
& the Painkillers. Blues, soul, and rock
musicians in concert. The Redstone
Room (129 Main Street, Davenport).
7 p.m. $17-20. For tickets and
information, call (563)326-1333 or visit
RiverMusicExperience.org. For a 2010
interview with Castro, visit RCReader.
com/y/castro.
Tuesday, May 13 - Fender
Stratocaster 60th Anniversary
Tour. Event featuring Strat history,
presentations, and demonstrations of
the 2014 line of products with members
of the Fender team. Guitar Center (3860
Elmore Avenue, Davenport). 7 p.m. Free.
For information, call (563)355-5667 or
visit GuitarCenter.com.
THEATRE
Thursday, May 1, through Sunday,
May 4 – Out of Bounds. Working Group
Theatre presents a drama created
from local interviews with victims
of bullying and their families, in a
Hancher Auditorium Visiting Artists
series presentation. Riverside Theatre
(213 North Gilbert Street, Iowa City).
Thursdays through Saturday 7:30 p.m.,
Sunday 2 p.m. $10-25. For tickets and
information, call (319)335-1160 or visit
http://www.Hancher.UIowa.edu.
Friday, May 2, through Sunday, May
11 – Playwrights Festival. New Ground
Theatre’s presentation of new works
by area authors, featuring A Decent
Interval by Michael Carron, Well Done by
Shea Doyle, Memory by Joshua Malone,
and Calling Home by William Pepper.
Village Theatre (2113 East 11th Street,
Davenport). Fridays and Saturdays 7:30
p.m., Sundays 2 p.m. $15-18. For tickets
and information, call (563)326-7529 or
visit NewGroundTheatre.org.
Friday, May 2, through Sunday,
May 11 – Something’s Afoot. Murder-
mystery musical performed in
conjunction with Opera@Augustana,
directed by Jeff Coussens and music-
directed by John Pfautz. Augustana
College’s Potter Theatre (3701 Seventh
Avenue, Rock Island). Fridays and
Saturdays 7:30 p.m., Sundays 1:30 p.m.
$10-14. For tickets and information, call
(309)794-7306 or visit Augustana.edu.
Friday, May 2, through Sunday,
May 4 – Die Fledermaus. Johann
Strauss II’s opera directed by Bill Theisen,
conducted by William LaRue Jones.
Englert Theatre (221 East Washington
Street, Iowa City). Friday and Saturday
8 p.m., Sunday 2 p.m. $5-20. For tickets
and information, call (319)688-2653 or
visit Englert.org.
Friday, May 9, through Saturday,
May 17 – Becky’s New Car. Dreamwell
Theatre’s production of Steven Dietz’s
rags-to-riches comedy. Unitarian
Universalist Society (10 South Gilbert
Street, Iowa City). Fridays and Saturdays
7:30 p.m. $10-13. For tickets and
information, call (319)423-9820 or visit
Dreamwell.com.
Wednesday, May 7, through
Saturday, May 10 – Robin Hood.
Family presentation of the legendary
adventure. Timber Lake Playhouse
(8215 Black Oak Road, Timber Lake).
10 a.m. and 1 p.m. $5. For tickets and
information, call (815)244-2035 or visit
TimberLakePlayhouse.org.
COMEDY
Thursday, May 1 – Red Green.
Canada’s foremost handyman comedian
on his “How to Do Everything Tour.”
Adler Theatre (136 East Third Street,
Davenport). 7 p.m. $49.50. For tickets,
call (800)745-3000 or visit AdlerTheatre.
com.
Thursday, May 8 – Karyn Ruth
White. Comedienne delivers the
presentation “Hersterics: A Hilarious
Peek Inside the Uniquely Female Mind”
in the Women Connection’s 10th-annual
“Celebrate a Special Woman” signature
event. Davenport RiverCenter (136
East Third Street, Davenport). 5:30
p.m. cocktails, 6 p.m. dinner, 7 p.m.
presentation. $40. Reserve by Monday,
May 5. For tickets and information,
call (309)631-0167 or visit Womens-
Connection.org.
VISUAL ARTS
Friday, May 2 – Gallery Hop!
Annual spring event featuring visual
and performing arts in a variety of
downtown locales. The District of Rock
Island. 5-9 p.m. Free admission. For
information, call (309)788-6311 or visit
RIDistrict.com.
Saturday, May 3, through Sunday,
May 11 – Young Artists at the Figge:
Geneseo. Exhibit featuring the works
of student artists. Figge Art Museum
(225 West Second Street, Davenport).
Tuesdays through Saturdays 10 a.m.-5
p.m., Thursdays 10 a.m.-9 p.m., Sundays
noon-5 p.m. Free with $4-7 museum
admission. For information, call
(563)326-7804 or visit FiggeArt.org.
Sunday, May 4 – Video Art from
Israel: A One-Day Sensory Experience.
Shorts, documentaries, and videos
from Israeli filmmakers Maya Zak, Gilad
Ratman, Ayelet Ben Dor, and others,
curated and hosted by Keren Shavit.
Figge Art Museum (225 West Second
Street, Davenport). 3 p.m. $5-7. For
information, call (563)326-7804 or visit
FiggeArt.org.
Saturday, May 10, and Sunday,
May 11 – Beaux Arts Spring Festival.
Annual springtime event featuring
juried fine art and crafts, live music,
children’s activities, a food court, and
more. Figge Art Museum Plaza (225 West
Continued From Page 13
What Else Is Happenin’
River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 21 No. 855 • May 1-14, 2014 15 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com
April 17 Crossword Answers
River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 21 No. 855 • May 1-14, 2014 16
Continued From Page 6
ART
Parrots and Cats and a Pageant for Bunnies
by Mike Schulz
mike@rcreader.com
even Stanley Kubrick. The Holocaust
remembrance Mother Economy finds
a housekeeper carefully documenting
and tracing discarded objects from
presumed loved ones now gone, creating
a miniature parable on the need for ritual
in the wake of chaos. Black & White
Rule, meanwhile, takes place mostly on
an oversize chessboard, and features a
pair of poodles performing tricks for a
mysterious experiment that examines
humans’ continued attempts at imposing
order in the universe – and one that
results, frighteningly, in a literal dogfight.
In the mind-blowing and rather
hilarious short The Days of the Family
of the Bell, director and video artist
Gilad Ratman explores the limits,
and limitlessness, of the human body
through a series of extraordinary (and
physically impossible) feats of strength
and contortion. Employing wizardly
computer techniques, Gilad treats us
to such sights as one man balancing
another, heavier man using only his
right hand, and eight people balancing
precariously on the back of a petite
woman; the resulting positions and
pyramids are remarkable on their own,
but watching Gilad’s participants getting
into those positions and pyramids must
be seen to be believed.
And in addition to Invert, Double
Conspiracies Outside My Doorstep,
and directors Rona Perry’s and Mor
Aarcadir’s Haifa Odessa: Ship Schwestern
– a time-travel piece that begins on a
luxury cruiser and ends on Ukraine’s
famed Potemkin stairs – the Figge’s
Video Art from Israel shorts will include
Shavit’s Oryctolagus Cuniculus, about that
aforementioned, rather unusual beauty
contest.
“Over a two-year period,” said Shavit
of her film’s inception, “I spent several
months in Poland for research and
filming. One possible story that I found
interesting there involved an Englishman
who decided to leave all he had in
England, and almost arbitrarily chose
to buy a run-down farm in the middle
of rural Poland, living in solitude. I was
filming him for a couple of weeks, and
as I was filming, I happened to meet
a man who turned out to be involved
in rabbit beauty competitions. The
subject sounded so bizarre, and it was
definitely nothing I had ever heard of.
So I just made a spontaneous decision
to temporarily postpone the filming of
the Englishman, and instead I went and
documented this rabbit competition.”
If you react to the film as I did,
however, you may spent most of
Oryctolagus Cuniculus not realizing it’s
about a rabbit competition, as Shavit’s
clinically arresting images – propelled
by an evocative and insistent score by
Adi Omry – led me to think something
horrible was in store for all those bunnies
being stared at and handled by men in
white lab coats ... one of whom wears a
baseball cap on which the Golden Arches
are displayed. (By the film’s end, I was
delighted to see that a McHare sandwich
was not in the works.)
“The film is perceived very differently
by different people,” said Shavit of her
Video Art from Israel contribution, and
my initial fears for the rabbits’ fates.
“Though it was not my intention, you are
not alone in anticipating that something
bad is going to happen to the rabbits
in the end. For me, it was more about
this doctor-looking group of men, like
scientists, examining these rabbits so
meticulously and seriously.”
And Omry’s music, she added, “was
meant to create a loop-like atmosphere
and accentuate the dramatics and
seriousness that surrounded this event,
which, for me, just made it all the more
surreal. But if it also created a sense of
anticipation or suspense, I guess that’s a
good thing.”
Video Art from Israel: A One-Day
Sensory Experience will be presented at
the Figge Art Museum (225 West Second
Street, Davenport) on Sunday, May 4,
from 3 to 6 p.m. For more information
on the event, call (309)793-1300 or visit
JFQC.org.
Gilad Ratman's The Days of the Family of
the Bell
Continued From Page 5
Creating a New Monster
current 5-percent rate will be extended, or
the reality that Harmon’s rates would match
the revenue of the 5-percent flat rate.
Further, other surveys show how
malleable public opinion can be. In
January, the Illinois Policy Institute
released a poll testing several questions
related to the Fair
Tax constitutional
amendment and its
companion rate structure.
One group was asked
a question noting that
“lower-income wage
earners [presently] pay
the same percentage as
those making millions of
dollars a year” and asking
whether they’d support
a plan “that would lower
tax rates for 90 percent of
Illinois taxpayers while
increasing rates on higher
earners.” More than 57
percent supported the
plan.
Another group was asked a question
removing the language about millionaires,
adding language about a constitutional
amendment, and making the proposal
more personal: “a graduated rate that
requires a higher percentage paid as your
income increases” (emphasis added).
Support dropped below 34 percent.
Considering All the
Possibilities
But even the Illinois Policy Institute
questions were abstract. What people want
to know is how much they’ll be paying.
Here are the basic facts:
• Compared to the pre-2011 flat-
income-tax rate of 3 percent, the Fair Tax
represents a tax break for only those whose
net income is below roughly $13,150.
(Over-simplistically, net income is total
income minus the standard deduction
of $2,100 per person in a household. So
for a married couple with two dependent
children, $13,150 in net income would be
the same as $21,550 in total income.)
• Compared to the 3.75-percent income-
tax rate that is scheduled to take effect on
January 1, the Fair Tax plan represents a
tax cut to taxpayers with net incomes up to
roughly $21,740.
Compared to the 5-percent income-
tax rate that took effect in 2011 and is
scheduled to expire at the end of this year,
the Fair Tax plan represents a tax cut for
those with net incomes up to roughly
COVER STORY
Sly marketing
promoting tax
cuts for nearly
everybody can’t
erase the simple
fact that the Fair
Tax represents a
broken promise.
$202,630. This is the comparison that Fair
Tax advocates are making with the promise
of tax cuts for 94 percent of Illinoisans.
(You can see how your income-tax picture
looks in this scenario at FairTaxCut.
com. Be sure to enter your total income
before the $2,100-per-person standard
deduction.)
Yet even if one
compares the Fair Tax
plan to the 5-percent rate,
the tax cut is modest. At
$180,000 of net income,
a taxpayer’s bill under the
Fair Tax plan would be
$430 less than it is now
– a tax cut of less than 5
percent.
As a percentage of
taxes owed, the Fair
Tax plan would benefit
lower-income taxpayers
most, but even then it
would amount to only
a few hundred dollars.
(The tax cut doesn’t reach
$300 until $50,000 of net income.) Still, for
taxpayers with net incomes below roughly
$62,000, it is a tax cut of more than 10
percent from what they’re currently paying.
The lower-income tax cuts are offset by
tax hikes for higher incomes. A taxpayer
with $1 million in net income will see a
tax hike of $15,150 (more than 30 percent)
compared to the current 5-percent-flat-
tax rate, and $27,650 (almost 74 percent)
compared to the scheduled 3.75-percent
rate. At $300,000 of net income, the tax
hike is $1,850 (more than 12 percent)
compared to the 5-percent flat rate, and
$5,600 (almost 50 percent) compared to
3.75 percent.
Perhaps the best way to understand
the “tax cut” mechanics of the Fair Tax
proposal is to look at it as two separate
transactions – making permanent the
revenue from the 5-percent rate and then
adjusting the amount with graduated rates.
For a taxpayer with $50,000 of net income
under the Fair Tax system, for example, the
state would be taking $625 (the difference
between tax rates of 3.75 and 5 percent)
and giving back $300 (through the use of
graduated rates). Fair Tax supporters claim
that amounts to a $300 tax cut, but it’s still
$325 more than should be owed to the state
based on the scheduled reduction in the
2011 hike.
Incomes greater than $202,630 will be
getting hit twice, on the other hand: the
difference between 3.75 and 5 percent, and
then the highest marginal tax rate applied
to the top tier of income. At $250,000 of
River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 21 No. 855 • May 1-14, 2014 17 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com
That wouldn’t be an easy sell, because
like the Fair Tax proposal it would still
represent a serious breach of trust – a
broken promise. But instead of trying
to recast the revenue status quo as “tax
fairness” or “tax cuts,” such a proposal
would at least be a more-honest attempt at
those goals.
So far the General Assembly hasn’t
shown a willingness to try. It seems happy
to have three equally frightening monsters
from which to choose.
Creating a New Monster
by Jeff Ignatius
jeff@rcreader.com
net income, the difference between 3.75
and 5 percent is $3,125, and the graduated
system tacks on another $900.
A Real Third Way
Arguing about whether the Fair Tax is
a tax cut or a tax hike for most taxpayers,
however, ignores the core deficiency of
the proposal with Harmon’s structure:
It’s moving numbers around within the
revenue status quo and is not remotely
close to what Illinois was promised. The
personal-income-tax rate is scheduled
to drop to 3.75 percent next year, and
legislators have known that since they
passed the current tax rate in January 2011.
As the Chicago Tribune said in an April
23 editorial: “The rollback of the temporary
income-tax increase is the Democrats’
plan – written, passed, and signed into law
over unanimous Republican opposition.
Democrats have a responsibility to tell us
how Illinois should deal with their law.”
The Illinois Policy Institute’s Rasmussen
added that the 3.75-percent rate in 2015
already represents a gradual rollback of
income taxes, considering that it isn’t
scheduled to go back to its pre-2011 rate of
3 percent.
And she said that legislators are now
paying for their failure to prepare for the
expiration of the 5-percent rate: “They’ve
had three years to plan for this ... reduction
in the income-tax rate, and they should
keep that promise. That’s how they sold it.
... If anything, this coming year should be
the easiest to budget for [because it’s only
a partial-year reduction in revenues]. ... If
they can’t get next year right, there’s really
no hope that they’ll ever get it right.”
But let’s say that voters truly wouldn’t
want the General Assembly to cut billions
from the state budget next year – and even
more in subsequent years.
The legislature didn’t have to cast its
lot with a revenue-neutral proposal such
as Harmon’s. If it were truly interested in
graduated income-tax rates, it could pass
the constitutional amendment onto voters
and propose a rate structure that finds
some middle ground between revenue
generated by the current 5-percent rate and
the scheduled 3.75-percent rate.
In other words, it could propose revenue
equivalent to a 4-percent flat-tax rate, or
4.25-percent, or ... . Even the equivalent
of a 4.75-percent flat rate would show an
ever-so-slight willingness to compromise
– to provide significant tax relief in total
to Illinois citizens while trying to prevent
some cuts that would be necessary with a
3.75-percent rate.
River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 21 No. 855 • May 1-14, 2014 18 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com
deniability “doesn’t have to be plausible, only
possible,” Pinker explains in a paper. So if
Dr. McDreamy doesn’t want the romantic
relationship you do, he can pretend you’re
just suggesting it would be nice to bump into
him at a gallery opening or something, not
bump into him between your sheets. But
before you do anything, you should accept
that you may have misread the signals, and
he may not be interested. Either way, you’ll
need a new doctor, whom you can search for
online – ideally, on your health-plan site, not
Match.com.
Apartment 2B or Not 2B
I’m a single guy living in an apartment
down the hall from two single girls. I find
one very attractive, but the one I’m not
interested in is clearly interested in me. She
flirts with me overtly and keeps saying she
and I should go for a drink. What I’d really
like is to get something going with the other
roommate.
– Double Trouble
Unfortunately, dropping in on the girls
down the hall isn’t like visiting a frozen-
yogurt shop: “I’m not crazy about the sample
you offered, but may I try the other flavor?”
You’ve heard of the Bro Code – unwritten
rules for how guys are supposed to look after
their buds? There’s a female version. Call it
the Bra Code: Sistas before mistas, besties
before testes. A girl will not date the guy her
friend – especially her friend she lives with –
has set her sights on. Worse yet, there’s a good
chance that asking you out was something the
hot one helped the other one plot. You can,
of course, ask the hot one out, but unless the
not-so-hot one falls desperately in love with
some other guy, the hot one is unlikely to join
you in anything sexier than an elevator ride
to the lobby.
What you can take out of this is a reminder
not to get too laser-focused on one particular
girl. You should always be scanning the
horizon for possibilities and have a few on
deck so when one falls through, you can just
shift over to the next. This should keep you
from clinging desperately to lost causes, like
by pretending you have an identical twin
brother and trying to date both the hot and
not-so-hot roommate at once. (No, you can’t
just feign a stomach ache and run back in
wearing a different hat.)
Got A Problem? Ask Amy Alkon.
171 Pier Ave, #280, Santa Monica, CA 90405
or e-mail AdviceAmy@aol.com (AdviceGoddess.com)
©2014, Amy Alkon, all rights reserved.
Ask
the
Advice
Goddess
BY AMY ALKON
All Doc and No Action
I’ve been going to the same primary-care
doctor for a few years. I’m very attracted to
him, and I believe he’s attracted to me, too.
There’s always been a dynamic between us.
I thought it was his “bedside manner,” but
when I asked others, they didn’t have the
same experience with him. I know he isn’t
married. Also, I am very healthy and only
see him annually for “well checks.” Do you
have any advice on whether I should do
anything?
– Patiently Waiting
It’s okay for your doctor to ask you, “Can
I give you a breast exam ... ?” – but not if he
adds, “ ... later tonight, in my Jacuzzi?”
There are all sorts of places a doctor can go
to meet women – bars, parties, bowling alleys,
grocery stores, and hostage standoffs – but he
can lose his license for dating those he picks
up in his reception area. Not only does the
American Medical Association deem current
patients off-limits, but a former patient
can also be a no-go if it seems the sexual
relationship started through an exploitation
of trust, knowledge, or emotions from the
doctor-patient relationship. Because rules can
vary from place to place, it’s wise to check
with your state medical board to see whether
they have stricter standards. For example,
Colorado’s Medical Practice Act imposes a
six-month waiting period before your doctor
is allowed to see you in a dress that doesn’t tie
in the back and expose your butt crack.
Even if your doctor does have the hots
for you, he probably has an even stronger
desire to avoid downscaling to “driving” a
shopping cart, collecting cans, and living
beside a dumpster. So the first move, if any,
must be yours – putting an unambiguous end
to the medical portion of your relationship.
Do this in writing, adding something like,
“You’re an excellent doctor, but I would like
to see a doctor closer to my house.” It doesn’t
matter whether that’s true. It just has to get the
message across – without impugning his skills
– that you’re formally outta there. At the end,
add, “I would, however, be interested in seeing
you socially.”
That little addition might not seem like
much, but as linguist Steven Pinker notes
about a remarkable feature of human
psychology, even the slightest veiling of
what we really mean will allow people to
pretend it meant something innocuous. The
River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 21 No. 855 • May 1-14, 2014 19 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com
and self-wounding overachievers to be as
proficient as they are? Are you coming to see that
if you want to fix, heal, and change the world
around you, you have to fix, heal, and change
yourself? Is it becoming clear that if you hope to
gain more power to shape the institutions you’re
part of, you’ve got to strengthen your power over
yourself? Are you ready to see that if you’d like to
reach the next level of success, you must dissolve
some of your fears of success?

VIRGO (August 23-September
22): “Beauty is the purgation of
superfluities,” said Michelangelo.
Do you agree? Could you make your life more
marvelous by giving up some of your trivial
pursuits? Would you become more attractive if
you got rid of one of your unimportant desires?
Is it possible you’d experience more lyrical grace
if you sloughed off your irrelevant worries? I
suggest you meditate on questions like these,
Virgo. According to my interpretation of the
astrological omens, experiencing beauty is not
a luxury right now, but rather a necessity. For
the sake of your mental, physical, and spiritual
health, you need to be in its presence as much as
possible.

LIBRA (September 23-October 22):
I’m pretty sure God wants you to be
rich. Or at least richer. And I know for a fact that
I want you to be richer. What about you? Do
you want to be wealthier? Or at least a bit more
flush? Or would you rather dodge the spiritual
tests you’d have to face if you became a money
magnet? Would you prefer to go about your daily
affairs without having to deal with the increased
responsibilities and obligations that would come
with a bigger income? I suspect you will soon
receive fresh evidence about these matters.
How you respond will determine whether
you’ll be able to take advantage of new financial
opportunities that are becoming available.

SCORPIO (October 23-November
21): The U.S. military budget this
year is $633 billion. In comparison,
the United Nations’ peacekeeping budget is
$7.8 billion. So my country will spend 81 times
more to wage war than the U.N. will spend to
make peace. I would prefer it if the ratio were
reversed, but my opinion carries no weight. It’s
possible, though, that I might be able to convince
you Scorpios, at least in the short run, to place a
greater emphasis on cultivating cooperation and
harmony than on being swept up in aggression
and conflict. You might be tempted to get riled
up over and over again in the coming weeks, but
I think that would lead you astray from living the
good life.

SAGITTARIUS (November
22-December 21): Actor Matthew
McConaughey prides himself on
his willingness to learn from his mistakes and
failures. A few years ago he collected and read all
the negative reviews that critics had ever written
Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny's
EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES
& DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES
The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at
1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700
FREE WILL ASTROLOGY by Rob Brezsny
ARIES (March 21-April 19): “Dear
Astrologer: We Aries people have an
intense fire burning inside us. It’s an
honor and a privilege. We’re lucky to be animated
with such a generous share of the big energy that
gives life to all of nature. But sometimes the fire
gets too wild and strong for us. We can’t manage
it. It gets out of our control. That’s how I’m
feeling lately. These beloved flames that normally
move me and excite me are now the very thing
that’s making me crazy. What to do? – Aries.”
Dear Aries: Learn from what firefighters do to
fight forest fires. They use digging tools to create
wide strips of dirt around the fire, removing all
the flammable brush and wood debris. When the
fire reaches this path, it’s deprived of fuel. Close
your eyes and visualize that scene.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): “My
personal philosophy is not to undertake
a project unless it is manifestly
important and nearly impossible.” So said
Taurus-born Edwin Land, the man who invented
the Polaroid camera. I have a feeling these might
be useful words for you to live by between your
birthday in 2014 and your birthday in 2015.
In the coming 12 months, you will have the
potential of homing in on a dream that will fuel
your passions for years. It may seem to be nearly
impossible, but that’s exactly what will excite you
about it so much – and keep you going for as
long as it takes to actually accomplish.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): I wish
there was a way you could play around
with construction equipment for a
few hours. I’d love it if you could get behind the
wheel of a bulldozer and flatten a small hill. It
would be good for you to use an excavator to
destroy a decrepit old shed or clear some land of
stumps and dead trees. Metaphorically speaking,
that’s the kind of work you need to do in your
inner landscape: move around big, heavy stuff;
demolish outworn structures; reshape the real
estate to make way for new building projects.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): In the
Transformers movies, Optimus Prime
is a giant extraterrestrial warrior
robot. His body contains an array of weapons
that he uses for righteous causes, like protecting
Earth’s creatures. His character is voiced by actor
Peter Cullen. Cullen has also worked extensively
for another entertainment franchise: Winnie the
Pooh. He does the vocals for Eeyore, a gloomy
donkey who writes poetry and has a pink ribbon
tied in a bow on his tail. Let’s make Cullen your
role model for now. I’m hoping this will inspire
you to get the Eeyore side of your personality
to work together with the Optimus Prime part
of you. What’s that you say? You don’t have an
Optimus Prime part of you? Well, that’s what
Eeyore might say, but I say different.

LEO (July 23-August 22): Do you
finally understand that you don’t have
to imitate the stress-addled workaholics
about his work in films. It was “an interesting
kind of experiment,” he told Yahoo News. “There
was some really good constructive criticism.”
According to my reading of the astrological
omens, Sagittarius, now would be an excellent
time for you to try an experiment comparable to
McConaughey’s. Be brave!

CAPRICORN (December
22-January 19): “Dear Oracle: I
might be hallucinating, but recently
I swear my pet iguana has been getting turned
on whenever I disrobe in front of it. My naked
body seems to incite it to strut around and make
guttural hissing sounds and basically act like it’s
doing a mating dance. Is it me, or is the planets?
I think my iguana is a Capricorn like me. –
Captivating Capricorn.” Dear Capricorn: Only
on rare occasions have I seen you Capricorns
exude such high levels of animal magnetism as
you are now. Be careful where you point that
stuff! I won’t be shocked if a wide variety of
creatures finds you extra alluring.

AQUARIUS (January 20-February
18): “Eat like you love yourself,”
advises author Tara Stiles. “Move
like you love yourself. Speak like you love
yourself. Act like you love yourself.” Those four
prescriptions should be top priorities for you,
Aquarius. Right now, you can’t afford to treat
your beautiful organism with even a hint of
carelessness. You need to upgrade the respect
and compassion and reverence you give yourself.
So please breathe like you love yourself. Sleep
and dream like you love yourself. Think like you
love yourself. Make love like you love yourself.

PISCES (February 19-March 20): If
blindfolded, most people can’t tell the
difference between Pepsi and Coca-
Cola. But I bet you could, at least this week.
Odds are good that you will also be adept at
distinguishing between genuine promises and
fake ones. And you will always know when
people are fooling themselves. No one will
be able to trick you into believing in hype,
lies, or nonsense. Why? Because these days
you are unusually perceptive and sensitive
and discerning. This might on occasion be a
problem, of course, since you won’t be able to
enjoy the comfort and consolation that illusions
can offer. But mostly it will be an asset, providing
you with a huge tactical advantage and lots of
good material for jokes.

Homework: Think of the last person you cursed,
if only with a hateful thought if not an actual
spell. Now send them a free-hearted blessing. Visit
FreeWillAstrology.com.
River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 21 No. 855 • May 1-14, 2014 20 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com
April 17 Answers: Pg 15
NO TAKERS · May 1, 2014
ACROSS
1. Cavort
5. Social stratum
10. 44th POTUS
15. Shindy
19. First Oscar winner __ Jannings
20. Some singers
21. Greens, dressed
22. Old chest for riches
23. Russian empress
24. Downturn
25. Bold
26. Corps
27. Start of a quip by Erma Bombeck: 5 wds.
31. High chair part
32. Lugs
33. Haggard title
34. “The Iceman Cometh”playwright
37. Copal, e.g.
39. Et __ (and others)
41. Educ. gp.
44. Mater
45. Scuffle
46. Spelunker’s domain
47. Elver
48. Dresden’s river
49. Catchphrase
50. Part 2 of quip: 2 wds.
52. A conjunction
53. Analyze
54. An ungulate
57. __ of passage
58. Closed curves
60. Temptress
61. Repeating pattern
63. Part 3 of quip: 5 wds.
67. Cotton cloth
68. Juliet’s beloved
69. Jibe
70. Beverages
71. Moxie
72. Roadside sign
74. Cold and damp
77. Part 4 of quip
80. Search or slumber
81. “__ Ha’i”
82. Consumed
83. __ Patrick Harris
84. Hooter-like
86. Opposite
87. Cal. abbr.
88. Tins
89. Do a garden job
90. Posh
91. Hob
92. The out-of-doors
93. Organic fuel
94. End of the quip: 4 wds.
103. Dossier
104. Fragrant rootstock
105. Desktop items
106. Under the covers
107. __ Bator
108. Artless
109. John __ Garner
110. Large crucifix
111. Torn
112. Kiddies
113. Cupidity
114. Say it isn’t so
DOWN
1. Scan
2. Hotel chain
3. Give heed to
4. School recess, e.g.
5. Laid-back
6. Tin Pan __
7. R-W link
8. Book
9. Cappuccino base
10. “Look Back in Anger”playwright
11. Starr and Scott
12. Jai __
13. Abbr. in grammar
14. Library paste
15. Skinny-dip
16. Zone
17. Begone!
18. Over-the-top actor
28. Parisian suburb
29. Fasten
30. Second-story man
34. Sign
35. __ contendere
36. Like a sampler
37. Furrows
38. European dynasty
39. Interim
40. Cowardly Lion actor Bert __
41. Auxiliary devices
42. Exam subject
43. Revamp
45. Trunk
49. Sons and grandsons
51. In a snit
53. Spotted rodent
54. Predatory animal
55. Mythical ship
56. Legume
59. Recto’s opposite
60. Wrestling sport
61. Pup
62. Concerning: 2 wds.
63. Liking
64. Nonessential things
65. Written record
66. Solid ground
67. Parrot
71. Layer of ore
72. Might and __
73. Gaelic
75. Cry of despair
76. Lean and tough
78. “__ Vanya”
79. Resort location
80. Falling
81. Place for nautical repairs
84. Fights
85. Small bird
86. Conspiracy
90. Came to an end
91. Happenstance
92. Tapenade ingredient
93. Juan __ de Leon
94. Luxor’s river
95. __ vital
96. Laugh out loud
97. The phantom of the opera
98. Cicatrix
99. Musical sound
100. Hautbois
101. Gas that glows
102. Whirlpool
103. Fake __
River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 21 No. 855 • May 1-14, 2014 21 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com
Live Music Live Music Live Music
Email all listings to calendar@rcreader.com • Deadline 5 p.m. Thursday before publication
Mobb Deep - Daggers & Gadema - DJ
GMJ - DJ OMS -RIBCO, 1815 2nd Ave.
Rock Island, IL
Open Mic Night -Downtown Central
Perk, 226 W. 3rd St. Davenport, IA
Pierced Productions Karaoke & DJ
featuring Leigh Timbrook -The
Old Stardust Sports Bar, 1191 19th
Street Moline, IL
River Prairie Minstrels (6pm) -RME
Community Stage, 131 W. 2nd St.
Davenport, IA
RME Guitar Circle (2pm) -RME (River
Music Experience), 131 W. 2nd St.
Davenport, IA
Southern Thunder Karaoke -Hollar’s
Bar and Grill, 4050 27th St Moline, IL
The Hitman (6pm) -Rustic Ridge Golf
Course Grille & Pub, 1151 East Iowa
St. Eldridge, IA
The Knockoffs -Building 311 @ Fro’s
Pub & Grub, 309 Cedar St. Wilton, IA
The Tangents -Cool Beanz Coffeehouse,
1325 30th St. Rock Island, IL
Two Peace - Fire Sale - The Fiyah -RME
(River Music Experience), 131 W. 2nd
St. Davenport, IA
Xposed - Complicit - Mike Wlkr - Pat-
rick Blin -Gabe’s, 330 E. Washington
St. Iowa City, IA
Zach Harris Band -The Muddy Waters,
1708 State St. Bettendorf, IA
2014/05/04 (Sun)
ABC Karaoke -11th Street Precinct, 2108
E 11th St Davenport, IA
Alan Sweet & Friends (6:30pm) -The Mud-
dy Waters, 1708 State St. Bettendorf, IA
Chuck Murphy -Shannon’s Bar and Grill,
252 S State Ave Hampton, IL
Dylan Sires & Neighbors - Seth Knap-
pen -Rozz-Tox, 2108 3rd Ave. Rock
Island, IL
2014/05/01 (Thu)
C.J. the DJ -RIBCO, 1815 2nd Ave.
Rock Island, IL
Chuck Murphy -It’s on the River, 201 N.
Main St. Port Byron, IL
Danika Holmes -Barrel House 211, 211
E. 2nd St. Davenport, IA
DJ & Dance Night -The Rusty Nail, 2606
W Locust Davenport, IA
Indigosun -Iowa City Yacht Club, 13 S
Linn St Iowa City, IA
Jazz Jam w/ the North Scott Jazz
Combo -RME Community Stage, 131
W. 2nd St. Davenport, IA
Johnny O' Jam Session -The Muddy
Waters, 1708 State St. Bettendorf, IA
Open Mic Night -The Quarry, 2202 W.
3rd St. Davenport, IA
Open Mic Night w/ Rob Dahms -Rustic
Ridge Golf Course Grille & Pub, 1151
East Iowa St. Eldridge, IA
Open Stage Night -Theo’s Java Club,
213 17th St. Rock Island, IL
Pierre Bensusan -CSPS/Legion Arts,
1103 3rd St SE Cedar Rapids, IA
Soulshake - Mixology -Gabe’s, 330 E.
Washington St. Iowa City, IA
Stardust Talent Night -The Old Star-
dust Sports Bar, 1191 19th Street
Moline, IL
2014/05/02 (Fri)
ABC Karaoke -Circle Tap, 1345 Locust
St. Davenport, IA
ABC Karaoke -Creekside Bar and Grill,
3303 Brady St. Davenport, IA
ABC Karaoke -Moose Lodge - Daven-
port, 2333 Rockingham Rd Dav-
enport, IA
Central Standard Time (5:30pm) -
“Cinco de Funko” w/ Funktastic
Five (8:30pm) -The Rusty Nail, 2606
W Locust Davenport, IA
Open Mic for Originals Only (noon)
-Mama Compton’s, 1725 2nd Ave
Rock Island, IL
Robert Newton -Gabe’s, 330 E. Wash-
ington St. Iowa City, IA
Sunday Jazz Brunch (10: 30am &
12:30pm) -Bix Bistro, 200 E. 3rd St.
Davenport, IA
Sunday Live Jazz (10:30am) -Brady
Street Chop House, Radisson QC Pla-
za Hotel, 111 E. 2nd St. Davenport, IA
The Fez -The Mill, 120 E Burlington
Iowa City, IA
The Gents (4pm) -Riverside Casino
and Golf Resort, 3184 Highway 22
Riverside, IA
Vegas Karaoke Contest -The Rusty Nail,
2606 W Locust Davenport, IA
2014/05/05 (Mon)
ABC 2 Karaoke Night -Governor’s Pub &
Grill - Moline, 2180 53rd St. Moline, IL
ABC Karaoke -The Muddy Waters, 1708
State St. Bettendorf, IA
Ganzo's Cinco de Mayo Party - Los
Mocambos (5pm) -Ganzo’s, 3923 N.
Marquette St. Davenport, IA
Lapalux - Jack Lion -Gabe’s, 330 E.
Washington St. Iowa City, IA
Swells - Sept of Memnon - Outsid-
ers -Rozz-Tox, 2108 3rd Ave. Rock
Island, IL
The Homel ess Open Mi c Proj ect
(1pm) -The Center, 1411 Brady St.
Davenport, IA
2014/05/06 (Tue)
ABC Karaoke -Creekside Bar and Grill,
3303 Brady St. Davenport, IA
ABC Karaoke -The Muddy Waters, 1708
State St. Bettendorf, IA
University of Iowa Latin Jazz En-
semble and Afro-Cuban Drum &
Dance Ensemble (6pm) -RME (River
Music Experience), 131 W. 2nd St.
Davenport, IA
Vagabond Entertainment presents
Kooby’s Karaoke - Bi er St ube
LeCl ai re, 1001 Canal Shore Dr.
LeClaire, IA
2014/05/03 (Sat)
ABC Karaoke -Creekside Bar and Grill,
3303 Brady St. Davenport, IA
Brad Pouleson -Uptown Bill’s Coffee
House, 730 S. Dubuque St. Iowa
City, IA
Chuck Murphy -Goodfellas, 1414 N. 8th
St. Pekin, IL
Cinco de Mayo Celebration featur-
ing Orquesta Son del Tumbao
-The Redstone Room, 129 Main St
Davenport, IA
Cosmic -11th Street Precinct, 2108 E
11th St Davenport, IA
Dan Hubbard & the Humadors - Mo
Carter -Rozz-Tox, 2108 3rd Ave.
Cheese Pizza -Rascals Live, 1418
15th St. Moline, IL
Chuck Murphy -Big Shots, 419 15th
St. Moline, IL
Cross Creek Karaoke -Stickman’s, 1510
N. Harrison St. Davenport, IA
Danika Holmes (5pm) -Wi de Ri ver
Winery - LeClaire, 106 N. Cody Rd.
LeClaire, IA
Fire Sale - Surrounded by Giants - The
Casual Ties -Iowa City Yacht Club, 13
S Linn St Iowa City, IA
Ganzo's Cinco de Mayo Party - Los
Mocambos (5pm) -Ganzo’s, 3923 N.
Marquette St. Davenport, IA
Groove Inc. -Ri versi de Casi no and
Golf Resort, 3184 Highway 22 Riv-
erside, IA
Karaoke Night -Rooster’s Sports Bar &
Grill, 2130 3rd Ave. Rock Island, IL
Kevin B.F. Burt & Big Medicine -The
Muddy Waters, 1708 State St. Bet-
tendorf, IA
Pierced Productions Karaoke & DJ
featuring Leigh Timbrook -The
Old Stardust Sports Bar, 1191 19th
Street Moline, IL
S.O.N. (Sons of Necessity) - CoryaYo
- Fooch the MC - Dojorok - Omaha
- Good Loser - goldPiece -Gabe’s,
330 E. Washington St. Iowa City, IA
Short-Lived Fun -RIBCO, 1815 2nd
Ave. Rock Island, IL
Smooth Groove -On the Rock Grille
& Bar, 4619 34th St Rock Island, IL
Southern Thunder Karaoke -Hollar’s
Bar and Grill, 4050 27th St Moline, IL
The Giving Tree Band - The Dawn
-The Redstone Room, 129 Main St
Davenport, IA
The Saturday Giant (6pm) -RME Com-
munity Stage, 131 W. 2nd St. Dav-
enport, IA
The Soil & the Sun -Rozz-Tox, 2108 3rd
Ave. Rock Island, IL
Rock Island, IL
DJ Entertainment -Barrel House 211,
211 E. 2nd St. Davenport, IA
Flat Top (4pm) -Wide River Winery -
Clinton, 1776 East Deer Creek Rd.
Clinton, IA
Ganzo's Cinco de Mayo Party - Funktas-
tic 5 (3pm) - Los Mocambos -Ganzo’s,
3923 N. Marquette St. Davenport, IA
Gordy & Debbie -Ohnward Fine Arts
Center, 1215 E Pl att St. Maquo-
keta, IA
Groove Inc. -Ri versi de Casi no and
Golf Resort, 3184 Highway 22 Riv-
erside, IA
Joe Tingle’s DJ Entertainment -Bar-
rel House Moline, 1321 5th Ave.
Moline, IL
Karaoke Night -Boozie’s Bar & Grill, 114
1/2 W. 3rd St. Davenport, IA
Kentucky Derby Party (5pm) - “Cinco
de Funko” w/ Funktasti c Fi ve
(8:30pm) -The Rusty Nail, 2606 W
Locust Davenport, IA
Lynn Allen -Rascals Live, 1418 15th
St. Moline, IL
Mobb Deep @ RIBCO – May 3
30
3 SATURDAY
00
2 FRIDAY
4 SUNDAY
Continued On Page 22
00
1 THURSDAY
5 MONDAY
6 TUESDAY
River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 21 No. 855 • May 1-14, 2014 22 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com
Live Music Live Music Live Music
Email all listings to calendar@rcreader.com • Deadline 5 p.m. Thursday before publication
Peter Yarrow -Englert Theatre, 221 East
Washington St. Iowa City, IA
Pierced Productions Karaoke & DJ
featuring Leigh Timbrook -The
Old Stardust Sports Bar, 1191 19th
Street Moline, IL
Southern Thunder Karaoke -Hollar’s
Bar and Grill, 4050 27th St Moline, IL
The Dad Horse Experience (5pm)
-Heirloom Market & Caf�, 2200 Il Rt.
84 Thomson, IL
The Jordan Danielsen Band -Rhythm City
Casino, 101 W. River Dr. Davenport, IA
The Knockoffs -Jimbo’s Knucklehead
Saloon, 902 16th Ave. East Moline, IL
The Locals -Rozz-Tox, 2108 3rd Ave.
Rock Island, IL
The Manny Lopez Big Band (6pm) -The
Circa ‘21 Speakeasy, 1818 3rd Ave.
Rock Island, IL
The Old 57’s (5pm) -Wide River Winery -
LeClaire, 106 N. Cody Rd. LeClaire, IA
The Steepwater Band - Edward David
Anderson -The Redstone Room, 129
Main St Davenport, IA
Vagabond Entertainment presents
Kooby’s Karaoke - Bi er St ube
LeCl ai re, 1001 Canal Shore Dr.
LeClaire, IA
2014/05/10 (Sat)
ABC Karaoke -Creekside Bar and Grill,
3303 Brady St. Davenport, IA
Cody Road -The Rusty Nail, 2606 W
Locust Davenport, IA
Corporate Rock -Schneid’s, 205 Wash-
ington Ave. Lowden, IA
DJ Entertainment -Barrel House 211,
211 E. 2nd St. Davenport, IA
Iowa City Music Scene Showcase:
Item 9 & the Mad Hatters - Zeta
June - Oculus - Flannel Season - For
Richer or Poorer -Iowa City Yacht
Club, 13 S Linn St Iowa City, IA
ABC Karaoke -The Rusty Nail, 2606 W
Locust Davenport, IA
Julian Lage & Chris Eldridge -CSPS/
Legion Arts, 1103 3rd St SE Cedar
Rapids, IA
Language of Termites - Ian Cooke -Rozz-
Tox, 2108 3rd Ave. Rock Island, IL
Open Jam Session -Brady Street Pub, 217
Brady St. Davenport, IA
Open Mic Night (6:30pm) -Cool Beanz
Cof feehouse, 1325 30th St. Rock
Island, IL
Open Mic Nite w/ Alan Sweet -Van’s
Pizza, Pub, & Grill, 3333 Harrison St.
Davenport, IA
Open Mic w/ Corey Wallace & Friends
-11th Street Precinct, 2108 E 11th St
Davenport, IA
William Fitzsimmons -Englert Theatre,
221 East Washington St. Iowa City, IA
2014/05/07 (Wed)
ABC Karaoke -11th Street Precinct, 2108
E 11th St Davenport, IA
ABC Karaoke -Circle Tap, 1345 Locust St.
Davenport, IA
Acoustic Jam Night w/ Steve McFate
-McManus Pub, 1401 7th Ave Moline, IL
Acoustic Open Mic Night (6: 30pm)
-RME Community Stage, 131 W. 2nd
St. Davenport, IA
Cross Creek Karaoke -Hero’s Pub, 3811 N.
Harrison St. Davenport, IA
Jam Session w/ Ben Soltau -Iowa City
Yacht Club, 13 S Linn St Iowa City, IA
Karaoke Night -RIBCO, 1815 2nd Ave.
Rock Island, IL
Open Mic Night w/ Karl Beatty & Mike
Miller -Boozie’s Bar & Grill, 114 1/2 W.
3rd St. Davenport, IA
The Chris & Wes Show -Mound Street
Landing, 1029 Mound St. Davenport, IA
Iowa City Music Scene Showcase:
OSG - Crystal City - Surrounded by
Giants - Unnamed Acoustic - Juan
Manbando -Gabe’s, 330 E. Washing-
ton St. Iowa City, IA
Joe Tingle’s DJ Entertainment -Bar-
rel House Moline, 1321 5th Ave.
Moline, IL
John Corabi -Rascals Live, 1418 15th
St. Moline, IL
Karaoke Night -Boozie’s Bar & Grill, 114
1/2 W. 3rd St. Davenport, IA
Kenny Rogers -Riverside Casino Event
Center, 3184 Hi ghway 22 Ri ver-
side, IA
Midnite Riders -Milan American Legion,
515 W 1st Ave Milan, IL
Natty Nation - Smooth Groove - The
Old 57’s - Dirt Road Rockers -Bass
Street Landing Plaza, Moline, IL
Open Mic Night -Downtown Central
Perk, 226 W. 3rd St. Davenport, IA
Pierced Productions Karaoke & DJ
featuring Leigh Timbrook -The
Old Stardust Sports Bar, 1191 19th
Street Moline, IL
Pigs and Clover -Uptown Bill’s Coffee
House, 730 S. Dubuque St. Iowa
City, IA
Rooster Alley -The Muddy Waters, 1708
State St. Bettendorf, IA
Smooth Groove (6pm) -Bass Street
Landing Plaza, Moline, IL
Songwriter’s All-Original Open Mic
(3pm) -RME Community Stage, 131
W. 2nd St. Davenport, IA
Southern Thunder Karaoke -Hollar’s
Bar and Grill, 4050 27th St Moline, IL
Steve Bobbit (6:30pm) - Adam Fears
(9:30pm) -Ri versi de Casi no and
Golf Resort, 3184 Highway 22 Riv-
erside, IA
ABC Karaoke -Moose Lodge - Daven-
port, 2333 Rockingham Rd Dav-
enport, IA
Charlie Hayes and “Detroit” Larry
Davison (6pm) -City Limits Saloon
& Grill, 4514 9th St. Rock Island, IL
Corporate Rock -1 Hundred West Bar
& Dance Club, 100 76th St. Dav-
enport, IA
Cross Creek Karaoke -Stickman’s, 1510
N. Harrison St. Davenport, IA
E11eventh Hour (6pm) -Poopy’s Pub
& Grub, 1030 Viaduct Rd Savanna, IL
Gary Pickett (5:30pm) - Caught in the
Act (8:30pm) -The Rusty Nail, 2606
W Locust Davenport, IA
Highfives & Handshakes - Condor &
Jaybird - Culture Coup -RME (River
Music Experience), 131 W. 2nd St.
Davenport, IA
Iowa City Music Scene Showcase: Mad
Monks - David Zollo - The Feralings
- Kevin Burt - Awful Purdies - Greg
& Susan Dirks -Gabe’s, 330 E. Wash-
ington St. Iowa City, IA
The Harris Collection Open Jam Ses-
sion -Brady Street Pub, 217 Brady St.
Davenport, IA
The Old 57’s (6pm) - Vegas Karaoke
Contest (9:30pm) -The Rusty Nail,
2606 W Locust Davenport, IA
Timber Timbre -The Mill, 120 E Burling-
ton Iowa City, IA
2014/05/08 (Thu)
ABC Karaoke -The Rusty Nail, 2606 W
Locust Davenport, IA
C.J. the DJ -RIBCO, 1815 2nd Ave.
Rock Island, IL
Chuck Murphy -Crust Stone Oven Pizza,
2561 53rd Ave. Bettendorf, IA
Jordan Danielsen & Jef Spradley
-11th Street Precinct, 2108 E 11th St
Davenport, IA
Live Lunch w/ Roxi Copland (noon)
-RME Community Stage, 131 W. 2nd
St. Davenport, IA
Low Ceilings -Iowa City Yacht Club, 13
S Linn St Iowa City, IA
Open Mic Night -The Quarry, 2202 W.
3rd St. Davenport, IA
Open Mic Night w/ Rob Dahms -Rustic
Ridge Golf Course Grille & Pub, 1151
East Iowa St. Eldridge, IA
Open Stage Night -Theo’s Java Club,
213 17th St. Rock Island, IL
Perfect Pussy - Yamantaka - Sonic
Titan - Green Dreams -Gabe’s, 330
E. Washington St. Iowa City, IA
Stardust Talent Night -The Old Star-
dust Sports Bar, 1191 19th Street
Moline, IL
2014/05/09 (Fri)
ABC Karaoke -Circle Tap, 1345 Locust
St. Davenport, IA
ABC Karaoke -Creekside Bar and Grill,
3303 Brady St. Davenport, IA
Iowa City Music Scene Showcase: Milk
Duct Tape - The Treats - Velcro
Moxie - Maiden Mars -Iowa City
Yacht Club, 13 S Linn St Iowa City, IA
Jazz After Five w/ Dan Padley Group
(5pm) -The Mill, 120 E Burlington
Iowa City, IA
Karaoke Night -Rooster’s Sports Bar &
Grill, 2130 3rd Ave. Rock Island, IL
Kathy Ogden (6:30pm) - Adam Fears
(9:30pm) -Ri versi de Casi no and
Golf Resort, 3184 Highway 22 Riv-
erside, IA
Kenny Rogers -Riverside Casino Event
Center, 3184 Hi ghway 22 Ri ver-
side, IA
Live Lunch w/ Tony Hoeppner (noon)
-RME Community Stage, 131 W. 2nd
St. Davenport, IA
Mercury Brothers -The Muddy Waters,
1708 State St. Bettendorf, IA
Moseley - Cadaver Dogs - Dynoride
-RIBCO, 1815 2nd Ave. Rock Island, IL
Open Mic Coffeehouse -First Lutheran
Church - Rock Island, 1600 20th St.
Rock Island, IL
Tommy Castro & the Painkillers @ The Redstone Room – May 13
8 THURSDAY
Continued From Page 21
30
10 SATURDAY
00
9 FRIDAY
7 WEDNESDAY
Davenport, Iowa • 563.326.7804
www.figgeartmuseum.org
Katja Loher:
Videoplanet-Orchestra
Closing May 4, 2014
Katja Loher: Videoplanet–Orchestra will be closing on May 4.
Don’t miss your opportunity to check it out before it’s too late!
EXHIBITION CLOSING
Interplanetary Constellations 2012, Solo exhibition MuBE, Museu Brasileiro da Escultura,
Sao Paulo,Brazil. Installation of Videoplanets: Video projections on to floating spheres;
dimensions variable (4-8 ft. diameter). Photo courtesy: MuBE, Museu Brasileiro da Escultura.
This project is made possible by a grant to EICCD
from the U.S. Institute of Museum & Library Services.
River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 21 No. 855 • May 1-14, 2014 23 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com
Live Music Live Music Live Music
Email all listings to calendar@rcreader.com • Deadline 5 p.m. Thursday before publication
Karaoke Night -Rooster’s Sports Bar &
Grill, 2130 3rd Ave. Rock Island, IL
Laura Jane Grace - Big Eyes - Bedroom
Shrine -RIBCO, 1815 2nd Ave. Rock
Island, IL
Live Lunch w/ Midwest & Dear Creek
(noon) -RME Community Stage, 131
W. 2nd St. Davenport, IA
Murder Death Kill - Leaders - Reform-
ers (5pm) - Heatbox - Dead Larry
(9pm) -Gabe’s, 330 E. Washington
St. Iowa City, IA
Passion -Riverside Casino and Golf Re-
sort, 3184 Highway 22 Riverside, IA
Pierced Productions Karaoke & DJ
featuring Leigh Timbrook -The
Old Stardust Sports Bar, 1191 19th
Street Moline, IL
River City Radio Hour (5:30pm) -Mo-
line Commercial Club, 513b 16th St
Moline, IL
Russ Reyman (5:30pm) - Pickett Coun-
try & Friends (8pm) -The Rusty Nail,
2606 W Locust Davenport, IA
Southern Thunder Karaoke -Hollar’s
Bar and Grill, 4050 27th St Moline, IL
The Fez (6:30pm) -Sheraton Iowa City
Hotel, 210 S. Dubuque St. I owa
City, IA
The Franti Project -Brady Street Pub,
217 Brady St. Davenport, IA
The Tony Hamilton Orchestra -CASI
(Center for Active Seniors), 1035 W.
Kimberly Road Davenport, IA
Vagabond Entertainment presents
Kooby’s Karaoke - Bi er St ube
LeCl ai re, 1001 Canal Shore Dr.
LeClaire, IA
Walking Robots - The Ex-Bombers -
The Post Mortems -Rozz-Tox, 2108
3rd Ave. Rock Island, IL
Winterland -Iowa City Yacht Club, 13 S
Linn St Iowa City, IA
ABC Karaoke -The Muddy Waters, 1708
State St. Bettendorf, IA
Lipstick Homicide -Gabe’s, 330 E. Wash-
ington St. Iowa City, IA
The Lettermen (1&7pm) -Circa ‘ 21
Dinner Playhouse, 1828 3rd Ave.
Rock Island, IL
2014/05/13 (Tue)
ABC Karaoke -Creekside Bar and Grill,
3303 Brady St. Davenport, IA
ABC Karaoke -The Muddy Waters, 1708
State St. Bettendorf, IA
ABC Karaoke -The Rusty Nail, 2606 W
Locust Davenport, IA
An Evening with Tommy Castro & the
Painkillers -The Redstone Room,
129 Main St Davenport, IA
Open Jam Session -Brady Street Pub,
217 Brady St. Davenport, IA
Open Mic Night (6:30pm) -Cool Beanz
Coffeehouse, 1325 30th St. Rock
Island, IL
Open Mic Nite w/ Alan Sweet -Van’s
Pizza, Pub, & Grill, 3333 Harrison St.
Davenport, IA
Open Mic w/ Corey Wallace & Friends
-11th Street Precinct, 2108 E 11th St
Davenport, IA
T.V. Mike & the Scarecrows - Annie Girl
& the Flight - Mystic Dolphin -Rozz-
Tox, 2108 3rd Ave. Rock Island, IL
2014/05/14 (Wed)
ABC Karaoke -11th Street Precinct,
2108 E 11th St Davenport, IA
ABC Karaoke -Circle Tap, 1345 Locust
St. Davenport, IA
Soulshake - Mixology -Gabe’s, 330 E.
Washington St. Iowa City, IA
Stardust Talent Night -The Old Star-
dust Sports Bar, 1191 19th Street
Moline, IL
Third Seven (6pm) -RME Community
Stage, 131 W. 2nd St. Davenport, IA
U.S. Army Soldier Show -Adler Theatre,
136 E. 3rd St. Davenport, IA
2014/05/16 (Fri)
ABC Karaoke -Circle Tap, 1345 Locust
St. Davenport, IA
ABC Karaoke -Creekside Bar and Grill,
3303 Brady St. Davenport, IA
ABC Karaoke -Moose Lodge - Daven-
port, 2333 Rockingham Rd Dav-
enport, IA
Bucktown Revue -Nighswander Ju-
nior Theatre, 2822 Eastern Avenue
Davenport, IA
Chuck Murphy -Doc’s Inn Bar & Grill,
985 Avenue of the Cities Silvis, IL
Cody Road -Mulligan’s Valley Pub, 310
W 1st Ave Coal Valley, IL
Cross Creek Karaoke -Stickman’s, 1510
N. Harrison St. Davenport, IA
Double D & the Sensations -Col Ball-
room, 1012 W. 4th St. Davenport, IA
Drama Major -Rascals Live, 1418
15th St. Moline, IL
Jaiguru - Permasmile - The Effie Afton
-The Redstone Room, 129 Main St
Davenport, IA
Jim Bowe (noon) -Bettendorf Public
Li brar y, 2950 Learni ng Campus
Bettendorf, IA
Jimmy Nick & Don’t Tell Mama -The
Muddy Waters, 1708 State St. Bet-
tendorf, IA
Jordan Danielsen w/ Jef Spradley &
Carolynn Johnston (5pm) -Wide
River Winery - LeClaire, 106 N. Cody
Rd. LeClaire, IA
The Harris Collection Open Jam Ses-
sion -Brady Street Pub, 217 Brady St.
Davenport, IA
Water Liars - White Zephyr -Rozz-Tox,
2108 3rd Ave. Rock Island, IL
2014/05/15 (Thu)
ABC Karaoke -The Rusty Nail, 2606 W
Locust Davenport, IA
C.J. the DJ -RIBCO, 1815 2nd Ave.
Rock Island, IL
Gone South - Promiscuous School
of Fish - Cedar County Cobras
-Iowa City Yacht Club, 13 S Linn St
Iowa City, IA
Open Mic Night -The Quarry, 2202 W.
3rd St. Davenport, IA
Open Mic Night w/ Rob Dahms -Rustic
Ridge Golf Course Grille & Pub, 1151
East Iowa St. Eldridge, IA
Open Stage Night -Theo’s Java Club,
213 17th St. Rock Island, IL
Ska Punk Show: Sur vay Says! -
Fairhaven - The Suites -Rozz-Tox,
2108 3rd Ave. Rock Island, IL
Acoustic Jam Night w/ Steve Mc-
Fate -McManus Pub, 1401 7th Ave
Moline, IL
Burlington Street Bluegrass Band -The
Mill, 120 E Burlington Iowa City, IA
Cross Creek Karaoke -Hero’s Pub, 3811
N. Harrison St. Davenport, IA
Fifth of Country (6pm) - Vegas Kara-
oke Contest (9:30pm) -The Rusty
Nail, 2606 W Locust Davenport, IA
Heart of the Heart -Gabe’s, 330 E.
Washington St. Iowa City, IA
Jam Session w/ Ben Soltau -Iowa City
Yacht Club, 13 S Linn St Iowa City, IA
Karaoke Night -RIBCO, 1815 2nd Ave.
Rock Island, IL
Live Lunch w/ Lojo Russo (noon) -
Acoustic Open Mic Night (6:30pm)
-RME Community Stage, 131 W. 2nd
St. Davenport, IA
Open Mic Night w/ Karl Beatty & Mike
Miller -Boozie’s Bar & Grill, 114 1/2
W. 3rd St. Davenport, IA
The Chris & Wes Show -Mound Street
Landing, 1029 Mound St. Daven-
port, IA
The Blasters - Pinata Protest - 3 on
the Tree -RIBCO, 1815 2nd Ave. Rock
Island, IL
The Knockoffs -The Office Bar & Grill,
305 3rd St Sherrard, IL
Travis Hosette (4pm) -Wide River Win-
ery - Clinton, 1776 East Deer Creek
Rd. Clinton, IA
Youth-Kelele Kids’ Ukulele Club (1pm)
- A Damn Good Time Volume 7
(8pm) -RME (River Music Experi-
ence), 131 W. 2nd St. Davenport, IA
2014/05/11 (Sun)
ABC Karaoke -11th Street Precinct,
2108 E 11th St Davenport, IA
Alan Sweet & Friends (6:30pm) -The Mud-
dy Waters, 1708 State St. Bettendorf, IA
Giant Questionmark - Juiceboxxx - DJ
George Costanza - Ion -Gabe’s, 330
E. Washington St. Iowa City, IA
Matt Hectorne & the Family Tree -Ro-
zz-Tox, 2108 3rd Ave. Rock Island, IL
Open Mic for Originals Only (noon)
-Mama Compton’s, 1725 2nd Ave
Rock Island, IL
Steve Bobbit & Brian Harris (2pm)
-Riverside Casino and Golf Resort,
3184 Highway 22 Riverside, IA
Sunday Jazz Brunch (10: 30am &
12:30pm) -Bix Bistro, 200 E. 3rd St.
Davenport, IA
Sunday Live Jazz (10:30am) -Brady
Street Chop House, Radisson QC Pla-
za Hotel, 111 E. 2nd St. Davenport, IA
Vegas Karaoke Contest -The Rusty Nail,
2606 W Locust Davenport, IA
2014/05/12 (Mon)
ABC 2 Karaoke Night -Governor’s Pub &
Grill - Moline, 2180 53rd St. Moline, IL
14 WEDNESDAY
12 MONDAY
13 TUESDAY
15 THURSDAY
16 FRIDAY
11 SUNDAY
Language of Termites @ Rozz-Tox – May 6
QuadCitiesDiningGuide.com
Search ∙ Find ∙ Share ∙ Review ∙ EAT!
River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 21 No. 855 • May 1-14, 2014 24 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com
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