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Water Supply & Sanitation in the Philippines • Water supply and sanitation in the Philippines is characterized by achievements and challenges

. • The exhausting journey is necessary because safe water is desperately scarce in this stormravaged portion of the Philippines • While aid agencies work to provide a steady supply, survivors have resorted to scooping from streams, catching rainwater in buckets and smashing open pipes to obtain what is left from disabled pumping stations. With at least 600,000 people homeless, the demand is massive. • Providing clean, safe drinking water is key to preventing the toll of dead and injured from rising in the weeks after a major natural disaster. • protected from waterborne diseases such as cholera and typhoid Filtration systems are now operating in Tacloban, the center of the relief effort, and two other • towns in Leyte province, the hardest-hit area. Helicopters are dropping bottled water along with other relief supplies to more isolated areas.

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• Typhoon Haiyan, known as Typhoon Yolanda in the Philippines, was one of the strongest tropical cyclone recorded, which devastated portions of Southeast Asia, particularly the Philippines, on November 8, 2013.[1] It is the deadliest Philippine typhoon on record,[2] killing at least 6,268 people in that country alone. • Philippines Typhoon Survivors Desperate For Clean Water • http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/11/16/philippines-typhoon-survi_n_4287114.html

• As of first semester of 2013, poverty incidence among Filipinos registered at 24.9%

Source for charts: Philippine Statistics Authority. The 2013 poverty estimates are based on the 2013 Annual Poverty Indicator Survey (APIS) conducted in July 2013

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• 85% of the country’ water demand is for agriculture, with industry and the domestic sector sharing the balance. • Per cent coverage has been static or even slipped since the year 2000, • indicating that investments in this sector has barely kept up with population growth and with the replacement of aging water systems. • Financing and technical support for water districts are administered by the government’s Local Water Utilities Administration • As many LGU’s (Local Government Units) have negligible incomes from local fees and taxes, and despite the allotment from the national government of their share of the national internal revenue, surplus funds for major infrastructure such as water supply are otherwise rare. • There is little data on the quantitative and qualitative contribution of NGO’s in delivering potable water services to Filipinos (guesses range from 5 to 25% of government investment). • The Philippine standard for access to potable water is a clean supply of at least 50 liters per capita daily (lcpd) available from waterpoints no more than 250m from the user’s residence. • Many water sources in the country, perhaps as much as two out three, are bacteriologically contaminated due to inadequate sanitation facilities. In addition, 12-25% of wells yield ironladen water. • Philippine sanitation coverage is said to be about 74% (81% for urban and 61% for rural), but this probably does not include households with open-pit toilets or those with no toilets but which use the neighbors’ or relatives’

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Foreign Relations • No political issues should erupt since the U.S. and Philippines Agreed to a 10-Year Pact on the Use of Military Bases on April 27th of this year. • Movement of organic cotton from India to Philippines should not be an issue: • Treaty of Friendship was signed between the Philippines and India on 11 July 1952. • “There shall be perpetual peace and everlasting amity between the Republic of India and the Republic of the Philippines and their peoples.” US-India Relations • • At the close of U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton's meetings with the Government of India July 20, 2009, the two governments issued a joint statement regarding their intentions to accelerate the growth of their bilateral relationship to enhance global prosperity and stability in the 21st century.

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India • population: 1,103,596,000 • Area: 1,269,221 square miles • Currency: Indian rupee • GDP per Capita: US $2600 • gross domestic product divided by midyear population. • Economy: • Industry: Textiles, chemicals, food processing, steel, transportation equipment, cement, mining • Agriculture: Rice, wheat, oilseed, cotton; cattle; fish • Exports: Textile goods, gems and jewelry, engineering goods, chemicals, leather manufactures According to UN estimates, India will become the most populous country in the world in • just 14 years' time, when it will have about 1.45 billion inhabitants.

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• Cotton Corporation of India Ltd (see charts above): • Mission: Helping cotton farmers by ensuring them remunerative price for their produce and thereby protect their interest. • To overcome the problem of contamination in cotton, maximum quantities of kapas (seed cotton) are arranged to be processed in the modern ginning and pressing factories only • All operations being sales driven, quality cotton of any specific grade and parameters, can be supplied to meet the specific demand of the client mills. • Exports: • In the 1980s and up to mid 1990s, with an extreme surplus of cotton, India began exporting • Since 2004-05, with increased cotton production in the country, cotton exports from the country are again surging ahead and CCI having own infrastructure, export experiences, as well as confidence of the overseas buyers, is availing all export opportunities with special emphasis on neighboring Bangladesh and countries in the Far East. • Ensure stability in the domestic market • Floods are the most common natural disaster in India. The heavy southwest monsoon rains cause the Brahmaputra and other rivers to distend their banks, often flooding surrounding areas. They provide rice paddy farmers with a largely dependable source of natural irrigation and fertilization.

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Manhattan Office: • 45 East 34th Street, Manhattan, NY 10016 • $3,794/Month • 350 square feet • 3 offices for CEOs, Mark Saba, Judy Chen, and Naya Williams. No other corporate positions available at the moment. • professional conference room & office utility space

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Sources: - http://www.foxnews.com/world/2013/11/17/finding-clean-water-concern-for-philippinestyphoon-survivors/ - http://www.watermissions.org/haiyan - http://www.nscb.gov.ph/poverty/ - http://www.waterdialogues.org/documents/PhilippinesCountryContext.pdf - http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/11/16/philippines-typhoon-survi_n_4287114.html - http://www.commonlii.org/in/other/treaties/INTSer/1952/8.html - http://newdelhi.usembassy.gov/us-india-relations.html - http://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-25881705 - http://travel.nationalgeographic.com/travel/countries/india-facts/ - http://cotcorp.gov.in/export.aspx - http://cotcorp.gov.in/sale-of-cotton.aspx - http://cotcorp.gov.in/statistics.aspx#area

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