You are on page 1of 9

CIVIC ACTION LEADER COMPETENCIES

Inform. Inspire. Impact.


Civic Action Leader (CAL) Program: Civic Action Leaders advocate for, provide access to, and take action to support service-learning, community engagement, civic action, public work, sustainable communities, and leadership for the Bowling Green State University community, while supporting the Office of Service-Learning. Program Goals: Engage the Bowling Green State University community in service-learning, community engagement, civic action, public work, sustainable communities, and leadership. Connect faculty, staff, students, and alumni to volunteer opportunities in Northwest Ohio. Assist faculty, staff, and students with developing, implementing, and evaluating civic engagement projects. Provide support for Office of Service-Learning programs and partnerships such as: the MLK Jr. Day of Service Challenge, Volunteer and Community Partnership Fair, Service-Learning and Civic Engagement Awards, Service Update, and affiliated student organizations (bGAB and Serve BG). Develop leadership skills to prepare for a globalized world in which personal and social responsibility will guide the roles and responsibilities of citizens. Cultivate strong relationships between the Bowling Green State University and the Northwest Ohio community. Program Description: The Civic Action Leaders (CALs) are a group of students passionate about community service and civic engagement. CALs work to increase the visibility of service opportunities, while also creating new opportunities for BGSU faculty, students, and staff to engage in service. CALs also develop individual leadership styles and gain skills through a variety of projects and responsibilities. The program is a 3-year cohort model with students applying in the spring of the first year and participating in the program during their sophomore, junior, and senior years. Competency Program: The CAL Competency program developed out of a need to link the learning and experiences that were occurring through this scholarship program to university learning outcomes and to students' career goals and aspirations. While CAL's were previously guided and engaged in enhancement opportunities, the competency program presented a more intentional experience for CAL's to identify the skills they have acquired through their various responsibilities and experiences at BGSU. In the Fall Semester of 2013, in a facilitated discussion, the current cohort of CAL's identified five competencies that are honed during the three-year scholarship program. This was done through identifying the various components of the position and grouping them into common themes. From this discussion, the competencies were put together in this document with definitions and learning outcomes at three different levels that students can achieve (these are described below). Included in this program are opportunities for students to identify potential experiences inside and outside of the CAL position to enhance the competencies and is assessed through personal assessment, reflection, and through a digital experience webpage to be completed over the three years of the CAL program. Competency Levels and Phases: Within each competency, students will be able to assess their level of achievement as 'Basic', 'Proficient', or 'Exemplary'. While students may not necessarily share equal levels of achievement within each competency, based upon their experiences and professional development each CAL should move beyond a 'Basic' level for

more than one competency. While it is ideal for each student to complete the program with an exemplary level of achievement in each competency, it is more likely that students will achieve a proficient level. Students, however, will be given multiple opportunities to assess their growth throughout the three-year program and identify opportunities for enhancement inside and outside of the position. This personal assessment will occur in phases. These phases are constructed based upon how most students will likely enter into the position and how they will grow based upon development in college (i.e. moving from a narrow concept of their skills/experiences to one that is more holistic and encompasses their CAL role, and leadership experiences outside of the office, while simultaneously integrating their career goals). The phases are: Phase 1: Identifying Traits & the Civic Action Leader Role Phase 2: Clarifying and Enhancing the Civic Action Leader Role Phase 3: Integrating Leadership Phase 4: Professional and Community Integration Phase 1: In this phase CAL's will be learning the tasks and responsibilities that the position requires, while observing the skills of their older peers. This time, specifically set aside for learning and observing, is an opportunity for new CAL's to assess their current skill levels in relation to the position responsibilities. Through active experimentation of taking on new and unique roles, new CAL's will grow to fully understand the CAL role and how they function within it. Phase 2: In phase two, CAL's will have had either an entire semester or an entire year to clarify their role within the office and enhance their skills. At this point in the CAL position (both at the end of the first and second semesters), students should assess their performance and skill acquisition within the CAL role. Through guided reflection students will be able to identify areas for growth and opportunities for enhancement inside and outside of the OSL office. Phase 3: After CAL's have had more than a year within the position, it is natural to take on more advanced roles and responsibilities in the office. Once CAL's have identified skill growth, active steps for developing in their competencies should be taken through larger leadership roles. Through these roles CAL's will have the opportunity to practice collaborating with each other and with community/campus partners in achieving mutually beneficial goals. In phase three, CAL's will identify their personal definition of leadership, grounded in the social change model through the digital experience webpage. Phase 4: Towards the end of their college career, CAL's will begin to look outward into their communities and the professional world. While students have been growing within their skill-sets, specifically related to the CAL position, it will be imperative for students to connect the dots between their experiences and the skills they could potentially bring to professional roles in organizations. This phase will be characterized by career development activities, specifically tailored to identifying one's knowledge, skills, and abilities, and an opportunity for CAL's to complete their digital experience webpage that shares their professional story. Furthermore, this phase is characterized by an increased understanding of community action and how individuals and groups impact a community. CAL's will have the opportunity to assess their growth as a civically engaged citizen and create a plan of action for continued active citizenship in their community.

Facilitation and Activities: Included in the competency program are the following guides and activities: Competency Descriptions: Includes definitions, learning outcomes at basic, proficient, and exemplary levels, components of the OSL/CAL program that help achieve learning outcomes, and opportunities inside and outside of the CAL program to enhance each competency. Facilitation Guide: This includes a timeline and instructions to facilitate assessment components for the competencies. Assessments: There is an assessment for each stage of the CAL process that should be utilized throughout the experience. It can be used as a planning tool in the beginning of each new year. Competency Pre-Assessment: This document is to be utilized in the Fall semester for first year, incoming CAL's. It serves as an opportunity to identify opportunities for growth in the first year, and in moving through phases 1 and 2 in the program. Competency Assessment: This assessment will be completed at the beginning of the second and third years as a CAL. Competency FINAL Assessment: This assessment should be completed at the end of the third year when CAL's are ready to graduate. It can be included in a final evaluation with a supervisor. Reflection & Re-Assessment: This is an activity that should be utilized at the mid-point of the year to assess current levels of achievement within the competency plan that was created at the beginning of the year. Digital Experience Guide: The digital experience guide will serve as a digital story of each CAL's experience inside and outside of the CAL position and the OSL. It includes specific activities in each year of the program that assist the CAL in identifying and articulating their growth, skills, and experiences in relation to their careers, leadership, and engagement as a citizen.

Relationship to University Learning Outcomes This matrix describes how the various components of the CAL competency program meet current university learning outcomes. University Critical & Constructive Outcome Thinking Competency/Program Component Communication Engaging Personal & Integrate, Others in Social Apply, & Action Responsibility Reflect

COMPETENCY CURRICULUM
PROFESSIONALISM
Organizes information, logistics, people, and processes towards desired outcomes. Students will be able to...

BASIC
Set and follow timelines and expectations for assigned roles and responsibilities Compose professional e-mails Demonstrate courtesy and professional etiquette on the phone Develop personal, academic, and professional goals Recognize personal strengths and weaknesses in relation to assigned roles and responsibilities Create a professional development plan of action for remaining college years

PROFICIENT
Apply feedback to enhance and change performance Recognize office environment and culture and the impact on policy and procedure Explain concepts to individuals and small/large groups of people Manage multiple priorities and projects in conjunction with office goals Assess and evaluate projects in relation to office goals

EXEMPLARY
Assess personal strengths and weaknesses and choose roles and responsibilities for enhancement Articulate strengths in relation to future career goals Formulate new initiatives and action plans based upon assessment and feedback

PROGRAM COMPONENTS
OSL Fall & Spring Trainings Supervisor meetings Goal setting activity Professional development plan reflection StrengthsQuest assessment Assigned role/responsibility for large office events

Evaluative feedback from supervisors and peers on personal performance on projects, presentations, and office work Participate in communicating the goals of the OSL and CAL program to student organizations and at outreach events Assume more responsibility with project planning, implementation, and evaluation

Complete an digital webpage Resume review with supervisor Opportunities to create new projects and service experiences Serve as the lead CAL on collaborative assignments Exit interview with supervisor

ENHANCEMENT
IN-OFFICE
Opportunities to lead enhancement meetings and team builders at training Bonner Trainings o Action Planning o BHAG's Training1 Present on service experiences at enhancement meetings

OUT OF OFFICE
Create a LinkedIn account Meet with the Career Center Participate in experiential learning related to academic major (research, internship, or part-time job)

Optional trainings are provided as a link in the appendix as a resource for supervisors and facilitators.

Student Leadership Assistant Trainings (Any!)

RELATIONSHIPS & GROUPS


Manages and leads individuals in the establishment and execution of group goals. Students will be able to...

BASIC
Demonstrate an understanding of group dynamics and interpersonal relationships Express ideas and thoughts in a group setting Employ communication and collaboration to provide assistance on individual tasks and group projects Demonstrate honesty towards others while accepting alternative viewpoints Recognize the value and contribution of others

PROFICIENT
Use communication to hold others accountable Generate feedback to support and enhance the groups goals Identify ones personal values in relation to individual and group values Identify partnerships internally and externally to achieve group goals

EXEMPLARY
Support and implement alternative ideas and proposals in the achievement of group goals Sustain internal and external partnerships Employ networking techniques to create informal and formal partnerships Recognize negative group interactions and employ strategies for conflict resolution

PROGRAM COMPONENTS
Participate and contribute to training and enhancement meetings Collaborate on and contribute to OSL projects Supervisor meetings Deliver presentations to campus constituent groups and off-campus groups Communicate with community partners Participate in program feedback sessions Build relationships with community partners at VCPF and through managing components of MLK day Co-coordinate direct service opportunities with incoming CALs Collaborate with organizations and community partners to deliver service opportunities Create/utilize marketing and outreach techniques

ENHANCEMENT
IN-OFFICE
Bonner Trainings o Building a Personal Network o Building Career Networks o Building Coalitions o Conflict Resolution o Four Corners: Building Appreciation for Diverse Ideas & Dialogue Community partner site-visits Service Saturdays Student Leadership Assistant trainings (Any!)

OUT OF OFFICE
Membership or leadership in a student organization Utilize LinkedIn to network with alumni and professionals in one's intended field Visit professor office hours Identify a personal/professional mentor Attend conferences such as Ohio Campus Compact.

DIVERSITY & INCLUSION


Creates broad and safe environments that engage and support diversity. Students will be able to...

BASIC
Recognize one's own identify, privilege, and culture Recognize the contributions diversity brings to communities Use inclusive language Demonstrate an understanding of the difference between tolerance and appreciation

PROFICIENT
Demonstrate an understanding of social justice and how it is connected to social change Choose to be involved with people different from oneself Evaluate concepts of intersection of identity Develop and maintain relationships with diverse groups

EXEMPLARY
Advocate for equality and inclusiveness Explain and illustrate concepts of privilege and oppression in communities to others Demonstrate a personal and professional commitment to diversity and inclusion

PROGRAM COMPONENTS
Participate in social justice and diversity training at training and enhancement meetings Participate in service opportunities in diverse communities and reflect on those experiences

ENHANCEMENT
IN-OFFICE
Presentations from Diversity Peer Educators Student Leadership Assistant Trainings: o Creating Safe and Inclusive Environments o I-Stand Advocacy o Diversity & Dialogue o Diversity Why is it critical to your organization? o Diversity: A focus on Ethnic and Cultural Diversity Bonner Trainings: o Ethnocentrism: Exploring Your National Identity o Groups Within Groups: Exploring Dimensions of Diversity o Homophobia: Countering It o Identity Circles: A Personal Exploration of Diversity Participate in a bGAB trip.

OUT OF OFFICE
Participate in Not In Our Town activities SafeZone Training Join a diversity-related student organization Attend Latino Issues Conference, Black Issues Conference, State of the State Conference, and Asian-American Week events Attend Mosaic Series events hosted by the Office of Multicultural Affairs Attend Taste of February Participate in NCBI Workshop Trainings Register for diversity/perspective classes related to cultural awareness and diversity. Participate in alternative break trips from other offices, departments, and organizations.

CITIZENSHIP
Emphasizes working with others in a way that promotes an outward focus on social responsibility and addresses the needs of multiple communities. Students will be able to...

BASIC
Recognize the definition of community Recognize issues in one's community Demonstrates an understanding of the various resources and services in the community Identify a sense of responsibility for community action Participate in direct service opportunities Form opinions on political issues

PROFICIENT
Conceptualize and articulate a personal definition of civic engagement. Model civic behavior to promote involvement in service opportunities Identify community partners and resources in order to contribute to civic change Demonstrate an understanding of laws and the roles of decision-making in communities Organize and manage civic engagement opportunities for others

EXEMPLARY
Generate opportunities for change and reciprocity in partnership with others Relate academic and cocurricular experiences and skill development as a way to address societal issues Lead others in reflection of service to enhance others' civic responsibility Advocate for justice related to societal issues Identify one's personal values in relation to opportunities for civic action

PROGRAM COMPONENTS
Participate and contribute to training and enhancement meetings Participate in direct service opportunities, including Service Saturdays Build relationships with community partners at VCPF and through managing components of MLK day Articulate the benefits of civic engagement at outreach events Manage components of MLK Day and/or Service Saturdays Plan components and logistics of MLK day and Service Saturday Create an E-Portfolio Facilitate MLK day site leader training Lead service-related reflection during Service Saturday, bGAB trips, or other service opportunities Act as a liaison to serviceoriented organization

ENHANCEMENT
IN-OFFICE
Trainings on Service-Learning courses and Curricular Components Bonner Trainings o Advocacy 101/201 o Bridging the Gap Between Service, Activism, and Politics o Citizenship: Rights, Responsibilities, and Struggles o Community Asset Mapping: A Critical Strategy for Service

OUT OF OFFICE
Take a service-learning course Participate in a bGAB trip Join a service-related organization Participate in Project Homeless Connect, Rock the Block, or other service projects in BG and Toledo Vote in local and federal elections. Engage with local and national campaigns or community leaders (such as register people to vote

Power Mapping

LEADERSHIP
Integrates personal and organizational values and establishes a sense of purpose that contributes to the development of program goals and others. Students will be able to...

BASIC
Demonstrate congruence between personal values, thoughts, and actions. Demonstrate understanding of personal strengths and how they impact leadership Recognize how one's leadership style affects and impacts others Identify how the environment and others impact one's leadership Demonstrate self-efficacy in the initiation and completion of tasks Articulate tenets of social change model of leadership

PROFICIENT
Display the capability to influence others through nontraditional leadership roles Demonstrate an ability to share authority and follow when needed Create a shared vision based on group values Demonstrate an ability to understand role and influence of power structures

EXEMPLARY
Examine and assess group members' talents and gifts to utilize in accomplishing group goals Identify personal growth from academic, co-curricular, and service experience Demonstrate an ability to take action on career goals Mentor and guide the development of incoming group members

PROGRAM COMPONENTS
Participate in OSL training and enhancement meetings Supervisor meetings Collaborate and contribute directly to major OSL programs and events Initiate and lead new programs in the office Create an E-Portfolio Provide feedback and guidance for new/incoming CAL's

ENHANCEMENT
IN-OFFICE
Bonner Trainings: o Leadership Compass: Appreciating Diverse Work Styles o Personal Vision: Articulating One o Board of Directors/Personal Mission & Mentoring Exercise Student Leadership Assistant Topics o Non-Positional Leadership o Authentic Leadership o Leading Change

OUT OF OFFICE
Participate in the Leadership Certificate program through the Center for Leadership Acquire a leadership position in another student organization Attend Leadership Academy, Falcon Leadership Institute, Student Leadership Retreat, or Leadership Week events hosted by the Center for Leadership Register for courses related to leadership.

o Leadership Challenge Assume leadership roles with Serve BG or bGAB.