March 2009 Dear Parent/Guardian Key Stage 4 Courses, September 2009 - May 2011 After 3 years following

the compulsory Key Stage 3 of the National Curriculum, the time has now come when a limited choice of subjects for the final stage of compulsory education (Key Stage 4) is available. In order to maintain the principle of a 'broad and balanced' education, pupils will study a core of compulsory subjects. The optional courses will allow students some choice in relation to their particular interests, aptitudes, abilities and careers ambitions. The level, content and emphasis of work will be related to pupils' abilities. The general aims of our curriculum are as follows: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. To ensure that all pupils, regardless of ability, reach the highest academic standards of which they are capable and develop their particular talents. To enable pupils to chose between a range of academic, vocational and work related learning. To enable pupils to value themselves and their relations with other people without discrimination on the grounds of religion, race, gender, class or disability. To help pupils understand moral issues and social problems, including an awareness of the social, political and economic context in which they live. To stimulate and encourage creativity, inventiveness and originality and to appreciate achievements in art, music, drama, literature, science and technology. To acquire a range of skills of study, communication, problem solving, enterprise, practical work, observation, investigations and information handling.

We seek to achieve these aims by: a. b. c. d. Developing pupils' skills in reading, writing, speaking, listening and numeracy. Effective delivery through schemes of work and programmes of study. Making Information Technology an integrated part of the curriculum of every department. Recognising the identified special needs of pupils in terms of differentiation.

Vocational preparation is also a vital part of the Key Stage 4 curriculum. It is broader than just Careers Guidance and is aimed at enabling young people to make informed decisions at every important stage. An introduction to the working environment is included through Work Experience for all students and expert advice is available through individual careers counselling and advice about options post 16. Several vocational choices have also been introduced into the curriculum including the new Diplomas available at Level 2 in ICT and Business, Administration and Finance.

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Unfortunately we are not always able to provide every first choice of subject as in some cases the number of students who opt for a course is either too small to be viable, or too large. We therefore are asking students to choose a second and third preference. We will, however, endeavour to do all we can to ensure a student's first choice; if not, we will discuss the problem fully with individual students. External Examinations The courses described in this booklet are normally examined at the level of the General Certificate of Secondary Education (GCSE). Some other subjects are awarded Level 1 which is equivalent to Grades D to G at GCSE Level or Level 2, which is equivalent to grades A* to C. The examination system tests not only memory and the orderly presentation of facts, but also understanding, practical and other skills, plus the ability to apply that knowledge. It places emphasis upon continuous assessment of coursework, which requires particular skills of organisation of time and homework. All courses and examinations follow nationally agreed guide-lines, known as the ‘national criteria’. Within subjects there will be a choice of levels of assessment. Decisions concerning entry for examinations in each subject are made in Year 11 and parents will be fully consulted at every stage. Timetable of Events March/April Thurs 12 March Tuesday 17 March Thursday 19 March May/June/July Tutor Group Time to be used for careers advice and issues connected with making a choice Careers Convention – Senior Staff available for discussion. Year 9 Parents Evening. Discussions with subject teachers, Careers Officers and senior staff – 5.00 pm to 8.00 pm Final choice forms to be returned to school Individual interviews – to discuss and confirm choices

To Pupils The modern world makes serious demands upon us all and your school life should prepare you to face these challenges. You will also live in a world of information and communications technology which you will need to exploit. You will soon be faced with the first really big educational decision of your life - that of your future career. No-one can forecast the next ten years; the logical course to take is to keep one's options as wide as possible to give you the greatest chance in the greatest number of opportunities.

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How to Decide 1. 2. 3. What subjects can you choose from? Find out essential facts - ask subject teachers, Heads of Departments and your Form Tutor. Do not be influenced by the decision of a friend or the personality of the teacher. Make your decisions carefully.

The information in this booklet has been put together to help you. Read it carefully and ask for further explanation so you are confident you have made the right choice. Parents will no doubt be interested in the breakdown of the school’s examination results for the past 5 years. These show: Pupils achieving 5+ A* to C grades: 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 62.4% 65.1% 62.0% 70.0% 76.0%

Pupils achieving 5+ A* to G grades: 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 98.8% 96.8% 96.7% 95.5% 96.9%

Our aim is that our students will continue to maintain, and even surpass, these high standards in the future. Yours sincerely

J D Pickerill Headteacher

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Frequently asked Questions
How do we decide who will be accepted onto a course if there are too many pupils? Pupils are asked to indicate a second, or a third, preference to provide us with information about the other subjects they would like to do. Where there are too many pupils all of them will be interviewed to establish why they wanted to study that subject and if an alternative would be just as satisfactory. In some cases pupils who have chosen two oversubscribed subjects are guaranteed a place on one, but have to study their second choice in another. In most cases the problems are resolved in this way. If there are still problems, selection criteria are developed based on levels of interest and aptitude. The aim is to be fair and equitable to all pupils. Parents are consulted and informed at various stages through this process. Are there other courses available? As we progress through the option process we will identify opportunities to offer more choice to pupils with particular interests, needs or aptitudes. The completion of the preference form is the beginning of a process and all possibilities are explored. Will all the courses run? There may be a situation where the take up of a particular subject is too small to make it viable, in which case it would not run. The maximum and minimum number of pupils does vary between subjects and so there is no single figure that can apply. Some new courses have been put on the preference form to see if there is sufficient interest. These courses will only run if they have sufficient pupils and if they can be timetabled successfully. What are Level 1 and Level 2 Course? All qualifications are approved and fit into the National Qualifications Framework. Each qualification is allocated a Level. Level 1 courses offer a qualification equivalent to GCSE grades D to G. Level 2 courses offer a qualification equivalent to GCSE grades A* to C. All GCSE courses therefore cover Levels 1 and 2. Some of the vocational courses are offered at either Level 1 or 2. In these cases it is important to place pupils in the appropriate level to ensure they can cope with the course and are appropriately challenged. -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Please tear off and return to Mr Woollen's pigeonhole if you have further questions If you have further questions, senior members of staff will be available at the front of the school at the Careers Convention on Thursday 12 March and the Parents Evening on Tuesday 17 March, or please contact Mr Woollen. You may wish to pose the question in the space below and an appointment can be arranged with a senior member of staff during the Parents Evening. Name of son/daughter: Question Form:

Signed: ____________________________ Please return to Mr Woollen's pigeonhole

Date:

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KEY STAGE 4 CURRICULUM Contents
Level THE CORE CURRICULUM CAREERS CITIZENSHIP ENGLISH INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY MATHEMATICS MODERN FOREIGN LANGUAGE - FRENCH PHYSICAL EDUCATION RELIGIOUS EDUCATION SCIENCE SINGLE BLOCK SUBJECTS ART & DESIGN BUSINESS STUDIES DRAMA ENGINEERING GEOGRAPHY GERMAN HEALTH AND SOCIAL CARE HISTORY ICT – CIDA (Certificate in Digital Applications) MUSIC PHYSICAL EDUCATION TRIPLE AWARD SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY SUBJECT ELECTRONIC PRODUCTS FOOD AND NUTRITION GRAPHIC PRODUCTS RESISTANT MATERIALS TEXTILES DOUBLE BLOCK* SUBJECTS HEALTH & SOCIAL CARE SPORT (BTEC FIRST DIPLOMA) DIPLOMAS BUSINESS, ADMINISTRATION AND FINANCE (BAF) INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGY (ICT) Page 7 8 8 9 10 11 12 12 13

1 and 2 1 and 2 1 and 2 1 and 2 1 and 2

1 and 2 1 and 2 1 and 2 2 1 and 2

1 1 1 1

and and and and

2 2 2 2

1 1 1 1 1

and and and and and

2 2 2 2 2

15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 27 27 29 29 29

1 and 2 1 and 2 2

31 32

2 2

34 36

*Block refers to a unit of time ie. 5 lessons over 2 weeks

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THE CORE CURRICULUM
These are compulsory subjects that, with limited exception, everyone takes. It includes:

CAREERS ENGLISH RELIGIOUS EDUCATION (Full course) YEAR 10 CITIZENSHIP (Short course) YEAR 11 INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY (Core course) MATHEMATICS MODERN FOREIGN LANGUAGE - FRENCH (Based on attainment grades over the last 3 years) PHYSICAL EDUCATION (Core course) SCIENCE (Core course)

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CAREERS EDUCATION
You will have a structured Careers Education programme in Years 9, 10 and 11. In Year 9 the course is designed to make you more aware of post 16 opportunities, to assess your own strengths and weaknesses and to help you prepare for future decision making both at 14 years and 16 years of age. In Year 10 the programme ensures that you gain a complete understanding of post 16 options. The introduction of new qualifications is making decision making more complex, particularly with the different levels within each of these qualifications, and so a significant amount of time is spent discussing both new and traditional qualifications. Progression beyond 18 years of age and the GCSE’s required for these new courses as well as traditional courses such as A level are also discussed in detail. Preparation for work experience is also an important part of Year 10 Careers. In Year 11 the emphasis is on application forms, the CV and interview skills, with significant support in lessons being provided by local industry and commerce. You will participate in two weeks of work experience currently just before half term in the Autumn Term of Year 11 and we also concentrate on reinforcing our work on post 16 options with verbal presentations by local colleges, prior to the completion of the appropriate applications. Local industrialists also provide support in the development of Interview Skills. Connexions Personal Advisers provide a vital supporting role throughout the Careers programme from Year 9, whilst in Year 11 we try to provide individual careers interviews with the Personal Advisers. Our Annual Careers Convention in March provides you and your parents with the opportunity to meet many representatives from local colleges, industry, training providers, the Armed Services and Careers Officers. You basically have a choice of 3 different routes when leaving school at 16 years of age: 1. To stay in full time education which may be in a Sixth Form College, eg Pontefract, Boothferry or John Leggott; or College of Further Education eg Selby or North Lindsey, Scunthorpe. About 75% of our pupils tend to choose this route. 2. To seek full time employment where currently there are a limited number of opportunities. 3. To opt for a structured training programme, for example in the form of Apprenticeships. Local training managers provide appropriate programmes with the emphasis on practical skills. Pupils receive a training grant (approximately £80 per week) and the programme usually lasts for up to 2 years. Up to 10% of our pupils currently tend to opt for this route.

For more information see Mr Sharphouse

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CITIZENSHIP
In Year 11 pupils will study the OCR short course in Citizenship. The following topics will be covered:• • • • • • • • • • The legal and human rights and responsibilities underpinning society and how they relate to citizens, including the role and operation of the criminal and civil justice systems. The origins and implications of the diverse national, regional, religious and ethnic identities in the UK and the need for mutual respect and understanding The work of parliament, the government and the courts in making and shaping law The importance of playing an active part in democratic and electoral processes How the economy functions, including the role of business and financial services The opportunities for individuals and voluntary groups to bring about social change locally, nationally, in Europe and internationally The importance of the free press, and the media’s role in society, including the internet, in providing information and affecting opinion The rights and responsibilities of consumers, employers and employees The United Kingdom in relation to Europe, including the European Union, and relations with the Commonwealth and United Nations The wider issues and challenges of global interdependence and responsibility, including sustainable development and Local Agenda 21

Pupils will be provided with the opportunity to further develop their skills of enquiry and communication during this course. Students are expected to take part in an active community event as part of the requirements of the course. The course will involve one piece of internal assessment and one exam. The course will lead to external accreditation. For more information see Mr Gardner

ENGLISH AND ENGLISH LITERATURE (GCSE)
You will all follow a course based on the WJEC English GCSE syllabus whose aims are to help you develop your: 1. understanding of the spoken word and the ability to take part in a variety of speaking and listening activities matching your style and response to different audiences and purposes 2. reading, understanding and response to all types of writing while improving information retrieval skills for the purpose of study 3. ability to construct and convey meaning in your written work using correct grammar and standard English and matching your style to the audience and purpose. The syllabus is assessed by terminal examination (60%) and coursework (40%). You will continue to be grouped in ability bands. Pupils in most groups will also be entered for the WJEC English Literature GCSE (70% examination, 30% coursework). The WJEC syllabuses allow for assessment in a common 8

folder. The department is currently piloting the Edexcel Adult Literacy onscreen testing regime with a small number of pupils and this may expand during 2009-10. Individual teachers will inform their groups of the combinations of courses and assessment that will be used with them. Assessment English English Literature Examination 60% Examination 70% Coursework 40% Coursework 30%

For more information see Mr Williams

CORE ICT -AIDA (AWARD IN DIGITAL APPLICATIONS) 1 GCSE
You will all gain a qualification in ICT. The course we follow is part of a suite of qualifications enabling you to progress to higher levels if you choose ICT as a single block subject. ⇒ ⇒ Award (AiDA) – equivalent to 1 GCSE

Certificate (CiDA) – equivalent to 2 GCSE’s

The qualification is paperless, making pupils' evidence searchable, dynamic and interactive. It promotes creative use of applications, and its real-life, goal orientated emphasis is involving and stimulating. We live in an age of information overload – TV, radio, text messaging, web and email, telephone, video, DVD and CD to say nothing of newspapers, magazines and face-to-face conversations. How do we manage all the information we receive? How do we judge its usefulness? How can we present it clearly and effectively so it communicates the message we want to convey? This is the keystone of the entire suite of awards available within the DiDA This course will support pupils' learning and help maximise their achievements across the curriculum. In the AiDA course you will study • • • • • • • Researching information sources – involving the Internet and email Working with Information – involving databases and spreadsheets Presenting Information – using digital media Displaying Information – using Dreamweaver and Flash animation Communicating – all forms of communication media, radio, TV, email Planning, monitoring and evaluating your work Creating an e-portfolio online to showcase your work

For more information see Mrs Rome

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MATHEMATICS
Everyone will follow a GCSE Mathematics course examined by the AQA examination board This course aims to enable candidates to: • • • • • • • • • develop a positive attitude to Mathematics consolidate basic skills and meet appropriately challenging work apply mathematical knowledge and understanding to solve problems think and communicate mathematically - precisely, logically and creatively appreciate the place and use of Mathematics in society apply mathematical concepts to situations arising in their own lives understand the interdependence of different branches of Mathematics work co-operatively, independently, practically and investigationally acquire a firm foundation for further study or for work

The GCSE course is split into 3 modules, each of which will be examined separately. The first module to be taught and examined will be Data Handling. This will be examined in November 2008. In June 2009 the next module, Number, will be examined. The final module comprises Shape and Space and Algebra – this will be examined in June 2010. Pupils will need to purchase a revision guide from school (currently £2.50) during Year 10. Parents and pupils should note that calculators are an essential piece of equipment and should be brought to all lessons as they cannot be provided by the department.

For more information see Mr Smith

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MODERN LANGUAGES - FRENCH
You have used Métro in KS3 and are familiar with the 4 attainment targets of Listening, Speaking, Reading and Writing. You will be using Métro 4 along with other materials in a topic based approach in KS4. The GCSE at the end of Year 11 covers the 4 skill areas. Listening (F) You will be expected to listen to and understand shorter items. (H) You will be expected to listen to and understand longer conversations and passages. (F) = Foundation (H) = Higher Reading (F) You will have to read and respond to shorter notices and signs. (H) You will have to read and respond to longer passages and articles. Writing This section is covered by coursework. You must complete a minimum of 3 pieces of coursework. The coursework makes up 30% of the total mark and is extremely important. Pupils must produce their best work and adhere to deadlines if they are to achieve their optimum overall grade. Speaking The test is in two sections and pupils must do 2 of the following: a) Presentation with discussion b) Picture-based discussion c) Open interaction Homework will continue to play an important part in the course. Vocabulary will be a key area and emphasis will be placed upon the regular learning of words and phrases. Throughout the course you will be encouraged to develop the skills necessary to express yourselves confidently in the foreign language and to develop an awareness of French speaking countries. Knowledge of a foreign language is an extremely important skill in today's Europe and the department aims to help all pupils to develop a foreign language ability fully. Any contact with the foreign language will help to boost your knowledge and understanding. DVD with foreign subtitles, Satellite TV, Internet and Computer Assisted Learning are some of the options open to pupils at home. A trip abroad can also help to add enjoyment and context to what has been learnt.

For more information see Mr Banks

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PHYSICAL EDUCATION
You will have already received a good grounding in the ‘Core’ activities. The programme in Years 10/11 allows you to develop individual expertise in other areas to encourage your continued participation after leaving school. Pupils are encouraged to develop positive attitudes towards participation. That encourages healthy attitudes and positive lifestyles. Students may be offered the potential of following an accredited sports leadership course in this lesson. Representative teams continue to run for both boys and girls, with excellent results being achieved in the past. Those with exceptional ability have gone on to represent the District and County. It is expected in the Department that you continue to wear the regulation school kit, which must be named and kept clean. The wearing of watches and jewellery during PE lessons is not permitted as it can cause injury to both the wearer and others. Due to occasional problems experienced with collecting valuables and money, please ensure that you place them in a named container. For more information see Mr Simm

RELIGIOUS EDUCATION
Pupils are currently following the Religious Education GCSE full course. This is the OCR examination board (Oxford and Cambridge). The course is entitled Philosophy and Ethics. Pupils will study four philosophy topics and four topics. These topics will be:The Nature of God (Year 9) Religion and Science (Year 9) Death and the Afterlife (Year 10) Good and Evil (Year 9) Religion and Medical Ethics (Year 10) Wealth and Poverty (Year 9) Religion Peace and Justice (Year 10) Religion and Human Relationships (Year 10) This course gives pupils the opportunity to further both their knowledge and understanding, but also gives them time to reflect upon their own beliefs, opinions and ideas. It is expected that students will sit the examination at the end of Year 10. Pupils studying Level 1 Engineering, Hair and Beauty or the CACHE course at college will study a short course RE leading to half a GCSE. For more information see Mrs Yates

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SCIENCE Core Course (GCSE)
During Years 10 and 11 students will work towards two GCSE qualifications; GCSE Science and GCSE Additional Science. The first GCSE will be examined at the end of Year 10 and is designed to be a foundation for the ideas to be developed in GCSE Additional Science studied in Year 11. The main content areas of GCSE Science are as follows: Biology
how the nervous system and hormones allow us to respond to changes. how we can keep our bodies healthy. the effects of using and abusing drugs. how we defend ourselves against infectious diseases. how living things adapt to their environment. variation and genetics. how living things evolve. how humans affect the environment. -

Chemistry
how we get building materials from the rocks. where metals come from and how we use them. how we get fuels from crude oil. how we make polymers and ethanol from oil. how plant oils can be used. how the Earth and its atmosphere have changed. -

Physics
how heat energy can move from one place to another. how we can use energy efficiently. how we use electrical devices. how we can generate electricity. how can we safely use the energy in the electromagnetic spectrum. how we can use radioactivity safely. how the Universe was formed and is changing.

The new syllabus provides progression to A Level and makes use of the subject specialisms we have preserved at Snaith School. How is it assessed? The work is assessed through three, 45 minute examinations (75%) and one Centre Assessed Practical activity carried out in lessons under exam conditions (25%) in Year 10. This pattern is repeated in Year 11.

For more information see Mrs Robinson

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SINGLE BLOCK SUBJECTS
The following subjects occupy one timetable block, normally 5 hours over two weeks. ART & DESIGN GCSE BUSINESS STUDIES GCSE DRAMA GCSE ENGINEERING BTEC FIRST CERTIFICATE LEVEL 2 (Equivalent to 2 GCSEs Grades A*-C) GEOGRAPHY GCSE FRENCH GCSE (see core section) GERMAN GCSE HEALTH AND SOCIAL CARE HISTORY GCSE IT CiDA GCSE MUSIC GCSE PHYSICAL EDUCATION TRIPLE AWARD SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY SUBJECTS: RESISTANT MATERIALS GCSE ELECTRONIC PRODUCTS GCSE FOOD AND NUTRITION TECHNOLOGY GCSE GRAPHIC PRODUCTS GCSE TEXTILES GCSE 14

ART AND DESIGN
What is the Course About? This is a broad course including practical art work and research. Pupils are encouraged to use a range of 2D and/or 3D processes and new media and technologies. It is a course where candidates can work in appropriate art, craft and design materials and processes. What will I study? Students can explore and develop ideas associated with two or more of the following areas: • • • • • Fine Art Graphic Communication Photography: lens-based and light-based media Textile Design Three-Dimensional design

Who is the course suitable for? Pupils who choose to pursue this option must have an interest in and enjoy Art. They should be able to work independently, show commitment and motivation, be organised, meet deadlines and be creative. In Art a lot of work has to be done at home. What can I do with a GCSE in Art and Design? Art and Design is present in all aspects of our environment. This option can lead to a wide range of fulfilling careers such as: Teaching, Fashion Design, Graphic Design, Packaging Design, Photography, Animation, Interior Design, Web-Site Design, Illustration, Architecture, Industrial Design, Product Design, Print Production and Advertising. How will it be assessed? Portfolio of Work – Controlled Assessment 60% of total marks (Marked out of 80) Externally Set Task – External Assessment

40% of total marks (Marked out of 80) 10 hours unaided piece of work The portfolio should be selected from work Students respond to their chosen starting point. undertaken during the course of study and Question papers can be issued to students from must include more than one project. 1 January in the year of the exam. There is unlimited preparation time and 10 hours of supervised time. For more information please see Mr Richardson Medd or Miss Kirk

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BUSINESS STUDIES GCSE
Business is a popular subject at all levels (60% of all college and university courses are in business related subjects) it is very likely that at some time in the future you will find yourself studying it! All jobs are in a business of some kind and the skills and knowledge learnt from a business course will be of value to yourself and make you attractive to an employer. What is this course about? This subject looks at the way that businesses are set up, financed, organised and controlled, how people are recruited and motivated to work, how goods and services are developed and marketed and how governments and other organisations help and hinder business. We will use Business Simulation software so that you can actually set up and experience the running of a business. You will be able to compete with other pupils in the school and also enter the PROSHARE competition where you will buy Shares and see if you can win a trip to New York! This course will prepare you well for running a business as part of the Young Enterprise Company programme in Year 10. Who is it suitable for? This course is very popular and has been taught at Snaith for the past 19 years. A GCSE in Business Studies
♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

develops communication, research, IT and analytical skills. will help you qualify for A/AS levels, vocational courses and then higher education. has direct relevance to jobs in all types of businesses (e.g. manufacturing, retail, sport & leisure, hospitality, office admin and IT). can provide a foundation for running your own business. combines well with all other subjects allowing a broad career choice e.g. + art (advertising, design), + history and English (law, civil service), + modern languages (overseas business, travel and tourism), + maths and science (banking, engineering).

What will I Study? The ownership and objectives of businesses Marketing and advertising Finance and accounting Employment and people in business Production in business External influences on business activity How will I be Assessed? The final grade is made up of three elements
• • •

25% of controlled assessment where candidates can research and collect data (10 hours) then use this to write a report (up to 6 hours). 25% of one hour short answer paper 50% of one half hour written paper based on a case study

For more information see Mr Warren

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DRAMA
What is the Course About? This is a GCSE course run by AQA. It is a largely practical subject involving working in groups to prepare scripted, improvised and devised drama. Plays will also be read, discussed and analysed. You will learn about stage lighting, costume, props, set design and directing as well as developing acting techniques and skills. You will be taken to study professional performances and encouraged to see live theatre yourself. Who is it Suitable For? You should enjoy practical Drama and be able to write essays confidently as most of the written work is in this format. This course builds self-confidence, communication skills, creativity and the ability to work as part of a team. It would be an ideal course for anyone wishing to work with the public, eg working with children, police, sales, teaching, banking, hairdressing, law etc. A good attendance is necessary since it is almost impossible to 'catch up' with practical group work, and group members are dependent upon each other for their practical assessment marks. Severe problems in this area may result in removal from the course. What Will I Study? Practical Drama You will work in groups of 3-5. Each practical piece will take at least 9 weeks to prepare and will last about 15-20 minutes. Marks are submitted for the best work completed during the 2 year course. Usually 4 practical pieces are completed and the 2 highest marks are selected. You are assessed on your rehearsals, performance and the ability to complete a written evaluation of your work. Written Work You will learn how to analyse set plays from a performance point of view and explain how sections could be acted out. You will review a live professional performance by visiting the Theatre and making notes on the acting and staging which will later be written up as an essay. You will evaluate your own and others’ performances in school. You will study a script from a performance point of view and write about it. Homework There will be homework involving learning lines, reading plays, writing extended evaluations of performances you have been to see and completing research tasks. This course is very different to Year 9. There is a great deal of candidate choice in creation of the content of the course and group work. How is the Work Assessed? 60% of the marks are awarded for practical coursework assessed by your teacher and 40% is awarded through written examination (1½ hours – questions based on live performances and scripts you have studied). For more information see Mrs Baddon

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ENGINEERING BTEC FIRST
(Equivalent to 2 GCSEs Grades A*-C)

CERTIFICATE (Level 2)

What is the Course About? There is a shortage of qualified engineers both locally and in the country as a whole. This course will allow you to develop the underpinning knowledge and understanding needed to work in Engineering. It is a mixture of theory and practical work. Who is it Suitable For? This is a level 2 course equivalent to 2 GCSEs, grades A*-C. You will need an interest in engineering and able to work to deadlines. What Will I Study? You will study two core units and two specialist units. Core Units Unit 1: Working Practices in Engineering - The aim of this unit is to deal with Health and Safety; the essential working practices of engineering to ensure that you appreciate potential hazards. Unit 2: Using and Interpreting Engineering Information – will show you how to use different types of information when working with engineering drawings, technical charts and other sources. Unit 3: Using Computer Aided Drawing Techniques - Provide the learner with an introduction to CAD and to enable learners to produce engineering drawings. Unit 4: Machining Techniques - Provides a detailed understanding of manufacturing processes of generating and forming of shapes through machining. How Will I Be Assessed? Assessment is through portfolio work and practical assessment by your teacher. This course has only 4 possible levels of attainment:Distinction (equivalent GCSE grade A) Merit (GCSE grade B) Pass (grade C) Fail Therefore, only pupils who are prepared to make a commitment to hard work need apply – only 25% of the time will be spent on practical tasks the remaining time and regular homework will be spent on completing assignments that are essential to passing the course. For more information see Mr Woollen

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GEOGRAPHY GCSE
What is the course about? The course focuses on the critical importance of geography for understanding the world and for stimulating an interest in places. It will inspire students to become global citizens by exploring their place in the world, their values and responsibilities to other people and to the environment. Who is it suitable for? Anyone with an interest in the world and the environment. What will I Study? Unit 1 – Physical Geography. The Restless Earth Rocks, Resources and Scenery Water on the Land Ice on the Land. Unit 2- Human Geography. Changing Urban Environments Globalisation Tourism Case studies and examples are studied at a variety of scales and in differing environments including areas at various stages of economic development. Fieldwork will be included in the study of at least two of the topics studied. Studying Geography at GCSE will help to develop many of the abilities and skills that employers are looking for. It is also recognised as a valuable subject for a range of jobs which require a knowledge of the world in which we live. The type of work in Geography helps you to develop:• Good communication skills. • The ability to work in a team. • The ability to manage and organise. • Skills in analysing information. • Numeracy and literacy skills. • The ability to ask the questions and then find the answers. • ICT skills. • Spatial awareness. • Environmental and social awareness. How will the work be assessed? Two examination papers, one on the physical topics studied and one on the human topics. 75% of the total mark. Local Fieldwork Investigation – this controlled assessment requires students to use fieldwork to investigate one question or hypothesis at a local scale. Students will submit an extended piece of work prepared under controlled conditions. 25% of the total mark. For more information see Mrs O’Rourke

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MODERN LANGUAGES - GERMAN
You have used LOGO in KS3 and are familiar with the 4 attainment targets of Listening, Speaking, Reading and Writing. You will be using LOGO 4 along with other materials in a topic based approach in KS4. The GCSE at the end of Year 11 covers the 4 skill areas, with equal weighting (ie 25% each). Listening (F) You will be expected to listen to and understand shorter items. (H) You will be expected to listen to and understand longer conversations and passages. (F) = Foundation (H) = Higher Reading (F) You will have to read and respond to shorter notices and signs. (H) You will have to read and respond to longer passages and articles. Writing This section is covered by coursework. You must complete a minimum of 3 pieces of coursework. The coursework makes up 25% of the total mark and is extremely important. Pupils must produce their best work and adhere to deadlines if they are to achieve their optimum overall grade. Speaking The test is in two sections: a) Role plays (2 situations eg. shopping or buying a ticket) b) A general conversation on two topics. Homework will continue to play an important part in the course. Vocabulary will be a key area and emphasis will be placed upon the regular learning of words and phrases. Throughout the course you will be encouraged to develop the skills necessary to express yourselves confidently in the foreign language and to develop an awareness of German speaking countries. Knowledge of a foreign language is an extremely important skill in today's Europe and the department aims to help all pupils to develop a foreign language ability fully. Any contact with the foreign language will help to boost your knowledge and understanding. DVD with foreign subtitles, Satellite TV, Internet and Computer Assisted Learning are some of the options open to pupils at home. A trip abroad can also help to add enjoyment and context to what has been learnt. For more information see Mr Banks

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GCSE HEALTH & SOCIAL CARE

(SINGLE AWARD)

What is the course about? Health and Social Care is a vocational GCSE. It is about people and how personal development can affect our health and well-being. It is also about a whole range of health and social care job roles. This course is not a child development course. It is much broader and can lead to all sorts of jobs in medical science, allied health professions, social work, roles in fitness and health promotion or early years education. Here are some examples of jobs: Midwife, Dentist, Social worker, Police, Early Years Care, Teacher, Doctor, Psychologist, Dental nurse, Nurse, Physiotherapist, Speech therapist, Care assistant, Health Promotion workers. These are just some examples of the many job roles. The course is classroom based and lessons usually have a mixture of discussion work, films, activities and worksheets. The aim is to foster a caring attitude and teamwork within a hard working environment. Trips out are arranged when possible. An extended work placement is included in the course, usually in Year 10. Students undertake placements in Primary schools, Nurseries, care and Residential homes. Who is it suitable for? This course would suit any student who is interested in working with people in any role. The work we do helps with understanding of people in different situations. All caring professions have a similar framework of qualifications and GCSE grades in suitable subjects are the first step in the process. The course is open to both male and female students. What will I study? For the Single award the following two units will be studied: Unit 1 2 Title Health, Social Care and Early Years Provision Understanding Personal Development and Relationships What is included Needs of clients, How to obtain services Types of services, Job roles, Care Values Stages of growth development, Factors affecting growth and development, Self concept, Life changes and sources of support

How will I be assessed? The Units are assessed as follows: Unit Assessment 1 Controlled assessment 2 Written exam 1 hour

Weighting 60% 40%

For more information or to see examples of work see Mrs Marshall

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HISTORY GCSE
What is the Course About? This is a GCSE course. A great deal of emphasis is placed on the development of skills (i.e. what you can do), rather than the memorisation of facts and dates. You are encouraged to develop an understanding of the past through the use of historical evidence. Who is it Suitable For? You should have an interest in the past and how it influences the present events. You should be prepared to use a lot of written material and sources and to make detailed notes for revision classes. You will be taught in a mixed ability class. What Will I Study? The course followed is the AQA syllabus A - Schools Council History. It is divided into three sections, each considering a particular aspect of history. The first part, ‘Development through Time (Medicine)’, encourages you to consider how things change from pre-history to modern times and why. From Easter, you will follow the ‘History Around Us’ course which emphasises that history can be seen and appreciated all around us. This involves an individual research study of Snaith Church. Year 11 will be spent studying ‘The American West 1840-1895’. By studying a very short period of time it will be possible for you to gain a much greater understanding of what it was like to live at that time. How is it Assessed? Your work is assessed through Examination (75%) and Coursework (25%) Everybody will sit the same exam. For more information see Miss Bacchus

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INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY (CiDA – CERTIFICATE IN DIGITAL APPLICATIONS) 2 GCSEs
NB - YOU WILL STUDY THE CORE ICT (AiDA) plus the following: See the course details for AiDA in the Core section Unit 2 - Certificate in Digital Applications (CiDA) - 2 GCSE's This unit will help you to design your own multi-media applications, as well as take a critical look at multimedia in the world around you. It develops pupils' ability to design and create effective on-screen multimedia products such as websites, e-books and simulations with a strong emphasis on fitness for purpose. You will collect your own multimedia products – music, images and web design Content - MULTIMEDIA • • • • • • • • • Investigating multimedia products Designing and developing multimedia products Prototyping and testing Presenting multimedia products in an e-portfolio Project planning, monitoring and evaluation Creating a multimedia e-portfolio You must be able to reflect critically, evaluate and enhance improvements to projects Be able to manage projects over a period of weeks and meet DEADLINES Have a good attendance record because the course is 100% coursework and you will require all the time available to produce the evidence required to meet the deadlines

(There is an opportunity to gain the industry standard Macromedia Associate Qualification in the Web Design tools Dreamweaver, Fireworks and Flash) N.B. FURTHER EXTENSION TO DiDA There may be an opportunity to extend your qualification further to achieve the DiDa Qualification though you must realise the commitment and time factor involved: Unit 3 - Certificate in Digital Applications (DiDA) - 4 GCSE's Content - GRAPHICS • You will investigate the range of graphic products on web sites, photographs, magazines and media, to learn how to capture material to use in your own work • Developing graphic images using vector based and bitmap based software • Preparing images and planning an e-exhibition Unit 4 - Certificate in Digital Applications (DiDA) - 4 GCSE's Content - ENTERPRISE • Digital technology in the role of enterprise and financial planning • Communications in a Business theme • Create Business plans, advertising, and market research • Advertising and Promotion – creating an e-Business Plan For more information see Mrs Rome

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MUSIC
What is the Course About? This is a GCSE course which involves both the theory and practice of making music Who is it for? You should have an interest in music. You should enjoy playing an instrument or singing and ideally supported by instrumental or vocal tuition (in school or privately) throughout Years 10 and 11 What Will I Study? 1. Listening to & Appraising Music 20% of final marks

1 hour test taken at the end of Year 11 related to areas of study: i. ii. iii. iv. v. Rhythm and Metre Harmony and Tonality Texture and Melody Timbre and Dynamics Structure and Form 20% of final marks

2. Composing and Appraising Music

Students will compose one piece of music and must choose two or more of the five Areas of Study, with link to one of the three strands of learning which will be specified annually by AQA Candidates will then appraise the process of composition and the outcome. 3. Performing Music 40% of final marks

2 performances: one solo; one as part of a group 4. Composing Music 20% of final marks

One composition which explores two or more of the five Areas of Study

For more information see Mr Elliott .

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PHYSICAL EDUCATION (GCSE)
What is the Course About? The GCSE Physical Education course provides a comprehensive and detailed study into physical education and sport both through theory and in practice. Who is it Suitable For? You should have an interest in and an enjoyment taking part in sport. The course provides an excellent basis if you are aiming to pursue a career in sport or leisure, or because you have an interest in sport. Pupils considering the GCSE course must have some basic practical ability in PE activities in school. The PE staff will give advice on your suitability if in doubt. Courses at BTEC National Level and ‘A’ levels are available at College if required and the subject can be studied to degree level. What Will I Study? The theory of physical education covers aspects of anatomy and physiology, skills development, fitness, training and injury, social issues and an examination of the nature of Physical Education. In practical work you will consider a range of sports and physical activities in great detail. Study will focus on the teaching, coaching and performance factors. For assessment purposes you are assessed in 4 areas or activities. How is the Work Assessed? Your work is assessed through Examination (40%) and Coursework /Practical Sport (60%) For more information see Mr Simm

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TRIPLE AWARD SCIENCE
What is this course about? This is a GCSE course that will enable students to gain separate science qualifications in Biology, Chemistry and Physics. Running in parallel with the GCSE Science and GCSE Additional Science courses that all students will follow, it will further develop science knowledge and understanding in these areas. Who is it suitable for? You should have a strong interest in the Sciences and be aiming to achieve Level 6+ by the end of KS3. What will I study? The course followed is part of the AQA Science suite, and is explained below. Modules 1 and 2 in Biology, Chemistry and Physics follows the same course as GCSE Science. The extra content areas of the course are as follows: Biology Diffusion and osmosis of materials into and out of cells The function of the lungs, circulation system and kidneys Microorganisms and their use in industry Chemistry The development of the Periodic Table and chemical trends within it Strong and weak acids and alkalis Water quality Energy changes in chemical reactions Simple analytical techniques Physics More forces Properties of light and sound Further work on electricity, including motors and transformers The life cycle of stars How is it assessed? Your work is assessed through nine, 45 min examinations (75%) and three Centre Assessed Practical activities carried out in lessons under exam conditions (25%). For more information see Mrs Robinson

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TECHNOLOGY SUBJECTS
The aim of the Technology Department is to improve your ability to analyse problems, evaluate solutions and communicate ideas graphically as well as providing a working knowledge of tools, materials and techniques. In addition, we try to make you aware of the important role that Design and Technology plays in a modern industrial society as well as the value it can be in using your own leisure time in a constructive and beneficial way. The courses are demanding but they are also very rewarding; pupils gain personal satisfaction and a sense of achievement in producing work of a standard often higher than they thought themselves capable. All the courses include a common element – a problem solving approach; pupils will work through a clearly defined design process to create their own solution to a design problem. There are also compulsory elements in each course that are aimed at improving skills and knowledge but they also include projects which offer a wide range of choice of individual work. The assessment method for all the courses is the same: 60% of the total final mark is allocated to coursework – this is a major project carried out in school over a period of 2 to 3 terms. This gives pupils every opportunity to achieve a good final mark. The remaining 40% is awarded in a final written examination, so thorough learning and preparation is essential in order to secure the higher grades. Time is allocated in the programme of work for this preparation to be done.
Course Titles: Electronic Products Food Technology Graphic Products Resistant Materials Textiles Technology

ELECTRONIC PRODUCTS This course builds upon the work already undertaken in lower school. Pupils are expected to produce a high standard of design work, manufacture an electronic circuit and a suitable case. The course involves learning the theoretical knowledge of Electronics. During this course pupils will use specialist ICT software to model circuits and CAD to produce circuit boards. Pupils will be required to produce a number of different circuits. You will be required to produce a major project for your coursework, and design and make a circuit board and construct a case. It is now possible to programme your own integrated circuit using ICT. The laser cutter is available to assist project work. FOOD AND NUTRITION TECHNOLOGY What is the course about? This new course builds on Food work from KS3 and is about the study of Food as a material for making and as a crucial element in a healthy lifestyle. This course leads on from the Licence to cook, focusing on Food and Nutrition issues. These issues are looked at in terms of diet and health throughout life, the nutritional, physical, chemical and sensory properties of food in preparation, cooking and storage, food hygiene and safety. Students will plan and carry out their own investigations. You will need to be interested in research and analysing and evaluating information. Recent publicity has shown that there are huge problems to be faced in terms of Food and Health today. This course aims to raise further awareness of these issues, together with 27

realistic ways of managing them in daily life. Students will develop knowledge and understanding of human needs within a diverse society and relevant technological and scientific developments. Who is it suitable for? This course would suit any student who is interested in working with food and diet. The work we do helps with understanding of nutrition, food hygiene and safety, costs and consumer issues related to Food in the present day. There are several career opportunities stemming from this type of course - in food science and product development, in catering and hospitality, in dietetics and health promotion. There are study links between this subject and others – Sciences and GCSE Health and Social Care. If students wish to work in any kind of caring role, diet is an extremely important element. Students with an interest in Food and Cooking are very welcome on the course and should enjoy it, but they must appreciate that for GCSE level it is essential to complete tasks other than cooking. These tasks could, for example, be comparisons of freshly made and convenience foods followed by the production of a report. However this new course does not include design work, or extensive periods of development and testing. It has been chosen as it provides shorter course work tasks and more opportunities for practical work. The course is open to both male and female students. A willingness to provide ingredients for practical cooking is essential. What will I study? This is a single award course (approx. 2 and half hours per week) and leads to one GCSE grade ( A*-G) The Food and Nutrition course is made up of three units of study Unit 1 2 3 Title Food and Nutrition short tasks Food Study task Principles of Food and Nutrition What is included 3 tasks - practical skills 1 project - a variety of skills Theory work for examination

How will I be assessed? Unit 1 2 3 Assessment and Time 3 short tasks 7 hours per task Food Study task 22 hours Principles of Food and Nutrition Examination paper 1 hour 30 minutes Weighting 30% 30% 40% 5 questions

Unit 1 and 2 work is carried out in lesson time as controlled assessment (coursework). It is to be presented on A4 paper as Project work and should include use of ICT in the form of tables, graphs and spreadsheets. Both of these units will include practical work with food and this will be marked as part of the assessment on each task. For more information see Mrs Marshall

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GRAPHIC PRODUCTS This course aims at developing ability and skills in a range of topics including free-hand and formal drawing, eg orthographic, isometric, perspective and building plans; media techniques; cardboard engineering, eg ‘pop-ups’ and packaging; communicating information, eg charts, instruction leaflets, using computer aided drawing and the laser cutter to create industry standard pieces of work. Year 10 work provides a wide range of experience that can be developed into the project work in Year 11. The same problem solving approach is used and pupils will be required to complete a major project for the coursework, the emphasis being on designing, drawing, using ICT including CAD/CAM where possible to produce a final solution to the chosen problem. This is a challenging course and pupils produce high quality work. RESISTANT MATERIALS (working with wood, metal, plastic) This course deals mainly with designing and making skills, developing much of the work covered in Lower School to a higher level, but also looking at and using some mass production methods. You will learn more about resistant materials like wood, metal and plastic and how to work with them, but you may also work with other materials where appropriate and available. You will be required to produce a major project for your GCSE coursework - this will involve designing and making a product largely of your own choice the only restrictions being size and cost. Pupils must also try to incorporate CAD/CAM into their project, the use of the laser cutter is an option open to all pupils. TEXTILES TECHNOLOGY The GCSE Textiles Technology course is taught via two main projects in Year 10, and a major project in Year 11. You will have the opportunity to work in the context of both “fashion”, “accessories” and “interiors”, tailoring your choices toward your individual interests. All designing and making skills are taught throughout each of these projects. Knowledge and understanding of fibres and fabrics and the application of information communication technology are essential elements and are integrated into all areas of the course. You will be encouraged to adopt the role and practices of designers in industry, including an awareness of manufacturing process, leading to the production of quality, practical outcomes. For more information see your subject teacher

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DOUBLE BLOCK SUBJECTS
The following subjects occupy TWO timetable blocks, normally 10 hours over two weeks These subjects are designed to introduce you to particular career paths. They also focus on different ways of learning with a greater emphasis on working independently and in groups, solving problems and working more closely with business and services outside school.

Level 1/2 HEALTH & SOCIAL CARE (2 GCSEs) SPORT BTEC FIRST DIPLOMA (4 GCSEs)

Level 1 College Courses Course information has been distributed and applications to take part in one of these College courses has already taken place HAIR AND BEAUTY PERFORMING ENGINEERING OPERATIONS PUBLIC SERVICES

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GCSE HEALTH & SOCIAL CARE

(DOUBLE AWARD)

What is the course about? Health and Social Care is a vocational GCSE. It is about people and how personal development can affect our health and well-being. It is also about a whole range of health and social care job roles. This course is not a child development course. It is much broader and can lead to all sorts of jobs in medical science, allied health professions, social work, roles in fitness and health promotion or early years’ education. Here are some examples of jobs: Midwife, Dentist, Social worker, Teacher, Doctor, Police, Early Years Care, Psychologist, Dental nurse, Nurse, Physiotherapist, Speech therapist, Care assistant, Health Promotion workers. These are just some examples of the many job roles. The course is classroom based and lessons usually have a mixture of discussion work, films, activities and worksheets. The aim is to foster a caring attitude and teamwork within a hard working environment. Trips out are arranged when possible. An extended work placement is included in the course, usually in Y10, for half a day a week for 10-12 weeks. Although not specified as essential, the work placement enhances learning by giving good experience of the work environment. Students undertake placements in Primary schools, Nurseries, care and Residential homes. Who is it suitable for? This course would suit any student who is interested in working with people in any role. The work we do helps with understanding of people in different situations. All caring professions now have a similar framework of qualifications and GCSE grades in suitable subjects are the first step in the process. The course is open to both male and female students. What will I study? The Double award which takes up double lesson time (5 hours per week) the following four units will be studied: Unit Title What is included 1 Health, Social Care and Needs of clients, How to obtain services Early Years Provision Types of services, Job roles, Care Values 2 Understanding Personal Growth and development, Factors affecting Development and growth and development, Self concept and Relationships relationships, Life changes and support 3 Promoting Health and Health and Wellbeing, Physical measures. Wellbeing Positive factors, Risks to Health, Health Promotion and improvement 4 Safeguarding and Protecting Infection control, First Aid practice Individuals Recognising risks and reduce risks in settings How will I be assessed? The Units are assessed as follows: Unit Assessment Weighting 1 Controlled assessment 30% 2 Written exam 1 hour 20% 3 Controlled assessment 30% 4 Computer-based test or exam 20% 1 hour The Double award option may be suitable for students who feel quite keen to work in the health or caring professions and would like to spend more time on this working towards two GCSE grades. For more information or to see examples of work see Mrs Marshall 31

SPORT-BTEC FIRST DIPLOMA (AN EQUIVALENT 4 GCSES GRADES A*-C)
What is the Course About? BTEC Sport is a course designed for pupils who are interested sports and the sports industry. It is a mixture of theory and practical sporting activities in a range of different sports. Who is it Suitable For? This is a Level 2 course equivalent to 4 GCSEs, grades A*-C. You will need to have an interest in sport and the sport industry and be able to work to deadlines. The course will be jointly taught by staff at Goole College and by Snaith staff at school. What Will I Study? Unit 1. The Body in Sport A healthy body is an amazing piece of machinery which allows us to go from total rest to all out sprinting in a matter of seconds. This unit explores the foundation of how the body works. It will enable you to understand the structure and function of the skeleton, muscles, heart and the respiratory system. Unit 2: Health, Safety and Injury in Sport Any person who takes part in sport is at risk of sustaining injury. This unit will enable you to have a good understanding of health and safety and how sports men and women can take precautions in order to try to ensure people involved in sport avoid injury. And a number of units from the following: Practical Sport - Focuses on developing and improving your own practical sports performance. The Sports Industry - Gives you the opportunity to investigate the many elements that make up the multi-million pound sports industry. Preparation for Sport – Will give you an insight into the essential preparation required for successful sports performance. Planning and Leading Sports Activities - Provides you with the knowledge and skills to be able to plan and lead a range of practical sports activities. Technical Skills and Tactical Awareness for Sport. Will help you develop at least one specific technical skill. Fitness for Sports Performance. Where you will work with experienced and proficient coaching staff and other experts such as personal trainers. How is the Work Assessed? Assessment is through portfolio work, written assignments and practical assessment by you teachers. For more information see Mr Simm or Mr Wilson 32

HIGHER DIPLOMAS
Diplomas are qualifications based around an employment sector, combining academic study with practical, hands on experience. The Diploma will help you develop work related skills along with the knowledge, skills and understanding which employers recognise as being important and will enable you to progress to college. We are able to offer two Higher Diplomas (Level 2 – Equivalent to grades A*-C) Business, Administration and Finance (BAF) Information and Communications Technology (ICT) The New Diplomas are made up of several elements each of which is equivalent to GCSE qualifications. Providing all the elements are passed you will be accredited with a Higher Diploma.
ELEMENT Principle Learning – covers all you need to know about the specialist area you have chosen have chosen Additional and Specialist Learning – You will need to study another subject to contribute towards the diploma. Project – This individual project can be on any topic you like related to your specialist study, You will carry out research and use this to present your conclusions. Functional Skills in ICT, Maths and English enable you to understand real life issues and use these skills to communicate effectively and solve problems. You have to pass this at Grade C to obtain the Diploma. Personal Learning and Thinking Skills - are skills like team-working and creative thinking that employers value. Work Experience – You will be guaranteed 10 days work experience. WHERE THIS WILL BE TAUGHT This will be taught over 2 or 3 blocks of time (see comments below) This can be any subject from the list provided in the Single Block subject section This will be taught in a separate lesson each week GCSE equivalents A* -C 4.5 GCSEs

A* -C 1 or 2 GCSEs depending on choice A* -C 0.5 GCSEs

This will be taught in Maths, English and ICT along with extra sessions.

Grade B 1.5 GCSEs

This will be taught and recorded across all subjects

Not Accredited

There will be 2 weeks in Year 11

Not Accredited

You can find more information about the Diplomas at www.dcsf.gov.uk/14-19 Timetabling We have been looking at 2 different timetable models to deliver the diplomas. Each has its own advantages and disadvantages. The choice of model will depend on the number of pupils who wish to take up the course. The preference form is therefore a little more complex than in previous years. 33

BUSINESS, ADMINISTRATION

AND FINANCE (BAF)

Business is a popular subject at all levels (60% of all college and university courses are in a business related subject) it is very likely that at some time in the future you will find yourself studying it! All jobs are in a business of some kind and the skills and knowledge learnt from a business course will be of value to yourself and make you attractive to an employer. What is this program of courses about? For the Diploma in Business, Administration and Finance your course will look at 3 main areas: 1. Business enterprise: Develop ideas, carry out research and promote products or services 2. Business administration: Learn about business administration and how important it is to organisations 3. Finance: Teaches the knowledge and skills you need to manage personal and business finances Principal Learning This covers all you need to know about Business, Administration and Finance at the level you’re studying. You’ll learn about the issues that are affecting businesses today, how they work and what skills you need to work in them. Like communication and interpersonal skills, team working, admin, research and analysis, and giving presentations. Additional and specialist learning You will also need to choose a further subject to contribute to the qualification. You could, for example, learn more about ICT if you’re into business systems or history or geography if you’re more interested in people. Maybe even a subject that you can use to set up your own business in the future. You can pick subjects that you might want to study at college, like science or a language or a creative course such as music, dance, drama or art. Work Experience On your Diploma course you’ll get to do at least 10 days’ work experience. It might be with a small local firm, seeing how it’s organised and how one person does a variety of roles like finance, human resources and marketing. Or you could spend time with a larger organisation, looking at how the finance department or customer services teams do their jobs. Project You will complete a project of your choice in which you will show some of the things you’ve learnt on your Diploma course. It could be a written piece of work, like a report; an investigation or something practical, for example setting up some market research with shoppers in a local retail outlet to find out about buying trends. Who is the course suitable for? Due to the large amount of time spent working on this course you must be interested in this area and be well motivated. How will you be assessed? There are six internally assessed assignments and one externally set and marked examination. You need to average at least a grade C across the seven units of principal learning in order to access the Diploma award however individual accreditation can be received for the units. The method of assessment means that you should know how well you are doing at all times. 34

Other information This course has to be made up of 50% non-classroom based learning. You will be taught by people other than teachers and will work on a variety of activities designed to teach you real practical business based skills and knowledge, e.g. we are looking at training students to use ‘Sage’ accounting software within the Finance unit, this is a very desirable skill for employers.

For more information see Mr Warren

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INFORMATION AND TECHNOLOGY (ICT)
Who is the course for?

COMMUNICATIONS

The ICT Diploma is for anyone interested in learning about the business applications of ICT. Based on the integrated themes of business, people and technology the new ICT Diploma will develop your knowledge and understanding of ICT technologies and their applications within a business context. You will explore the potential technology has to transform and contribute to organisations, individuals and society; learn how to deliver successful projects; create technology solutions to meet business requirements and develop the ability to work effectively in a professional environment. What will I study on the course? The Diploma has four main parts: • Principal learning The principal learning follows three broad themes of business, people and technology, and within this students will study subjects such as multimedia technology, technology systems and solutions, business organisations and requirements and project and professional development, all within a computing and ICT context. • Generic Learning Mastering essential life and work skills is crucial in today's competitive job market. Diploma students will need to achieve a minimum standard in English, Maths and ICT, which involves ‘functional skills' that give students the skills and knowledge necessary for learning, employment and personal development. • Additional/Specialist Learning The additional / specialist learning element of the diploma offers students an opportunity to take other qualifications, which are relevant to the main area of interest. These additional qualifications could be linked to the principal learning. • Student project All Diploma students will complete a project to demonstrate the skills and knowledge they have acquired. Students will choose their own project which will focus on the use of ICT technologies in solving real life problems. What will I need for the course? For the Diploma you need a strong working commitment because deadlines will have to be met, self motivational decisions taken and an out of school ethos that your ICT will be continued at home. Your Maths And English will also play a huge role What makes this course special? Developed in conjunction with employers, this qualification will enable you to develop valuable transferable skills in English and communications, Maths and personal learning and thinking - helping you to prepare for adaptable careers and lives. How will I be assessed? Assessment will be predominantly assignment-based with some integrated project work. For further information please contact Mrs Rome and Mr Neesam 36

NOTES:

37

Name ________________________

Form __________

SNAITH SCHOOL KEY STAGE 4 PREFERENCE FORM, 2009-11 The completion of this form is the beginning of a process. You must answer the questions correctly and provide us with the information we need. Please remember it may not be possible to study all the subjects you want but we will get as close as we can. There are 4 possible timetable blocks, though in most cases one will be French. Part 1 You should first decide if you want to study a Higher (Level 2) Diploma. If you are not interested in studying a diploma, move on to Part 2. There are two possible models shown below. We will choose the model after the forms are collected to benefit the largest number of pupils. (Don’t make assumptions about how we are going to organise the Diplomas). You will need to complete…. either Model A OR Model B if only one model is suitable for you. or both Model A AND Model B if both models would be OK for you. Model A Double Block (You will not study Citizenship to a GCSE qualification and you will be expected to study for 6 lessons on Tuesdays) (This model will give room for 2 single block subjects) BAF – Business, Administration and Finance. ICT – Information and Communications Technology. Model B Triple Block You can (You will be expected to study for 6 lessons on Tuesdays) only TICK (This model will give room for 1 single block subjects) one BAF – Business, Administration and Finance. ICT – Information and Communications Technology. If you have selected a subject in Model A or B move onto Part 3 Part 2 You should now decide if you want to study a Double Block Subject. You will only be able to study one Double Block subject. You will not be able to study a Double Block subject and a Diploma. If you would prefer to study only single block subjects, move on to Part 3 Double Block Subjects (If you have been given a college place Tick that one) Health and Social Care (Level 1/2) Sport (BTEC First Diploma) (Level 1/2) Hair and Beauty (Level 1) Performing Engineering Operations (Level 1) Public Services (Level 1) You can only TICK one. You can only TICK one

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Part 3 Below are the list of Single Block Subjects you can study in combination with a Diploma, with a Double Block subject or on their own. Show your preferences in rank order by marking them 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th and 5th in the column below. Single Block Subjects Art and Design Business Studies Drama Electronic Products Engineering (BTEC First Certificate) Geography Food and Nutrition French German Graphic Products Health and Social Care History ICT – CiDA (Certificate in Digital Applications) Music Physical Education Resistant Materials Textiles Triple Award Science Possible Career (if known) ________________________ THIS FORM IS A COPY AND SHOULD BE KEPT FOR YOUR REFERENCE Indicate your 1st, 2nd, 3rd ,4th, 5th Preferences

39

Name ________________________

Form __________

SNAITH SCHOOL KEY STAGE 4 PREFERENCE FORM, 2009-11 The completion of this form is the beginning of a process. You must answer the questions correctly and provide us with the information we need. Please remember it may not be possible to study all the subjects you want but we will get as close as we can. There are 4 possible timetable blocks, though in most cases one will be French. Part 1 You should first decide if you want to study a Higher (Level 2) Diploma. If you are not interested in studying a diploma, move on to Part 2. There are two possible models shown below. We will choose the model after the forms are collected to benefit the largest number of pupils. (Don’t make assumptions about how we are going to organise the Diplomas). either Model A OR Model B if only one model is suitable for you. or both Model A AND Model B if both models would be OK. Model A Double Block (You will not study Citizenship to a GCSE qualification and you will be expected to study for 6 lessons on Tuesdays) (This model will give room for 2 additional subjects) BAF – Business, Administration and Finance. ICT – Information and Communications Technology. Model B Triple Block You can (You will be expected to study for 6 lessons on only TICK Tuesdays) one (This model will give room for 1 additional subjects) BAF – Business, Administration and Finance. ICT – Information and Communications Technology. If you have selected a subject in Model A or B move onto Part 3 Part 2 You should now decide if you want to study a Double Block Subject. You will only be able to study one Double Block subject. You will not be able to study a Double Block subject and a Diploma. If you would prefer to study only single block subjects, move on to Part 3 Double Block Subjects (If you have been given a college place Tick that one.) Health and Social Care (Level 1/2) Sport (BTEC First Diploma) (Level 1/2) Hair and Beauty (Level 1) Performing Engineering Operations (Level 1) Public Services (Level 1) Part 3 40 You can only TICK one. You can only TICK one

Below are the list of Single Block Subjects you can study in combination with a Diploma, with a Double Block subject or on their own. Show your preferences in rank order by marking them 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th and 5th in the column below. Single Block Subjects Art and Design Business Studies Drama Electronic Products Engineering (BTEC First Certificate) Geography Food and Nutrition French German Graphic Products Health and Social Care History ICT – CiDA (Certificate in Digital Applications) Music Physical Education Resistant Materials Textiles Triple Award Science Possible Career (if known) ________________________ Pupils Signature ________________________________ Parents Signature _______________________________ Any Comments or Questions _______________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________ Indicate your 1st, 2nd, 3rd ,4th, 5th Preferences

THIS FORM MUST BE RETURNED TO YOUR FORM TUTOR BY THURSDAY 19 MARCH

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