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Detailed Design Report

Power Generating Hydro Turbine



Josh Kukorlo
Erin Farrell
Johnson Dong
April 22, 2014






Executive Summary
The task was to design a miniature hydro-turbine generator that can be used with a faucet
or showerhead to provide electric power to LED lights. This report is a detailed account of the
design and manufacturing processes needed to create and mass produce the product.

Table of Contents
Introduction ...................................................................................................................................2
1.1 Problem Statement ......................................................................................................2
1.2 Background Information .............................................................................................2
1.3 Project Planning ..........................................................................................................2
Customer Needs and Specifications ..............................................................................................2
2.1 Identification of Customer Needs ...............................................................................2
2.2 Design Specifications..................................................................................................2
Concept Development ...................................................................................................................3
3.1 External Search ...........................................................................................................3
3.2 Problem Decomposition..............................................................................................3
3.3 Concept Generation ....................................................................................................4
3.4 Concept Selection .......................................................................................................4
Detailed Design .............................................................................................................................4
4.1 Modifications to Proposal ...........................................................................................4
4.2 Overall Description .....................................................................................................5
4.3 Detailed Drawings ......................................................................................................6
4.4 Final Theoretical Analysis ..........................................................................................8
4.5 Component and material Selection Process for Mass Production ..............................8
4.6 Fabrication Processes for Mass Production ................................................................8
4.7 Industrial Design .........................................................................................................9
4.8 Safety ..........................................................................................................................9
Testing.........................................................................................................................................10
5.1 Test Procedure and Plan............................................................................................10
Conclusion ..................................................................................................................................10
Appendix A: Project Management ..............................................................................................11
Appendix B: Customer Survey and Results ................................................................................13
Appendix C: Analytical Hierarchy Process (AHP) Charts .........................................................15
Appendix D: Theoretical Analysis ..............................................................................................16
Appendix E: Detailed Drawings .................................................................................................17
Appendix F: Bill of Materials .....................................................................................................24
Appendix G: Safety Standards ....................................................................................................25
Appendix H: References .............................................................................................................26
Appendix I: Attestation of Work ................................................................................................27




Introduction
1.1 Problem Statement
We will develop a device which can be placed in line with a home faucet or shower head
to generate power from the water flow without disruption. The product will be designed around
household constraints such as average water flow and energy requirements for small appliances.
There is a potential market for 100,000 units per year over the next four years.
1.2 Background Information
Pennsylvania adheres to the International Plumbing Code 1993 which states a max water
temperature of 120F [1]. The average flow rate and pressure from a faucet is approximately 1.5
gallons/minute and 60 pounds per square inch [1].
1.3 Project Planning
The Gantt chart shows the timeline for completion of each stage of the project. The Gantt
chart and a table of team members, their qualifications, roles, and responsibilities can be found in
Appendix A.

Customer Needs and Specifications
2.1 Identification of Customer Needs
Ten homeowners and farmers over the age of 30 in York, Pa were surveyed. They were
also chosen because they expressed interest in the product and were available to be surveyed via
email. Larger sample sizes are ideal, however, a smaller sample size was chosen due to time
restrictions.
According to the survey, the customers are most concerned with the usefulness and low
cost of the product. The customer was asked to rank seven things that they wish they had in their
shower. Their top choices were music, clock, and decorative
lights. The survey and detailed survey results can be found in
Appendix B.
Six design criteria were used to rate each system. The
design criteria were weighted by how highly they were ranked
in the survey. The results can be found in Appendix B.
The analytical hierarchy process (AHP) was used to
determine the weights of the design specifications from the
companys product requirements. These results can be found in
Appendix C. The design criteria weights are based on the
customer needs and the companys product requirements. The
combined results are shown in Figure 1.





Combined Weighting Results
Cost 0.22
Ease of use 0.08
Waterproof/No Leaks 0.19
Aesthetics 0.08
Ease of Manufacturing 0.20
Usefulness 0.23
Figure 1-Weighting

2.2 Design Specifications


The customer needs an inexpensive product that does not require lot of space in the sink
or shower. It should be easy to install and able to power a small appliance. These are accounted
for in the cost, size and weight, time to install, power, load, and attachments specifications. It
also must dispel water vertically which is accounted for in the water discharge specifications.
See Appendix C for design criteria selection.



Concept Development
3.1 External Search
Several products have been developed which are
similar to our design. A list of patents can be found in
Appendix B. Figure 4 shows a turbine which is powered by
running water [3]. When the turbine spins, it stores electricity
for later use and displays how much energy is stored. The
difference between this product and our product is that our
product will be using the generated power while the water is
running instead of storing energy for later.
LED shower heads which change color are on the market.
Some shower heads change colors randomly and others change color with water temperature.












Cost Less than $50 Attachments 3/8-18 NPS pipe thread
Weight Less than 1 lb Water Discharge Down
Size Less than 4" length Housing Waterproof
Load 10 Ohms Generator Jameco DC Motor
Voltage At least 1.5 V Time to Install Less than 5 Minutes
Product Specifications
Available DC Motors
Jameco Parts
238465
2120461
174693
238473
206949
Figure 2 Product Specifications
Figure 3 Motors
Figure 4: Hydro Turbine

3.2 Project Decomposition


Figure 5 is the decomposition of the project into three major categories.



3.3 Concept Generation
The turbine design for the Beta prototype and the mass
production unit is shown in Figure 7. This is a complete redesign from
the Alpha prototype shown in Figure 6. The Alpha prototype changed
the direction of the flow twice which caused energy loss. The new
design does not change the direction of flow. It will take advantage of
water pressure and gravity to create a more efficient product.
The Beta prototpe has an all around smaller size than the
Alpha prototype. The housing will eventually fill with water, but as
long as the water keeps moving around the turbine, the turbine will
continue to rotate. Stagnant water filled the housing in the Alpha
prototype which kept the turbine from spinning.
There are also less parts required to manufacture the Beta
prototype. Less parts usually leads to a less expensive, more durable
product.


Goal:DesignProductwhichgeneratespowerfromrunningwater.
GeneratingPower
Maxpower
Generator
Choice(need
calculations)
Turbine
Type/
Orientation
Size/
Limitations
(4inch
maximum
lenth)
Housing
Mustkeep
generator
dry
(waterproof
housing)
Seperate
housings
forturbine
and
generator
PowerUse
Speakers/
Ipod
Usepower
torun
speakers,
Ipod
should
alreadybe
charged
Speakersand
Ipodaway
fromwater
Battery
Charger
Willflow
provide
enough
powerto
charge
Doesa
batterneed
tobe
charged
continuously
Timer/
Clock
Clock
wouldbe
always
runningor
havetobe
reset
Attachments
Generator
toturbine
Productto
faucet
Housingto
components
Figure 6: Alpha Prototype
Figure 7: Beta Prototype/
Mass Production Unit
Figure 5: Hydro Turbine

3.4 Concept Selection


The design criteria were used to evaluate the product on a scale of 1 to 5. The lowest
score is 1 and the highest score is 5. The cheapest design received the highest cost score. Ease of
use was determined by how many tools are required to attach the product quickly. The final
design is waterproof and received a 5. The Alpha prototype, which is not waterproof, received a
0. The aesthetics score was based
on the design specifications for size
and weight. Ease of manufacturing
was based on manufacturing time,
required machines, tools, and
materials. Usefulness was
determined by the product
specifications for load, power, and
water discharge.



Detailed Design
4.1 Modifications to Proposal
The overall change to the proposal was a change in focus on the Alpha prototype to a
focus on the mass production unit. The Concept Generation and Concept Selection sections were
focused on the different types of housing and turbines. Now they contain information about the
designs for the Alpha prototypes and Beta prototype/mass production unit.
Changes were also made to the AHP charts and the way the design criteria were
weighted. The ease of manufacturing of the design does not matter to the customer, and the ease
of use does not matter to the manufacturer. The design criteria were weighted fifty percent on
each group, which skewed the actual importance of criteria. These two design criteria were given
a more realistic weight. The other criteria remained approximately the same.


















Prototype Weight Alpha Beta
Cost 0.22 2 3
Ease of Use 0.08 5 5
Waterproof/No Leaks 0.19 5 0
Aesthetics 0.08 3 1
Ease of Manufacturing 0.2 3 2
Usefulness 0.23 3 2
Total 3.32 2
Figure 8: Concept Selection Results

4.2 Overall Description








The faucet powered generator is a simple design that incorporates a Pelton wheel and a
one stage gear reduction to generate power through a motor. Falling water at the inlet causes a
turbine to rotate a shaft attached to a gear. The gear drives the pinion and shaft of the motor.
The housing for the turbine, gear, and motor are all made by plastic injection molding while the
Figure 9: Exploded View, Mass Production Unit
Figure 10: Exploded View, Motor Assembly

other parts are comprised of aluminum, steel, and acrylic. See the Bill of Materials in Appendix
F for identification of all parts in the exploded view.
4.3 Detailed Drawings
Detailed drawings to be used for manufacturing and fabrication can be found in
Appendix E. These include specifications for the injection molded parts, turbine, gear, and
pinion. Off-the-shelf parts are referenced in the Bill of Materials in Appendix E. These parts
include the ball bearings, motor, end adapters, and epoxy. Specifications for these components
can be found through their respective company. The shaft, cover, and circuit board have basic
geometries that are specified in the Bill of Materials.





Figure 12: Isometric Motor Assembly View
Figure 11: Isometric Assembled View







Figure 13: Isometric Assembled View
Figure 14: Isometric View of Gear Assembly

4.4 Final Theoretical Analysis


N
o
= Numbcr o Icctb o 0utput, N

= Numbcr o Icctb o Input

o
= Angulor SpccJ o 0utput,

= Angulor SpccJ o Input


0cor Rotio:
N
o
N

o
=

N
o

o
=


S6
2u

o
=

1.8
The motor produces the most power at one half of the no load speed. The angular speed
of the turbine will not achieve the optimal motor speed, so the design incorporates gears to
increase the rotation speed of the motor from the turbine. Due to design constraints and
geometry we were limited in selection of a gear ratio. The calculation above shows that the
motor angular velocity will be 1.8 times the angular velocity of the turbine.
The Alpha prototype was unable to produce power, so data was not available for analysis.
The Beta prototype was designed and fabricated. Testing of the prototype will provide data that
will be used to calculate the actual rotational velocity of the motor shaft. Once this data is
collected the design may be changed to accommodate a different gearing ratio to optimize the
performance of the motor.
4.5 Component and Material Selection Process for Mass Production
A majority of the components in the design need to be manufactured using plastic
injection molding since their geometry is vital. The housings, turbine, and gears are to be
injection molded with ABS Plastic. This type of plastic is commonly used for similar purposes
and has a strength and resistance to deformation that makes it a good work piece.
The components of this design will not be under high loads and therefore failure is
unlikely. There is minimal need for a high strength material such as steel. The shaft, ball
bearings, motor, cover, and end adapters are all off-the-shelf items. These components were
selected primarily to fit the design. The motor was selected because it was predicted to provide
the most power with respect to the capabilities of the input. Manufacturing these materials
requires extensive resources that would require too large of an investment.
4.6 Fabrication Processes for Mass Production
The fabrication process begins by plastic injection molding the four housings, gear and
pinion along with acquiring the parts from vendors. The following steps illustrate how the parts
are used to manufacture the final product.
Step 1: Turbine Housing
Begin by inserting one ball bearing into the bore of the Injection Molding # 1. Secure the
bearing using a small amount of epoxy. Then secure the shaft within the inner rings in the same

10

way. Then slide the turbine onto the shaft and correctly position it while securing it with epoxy.
Place Injection Molding #2 and fit the bearing within the hole and around the shaft. Epoxy the
end adapters onto the top and bottom surfaces of the Injection Molding #1.
Step 2: Motor Housing
Insert the cover and circuit board into the appropriate slots of the Injection Molding #3
and secure with epoxy. Secure the correct electronic connections between the circuit board and
motor. Slide the motor into the housing and secure it with epoxy. Finally, fix the motor
assembly onto the front side of the turbine assembly using epoxy.
Step 3: Gear Housing
Epoxy the gear onto the turbine shaft and the pinion onto the motor shaft making sure
they mesh appropriately. Complete the full assembly by epoxying the Injection Mold #4 onto the
turbine and motor housing.
4.7 Industrial Design
The faucet-powered generator is easy to use and can attach in line to the 3/8 NPT thread
specification. The size and geometry allows for it to be twisted into place with small risk of
being inhibited by a structure. The PSU design on the front makes it an interesting product that
is visually pleasing to a consumer. The product requires less than four inches from the inlet to
outlet making the design usable in tight areas. The cover and motor housing creates a waterproof
seal that keeps the electrical area dry and makes the product safe. The lightweight design also
reduces the likelihood of component failure or a falling object injuring a consumer.
The premise of a faucet-powered generator is environmentally conscious because it
provides electrical power without the direct impact of burning fossil fuels. This clean form of
energy utilizes injection molding. The process of plastic injected molding is efficient in that
there is low amount of waste product after manufacturing.
Environmental downfalls of the design are found in the end life of the product. Since the
product is made of different materials, it cannot be easily recycled and will most likely be
disposed of in a landfill. Also, the ABS plastic requires raw materials and fabrication processes
that are harmful to the environment.
4.8 Safety
Having a product evaluated by UL for safety can provide product integrity. The UL mark
is known around the world as the standard of approved safety products [8].
The generator design will be submitted online using the Request for Quote form found at
http://www.ul.com/global/eng/pages/corporate/contactus/rfq/. The next step is to accept the
quote and discuss the product and the steps to being approved with an UL engineer. Samples will
be sent to UL and evaluated to determine if the safety standards are met. The engineer will
inform us if the product passes inspection and a formal report will follow. If it does not pass
inspection, we will receive a letter and work to redesign the product to ensure safety standards
are met. [8]
Typically, a new product is evaluated against UL standards which have already been
created. UL does not have any standards for water powered generators; however, there are
several standards which could be applicable. A list of these can be found in Appendix G.

11

Because none of these stands are specific to water powered generators for the home, UL may
take this opportunity to create a new standard. [8]
Testing
5.1 Test Procedure and Plan
Testing was done with the Alpha prototype on April 8
th
. The
prototype failed to produce power and called for a complete redesign. The
redesigned product is the Beta prototype and will be tested April 29
th
. The
Beta prototype and the mass production unit have the same general design.
Testing will reveal how much power is generated in the mass production
unit and determine how many LED lights can be incorporated into the
circuit board.

Beta Prototype Testing
Purpose
Test Beta prototype to confirm mass production design
Confirm design is waterproof and produces sufficient power
Level of Approximation
Correct material, motor, bearings, gears, and water flow
Experiment Plan
Build mass production unit without parts 6, 7, 10, and 11 (see BOM)
Attach part 12 to faucet
Attach motor to multimeter
Set multimeter to measure volts
Turn on Maximum water flow
Measure and record voltage
Schedule
April 27 - Deadline for assembly of test Beta Prototype
April 29 - Testing completed
April 29 - Analysis Completed


Conclusion
The Beta prototype is a complete redesign of the Alpha prototype. The Beta prototype
should experience less energy loss and therefore be more efficient. Testing will determine how
many LED lights can be powered. This product is different from others on the market because it
can be customized. The panel which reads PSU as well as the color of the translucent plastic
behind the panel can be changed.








Testing
Equipment
Beta Prototype
Hose
Bucket
10 Ohm Resistor
Multimeter
Figure 15: Testing Equipment
Figure 16: Testing Procedure

12

Appendix A: Project Management



Role Qualifications Responsibilities
Johnson Dong Timekeeper
Microsoft Office Turbine Design
Microsoft Project Consumer Research
SolidWorks Testing
Josh Kukorlo Leader
Microsoft Office Solidworks models
SolidWorks Prototype Design and Manufacture

Erin Farrell Recorder
Microsoft Office Prototype Design and Manufacture
SolidWorks Report Writing


13


G
a
n
t
t

c
h
a
r
t

14

Appendix B: Customer Survey and Results


Survey

Please rank the following from 1-6 with 1 being the most important:

Cost Effective
Ease of Use
Aesthetics
Usefulness
Waterproof/No Leaks
Ease of Manufacturing

Please rank the following in order of thing I most want to have in my bathroom:

Clock
Timer (to keep track of how long your shower is)
Decorative LED Lights
Music
Thermometer
LED Lights which change according to temperature of water
Battery charger (power would be used to recharge batteries for later use)
Please feel free to write in any other things that you wish to have in your bathroom.

Explanation of Customer Survey Results and Weighting
The number of times that each specification was ranked a certain number (1-6) is
recorded in the following charts. If two people ranked a specification as the most important,
there will be a number 2 in the first column. If a part is has a number in the first column, that
number it is multiplied by 9. The idea is that the specification gets nine points towards its
importance for every time a person decided it was the most important specification. This applies
to each of the rankings. The weights for the rankings can be found in the bottom row.
The total is determined for each of the specification. The total number of points is
determines (250). The number of points for the specification is divided by the total points. This
determines the customer weight.

Customer Survey
Results and Weighting 1 2 3 4 5 6 Total Customer Weight
Cost Effective 2 3 1 2 2 52 0.21
Ease of Use 8 2 46 0.19
Aesthetics 1 1 1 2 3 2 30 0.12
Usefulness 6 3 1 76 0.31
Waterproof/No Leaks 1 3 4 2 44 0.18
Weight of ranking 9 7 5 3 1 0 248

15

Explanation of Customer Survey of Concepts



This chart is the same as the previous chart except that the total score is used to determine
which concepts will be used. The concepts with the highest scores will be considered. The clock
will not be considered because a clock would use about 50% of the budget. The clock is too
expensive.

Customer Survey of
Concepts 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Total Score
Clock 3 3 1 1 1 1 51
Timer 1 2 3 1 1 1 28 (too expensive)
Decorative LED
Lights 1 1 3 3 3 24
Music 5 2 1 2 64
Thermometer 1 1 1 7 15
LED
Lights/Temperature 1 2 1 3 1 2 21
Battery Charger 2 2 2 4 22
Weight 9 7 5 3 1 0 -1













16

Appendix C: Patents and Analytical Hierarchy Process (AHP) Charts


Patents
Name Number
Hydro turbine US 6309179
Miniature hydro-power generation system US 6885114 B2
Line flow electric power generator US 4276482
Miniature hydro-power generation system US 7233078

Score Meaning
1/5 Much Less Important
1/3 Moderately Less Important
1 Equally Important
3 Moderately More Important
5 Much More Important

Company AHP Cost
Ease
of use
Waterproof/
No leaks
Aesthetics
Ease of
manufacturing
Usefulness Total Weight
Cost 5 1 3 1 1 11.00 0.23
Ease of use 1/5 1/5 1/3 1/5 1/3 0.93 0.02
Waterproof/No
Leaks
1 5 3 1 1 11.00 0.23
Aesthetics 1/3 3 1/3 1/3 1/3 4.33 0.09
Ease of
Manufacturing
1 5 1 3 3 13.00 0.27
Usefulness 1 3 1 3 1/3 8.33 0.17
48.60

Concept Weight
Timer
LED
Lights Speaker
Cost 0.22 1 3 5
Ease of use 0.09 5 5 5
Waterproof/No
Leaks
0.21
1 1 1
Aesthetics 0.11 3 5 2
Ease of
Manufacturing
0.14
5 5 5
Usefulness 0.24
5 1 3
Total 1
3.11 2.81 3.4

17

Appendix D: Theoretical Analysis



Preliminary Theoretical Analysis


Flow Rate
(gallons/min)
Max 1.5
Min 0.8
Average 1.15

P = Power, p = pressure, V = volumetric flow rate, d = internal pipe diameter
P = V * p
P = 1.5
guI
mn
*60
Ib
n
2
*241
n
3
guI
* 1/60
s
mn
* 1/12
]t
n

P =30.38
Ib]t
s
= 41.2 W

















Pressure
(psi)
Max 60
Min 20
Average 40

18

Appendix E Detailed Drawings


19

20

21

22

23

24

25

Appendix F Bill of Materials


Part
ID
Quantity Description Material Company Part # Size Details
1 2 Ball Bearing Steel
McMaster-
Carr
6383K16 N/A
Plain Open for
3/8" Shaft
Diameter, 7/8"
OD, 1/4" Wide
2 1 Gear ABS Plastic
Professional
Plastics
N/A
1.19
in
3

3 IZOD General
Purpose Black
ABS GP Resin
3 1 Pinion ABS Plastic
Professional
Plastics
N/A
0.35
in
3

3 IZOD General
Purpose Black
ABS GP Resin
4 1
Injection
Mold #1
ABS Plastic
Professional
Plastics
N/A
2.81
in
3

3 IZOD General
Purpose Black
ABS GP Resin
5 1
Injection
Mold #2
ABS Plastic
Professional
Plastics
N/A
0.65
in
3

3 IZOD General
Purpose Black
ABS GP Resin
6 1
Injection
Mold #3
ABS Plastic
Professional
Plastics
N/A
2.76
in
3

3 IZOD General
Purpose Black
ABS GP Resin
7 1
Injection
Mold #4
ABS Plastic
Professional
Plastics
N/A
2.79
in
3

3 IZOD General
Purpose Black
ABS GP Resin
8 1 Shaft
Multi-purpose
6061
Aluminum
McMaster-
Carr
8974K24
1.625
in
Aluminum Rod,
3/8" Diameter
9 1 Motor N/A Jameco 174693 N/A N/A
10 1 Cover Acrylic
Delvies
Plastics Inc.
060_Translucent_1212
2.75" x
1.625"
1/16" Translucent
Cast Acrylic
Sheet
11 1
Circuit
Board
N/A N/A N/A
2.75" x
1.625"
N/A
12 2
End
Adapters
Thick-Wall
Black
Polypropylene
McMaster-
Carr
46825K11 N/A
3/8 Pipe Size, Hex
Nipple, Schedule
80
13 1 Turbine ABS Plastic
Professional
Plastics
N/A
0.51
in
3

3 IZOD General
Purpose Black
ABS GP Resin
14 1 Epoxy N/A Loctite N/A N/A
Loctite Epoxy
Plastic Bonder


26

Appendix G Safety Standards



ULStandard
SubjectNumber
StandardTitle
Edition
Number
Edition
Date
1196 StandardforFloatingWaterlights 3 10/29/1998
778
StandardforMotorOperatedWater
Pumps 5 2/22/2010
1112
StandardforMarineElectricMotors
andGenerators 3 9/5/1997


















27

Appendix H: References
[1] Guide to Scalding Hot Water Temperatures, Laws, Regulations, Anti-Scald Equipment.
InspectAPedia. n.p. n.d. Web. 6 March 2014.
[2] Google. Patents. Web. 6 Feb. 2014. https://www.google.com/?tbm=pts
[3] Ecofriend. Eco Gadgets: Mini Hydro Turbine. 17 March 2009. Web. 20 Feb. 2014
http://www.ecofriend.com/eco-gadgets-mini-hydro-turbine-a-long-shower-for-a-
recharged-cellphone-battery.html
[4] McMaster-Carr. Single-Event Digital Timer. Web. 25 Feb. 2014
http://www.mcmaster.com/#alarm-timers/=qz9kyd
[5] Jameco. LEB Bi Color Green/Red 565nm/697nm 3-pin. Web. 25 Feb. 2014.
http://www.jameco.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/Product_10001_10001_34673_-1
[6] Jameco. Single Pole Speaker Round Ferrite. Web. 25 Feb. 2014.
http://www.jameco.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/Product_10001_10001_2081254_-1
[7] McMaster-Carr. McMaster-Carr Fastening and Joining. Web 1 March 2014.
http://www.mcmaster.com/#
[8] UL. Standards. Web. 2014.
http://www.ul.com/global/eng/pages/?utm_source=google&utm_medium=cpc&utm_ter
m=ul%20laboratory&utm_campaign=UL+Corp+-+Brand+-+Broad+-
+G&mkwid=sm7ilwG5U&pcrid=15225311913&kw=ul%20laboratory&placement=&pm
t=b&gclid=CL-nr_S29L0CFaN9OgodT20AGQ










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Appendix I: Attestation of Work


Johnson Dong
In writing the DDR, my contributions were parts 4.4 to 4.8 of the detailed design report.
What I had to do was research and write up the fabrication process for mass production, the
industrial design, safety, and economic analysis. We were told that we did not have to worry
about 4.8, economic analysis; so I did not include that in my work. For the fabrication processes
for mass production, I researched how our team will manufacture our product and the ways we
will be utilizing for the mass production. In industrial design, I explained the ease of use,
safeness and the aesthetic pleasing of our shower head design. Briefly explaining our design, I
believe that we meet customer needs and requirements.
Josh Kukorlo
My primary contribution to the detailed design report was technical drawings of the
product. I focused on creating SolidWorks models while modifying the design to incorporate the
appropriate manufacturing processes. I researched distributers and manufacturers to locate the
materials we needed and which off the shelf components could be incorporated. I provided the
detailed drawings that are to be used for fabrication and production. I also spent time in the
Learning Factory and in Reber in order to develop the Beta Prototype.
Erin Farrell
I worked with Josh and Johnson to develop a Beta prototype and mass production unit. I
spent time in the Learning Factory and Reber to fabricate the Beta prototype. I wrote part of the
design report and revised and edited the full document. I also revised the proposal sections which
were used in the Detailed Design Report to focus on the Alpha and Beta prototypes instead of the
different designs for the alpha prototype.
By signing this document we attest that it provides an accurate representation of our individual
efforts in the completion of this work.
Date: 22 April 2014
Member Name Printed: Erin Farrell

Member Name Printed: Josh Kukorlo

Member Name Printed: Johnson Dong