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SHEILA A.

MATHEWS :::
Editor; sheila@the-grip.net
The resignations of Grifn
High School Coach Steve
DeVoursney and his wife,
Jessica DeVoursney, also
a GHS teacher, followed
two investigations, though
neither was completed.
According to Tim
Shepherd, general counsel
for the Grifn-Spalding
County School System, the
frst investigation began
following an Oct. 28 formal
complaint fled by Spalding
High School Principal
Darrell Jefcoat.
At the heart of the
complaint was the
allegation of grade
JESSICA W. GREGORY :::
Publisher; jessica@the-grip.net
"We have three boys,
we don't make girls," joked
Slate Fluker, Grifn Young
Life Director. "We want to
grow our family and we
wanted a little daughter
and this is how we landed
on [adopting from] China,"
he said.
Slate's wife, Lindsay,
said they decided to
pursue adoption in March
2013, despite feeling
overwhelmingly busy and
high adoption costs.
"Our church, Journey,
has a real heart for working
with the poor and my eyes
were just opened and I
became aware of how
blessed we are in America. I
had a burden for orphans; it
just seemed to be popping
up everywhere I was going,"
she said. "We would talk
about it here and there and
we would think, our plates
our full and our boys are
keeping us busy and it's so
expensive, so we didn't feel
like the time was right but
it just kept coming up. Back
in March of last year, we
fnally made the decision
to start pursuing it."
"For me, China is just the
cross-section of our family's
desire and the great need
orphan crisis going on,"
said Slate, explaining why
the family chose China over
other countries or domestic
adoption. The Flukers
describe the grim scenario
that tens of thousands of
female Chinese infants
experience: "Southeast
China actually now has
baby drop-of centers. They
have built small buildings
where people can abandon
their babies safely because
people were abandoning
them in parks, markets,
on the side of the road,
and they were dying of
exposure," said Lindsay.
The little girl they will
adopt this August, who
they plan to name Camille,
was left at the gate of an
orphanage in a cardboard
box when she was only one
day old.
When they received the
email with a picture and
SHEILA A. MATHEWS :::
Editor; sheila@the-grip.net
Signs, signs, everywhere
signs – vertical art deco,
signs, that is.
Now being installed are
four signs representing
Grifn's rebranding logo at
the city's four gateways –
Zebulon Road, Highway 16
eastbound and westbound
and Highway 362.
The Zebulon Road and
Highway 362 signs have
been installed and the two
remaining for Highway 16
will be installed this week.
“We had one slated for
Highway 16, but the
construction kind of axed
that,” said Grifn City
Manager Kenny Smith. “The
www.the-grip.net ::: free
APRIL 24 - MAY 8, 2014 VOL. 04 NO. 8
CONT, INVESTIGATION, PG. 2
GOVERNMENT
ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT
CONT, SIGNS, P. 7
CONT, BABY LIAN RU, P. 2
THE GRIP
770-229-3559
PO Box 2251, Grifn GA 30224
Jessica W. Gregory
Publisher
jessica@the-grip.net
Sheila A. Mathews
Editor & Ad Executive
sheila@the-grip.net
Hours: Tuesday - Friday
10 a.m. to 6 p.m.
The Grip strives for
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Grip, please do not hesitate
to call or e-mail us.
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June 16-20 9-noon
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ART SUMMER CAMPS @ STACHE
painting ::: comics & drawing
paper mache ::: fiber arts & more
per week
770-229-6599 | www.stachestudio.net | 116 S. Sixth Street, Griffin
Check our Facebook page for weekly Open Studio times!
The city of Grifn is in the process of installing four gateway signs that
represent the rebranding initiative undertaking in 2012. The signs
cost $180,000 and were included in the Fiscal Year 2014 budget.
The Fluker Five plus one
Slate and Lindsay Fluker, with their three sons.
City's
gateway
signs
part of
rebranding
initiative
Records show claims of wrongdoing
in DeVoursneys' investigation
Griffin will soon
have the first
three of eight
monuments
celebrating the
hometown of
Doc Holliday
and the plans
to honor local
history.
From the Great Griffin Mayfling
to The Rock Ranch Strawberry
Festival, there is family fun galore
to be found thius weekend. Visit
the Mayfling in City Park to enjoy
all the festival food, Georgia Tech
robotics and entertainment before
then head south to create a new
tradition by picking strawberries at
the peak of freshness.
p. 7 »
p. 3 »
changing and illegal football
recruiting. Jefcoat also alleged he
had submitted previous complaints
that did not result in investigative
action being taken by Central Ofce.
“Seldom have responses or
resolutions been given or meetings
held,” Jefcoat wrote in his Oct. 28
complaint.
Based on this allegation against
school system administrators, the
Board of Education determined
an outside investigator should be
retained. This resulted in the hiring
of Richard Hyde, of Phoenix Research
LLC.
Hyde said he began his investigation
Nov. 7, and as part of that process
interviewed a number of local
school personnel. Included in his
case update provided to Shepherd
March 25, Hyde included damaging
statements from former Spalding
High School Assistant Principal
Dexter Sands, who is now principal of
Kennedy Road Middle School.
“I know that he (Steve DeVoursney)
has done it (illegal recruiting) once
before,” Hyde reported Sands said.
Hyde went on to say Sands
indicated Steve DeVoursney had one
approached a Spalding High School
student at a track meet regarding
transferring to Grifn High School.
The student did not transfer, but
rather reported the incident to the
SHS principal.
Sand also allegedly spoke of a
second incident involving another
student regarding transferring to
GHS.
According to Hyde, Sands also
indicated Steve DeVoursney had
others recruiting athletes on his
behalf.
“Coach DeVo has a lot of folks in
the community that recruit for him,”
Hyde reported Sands said. “Part of the
reason Central Ofce does (student)
transfers now is to stop recruiting.
DeVo is an average coach, but he gets
the cream of the crop.”
In response to Jefcoat's allegation
of illegal grade changing, Sands
reportedly stated that it would be
“impossible”for a student to complete
credit recovery utilizing Odyssey Ware
in one day. In specifc reference to
the extreme grade change noted in
Jefcoat's complaint, Hyde said Sands
stated, “I've never seen it before. I've
only seen one kid do one in under one
week. He was very smart, but missed a
lot of class.”
Additional statements reported
from Central Ofce staf included
those of Assistant Superintendent
Denise Burrell.
Hyde said Burrell also confrmed
that illegal recruiting was taking
place, but that she did not believe
Superintendent Dr. Curtis Jones was
aware of the activities.
“There's no indication that Jones
knows this is going on now...I would
be very surprised, but I'll tell you it's
going on,” Hyde reported Burrell as
having said.
Burrell was also quoted as having
been outspoken in her opposition to
the illegal recruiting activities.
“This (recruiting) coming back up
now, all of this is a blight on our
community. There's nothing positive
about it,” Hyde quoted Burrell as
saying. “It's talked about in the
community. It's accepted.”
Burrell also allegedly said the illegal
recruiting reaches beyond Steve
DeVoursney, with other school staf
being involved.
"Anybody who knows (Coach) Ray
Nash will tell you that he's recruiting,"
Hyde wrote of his interview with
Burrell, who also named Anotonio
Andrews as being involved. "I'm
immunie to the rumors; I've heard
them for so long."
Burrell was also reported to have
emphatically denied that credit
recovery could have occurred in
the manner some student athletes'
records indicate.
She denied the possibility of making
up an entire semester's credit by
saying, "No, no, no." Ω
fle for Lian Ru,
the Flukers said
they "kind of knew
immediately" that
she would be their little girl.
Though they describe her disposition in the photos as sad
and forlorn due to lack of interaction with a caretaker, the
Flukers are confdent that once she is a part of their family,
she will blossom.
"The family is a powerful thing," said Slate. "Just how
through scripture and life, the power of family to heal,
provide shelter and comfort. It's fun to be able to use the
family we started 16 years ago when we frst got married as
an agent of restoration, hope, rebuilding, healing, to carry
out a Biblical mandate to loose the cords of oppression."
The Fluker's church, Journey Church, is very supportive
of families wishing to adopt. Michael Moody, pastor of
Journey Church, says that two percent of the church's
budget goes to a general adoption fund to help families
raise the hight costs of adoption.
Moody has very actively fund-raised for the Flukers,
creating the "Fluker 50," where he asked 50 people or
families to donate $100 to the adoption. The $5,000 goal
has long been surpassed, with that particular fund-raiser's
balance at $12,000.
"It has been really huge for us that we have an advocate in
Michael and in our church. It looks like you're climbing Mt.
Everest. Michael has been our biggest PR person...to have
someone keep the word out there and advocate on our
behalf has really been huge," said Slate.
Though the fundraisers have been successful, the Flukers
are only about two-thirds of the way to their estimated
$30-40,000 needed for the adoption.
To donate to the Fluker 50 campaign, checks can be
designated for the Fluker adoption and sent to Journey
Church, P.O. Box 1333, Grifn, Georgia 30224; or online at
journeynow.org, where there is a "Give" link. All monies
donated go directly to the Fluker family and are tax
deductible.
To follow the Fluker family's adoption story, visit Lindsay's
blog at http://thefukers.blogspot.com. Ω
GET A GRIP AND GET THE GOOD STUFF THE GRIP APRIL 24 - MAY 8, 2014
TOP STORIES
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We assist clients with
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personal injury,
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other civil litigation.
ATTORNEYS
Timothy N. Shepherd
Patrick M. Shepherd
612 West Taylor Street, Griffin | 770-229-1882
www.shepherdslaw.com
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« investigation, cont.
« BABY LIAN RU, cont.
PHOTO COURTESY OF THE FLUKER FAMILY
Lian Ru, 14 months old, will be adopted this August by the Fluker
family.
Lic. # 126-226-H
3247 Newnan Rd. Griffin, Ga. 30223
www.brightmoorhospice.com
for making a difference
in the lives of others.
Thank you, Volunteers
770-233-0902 ∙ 126 W. College St
Mon - Fri 8am-7pm; Sat 8am-6pm
Sun 12pm - 5pm
Garden
Home Decor
Candles
& more
We have the perfect gift
for Mom.
Mother’s Day ::: May 11
SATURDAY
1-2 pm – Omar Mullins
2-3 pm – Pike Co. Jr. Players
3-5 pm – Studio D Musical
Theatre Class Production
SUNDAY
12-1 pm – First Williamson
Kids on Mission
3-4 pm – FBC Grifn Youth
Praise Band
ENTERTAINMENT LINE-UP
ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT 3
APRIL 24 - MAY 8, 2014 THE GRIP GET A GRIP AND GET THE GOOD STUFF
1110 Memorial Drive, Grifn
Sausage biscuits &
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Served 5:30-10:30 a.m.
Memorial Drive location only
646 S. 8th Street, Griffin
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Comprehensive Eye Exams
Diabetic Retina Exams • Contact Lens Evaluations
Online Contact Reordering
Optical Boutique • Online Store • Botox Injections
770.228.3836
SUBMITTED ::: A butterfy
and container garden
workshop will be ofered
Wednesday, May 28 from
9 a.m. until noon at the
University of Georgia
Research and Education
Garden of Ellis Road in
Grifn.
The workshop is based
on research from the
UGA garden and will be
presented by experts
from the UGA Center for
Urban Agriculture. The
topics will include garden
friendly insects, plants for
pollinators, pest control
strategies and putting it all
together.
Participants will build a
container garden that will
attract pollinating insects
like bees and butterfies.
The garden will also attract
benefcial insects that
naturally reduce the need
for pesticides.
The cost of the workshop
is $39 and includes
instruction, materials for
the container garden and
refreshments. For more
information or to register,
call (770) 228-7214 or
email bhorne@uga.edu.
Register online with a credit
card at http://tinyurl.com/
ugapollinatorworkshop.
Create butterfy container garden at UGA Grifn workshop
SUBMITTED ::: The Rock Ranch Strawberry Festival will be held Saturday, April 26, 2014
from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. This event will celebrate peak strawberry picking season at The
Rock Ranch.
Guests will enjoy picking fresh strawberries from the strawberry patch and eating
homemade strawberry ice cream. There will be tasty strawberry treats like strawberry
pies and strawberry shortcake. The Farm Market will remain open until 5:30 p.m. selling
berries, fresh produce, honey, jellies, all natural pork products and The Rock Ranch steroid
free, antibiotic free beef.
All The Rock Ranch attractions will be available for a $10 admission fee. Festival goers
will enjoy unlimited access to the locomotive train, pony rides, paddle boats, pedal carts,
the giant jumping pillow, Tiny Town, slide hill, cane pole fshing, a petting zoo and more.
The festivities include corn hole games, a children’s bounce house and a bluegrass band
providing some banjo pickin’ to accompany all the strawberry pickin’. Families may also
meet and take pictures with The Rock Ranch Strawberry Princess. Concessions will be
sold and menu options include Chick-fl-A sandwiches, pizza, kettle corn, turkey legs
boiled peanuts, premium home grown burgers, ribs, roast beef sundaes, funnel cakes and
more.
The “Cow-A-Bunga” zip lines will be open for those who are not too chicken. These
amazing attractions transport guests at tree top level across a corn feld and over two
ponds at speeds of 30 mph. The cost is $8 to ride the fast lines (800 ft.) or $12.75 to ride
the long lines (1400 ft.). There is also a 50 ft. tall rock climbing wall for $5.
Strawberries are sold for $3.00 a pound U-Pick or $3.50 pre-picked. The Farm Market,
U-Pick produce area and new playground are open every Monday through Saturday
10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. from now until November 22. After strawberry season, The Rock
Ranch Farm Market will ofer fresh crops of garden vegetables, raspberries, blueberries,
blackberries and grapes. The Rock Ranch is open each of the next three Saturdays: April
26, May 3 and May 10.
The Rock Ranch is located at 5020 Barnesville Highway (Highway 36), The Rock, Ga. It is
a 1500-acre ranch owned Chick-fl-A founder by S. Truett Cathy and dedicated to “Growing
Healthy Families”. For more information, visit www.therockranch.com, call 706-647-6374
or fnd them on Facebook.
Strawberry Festival promises springtime family fun
SUBMITTED ::: Annual Community Festival
Supports Humanitarian Eforts
GRIFFIN, GA. -- Kitchen Drawer Illustrated
has partnered with TogetherWorks in
an efort to build community, beyond
promoting tourism in downtown Grifn.
The partnership is encouraging community
support for humanitarian projects, both
local and abroad, through their sponsorship
of the 5th Annual Doc Holliday Beer, Wine
and Arts Fest on May 24, 2014.
The festival will be held at the Park @ 6th
in Grifn, GA., and will include tasting of
over 75 craft beers from all over the nation
and feature select, seasonal wines. David
Fountain, manager of Bank Street Café, is
serving as this year's beer professional and
is hand picking a seasonal selection of beers
that are hard to come by. Charles Arnold,
writer and wine enthusiast is serving as
wine sommelier and has compiled a list
of unique oferings, including some from
local Georgia wineries.
  Proceeds of this year's event will beneft
TogetherWorks. TogetherWorks has two
projects - one to help Veterans who sufer
from Post Traumatic Stress Disorder;
and another to help feed the needy in
Nicaragua. Event organizers, Kitchen
Drawer Illustrated and TogetherWorks, are
encouraging businesses to make charitable
contributions.
  Volunteers and sponsors are needed!
Volunteers receive an ofcial DHBF T-shirt
and training about the beers and wines
they will be presenting. Sponsors will
receive free tickets and other sponsor level
perks while having the opportunity to
promote their brand/product to patrons at
the event.
Annual community festival supports humanitarian eforts
A
s you save and invest
for retirement, what
are your ultimate goals? Do
you plan on traveling the
world? Purchasing a vaca-
tion home? Pursuing your
hobbies? People often think
and plan for these costs. Yet,
too often, many of us over-
look what potentially could
be a major expense during
our retirement years: health
care. By preparing for these
costs, you can help yourself
enjoy the retirement life-
style you’ve envisioned.
Many of us may ignore
the impact of health care
costs because we just as-
sume Medicare will pay
for everything. But that’s
not the case. In estimating
health care costs during re-
tirement, you may fnd that
$4,000 to $6,000 per year
per person for traditional
medical expenses is a good
starting point, although the
amount varies by individu-
al. Furthermore, this fgure
does not include the costs
of long-term care, which
can be considerable. To il-
lustrate: The national aver-
age for home health aide
services is nearly $45,000
per year, and a private room
in a nursing home is nearly
$84,000 per year, according
to a recent survey by Gen-
worth, a fnancial security
company.
So what can you do to help
cope with these costs? Here
are a few suggestions:
Estimate your costs. Try
to estimate what your out-
of-pocket health care costs
might be, based on your
health, your age at retire-
ment, whatever supple-
mental insurance you may
carry and other factors.
Know the key dates. Things
can change in your life, but
try to identify, as closely as
possible, the age at which
you plan to retire. This will
help you spot any coverage
gaps before you become
eligible for Medicare at age
65. Also, be aware of the
seven-month window for
enrolling in Medicare, be-
ginning three months be-
fore your 65th birthday.
Review your insurance op-
tions. Medicare-approved
insurance companies of-
fer some other parts to
Medicare, including Part
D, which covers prescrip-
tion drugs; Medigap, which
covers gaps in Parts A and
B (in-hospital expenses,
doctor services, outpatient
care and some preventive
services); and Part C (also
known as Medicare Advan-
tage, which is designed to
replace Parts A, B, Medigap
and, potentially, part D).
You have several options for
Part D, Medigap and Medi-
care Advantage, each with
varying coverage and costs,
so choose the plans that
best ft your needs. (To learn
more about Medicare and
supplemental insurance, go
to www.medicare.gov.)
Develop a long-term care
strategy. To meet long-term
care costs, you could self-in-
sure or purchase insurance
coverage. To learn about
long-term care insurance
solutions, contact your f-
nancial advisor.
Invest for growth and ris-
ing income. Health care
costs typically rise as you
move further into retire-
ment, so make sure that a
reasonable portion of your
assets is allocated to invest-
ments with the potential
for both growth and rising
income.
Think about health care
directives. If you were to
become incapacitated, you
might be unable to make
health care decisions —
and these decisions may
afect not only your quality
of life but also your fnancial
situation, and that of your
family. Talk to your legal
advisor about establish-
ing a health care directive,
which allows you to name
someone to make choices
on your behalf.
Health care costs during
your retirement may be un-
avoidable. But by anticipat-
ing these costs, you can put
yourself in a position to deal
with them — and that’s a
healthy place to be. Ω
This article was written by Edward Jones for
use by your local Edward Jones Financial Ad-
visor.
“Every challenging situation
becomes an opportunity for
me to trust Him – to obey, to
learn, to grow, to rely more
on His grace.” – Christina Fox
I
read this quote recently
and it has ministered to
my own spirit for the past
several days. Adjusting to
living on the farm has been,
well, an adjustment. We
labor more than we ever
have. Our drive to work is
longer. Heck, our drive re-
ally anywhere is longer. It’s
just harder. But, just be-
cause something is hard
doesn’t mean it’s wrong.
Or a wrong decision was
made. Sometimes, things
are just hard. And, hard is
okay.
It’s in the hard places
we truly grow. Growth is
impossible without some-
thing pushing us forward.
Trusting God isn’t necessary
unless we have something
to trust Him in. We don’t
need His grace when things
are always easy. We can’t
be an over-comer without
something to overcome.
Instead of focusing on
what “seems” wrong about
the place we are in and fo-
cusing on how hard things
may be, we have to focus
on what is good and right
while we are in that place.
We have to ask God, “What
do you want to work in my
life through this?” For ex-
ample, instead of focusing
my thoughts on the extra
work that comes from tak-
ing care of horses, I am
changing the way I look at
it.
I watch my daughter carry
two buckets of food and
walk across a feld to the
gate. I imagine what God is
working in her as she feeds
these large animals. What
is He speaking to her spirit
on those walks across the
feld? What does she hear
in those quiet moments
alone with God’s creation?
What if she learns some-
thing in these walks that
rescues her heart when she
is 40? What if?
God doesn’t waste one
day of our lives. He uses
everything for our growth.
For our good. For our des-
tiny. I love living on the
farm. But, if I focus on what
is hard, I will become bitter
instead of better. If I focus
on every positive, life-giv-
ing thing it provides, I will
not only fall in love with
every part of it, I will grow.
I will be fulflled. I will be
content. I will be full of joy.
This is why James said, “For
you know that when your
faith is tested, your endur-
ance has a chance to grow.
So let it grow, for when
your endurance is fully de-
veloped, you will be per-
fect and complete, needing
nothing.” (James 1:3-4)
He works all things for
your good. Even the hard
places. So, begin thanking
God for them. It is in these
places, we become better.
We become complete. Ω
This article was originally
published in the August 29,
2013 edition of The Grip. We
ran it again here because
Dusty is enjoying vacation
with her family and will re-
turn to writing for The Grip in
the next edition.
LIFESTYLES
4
GET A GRIP AND GET THE GOOD STUFF THE GRIP APRIL 24 - MAY 8, 2014
AMY DUNHAM
EDWARD JONES
FINANCIAL ADVISOR
DUSTY TAKLE
EAGLE'S WAY ASSOCIATE PASTOR
RELIGION/RELATIONSHIPS
Risk Reduction Program Defensive Driving
Drug Possession
604 W. POPLAR ST. GRIFFIN
770-412-0727
STATE CERT. 0790 & 0755
The hard places
bangla
GriffinEyeClinicOptical.com • 648 S. 8th Street • 770.228.4822
We can turn clear
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Prepare for health care costs in
retirement
Adoptable Pet of the Week: Jake
Lewis
H
appy, goofy, playful, loving Jake. Gets along well with
other dogs and really likes to play. He is missing his
friend Mavis, who was recently adopted but having fun
with Truly and new friend Koda. He is happy to be inside
or outside but really wants to be a real family dog. Has a
streak of the escape artist in him if he sees an opportunity
to challenge the fence. Adoption fee is $125 and includes
spay/neuter and routine shots. Call and leave a message
770-229-4925.
J
ust being competent
is not enough to get
ahead in today’s job market.
There are four very impor-
tant skills you need to suc-
ceed.
The frst one is CLEAR COM-
MUNICATIONS. This is the
ability to clearly state your
point of view and make a
connection through your
communication. A job-seek-
er needs to be able to clearly
communicate a picture of
his/her work style. The inter-
viewer should be able to feel
your enthusiasm and have a
good understanding of what
you think is important after
talking with you.
Ofce conversation has
increasingly become a se-
ries of online emails and
some people never develop
the ability to give a verbal
presentation for example.
Technology in some ways
has taken away our ability to
write well and many people
are so busy multitasking that
they skip basics like spelling
and proofreading.
The second is YOUR PER-
SONAL BRAND. What do I
mean by that? It’s the way
you present yourself not
only in person, but on blogs,
Twitter, Facebook, Linke-
dIn and other sites. Many
HR people research candi-
dates online and if they fnd
something they don’t like,
that can hurt you. Be careful
what you post!
The third skill is FLEXIBILITY.
How well and how quickly
you can respond to an em-
ployer’s changing needs is
as important as how quickly
your employer responds to
its customers. The ability to
learn new skills is of great im-
portance. Companies want
to know that if they roll out
a new program or new tools,
their employees are going to
be able to adapt readily and
are open to learning.
Finally, there is how well
you can improve your PRO-
DUCTIVITY. Do you do just
what is expected of you on
the job? Or do you volunteer
for projects? A way to really
diferentiate yourself in the
workplace is to be proactive.
Clients are looking for em-
ployees that have the ability
to understand what is want-
ed and needed rather than
waiting to be told.
If you can improve on these
skills and demonstrate what
you can and have done by
describing examples, you
will have a fghting chance
of either succeeding at your
current job, or landing a new
one. Ω
Gale Brown Sandler is the
founder of Grifn Resume
Service and can be reached at
galerbrown@gmail.com.
Question: There is a new study about marijuana
in the news. What is all of that about? Is there
anything dangerous about marijuana, really? I
only use it occasionally – may be three or four
times a month at parties.
W
hen we look at research, we
should consider the prepon-
derance of evidence that it ofers and
temper that with common sense.
Sadly, common sense is sometimes
trumped by political considerations
when it comes to this particular drug.
Icannot imagine, for example, pro-
tracted political fghts over personal
use of Zantac or Amoxicillin.
There seems to be a tsunami of ac-
ceptance for the use of marijuana. As
you know from the news, some states
have made it legal, or at least less ille-
gal, despite federal laws that suppos-
edly supersede state laws. Apparently,
those federal laws only apply when
the Attorney General and Depart-
ment of Justice agree with them.
Recently, fndings of another study
were released (April issue of the Jour-
nal of Neuroscience) that suggest that
marijuana use with a frequency of one
or more exposures per week in young
people will change the shape and
function of areas of the brain which
deal with emotion and motivation.
MRI studies comparing regular pot
users with people who do not smoke
marijuana found that the nucleus ac-
cumbens, a brain region known to
be involved in reward processing,
and the amygdala nuclei, which are
connected to emotion centers, were
larger and had a diferent shape and
structure in the marijuana users com-
pared to non-users. There were also
changes in the density of gray matter
in these areas of the brain, which is
composed of nerve cell bodies. These
fndings are consistent with animal
studies (How about a poodle smoking
pot for science?) that have shown the
same brain changes.
Many of the studies on marijuana
users have concentrated on those
with heavy usage, not light or moder-
ate users as this study did. This study
is potentially enlightening if we as-
sume that most users fall into the ca-
sual/light or moderate category. Brain
damage with casual marijuana use
might correspond to a social drinker
who shows measurable liver damage
with even light exposure, which does
not happen with small amounts of al-
cohol once per week, by the way, for
those who want to compare marijua-
na to alcohol.
Marijuana, though illegal, is every-
where. About 19 million people in
United States admit using marijuana,
according to the National Survey on
Drug Abuse and Mental Health, leav-
ing open the possibility that there are
millions more who do not admit it.
Because the supply is large, the price
has even come down over the years.
Marijuana use is known to be asso-
ciated with problems in motivation,
attention span, learning ability, and
memory impairments. It changes
mental acuity, reaction times, sensory
input, behavior, judgment, and social
relationships.
Marijuana stimulates receptors in the
brain that infuence pleasure, mem-
ory, thinking ability, concentration,
sensory and time perception, and co-
ordination of movement. It alters per-
ceptions and mood, impairs the abil-
ity to walk or perform functions that
involve fne motor control, interferes
with thinking and problem solving,
and disrupts learning and memory.
This study in the Journal of Neuro-
science focused on young adults. We
know that marijuana afects brain
development when used heavily by
young people, and its efects on think-
ing and memory may be long-lasting
or permanent. Another study showed
serious learning impairment among
people who began marijuana use in
their teenage years. A long-term study
from New Zealand showed that peo-
ple who began smoking marijuana
heavily as teenagers lost an average of
eight points and their IQ between the
ages of 13 and 38. The lost cognitive
abilities were not restored in those
who stopped smoking marijuana as
adults.
This study will spark debate on both
sides of the marijuana issue. Right
now in the state of Georgia, posses-
sion and use our illegal. Even light
exposure stays in your blood (and
urine) for about 30 days. Heavier ex-
posure will cause you to test positive
for up to four months after you quit. If
an employer does hair analysis, it may
be found farther back than that.
I return at this point to the combina-
tion of research and common sense
mentioned in the frst paragraph. If
you are a pot user now, or considering
trying it, just weigh the evidence as
you make your decision. Look at what
you think it does for you versus what
it actually does to you. Hopefully, re-
search and common sense will guide
you to a better decision. Ω
LIFESTYLES 5
APRIL 24 - MAY 8, 2014 THE GRIP GET A GRIP AND GET THE GOOD STUFF
DR. BOB HAYDEN
DC, PhD, FICC
HEALTH & WELLNESS
A brain gone up in smoke
Skills you need to succeed in
today’s job market
GALE BROWN SANDLER
GRIFFIN RESUME SERVICE
CAREER & RESUME
April 26-27. Great Grifn
Mayfing. Grifn City Park.
Vendor applications are
now being accepted. Appli-
cation may be found online
at http://www.grifncham-
ber.com?wp-content/
uploads/2012/11/2014-
Application.pdf.
May 1. Grifn-Spalding Chamber
of Commerce Government Afairs
Committee Breakfast. 7:30 to
8:30 a.m. in the Stuckey
Building on the University
of Georgia-Grifn Campus.
Senatorial candidates have
been invited to introduce
themselves and briefy
present their qualifcations
and platform.
Monthly Alzheimer's support
group meetings. Refec-
tions Adult Day Program
is hosting an Alzheimer's
Caregiver Support Group.
Afliated with the Georgia
Alzheimer's Association,
the meetings are held
from 2 to 3 p.m. the third
Thursday of each month at
the Spalding County Senior
Center, 885 Memorial Drive.
For additional information
call 770-233-6179.
Weekly line dance lessons. Held
at 7 p.m. every Thursday at
the Spalding County Senior
Center. Lessons for begin-
ners to advanced dancers.
$5 per class. For additional
information contact Eddie
Hufman at 770-412-8838.
Virtual Program Information
Sessions. For parents inter-
ested in learning about
this program, the Grifn-
Spalding County School
System is holding a series
of informational meetings
in the Learning Center
located at 216 S. 6th St.
Meetings will be ofered at
6 p.m. May 12 and 22, 3:30
p.m. June 9 and July 29. Re-
quired orientation sessions
are scheduled for 3:30 p.m.
May 29, June 13 and July
31. For additional informa-
tion contact Central Ofce
at 770-229-3700.
For more events, visit The Grip's
calendar at www.the-grip.net/
community-calendar.
GET A GRIP AND GET THE GOOD STUFF THE GRIP APRIL 24 - MAY 8, 2014
6
COMMUNITY
GET A GRIP :::
p o l l o f t h e w e e k
calendar :::
Do you believe that the fate of the proposed
new airport should be determined by voters?
Yes, the people should have a vote on big projects such as this. 62.32%
No, we elect ofcials to make important decisions such as this. 37.68%
Last week's results:
VOTE NOW AT WWW.THE-GRIP.NET
Like us on Facebook to
get updates and give your
opinion about stories, polls,
community events and
breaking news!
facebook.com/
thegripnews
Do you like the city of Grifn's branding as
represented on its new gateway signs?
no seein clearl
i drai.
We take multiple insurance plans,
including VSP, Eyemed, Spectera, Superior
Vision, and Medicare
Dr. Terry H. Wynne
112 W Oak St.
Griffin, GA 30224
(770) 227-2924
large selection of jewelry
gold dipped roses
sentimental plaques
Faerie Glen fgurines
Betty Boop items
& much more!
SUBMITTED ::: The Grifn-
Spalding County School
System will host four
informational sessions for its
Virtual Program. Students
in grades K through 9 who
are not currently enrolled in
the district can register for
online courses.
Information sessions will be
held on May 12 at 6 pm and
May 22, June 9 and July 29
at 3:30 pm in the Learning
Center at 216 South Sixth
Street.
Required orientation
sessions are set for May 29,
June 13 and July 31 at 3:30
pm.
Students are expected to
work on their lessons 20
hours per week in grades
K-3 and 25 hours per week
in grades 4-9.
The Virtual Program is
tuition free for students in
Spalding County provided
they stay enrolled through
October 15. Based on
education research, the
curriculum packages
high-quality lessons with
mastery-based assessments
that ensure students
achieve success at each and
every level.
With individualized learning
approaches, the Grifn-
Spalding Virtual Program
provides the tools students
need to succeed.
“Parents must be involved at
all grade levels,”said Deputy
Superintendent Denise
Burrell. “Some student
must increase the amount
of time spent on the classes
to be successful. But, this
is an opportunity for those
students who work best in a
virtual environment.” Ω
GSCS Announces Virtual Program Info Sessions
SUBMITTED ::: Join the many who have discovered the benefts of line dancing, enjoy the
music and the fellowship while getting exercise, having fun and much more.
The new line dancing class is open to all age groups, so if you have ever wanted to learn
how to line dance, now is the time.
Lessons are held at 7 p.m. Thursdays at the Spalding County Senior Center located at 885
Memorial Drive.
Sponsored by Spalding County Parks and Recreation, classes are $5 each. For additional
information, call Eddie Hufman, the certifed instructor, at 770-412-8838. Ω
Introduction to line dancing lessons being ofered
770-229-6599 | www.stachestudio.net | 116 S. Sixth Street, Griffin
(after April 31 for June / May 31 for July)
June 16-20 9 a.m. - 12 p.m.
July 21-25 9 a.m. - 12 p.m.
City to host “Touch-A-Truck” for GA Cities Week
SUBMITTED ::: City of Grifn residents will have the opportunity to “touch a truck” at an
event scheduled April 26th in City Park. Between 11AM and 4PM, residents will be able to
see, touch, and play in vehicles including a police car from the Grifn Police Department, a
fre truck from Grifn Fire Rescue, a bucket truck from Grifn Power, and more.
“The event is called ‘Touch-a-Truck,’ but it is much more than that,” said Alvin Huf, Citizen
Engagement Specialist for the City of Grifn. “It’s really about getting to understand what
the city does and how we do it. It’s a great event for the entire family. The kids can fip
switches and play in the police car while we advise the parent how to better secure their
homes. We’ll have city staf available, so the public can ask questions.”
This event is held in conjunction with the Georgia Municipal Association’s Georgia Cities
Week.
According to the Georgia Municipal Association website, “Georgia Cities Week gives cities
an opportunity to share information about the valuable services cities provide to residents
and how cities positively impact their quality of life.”
Also in the park that day, the Chamber of Commerce will be hosting the annual “Great
Grifn Mayfing,” Grifn’s annual arts and crafts fair.
For more information about the City of Grifn, visit www.cityofgrifn.com. Ω
GOVERNMENT 7
APRIL 24 - MAY 8, 2014 THE GRIP GET A GRIP AND GET THE GOOD STUFF
SPALDING • 770-227-5300 ::: LAMAR • 770-358-3600 ::: UPSON • 706-646-3200
Personal Injury • Tractor Trailer Wrecks
Workers Compensation • Wrongful Death Divorce/Custody
Social Security Disability • Wills & Estates • Civil Litigation • DUI • Criminal
Help is on its way
conner-westburyfuneralhome.com
279A Wilson Rd, Griffin • 770-227-4580
• Caring about your family’s safety for 35 years •
Trusted for all of your
transmission
and auto repair needs.
Matt Garrett,
Owner/Operator
2952 N. Expy, Suite C, Griffin
770-468-9475 · squeakycleaninc.org
Save yourself the
spring cleaning
hassle and just
give us a call!
state left us with no right-of-way, so
we changed the plan.”
Part of an initiative that was
undertaken in 2012, the design was
one of several proposed by SkyDesign,
the consulting group hired by the
Grifn Board of Commissioners to
craft a new identifying branding.
A committee of resident volunteers
was also involved in the process,
having met regularly with designers
and city ofcials.
The four signs, purchased for $80,000
that was funded in the Fiscal Year
2014 budget, have been met with
mixed reactions.
While some residents have taken to
social media to complain about the
price, others have assailed the design,
stating the vertical signs are difcult
to read and not representative of the
community.
Smith, who is aware of some
complaints, said the signs are the
latest step in the city's plan to move
forward with the full implementation
of the branding. The city has already
started using the new branding on
city vehicles, letterhead, business
cards and other signage.
“We also got t-shirts,” Smith said.
Additional projects have been
scheduled for the near future, with
funding planned for the coming year.
“We're budgeting in the Fiscal Year
2015 budget for directional signs
and parking signs, primarily for the
downtown area. Those signs are
varying costs, so we're going to try
and get as many as we can,”Smith said.
“We're probably going to propose
about $50,000 in next year's (Fiscal
Year 2015) budget.”
He said those wayfaring signs will
be similar to those now located on
Hill Street, and will be used to direct
motorists to lesser known downtown
parking spots such as those behind
Slices Pizzeria and the Post Ofce.
To those who are dissatisfed with
the overall branding itself, Smith
encouraged more timely participation
in future city endeavors.
“The people complaining about the
branding – they're well behind,” he
said. “In everything we do, we seek as
much input as we can possibly get.
The difculty on our part is trying to
get people involved in the decision
making process. Unfortunately, we
can't please everyone. We welcome
everyone's input, but we have to have
it before we roll the project out.” Ω
« signs, cont.
SUBMITTED ::: The Spalding
County Sherif's Ofce along
with the Drug Enforcement
Agency (DEA) and the
Grifn Police Department
are participating in the
annual Drug Take Back Day
on Saturday, April 26.
The Spalding County
Sherif's Ofce will be at
Wynn's Pharmacy located
at 566 S. 8th St. from 10 a.m.
to 6 p.m., and the Grifn
Police Department will be
at Wal-Mart from 10 a.m to
2 p.m.
This program allows
residents to properly
dispose of prescription
medication. Citizens with
prescription medication
that has reached its
expiration date or is
no longer needed are
encouraged to bring the
medication to Wynn's
Pharmacy or Wal-Mart.
Please do not bring liquid
medications or syringes.
The abuse of prescription
drugs is increasing and
the proper disposal of
unneeded medication will
help prevent any improper
use.
Beam said, “I am
encouraging all citizens
to bring any unneeded
prescription medication
to Wynn's Pharmacy
where agents from the
Spalding County Sherif's
Ofce Special Operations-
Narcotics Division will
dispose of the medication.
I want to thank Drew
Miller and the staf at
Wynn's Pharmacy for
their participation in this
program.”
Lt. Mike Richardson, of
the GPD, said, “Improper
disposal of medications
poses a risk to children and
to the environment,” and
advised marked patrol cars
would be located near the
Wal-Mart entrance. Ω
Drug Take Back Day set for April 26
City of Grifn Commissioner Dick
Morrow on Wednesday accepted
a $5,000 donation from Lewis
Walton, who in 2013 initiated
contact with local ofcials,
expressing a desire to assist in
eforts to spotlight Grifn as the
birthplace of John Henry "Doc"
Holliday.
Walton's donation will be
used to fund the purchase of
three monuments designating
Holliday's Solomon Street Dental
Ofce, Final Resting Place, and
the grave of Martha Eleanora
Holliday, Doc Holliday's sister.
The cost of each monument is
$2,000, and a total of eight are
currently planned. City ofcials
stressed that these monuments
will be entirely funded by private
donations, not taxpayer funds.

Join our sewing classes
We’ll make it oh-sew-easy! Ages 10+
770-229-2077 | 108 N. Hill Street, Downtown Griffin
(770) 227-2595
124 W. SOLOMON ST. | DOWNTOWN GRIFFIN
THURS & FRI: 9am-6pm ||| SATURDAY: 9am-4pm
We Buy Gold
Road • Mountain • Hybrid
SALES • SERVICE • PARTS
• Large bike
inventory
• Apparel & Shoes
• Accessories
•Friendly staff
•Gift Certifcates
678-692-8175
116 E. College St.
Opening May 3
Inside the Broad St Mill
324 E. Broad Street
Men & Women’s
Boots
Denim
Tee’s
Boutique Styles
and more
770.227.2349
212 S. 11th Street
Shop@11th Antiques
Gifts, Consignment & Estate Sale Services
Thursday & Friday 10-6 ::: Sat 10-5
Sunday 12:30 - 4:30
Voted Best Antique Shop
Booth space always available
Watch for “La Petite Boutique”
Griffin’s newest Children’s Consignment
ANTIQUE MALL
Monday-Saturday 10am-5pm
678-315-3402 ∙ 314 E. SOLOMON STREET
J. William Edwards Pavilion
in the Park at Sixth
2014 Free Movie Series
NOW SHOWING
Friday, May 9
presented by:
Fun starts at 7:30pm
Movie starts at dark
Bring your own
blanket or lawn
chair

Enjoy family fun,
games, prizes & free
refreshments
JOIN US
MEMORIAL DAY
WEEKEND
Saturday
May 24, 2014
2-7PM
PARK @ 6TH
GRIFFIN, GA
TO ORDER TICKETS OR FOR MORE INFORMATION VISIT
BeerWineArt.com
OVER 75 CRAFT BEERS, CIDERS & WINES | HOOTIN’ HOLLERIN’ MUSTACHE CONTEST
FOOD | VENDORS | BREWERIES ON-SITE | ART AUCTION | PROCEEDS TO CHARITY
n-eperienc-require
APRIL 26 4 PM
770-229-6599
stachestudio.net
116 S. Sixth Street
MAY 1 6 PM
MAY 3 5 PM
It's fun to walk around downtown!
Check us out at
www.the-grip.net