Elaine Em 

Plasmid Identification Final 
 
Introduction: A plasmid is a circular piece of DNA that exists apart from the chromosome and it can 
replicate independently. They can be found in bacteria with multiple reasons behind it. Plasmids are 
mainly used in labs for the manipulation of genes. The plasmids can carry genes that make them resistant 
to antibiotics. The plasmids can be used to investigate RNA’s and promoters. Restriction enzymes are 
enzymes that only cut DNA in very specific recognition sequences. Restriction enzymes are crucial to 
recombinant DNA technology; without restriction enzymes, scientists wouldn’t be able to cut the DNA 
to a certain length and allow for the attachment of new DNA. The restriction enzymes could also 
measure how long the DNA strand is. Gel electrophoresis is used to separate mixtures of RNA, DNA, 
and proteins according to their molecular size. Gel electrophoresis begins with a mixture of TAE a small 
amount of agarose to make an agarose gel. With a 10­well comb inserted into the gel before it solidifies, 
it creates wells for the solutions to be added to. The DNA and DNA ladders would be injected into the 
wells for gel electrophoresis to take place. The molecules from the solutions are separated as they’re 
being pushed by an electrical force through small filters in the agarose gel. The lengths of how far they 
travel and their sizes correspond with each other. The time for the gel to run will usually take up to an 
hour at the most. The gel would be removed and moved to the UV box in order to take a picture with 
UV lights shining onto the gel, after the picture is taken it would be possible to determine the distance of 
the DNA by measuring from the ladder base pair lengths to find the distance of the unknown DNA. The 
goal of the experiment is to determine the unknown plasmid that we were given in the beginning of the 
experiment. Finding the unknown plasmid may be important to my understanding of biotechnology lab 
techniques to get an understanding of how to use restriction enzymes, micropipettes, gel electrophoresis, 
and overall everything I had learned in my biotechnology lab to put to use in the final experiment. The 
strategy I had used to achieve this goal would include the use of restriction enzymes to cut the plasmid in 
a unique way in order to determine the unknown plasmid(s) (pKAN, pBLU, pAMP) with precise and 
cautious measurements throughout the lab. 
Methods: The concentration was 150 nanograms/microliter. In order to figure out how much DNA is 
needed the following equation would be used, (plasmid concentration * volume(ul) = desired 
concentration). The desired concentration had turned out to be 500ng/ul for the experiment. Another 
equation, 150 ng/ul* v(ul)=500 ng/ul is used and results to 3.3 ul of the DNA plasmid. 1 ul of 
restriction enzyme is also added to the DNA plasmid. In my single digest I had added 1 ul of PstI which 
was created by New England Biolabs (NEB). In my double digest I had included 1 ul of restriction 
enzyme HindIII and restriction enzyme Ndel, which were both created by NEB. The total volume of 
each microtube would add up to 20 ul. 1x buffer would be necessary to add to the solution. For my 
single digest containing restriction enzyme PstI I added a 3.1 NEBuffer.  To my double digest containing 
restriction enzymes of both Ndel and HindIII I would add a 2.1 NEBuffer to it. After adding the rest of 
the restriction enzymes I would bring it to volume by adding a specific amount of dH2O into each tube 
(as seen in the table below).  
 
Type of 
Digest  
Plasmid 
DNA 
2.1 / 3.1 
NEBuffer 
PstI  Ndel  HindIII  dH2O  Total 
Volume 
Control  3.3 ul  2 ul   ­­­­­­  ­­­­­­­  ­­­­­­­  14.7 ul  20 ul 
Single  3.3 ul  2 ul  1 ul  ­­­­­­­­  ­­­­­­­  13.7 ul  20 ul 
Double  3.3 ul  2 ul  ­­­­­­  1 ul  1 ul  12.7 ul  20 ul 
 
After including all of the necessary products into the microtubes I would incubate them at 37.0 
C for 2 hours. While the microtubes were incubating I had created the gel for the gel electrophoresis. I 
had gathered a specific amount of .8% of agarose gel that would be able to measure from 800­12,000 
base pairs. Agarose gel, TAE buffer, and 1 ul of ethidium bromide is mixed together as a solution for a 
50 ml gel. The equation.8 g/100 ml= x/50 ml was used to find ‘x’ which would be the amount of the 
agarose needed. The amount of agarose that was determined from the equation was .4 grams. The 
agarose is added into a flask with 10x TAE buffer. The amount of 10x TAE buffer that was needed was 
determined through an equation of 50ml*1X=10X*x, looking for ‘x’. 5 ml of the 10x TAE buffer was 
added into the flask and brought to volume of 50ml. Once I had included all of the products together I 
would swirl the flask before putting into the microwave for 50 seconds until the agarose mix wasn’t 
visible anymore. Later, 1 ul of ethidium bromide is added into the flask with the agarose mixture as it 
cools down to be able to pour into the gel tray. After pouring in the solution into the gel tray I would 
add a 10 well comb into the tray before it hardens. The gel would harden within half an hour, while 
waiting for it to harden I had began to make a TAE buffer to cover the entire gel during the gel 
electrophoresis. I would add 280 ml of 1x TAE buffer starting out with a 10x TAE buffer. The amount 
of TAE buffer needed would be determined by the equation 280 ml*1X TAE buffer=10X TAE 
buffer*x, in search of “x”. After solving the equation, 28 . ml of the 10X TAE buffer would be brought 
to volume to 280 ml. When I knew the gel had hardened I removed the gel from the gel tray with the 
comb and turned it so that the wells would be closer to the black (­) and across the red (+). The 280 ml 
of buffer I had just made would be added on top of the gel into the gel tray. 4 ul of loading dye would 
be added to each of the DNA tubes after the incubation would be over with the equation of, 20 ul*1X 
DNA=6X dye*x. After including the loading dyes into each of the microtubes I would inject 25 ul of the 
DNA into the wells, with that I would add 5 ul of the 1kb ladder (NEB made) With the table/pattern 
below is how the wells of the gel was loaded. 
 
ladder    control    single    double    ladder   
 
Lastly, I set the gel to run at 140 volts for about 45 minutes. Once the DNA reached between 
the 4­5 centimeters mark, I removed the gel from to take a picture of the DNA bands with the UV light. 
Once I had printed the image I had took from the machine, I would create a reference point and 
measure from the bottom of each band in millimeters. After finding the distances I would create a 
standard curve which was, y= 15464e^­.123x, I had used Microsoft Excel in order to find my standard 
curve. I was able to figure out my fragment size by using the DNA codes from 
tinyurl.com/plasmidseq. I would then find my fragment size by using tinyurl.com/NEBcutter. Two 
other websites were used such as tinyurl.com/nebbuffers in order to find the buffers that are used in a 
relationship with the enzymes. tinyurl.com/nebdoubledigest was also used to find out how enzymes 
and buffers work together.  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Results and Conclusion: Below is the Standard Curve I had created using Microsoft Excel. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Here is my Gel Electrophoresis picture with the lines drawn on it to figure out the fragments. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  PstI, single digest sizes  Ndel and HindIII, Double 
Digest Size 
pAMP  4539  2118, 2421 
pKAN  923 & 3271  2096, 2098 
pBLU  197, 1316, 3924  3006, 2431 
Unknown Plasmid     
 
In this experiment I have concluded that I have pKAN with a concentration of 150 ng/ml. There 
were many things that went with this. pKAN were the closest numbers to my cuts.  
 
References 
http://tools.neb.com/NEBcutter2/ 
http://www.dnalc.org/resources/plasmids.html 
https://www.neb.com/tools­and­resources/interactive­tools/double­digest­finder