EC Methods I

Learning Experience Plan #7

Name: Taylor Lamontagne
Age of children: 5 mo. - 17 mos.
Length of activity: Varies
Name of activity: Children’s Book of My Experience

Purpose: The purpose of this activity is to expand on the infants’ interest in books and create a
book of my experience in the infant room to help their cognitive development.
 This activity relates to the infants’ focused exploration of their environment and ability to
recognize familiar people, places and things.

State and National Standards: NH Early Learning Guidelines:
Cognitive Development; Focused Exploration (ELG, 2005)

Background knowledge of Children:
In the infant classroom, there are books on display for infants to explore during their time
on the floor. Each family of an infant has created a book that has pictures and names of their
family members. All of the infants enjoy looking at the pictures in their books and books of
other infants. We also have children’s books in the classroom that the infants enjoy looking at as
well. We often read books that have words to the infants to help their language/cognitive
development.
A.S. is an infant that is always looking at books in the classroom. She is approximately 7
months old and is often found laying on her back holding up a book and occasionally pointing to
pictures. Our oldest infant, A.N., and our youngest infant, W.M., greatly enjoy listening to us
read books to them. They are very engaged and intently look at the pictures as we read. N.Q.
also enjoys looking at the pictures and then she enjoys tasting the pictures as well. All of the
infants explore books in their own ways.

Background knowledge of the Content Area:
Infants have many cognitive experiences. A cognitive experience is the process of
gathering information, organizing and using this information to adapt to the world (Mena, 2012,
p. 162). To plan an environment that gives infants the opportunity to develop cognitively
involves an understanding how infants grow. Obtaining an understanding of what is
developmentally appropriate for infants will help the infants expand their cognitive development.
Infants use their senses to explore their environment. This sensory input helps infants to
distinguish between familiar and unfamiliar that later processes the experience the infant has
(Mena, 2012, p. 162). This cognitive development is something that is not easily seen. Instead,
care-givers see physical development of exploration, but the infant is not only developing
physically but also cognitively.

Objectives:
 The infant will find this new book in the infant room as they continue to explore their
environment
 The infant will recognize familiar people, places and things in the book

Assessment and Documentation Plan:
 Objectives will be assessed through observations of the infant’s interaction with the book
 Anecdotal records/photos will be used as documentation

Materials Need and Plan for Setting up the Environment: Create the book: paper, text,
pictures and laminate. Display the book with other books in the classroom in the “reading area.”

Description of how you will engage children and facilitate the learning opportunities:
 Show the book to an infant that shows an interest in it
 I will read the book and point to various pictures describing what is going on to the infant
 If an infant does not appear to be engaged in reading, he/she will have the opportunity to
explore the book independently
 The book will be left in the classroom on display with other books for the infants to
access at any time

Child Guidance/Adaptations: It is important to anticipate disruptions during exploration of the
book. Since the toddler room is connected to the infant room, it is possible that the infant room
may become too loud for an infant to focus on exploring this book. If this occurs, a care-giver
could bring the infant to a quieter location where he/she can explore without being overly
distracted by the toddlers. Also if this is a common occurrence, possible rearrangement may be
necessary. The infants will be able to focus on exploration in an area that is quieter; therefore
the teacher may consider moving the books/reading area to a more low key section of the
classroom.

LEP Reflection:
This activity is another continuous activity that is meant to be in the infant room for my
remaining time and as well as after I leave. The book is placed in the book area for infants (and
toddlers) to look at when they want to. Sometimes the book area moves to a higher or lower
location depending on the current development of most infants in the room.
I expected some infant to look at the book for a short period of time. Unless infants are
really focused on the object they are exploring, they usually look at it, put it in their mouth, and
then move onto something new. This is exactly what happened with some infants. N.Q looked
at one or two pages, and then crawled over the book to a different toy. E.B also pulled herself up
to her knees to where the books were. She looked at the book a made for a short period of time,
and then picked a new book. Since I understand that this is how the infants explore, I was not
insulted by their brief time with my book.
I was surprised at how engaged some infants were in my book. C.P closely looked at the
book for a longer duration of time. She also turned the pages and looked at all of them
independently. Our youngest infant, W.M, also looked at the book during floor time. Unlike
C.P, she looked at one page instead of turning the pages. (She has not yet mastered this skill.)
Through this activity I learned how there are different degrees of engagement that each infant
displayed.
As a teacher, I learned that activities such as this book are very meaningful. I wanted to
create something to sum up my observations of each infant and my time in the infant room. I
was very surprised at my cooperating teacher and my EDUC teacher’s reactions to my book.
This book was not only created to help expand the infants’ cognitive development, but it was
also a way to reflect on my wonderful experience in the infant room.


Abbreviated LEP for Extension:

1. State and National Standards: NH Early Learning Guidelines:
Cognitive Development; Focused Exploration (ELG, 2005)

2. Objectives:
 The infant will find this new book in the infant room as they continue to explore their
environment
 The infant will recognize familiar people, places and things in the book
 The infant will recognize familiar voices

3. Assessment and documentation plan:
 Objectives will be assessed through observations of the infant’s interaction with the book
 Anecdotal records/photos will be used as documentation of the infant’s reaction to
hearing my voice on the tape

4. Body of the lesson:
The idea behind this extension is that the infants will be able to read a book that I created
with our experiences in it, and also hear my voice even after I finish my placement. Care-givers
will show the infants the book and play the tape of me reading it. This will help their cognitive
development through recognition of familiar voices, people, places and things.

5. Materials needed: Create the book: paper, text, pictures and laminate. Display the book with
other books in the classroom in the “reading area.” Create a recording of myself reading the
book. Keep the tape in the classroom for the care-givers to play for the infants.


Bibliography

Early Learning Guidelines Task Force (2005). New Hampshire Early Learning Guidelines, NH
Department of Health and Human Services: Child Development Bureau.

Mena, J., & Eyer, D. W. (2012). Infants, toddlers, and caregivers: a curriculum of respectful,
responsive, relationship-based, care and education (9th ed.). New York: McGraw-Hill.