RUNNING HEADER: LITERACY PROJECT: CIVIL RIGHTS

Literacy Project: Civil Rights
Kristin N. Huff
Missouri Southern State University

LITERACY PROJECT: CIVIL RIGHTS
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Description
Compiled is a list of strategies and examples of each to use in the classroom to help
students comprehension with reading. Included is a content text set, vocabulary word sort,
vocabulary, self-awareness chart, QAR, graphic organizer, notetaking, and shared reading.
Each of the strategies are use to work with the standard of:
SS3 1.10 Describe the contributions of Martin Luther King, Jr.
This standard is to show third graders what Martin Luther King, Jr. accomplished during his life.
The resources also go farther than that and expand into the civil rights movement. This was
chosen so that students understand why Martin Luther King, Jr. was passionate about civil rights.
This also shows students where our country has come from.
In the classroom, these strategies can be used to teach history while also integrating
reading standards. In this assortment of strategies, the following reading standards for the fiction
resources are being used:
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.3.1 Ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a
text, referring explicitly to the text as the basis for the answers.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.3.4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a
text, distinguishing literal from nonliteral language.
These standards were chosen to help students with their vocabulary terms and their
comprehension of the text. The students are to ask questions and be able to answer the questions
with evidence from the text.
The following reading standards for the non-fiction resources are being use:
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.3.2 Determine the main idea of a text; recount the key
details and explain how they support the main idea.
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CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.3.3 Describe the relationship between a series of
historical events, scientific ideas or concepts, or steps in technical procedures in a text,
using language that pertains to time, sequence, and cause/effect.
These were chosen to use different levels of thinking skills. The first standard is
for basic thinking skills. It allows the students to find the main ideas of the text. The
second standard is more higher order thinking. It has students think about what happened
in the text and relate it to historical events. This allows students to relate the text to what
they are learning from other texts within the content text set.
This is an excellent assortment of strategies that can be used with any
discipline and topic.

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Annotated Bibliography
Abrams, A. (2013). A march remembered. Time for Kids. Retrieved from
http://www.timeforkids. com/news/march-remembered/99936
This is an article about anniversary of the civil rights march and the “I Have A Dream…”
speech.
Anderson, L. H. (2010). Chains: Seeds of America. New York, NY: Atheneum Books for
Young Readers.
In this fiction novel set in the Revolutionary War, a thirteen-year-old girl spies on her
owners for the British. Reluctant at first, she then realizes her loyalty is to the person who will
give her freedom.
Birth of the civil rights movement. (2013). Kids Discover, Civil Rights, 6-7.
This childrens magazine article talks about the civil rights movement and how it started.
Learn about civil rights. BrainPop. (2013). Retrieved from
http://www.brainpop.com/socialstudies /ushistory/civilrights/preview.weml
A great website for students to watch videos about the civil rights movement. It also has
quizzes and games that students can play.
Civil rights movement. (2014). Retrieved from
http://www.kidskonnect.com/subjectindex/ 16-educational/history/410-civil-rights-
movement.html
This is a kid friendly website that gives facts about the civil rights movement and has
other links that students can visit.
Curtis, C. P. (2000). The Watsons go to Birmingham-1963. New York, NY: Laurel Leaf.
This fiction novel takes a family from Michigan with little to no segregation to
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Birmingham. This novel shows students the difference between the north and south during the
civil rights period.
Griffin, L. W. (1975). Po’ man. Retrieved from
http://www.crmvet.org/poetry/pgriffin.htm#pl ulupoman
This poem is spoken like the African Americans of this time. It talks about how they
don‟t fit in with their clothes and their speech.
Joiner, L. L. (2013, May 2). How the children of Birmingham changed the civil-rights
movement. The Daily Beast. Retrieved from
http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2013/05/02/how
-the-children-of-birmingham-changed-the-civil-rights-movement.html
This article gives the opportunity to show students that children can make a difference.
They explain what children did during the march in Birmingham with MLK.
Lawton, K. (2013, May 01). „Children‟s march‟ 50 years later: Civil rights movement‟s
young „foot soldiers‟ recall their stories. Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly. Retrieved from
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/05/01/childrens-march-50-years-later-civil-rights-
foot-soldiers-recall-their-stories_n_3196699.html
This news article talks about the „Children‟s March‟ and the people that were in it. They
share their story in the article.
Levine, E. S. (2000). Freedom’s children: Young civil rights activists tell their own
stories. London: Puffin
In this non fiction book, thirty children tell their stories of what life was like during the
1950s and 1960s. This includes restaurants and schools to violence and arrests.
Levinson, C. (2012). We’ve got a job: The 1963 Birmingham children’s march. Atlanta,
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Ga: Peachtree Publishers.
This non-fiction book tells the story of the 4000 black school children went to jail
voluntarily in Birmingham.
Lewis, J., Aydin, A., & Powell, N. (2013). March book 1. Marietta, Ga: Top Shelf Productions
This graphic novel goes through the life of Congressman John Lewis as he is one of the
key figures of the civil rights movement and is committed to justice and nonviolence.
Osborne, L.B. (2012). Miles to go for freedom: Segregation and civil rights in the Jim
Crow years. New York, NY: Harry N. Abrams.
This non-fiction is told through first-person accounts about racial segregation and the
early civil rights efforts in the US from the 1890‟s to 1954.
Shelton, P. Y. (2009). Child of the civil rights movement. New York, NY: Schwartz & Wade.
This children‟s picture book is in a child‟s perspective on the civil rights movement. It
introduces activist Martin Luther King Jr. and includes the march from Selma to Montgomery.
Weatherford, C. B. (2007). Freedom on the menu: The Greensboro sit-ins. London: Puffin.
This children‟s picture book shares what an eight-year-old girl saw during this time in
Greensboro, NC. There were signs telling her where and where she couldn‟t eat until she hears
about the changes that are coming.
Williams-Garcia. R. (2011). One crazy summer. New York, NY: Amistad.
A fiction novel set in 1968. Three sisters set out to Oakland, Ca to meet their mother who
abandoned them when they were young. Their mother then sends them to a camp run by the
Black Panthers.

Word Sort
A March Remembered
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Abrams, A. (2013). A march remembered. Time for Kids. Retrieved from
http://www.timeforkids. com/news/march-remembered/99936
SS3 1.10
Describe the contributions of Martin Luther King, Jr.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy. RI.3.4
Determine the meaning of general academic and domain-specific words and phrases in a text
relevant to a grade 3 topic or subject area.
Directions: Review the categories provided and sort the vocabulary terms/concepts. (For an
Open Word Sort, instruct the students to come up with their own categories.) You will have
approximately 10 minutes to sort the vocabulary terms/concepts into the appropriate categories.
We will have a class discussion on where you categorized the vocabulary terms into. You will be
asked to defend your placement of the term and tell how it meets the criteria of the category. The
terms/concepts can be put in more than one category.
Before MLK During MLK After MLK
Discrimination

Segregation

The South

Racism
“I Have A Dream”

Discrimination

National Mall

Civil Rights Leaders

African- American President

Realize the Dream Rally

Martin Luther King, Jr.
Memorial
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Civil Rights Movement

Protest

March on Washington for
Jobs and Freedom

Racism

This word sort will be given before students read the article about Martin Luther King, Jr.‟s
march and speech. This will allow to assess the students‟ knowledge about Martin Luther King,
Jr. After the students read the article, the students will revise the word sort to fit what they
learned.

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Vocabulary Self-Awareness Chart
The Watsons go to Birmingham- 1963
Curtis, C. P. (2000). The Watsons go to Birmingham-1963. New York, NY: Laurel Leaf.
SS3 1. 10
Describe the contributions of Martin Luther King, Jr.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.3.4
Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, distinguishing literal
from nonliteral language
Student Directions:
1. Examine the list of words you have written in the first column
2. Put a “+” next to each word you know well, and give an accurate example and
definition of the word. Your definition and example must relate to the unit of study.
3. Place a “*” next to any words for which you can write only a definition or an
example, but not both.
4. Place a “?“ next to words that are new to you.
5. Add any additional words you feel are important to know or are unfamiliar to
you.
You will use this chart throughout the unit. By the end of the unit should have the entire chart
completed. Because you will be revising this chart, write in pencil.
Word + * - Example Definition
generate * Produce
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delinquent -
forecast + We forecast
the weather.
Predict in
advance
respectable
encourage
propose
interrupt
pout
flunk

Students will be introduced to the chart by modeling the process. After modeling, the student
will fill out the chart before, while, and after reading the story. They will fill out three different
charts. This will allow students to learn the terms/concepts throughout the study.


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Question Answer Relationship (QAR)
APA Reference(s)
Curtis, C. P. (2000). The Watsons go to Birmingham-1963. New York, NY: Laurel Leaf.
Content Standards
SS3 1.10
Describe the contributions of Martin Luther King, Jr.
CCSS ELA Standards
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.3.1
Ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring explicitly to the text
as the basis for the answers.
Student directions:
Answer the following questions about The Watsons Go To Birmingham -1963 in your writing
journal. Make sure all of you answer every part of the question.
In the Text Questions Answers

Right There
questions (2)
(think who is,
where is, list, when
is, how many,

1. Where was Momma
from?



Alabama pg. 47 p.1

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when did, name,
what kind of-
Remember that the
answer will be in
one location in the
text)


2. Where did the Watson‟s
live?
Michigan pg. 2 p.2
Think and Search questions
(2)
(require students to “search”
through the entire passage
they read to find information)
1. For what reason, did the
church get bombed?
The church got bombed
because of the racism that
was going on in Birmingham.
The white people did not like
African Americans. They
wanted to hurt them and they
knew that they would be in
church for the Sunday service
so they chose then.
2. Compare and Contrast
Michigan to Alabama.
Michigan was were the
Watson‟s were from. They
were more accepting of
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African American people.
They were prejudice more of
people who were in a
different social class than they
were.
Alabama was where the
Watson‟s travelled to. It was
very prejudice against African
Americans.
They both had prejudice of
some kind.
In Your Head
Author and You questions
(1)
(require students to answer
with information not in the
text; however, students must
read the text material to
understand what the question
is asking then use the
information from the text and
explain what you know or
1. Explain why you think the
author set the story in
Michigan and had the family
travel to Birmingham? Give
examples of a time when you
went on a road trip.
See sample rubric below.
I think Christopher Paul
Curtis set the story in
Michigan to begin with is
because he wanted that shock
factor of the kids. They didn‟t
understand the racism that
was going on in the south.
On the journey to
Birmingham, the Watson kids
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have experienced) were surprised that their
parents were so scared to stop
along the way. I also think
that he wanted to have them
from a northern state that
didn‟t have much racism to a
southern state that did. I
remember when I traveled to
California, I was shocked
how they did everything and
how they treated people. It
was not like the Mid-West.
On Your Own questions (1)
(can be answered with
information from the
students‟ background
knowledge and do not require
reading the text)
1. What kind of road trip have
you been on?
Sample response-use rubric
below.
A road trip that I went on was
from California to Missouri.
It took us 3 days to drive
back. We got to stop at really
good places to eat and drive
along Route 66 most of the
time. I also got to learn more
about my friends while
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traveling.

Rubric for Author and Me (adjust your rubric to match your question)
4 3 2 1
Student states
why they think the
author had the
book set in
Michigan. Two
pieces of
information from
the text are used
to support the
answer. The
student
thoroughly
explains
background
knowledge or
experiences of a
road trip to further
support their
answer.
Student states
why they think
the author had
the book set in
Michigan. At
least one piece
of information
from the text is
used to support
the answer and
the student uses
some
background
knowledge or
experience of a
road trip to
further explain
and support their
answer.
Student states
why they think
the author had
the book set in
Michigan and
uses at least one
piece of
information
from the text
OR uses
background
knowledge/expe
riences of a road
trip to support
and explain,

Student states
why they think
the author had the
book set in
Michigan but
does not use
information from
the text or
personal
knowledge/experi
ence to support or
explain.
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Rubric for On My Own (adjust your rubric to match your question)

4 3 2 1
Student stated a
road trip they
have been on.
They explained
with details what
they did on the
trip.
The student
stated a road trip
they have been
on and provided
at least two
things they did
on the trip.
Student
presented a
vaguely a road
trip they have
been on and
what they did
with only
minimal
explanation.
Student failed to
clearly present a
road trip. No
clear explanation
was stated.

When and why I would use this strategy
I would use this strategy when using a thematic unit. I think this would help students to make
real life connections with the subject that we are reading. It would also help assess what the
students need helps with when it comes to reading.


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Graphic Organizer
Joiner, L. L. (2013, May 2). How the children of Birmingham changed the civil-rights
movement. The Daily Beast. Retrieved from
http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2013/05/02/how-the-children-of-birmingham-
changed-the-civil-rights-movement.html
SS3 1.10
Describe the contributions of Martin Luther King, Jr.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.3.1
Ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring explicitly to the text
as the basis for the answers.
Student Directions: Fill out this KWL Chart to demonstrate what you know, what you want to
know, and what you have learned from this article. Fill the K of what you know about the civil-
rights movement before you read the article. Fill the W of what you want to know after you read.
Fill the L of what you learned from the article after you have read the article.
K W L
Martin Luther King Jr.
helped lead the Civil-
Rights Movement.
When did the civil-
rights movement start?
The most racist cities in
the south was
Birmingham in 1963.
Many marches
happened in
Birmingham, Alabama.
What did children do to
change the Civil-Rights
Movement?
3,000 black young
people marched
Birmingham on May 7,
1963.
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The civil-rights
movement was a
movement wanted
equality between
African-American
people and white
people.
Did other children in
other cities help change
the movement?
The children who
marched changed the
civil-rights movement
because they made a
difference, went to jail,
and protested. The
students helped people
see that this was
important.



The students will be able to use this to understand what they know, what they want to
know, and what the learned while reading a single article. This can also be used throughout the
unit. Teachers can use this to assess what students have learned and to see if they are on the right
track with their learning.

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Note Taking
Joiner, L. L. (2013, May 2). How the children of Birmingham changed the civil-rights
movement. The Daily Beast. Retrieved from
http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2013/05/02/how-the- children-of-birmingham-
changed-the-civil-rights-movement.html
SS3 1.10
Describe the contributions of Martin Luther King, Jr.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.3.1
Ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring explicitly to the text
as the basis for the answers.
Student Directions: Take notes over the article. Make sure you write any questions that you may
have and the topics in the left side column and the notes on the right column. Write a summary
at the bottom discussing all the key points of the article.


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Main Points:

800 Students


1963 Birmingham


Was Martin Luther King Jr. apart of this
march?


Children‟s Crusade





Changed

Notes:

800 students walked a 10-mile walk to
Birmingham City.

“In 1963 Birmingham was known as one of
the most racist cities in the South.”

Yes, he was at this march.



“In May 1963 they launched the Children‟s
Crusade and began a march on Birmingham....
more than 3,000 black young people were
marching on the city.”


They changed the how people saw the civil
rights movement by making a difference,
going to jail, and protesting.


Summary:
800 black students left their classrooms and marched on Birmingham. They changed how
people saw the civil rights movement because they were so passionate about it.


Students can use this notetaking strategy to help them understand what they are reading.
It also helps them determine what main ideas are and questions to ask. I also like how it has a
summary at the bottom. This helps student understand what read.

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Shared Reading
Title: The Watsons go to Birmingham-1963
Reference:
Curtis, C. P. (2000). The Watsons go to Birmingham-1963. New York, NY: Laurel Leaf.
Grade Level: 3rd
Content Area: Social Studies
Content GLE: SS3 1.10 Describe the contributions of Martin Luther King, Jr.
CCSS:
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.3.1 Ask and answer questions to demonstrate
understanding of a text, referring explicitly to the text as the basis for the answers.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.3.2 Determine the main idea of a text; recount the key
details and explain how they support the main idea.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.3.3 Describe the relationship between a series of
historical events, scientific ideas or concepts, or steps in technical procedures in a text,
using language that pertains to time, sequence, and cause/effect.
Directions: Use the first column to write information straight from the text. Use the second
column to write word for word what you would say to the students and where you put your think
aloud. Use the third column to write strategies that are being used during the think aloud.

Text Teacher commentary during
the think aloud
Strategies modeled/ practiced
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The Watsons Go To
Birmingham-1963
“Looking at the title, I wonder
why the Watsons are going to
Birmingham?”

“I see that the book is set in
1963… I wonder what was
going on in 1963?”

“When I look at the picture, I
see an African American boy
and an old brown car…. Is the
book about the little boy
driving in that car?”

“Let‟s read to see if my
predictions are correct.”
Making predictions based on
the title.
Motivation to read further to
see if our predictions are
correct.
“Dad went out to try and get
the Brown Bomber started.
That was what we called our
car. It was a 1948 Plymouth
that was dull brown and real
big, Byron said it was turd
I was correct. The car on the
front of the book is the car the
family owns.
Lets read on to see why they
are going to Birmingham
Confirming predictions.


Motivation
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brown.”
“The next time I took a little
rest Byron was still calling
my name but sounding like he
had something in his mouth.
He was saying, “Keh-ee!
Keh-ee! Hel‟... hel‟...! When
he started banging on the door
of the car I went to take a
peek at what was going on.”
“After reading this paragraph,
I‟m asking myself what is
going on with Byron?” Why
does he need help?”
Questioning
“I moved closer. I couldn‟t
believe my eyes! Byron‟s
mouth was frozen on the
mirror! He was as stuck as a
fly on flypaper!
“So because Byron stuck his
tongue to the ice on the car,
his tongue got stuck. Why do
you think this happened?”
Cause and Effect-Challenges
students to analyze and
explain an event. Includes a
science lesson.
“I sneaked to the bathroom
door and peeked through the
keyhole. By was pretending
he was making a movie called
Nazi Parachutes Attack
America and Get Shot Down
Using our prior knowledge,
who were the Nazi‟s and why
would Byron be shooting
them down to them.
Making text-to-world
connections.
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over the Flint River by
Captain Byron Watson and
His Flamethrower of Death”
“It was a little girl and she
had on a real pretty blue dress
and big, yellow wings and
something tied around her
head. When the Wool Pooh
pulled me closer I could see
that it was a little angel, and
wait a minute, it was Joetta,
looking just like the angel
Mrs. Davidson had given her!
Joey had wings and a halo!
Her face was real calm too,
but she was pointing straight
up like there was something
important I should look at.
This paragraph gives a great
description of Joetta. It helps
us see it in our minds so that
we can comprehend what is
going on better.
This paragraph is also making
us question. What happened
to Joetta?
Visualizing




Questioning


Summary: Shared reading is great strategy to use to help our students understand what they are
reading. This strategy allows students to predict, confirm or modify their predictions, use context
clues to identify vocabulary, activate prior knowledge, and visualize the information. I would use
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this strategy during reading to discuss the information in the text. I will encourage students to use
this strategy by modeling the use of it during their independent reading.