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Using Mobile Devices


















Developed by Susan Gaer
susangaer@gmail.com
http://www.susangaer.com
Call or text: (714)287-3475



Download handout at http://bit.ly/catesolie

Updated 5/3/14

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2
Movie Questions


Questions to consider
(discuss for 2 mins with a partner)

!. What was the teacher trying to do?

". What was the issue with the students?


#. What was the solution for the teacher?


$. How does this mirror or not mirror what happens in the classroom?


Decide who is the fastest typist in your group. This will be your group’s recorder.





!) Open text message app on phone.
") Telephone number is #%&'%
#) Example: Text !$$$'' (one) (three fours) (" zeros) + answer

If you have short codes disabled--(747) 444-3548



How could you text/call this in your class?

Polleverywhere located http://www.polleverywhere.com
Countdown Timer: http://www.online-stopwatch.com/countdown-
timer/

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3
Ten Simple Strategies for Re-engaging Students
http://www.edutopia.org/blog/reengaging-students-andrew-marcinek
Last week I observed a tired classroom. My English 101 class looked bored and
uninterested in the discussion we were having. I observed one student intently working on
a crossword puzzle. He was engaged. Another student was sneaking a peek at her
mobile device every so often and then quickly looked back in my direction. She was
almost engaged. Some students were simply staring at me so intently that I assumed they
had painted eyes on the exterior of their eyelids.
Quick. React. What do you do hot shot? What. Do. You. Do?
There have been many conversations about transforming classrooms and in fact just one
this week on transforming the entire educational system in #edchat. Change can be
overwhelming for anyone, whether you are a new teacher or if you are a year away from
retirement, but what is a good pace for change in our classrooms? Do we really need to
overhaul the entire system overnight or simply take a micro approach and create small,
incremental steps within our own classroom?
I came home from class and watched several videos by Michael Wesch, scanned Twitter
for insight, and put on some music to ease my troubled mind. Then I reacted. I did not
have time to sit around and wait. These students needed me and I was not living up to my
personal standards. I took those tired faces and placed them around my computer monitor
and reexamined my approach to English 101. Here's what we did.
Without disrupting the progression of the classroom too much, I decided to present the
class with some new expectations for the class. I added a class wiki to facilitate our new
path. Here is my list of expectations:
1. Have fun
I hope that this project will make writing a paper a more engaging process. Many times,
students go through the motions in pursuit of the grade while missing out on the learning.
This is where I hope this project will take us in a different direction. Too many times in
higher education grades are obtained and learning is left behind. This is where that
routine changes. I want you to become an expert on the issue you are covering and enjoy
the process of research and writing.
2. Learn beyond the walls
Every week we enter our classroom and shut the door. There are no windows, one
computer, and eight outlets. However, most of you possess devices that connect you to

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the outside world and to numerous contacts. Some of you are probably reading this on a
mobile device. What is wrong with this picture? It is a skewed vision of what learning
should be. Therefore, this project will take our class beyond the walls and windowless
concrete and carry us into a world that is constantly connected and moving.
3. Expand your audience
I read your paper. I edit your paper. I grade your paper. Yawn. While I am an objective,
worthy audience, I am simply one person. Today's student has the ability to reach out to
millions on a daily basis and simply ask, "Is this good?" This project will present many
windows to your work and engage you in a learning community beyond the walls of the
Science Center. Learning should be transparent and open. Please allow others to
collaborate with you as we engage in a new learning community.
4. Collaborate
One of our best resources as learners is our ability to connect. We can connect like never
before and have the opportunity to engage with others from around the world on a daily
basis. If we can learn anything from the web 2.0 generation it is that the ability to share
and learn from each other is limitless.
5. Deconstruct an issue transparently
This project will open up your research and allow others to see how you are progressing.
This project will model an environment of constructive criticism and intellectual discourse.
There is no room for bullying or inappropriate criticism. This environment will employ
transparency so that we can share and learn from each other.
6. Make many mistakes along the way
Unlike traditional assignments where mistakes are marked wrong, this project will mark
your mistakes as learning steps. I encourage you to take risks and seek out information
beyond what you think may or may not be right. In this forum, being right is hardly the end
goal. Rather, the pursuit of greater understanding while exercising all of your options
within a moral and ethical framework.
7. Share
What happens when you take notes within a notebook? You eventually close that
notebook and put it into a bag, or drawer. Only you possess that information. This is
hardly the way our world works today and hardly the way we will conduct our research for
this project. By conducting research that is transparent, it will allow us to text/call a variety
of sources and learn from each other.
8. Provide Constructive Criticism
One of the benefits of transparent learning is the ability to not only receive feedback from
the instructor but to seek feedback from a much larger audience. This community we are
creating will allow us to bounce ideas and critique work as we progress. While I will also
take part in this critique, I urge you to consult your classmates for feedback and
suggestions.
9. Eat a sandwich

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5
A sandwich is like a well-constructed argumentative essay. It contains many layers but is
constructed in a central...Ok, I can't continue with this nonsense. Just make a sandwich
and enjoy it.




10. Engage Others
This type of work will require you to engage an audience and be a participatory learner. It
is hard to sit back and coast in this format and will require each student to be an active
participant in the learning process. I look forward to learning from each of you and
creating a community of resources.
After I made this list, I sat back and imagined the project unfolding. What did this student
learn from my English 101 class? How are they different? My learning objectives were
clearly stated from the beginning, but I wanted more for them. I wanted them to go beyond
reading critically, critical analysis, evaluating a writing task for purpose, audience, etc. I
wanted them to not only write about this world, but also engage with it. My hope is that
they understand that learning can take on various forms. The classroom is only one
learning environment.
No matter the level of teaching experience we have all encountered moments where we
feel disconnected from our students. This hardly means we are an awful teacher and
need to forget everything we have learned and start over, but simply react. Find the best
way to connect with students and realize that not all connections will suit every student.
Connections can be made through a variety of ways. The key is not to overhaul the entire
system, but simply adapt and change as you progress. Set a course for learning and be
prepared for rough seas. Create a practical alternative or adaptation that blends elements
of what we have been doing and what we would like to do better. The connections will
follow.



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Unported License

6
Phone Features






1) Do you have a cell phone?

2) Does your cell phone have a camera?

3) Does your cell phone record video?

4) Does your cell phone have vibrate/mute?

5) Does your cell phone text message?

6) Does your cell phone have a calculator?

7) Does your cell phone have an address book?

8) Does your cell phone have an audio recorder?

9) Does your cell phone have Internet?
Interview a partner:
1) Do you have a cell phone?

2) Does your cell phone have a camera?

3) Does your cell phone record video?

4) Does your cell phone have vibrate/mute?

5) Does your cell phone text message?

6) Does your cell phone have a calculator?

7) Does your cell phone have an address book?

8) Does your cell phone have an audio recorder?

9) Does your cell phone have Internet?
Yes I do.

No I don't.

Yes it does.

No it doesn't.
Yes he does.
No he doesn't.
Yes she does.
No she doesn't.

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Polite or Impolite?
Discuss the difference between texting and calling
Is it polite/safe to text/call your cell phone_________?
Yes, it is.
No, it isn't.


1) Is it polite to text/call on your cell phone in the bathroom?

2) Is it polite to text/call on your cell phone at the supermarket?

3) Is it polite to text/call your cell phone at the movies?

4) Is it polite to text/call on your cell phone on the bus?

5) Is it polite to text/call on your cell phone at a restaurant?

6) Is it polite to text/call on your cell phone in English class?

Interview a partner

1) Is it polite to text/call on your cell phone in the bathroom?

2) Is it polite to text/call on your cell phone at the supermarket?

3) Is it polite to text/call on your cell phone at the movies?

4) Is it polite to text/call on your cell phone on the bus?

5) Is it polite to text/call on your cell phone at a restaurant?

6) Is it polite to text/call on your cell phone in English class?



Brainstorm with the class and create a chart with the results.


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Cell Phone Etiquette

With your partner, brainstorm 5 places it is inappropriate to text/call
a cell phone.

_____________ _____________ _____________

_____________ _____________

Watch the video at
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1TRDNdDWYDU

In what five places did “Curt the Cyberguy” say it was inappropriate
to text/call a cell phone?

_____________ _____________ _____________

_____________ _____________

Have you ever text/call d a cell phone inappropriately?
__________________
Describe a time when you saw a cell phone being text/call d
inappropriately. Where were you? Describe the person. What was the
person doing? How did that make you feel? What did you do?








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9
Student Sample (Inappropriate Text/call of Cell Phones)

Yesterday in the class, when I took the test, somebody called me. When my
cell phone started ringing, I felt embarrassed becatext/call I knew, we
were not supposed to text/call cell phones in the class. But, I have learned
now, before the class start, I have to turn off my cell phone.

See more models at
http://www.susangaer.com/esl2009/cellphonestories.doc

Texting as a Teaching Tool
• Remind 101 (Remind101.com) Mass texting
• Google Voice (http://voice.google.com)
o Tutorials: http://www.youtube.com/text/call
r/GoogleVoice
• PollEverywhere (http://polleverywhere.com)
o Video:
https://www.teachingchannel.org/videos/texting-
to-assess-learning

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10
Photos as a writing tool
Students text photos and perhaps short paragraphs/sentences of

Photos as a vocabulary development tool

Photo Ideas

Share photos on phone
iSpy- take a close up of an object and then take the full object. See
if your partner can guess
What is in your refrigerator? Take a picture of your
refrigerator and write what is in it and why
Favorite Clothing- Take a picture of your favorite clothing in
your closet and write a story about it.
Scavenger Hunt- Scavenger Hunt (find a list of objects)
Trash viewing- Take a picture of a piece of trash and write
how the story about how it got there


Favorite clothing in closet Your pet
Favorite piece of
furniture
Family Best friend Meal
Hotext/call Neighborhood Work
Typical Day Illustrate Idioms Illustrate vocabulary
Photo Hunts

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Photo Services
• Google+
• Flicker (Yahoo)http://www.flickr.com

Instant Student Response Systems

• http://www.polleverywhere.com/(no internet
necessary ---text messaging)
• http://m.socrative.com/ (requires internet but no
cost)
• Nearpod http://www.nearpod.com/

Google Voice (714) 584-7251

• http://voice.google.com

Google voice you tube channel
http://www.youtube.com/googlevoice

Mobile Device ideas
http://community-building.weebly.com/index.html


Evernote and its applications (free)
http://www.evernote.com
Skitch Penultimate Web Clipper Food
Clearly Peek Postach.io Coming

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12

Camera Ideas
Edit 0 0 8…
Using the Camera in a Cell Phone: Lesson Ideas

Ideas from Susan Gaer
Take a picture of something in your closet that you value. Describe it and write
why you chose it
Take a picture of someone in your family. Describe the person and write why you
chose him or her.
Ideas from Marian Thacher
• Take a picture of your favorite fruit, or a fruit from your country, or something in the
grocery story that you would never buy, a car you wish you had, a street sign, a sale
sign in a store (math lesson). If the photos are sent to the teacher, or to picasa, you
could make a matching or bingo game out of them.

Ideas from Steve Quann (Group Lessons)
• Guess What it is?
A portion of an object is taken with the class guessing. Or better yet teams go and
find the object, take picture of it and the first one to get it to the teacher wins!
• Small Group Frames a Shot: In groups of three, one person being the photographer
the others pose for a shot. For example for beginners, two sit and talk at desk. Class
sees the image and generates possible things they are doing and tries to guess what
they were intending to act out. Just talking chatting or interviewing for a job. More
advanced could be what did they just do or have been doing? Or act out an idiomatic
expression. Raining cats and dogs? hmm Might need some blackboard drawing for
background. :-)
• What emotion am I feeling?
Students snap shots of various emotions class guesses what they are feeling
• What wrong with this picture?
Students create a scene where something is out of place and class has to identify
what is wrong.
• Believe It or Not?
After students are comfortable with the camera have them be on the look out for
unusual things they see and take a week to see how many they can capture in their
community or around the hotext/call .


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13
Your favorite clothes
Lesson Plan
Any Level See Adaptions
Materials Needed: Cellphones with a camera and text messaging or email capability. Need at
least one computer in classroom to get drafts typed in.
Warm Up
Beginning Levels: Review Clothing items, colors and basic styles
Intermediate Levels: Review clothing items, colors, basic styles, materials and any other
necessary vocabulary for students to be able to describe clothing.

Presentation (Day 1 and 2)
• Present a model for students as a reading activity. Most effective models are written by the
instructor.
o Model for Beginning Level: to be constructed
o Model for Intermediate level:http://www.susangaer.com/esl2009/favorite_clothes.pdf
• Ensure comprehension of the model (ask students basic questions about the model)
• Have students take pictures with their cellphone and practice texting them to the instructor using
their cellphones. If some students do not have texting as part of their cellphone, have them work
in groups with those that do. For those students who have smartphones, text/call a photo sharing
site and students can upload their photos directly to the photo sharing site.
o Photo Sharing Sites:
! Flickr
! Picasa
• Homework: Students go home, take picture of their favorite piece of clothing in their closet. This
can be done with hats, bags, t-shirts, jewelery etc (Note in the models that men had no problem
writing about their clothing item.)
Practice (Day 3)
• In pairs or small groups, students share their photos. (Be sure to develop questions based on
your level. Beginning level classes may only answer what, where and when.Make a handout
to guide them using some of the following questions:
o What did you take a picture of?
o Describe your item: (color, style, material)
o Where did you buy this item?
o When did you buy this item
o Why did you choose this item?
• Share select stories with the whole class
• Homework: Students write paragraphs (It is ok for beginning level students to only write a few
sentences such as This is a picture of my favorite dress. My mother gave it to me when I was 10.
It is blue and I wear it a lot. I love my dress.)
Evaluation:(Day 4)

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14
• Have groups edit work. I text/call Google docs and have students share their doc with me so that
it is easy for me to put them together for a publication in the application setting.
• Help groups with editing by providing a checklist of things to look for. (Create a writing checklist
athttp://4teachers.org/projectbased/24wrt.shtml)
• Homework: Students rewrite paragraphs
Application
Either you or students can compile stories into a student publication to share with the class or
school.

Student Sample







My name is Jose Mendoza. I was born in Oaxaca, Mexico. I came here
a long time ago. Since I came from Mexico, I have been living in the
Orange County. I like this part of southern California. I want to say I’m
sorry becatext/call I can’t send a picture of my favorite clothes, but
I’ll try to describe them. My favorite clothes are the first pants I wore
here but I didn’t buy them. My friend gave them to me and I never
wore them for special occasions, I wore them only for every day
text/call . I had recently arrived from Mexico and I didn’t bring any
kind of clothes to wear here. I didn’t have money to buy anything and
I didn’t have a job either. When you are illegal, it is difficult to find a
job. These pants are made of blue cotton, have four pockets, have an
adjustable waist, blue flannel inside and are warm. They were
designed especially for text/call in the winter becatext/call they are
very warm. Now my jeans are too old and have like two or three holes
in the legs, but I keep them in my closet becatext/call for me, they
have a sentimental value. Sometimes on occasions when I look at my
jeans, I remember my difficult moments when I came here along time
ago.



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15
Our Hotext/call

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