S Synth
Nan
s
hesis
nociy
ubmitted in p
Degree i
& Ch
ystall
Pre
HAN K
20

partial fulfillm
n Bachelor of
Faculty o
Monas
Supe
Dr. T. 
Octo
haiact
line Z
 
 
pared by 
KOK DENG 
0221290 
 
 
 
Thesis  
ment of the re
f Engineering
of Engineering
h University
 
 
 
ervised by 
Venugopal 
 
 
 
ober 2008 
teiiza
Zinc 0
equirements f
 (Mechanical

ation
0xiue
for the  

of

Acknowledgements 
P a g e  | I 
 
Acknowleugements
I would like to express my gratitude to all those who had supported me in this project. 
First,  I  would  like  to  thank  Dr.  T.  Venugopal  who  is  my  supervisor.  He  has  contributed  tremendous 
amount of works starting from the early stage of project proposal till now. Imagine the time it takes 
for  the  project  proposal  to  be  approved  and  the  difficulty  in  convincing  the  committee  to  approve 
the  purchasing  of  expensive  machine.  He  has  also  successfully  in  transforming  me  who  has  little 
background  knowledge  on  nanomaterials  to  someone  who  managed  to  complete  this  project  far 
beyond anybody expectation. 
Secondly,  I  would  like  to  thank  Dr.  T.  Mahesh  Kumar
1
  who  is  collaborating  in  this  project.  He  had 
contributed  in  x‐ray  diffraction  experimental  work  which  is  the  backbone  of  data  input  for  this 
project.  I  have  been  inspired  by  him  to  understand  chemistry  at  a  different  perspective  angle.  It  is 
quite  surprising  that  someone  like  me  who  majored  in  mechanical  engineering  has  been  able  to 
develop interests in learning chemistry. 
Finally,  I  would  like  to  convey  my  gratitude  to  Assoc.  Prof.  Dr.  Teoh Kok  Soo  who  is  responsible  for 
coordinating everything that is related to final year projects. Laboratory staffs – Ms. Farisyah and Mr. 
Suresh have been very kind in making the facilities ease to access, and sometime extend the opening 
hours due to my marathon nature of experiments. My family, especially my mother and sister have 
given  moral  support  to  me  all  along  the  way  when  I  am  exhausted  in  doing  number‐crunching 
calculations. 
I apologize to everyone who I have not properly acknowledge their contributions. 
 
                                                           
1
 Dr. T. Mahesh Kumar 
   Senior Lecturer 
   Faculty of Applied Science 
   UiTM Shah Alam 
Abstract 
P a g e  | II 
 
Abstiact
The  effect  of  different  material  used  for  synthesizing  nanocrystalline  zinc  oxide  was  investigated.  It 
has been discovered that zirconium oxide material is suitable to be used as medium to synthesis zinc 
oxide  because  it  has  a  catalytic  effect  on  the  mechanochemical  process.  Decomposition  of  zinc 
carbonate  into  zinc  oxide  and  carbon  dioxide  without  applying  any  external  heating  has  been 
observed  in  experiments.  Milling  time  and  reactants  concentration  have  prominent  effect  on  zinc 
oxide crystallite size. 
 
 
Table of Contents 
P a g e  | III 
 
Table of Contents
Acknowledgements .................................................................................................................................. I 
Abstract ................................................................................................................................................... II 
Table of Contents ................................................................................................................................... III 
List of Figures ......................................................................................................................................... IV 
1  Introduction .................................................................................................................................... 1 
2  Aim .................................................................................................................................................. 2 
3  Objectives........................................................................................................................................ 3 
4  Literature Review ............................................................................................................................ 4 
4.1  Mechanochemical Processing (MCP) ...................................................................................... 4 
4.2  Synthesis of Nanocrystalline Zinc Oxide ................................................................................. 7 
5  Experiments and Analysis ............................................................................................................... 8 
5.1  Synthesis of Zinc Oxide ........................................................................................................... 8 
5.1.1  Calculation of Milling Energy ........................................................................................ 10 
5.2  Characterization of Zinc Oxide .............................................................................................. 12 
5.2.1  X‐ray Diffraction (XRD) .................................................................................................. 12 
5.2.2  Calculation of Crystallite Size ........................................................................................ 15 
6  Results and Discussion .................................................................................................................. 16 
6.1  Evolution of NanoCrystalline Zinc Oxide ............................................................................... 16 
6.2  Effect of Milling Time on Crystallite Size ............................................................................... 23 
6.3  Effect of Molar Ratio on Crystallite Size ................................................................................ 27 
6.4  Effect of Different Milling Media on Crystallite Size ............................................................. 28 
6.5  Effect of Catalyst – Zirconium Oxide Powder ....................................................................... 30 
6.5.1  Catalytic Effect of Zirconium Oxide ............................................................................... 32 
7  Conclusions ................................................................................................................................... 33 
References ............................................................................................................................................... i 
 
List of Figures 
P a g e  | IV 
 
List of Figuies
Figure 1   Planetary ball mill, Fritsch Pulverisette‐5. (Source: Gmbh, Fritsch, 1999) ............................................ 4 
Figure 2   Movement of grinding bowl and sun disc. (Source: Gmbh, Fritsch, 1999) ............................................ 4 
Figure 3   Ball‐powder‐ball collision during milling. Source: (Suryanarayana, 2001) ............................................ 5 
Figure  4      Narrow  particle  size  distribution  caused  by  tendency  of  small  particles  to  weld  together  and  large 
particles to fracture under steady state conditions. Source: (Suryanarayana, 2001) ........................................... 6 
Figure 5   Processes and reactions in synthesizing zinc oxide .............................................................................. 7 
Figure 6   Illustration of the Bragg law ............................................................................................................... 12 
Figure 7   X‐ray diffraction pattern of zinc oxide experiment specimen ............................................................. 13 
Figure 8   X‐ray diffraction pattern of zinc oxide (ICDD ‐ PDF#89‐0510) ............................................................. 14 
Figure  9     Typical  shape  of  an  XRD  Bragg’s  peak  –  relevant  annotations  are  applied  in  Equation  6  to calculate 
crystallite size. ................................................................................................................................................... 15 
Figure 10   XRD patterns of ZnCl
2
 + Na
2
CO
3
 + 6NaCl as milling progressed (zirconium oxide as milling media, no 
added catalyst) .................................................................................................................................................. 16 
Figure 11   XRD patterns of milled 5hr; milled 5hr and calcined; milled 5hr, calcined and leeched; milled 5hr and 
leeched (zirconium oxide as milling media, no added catalyst) ‐ ZnCl2 + Na2CO3 + 6NaCl ................................ 17 
Figure  12      XRD  patterns  of  milled  5hr  and  leeched;  milled  5hr,  calcined,  and  leeched  (tungsten  carbide  as 
milling media, no added catalyst) ‐ ZnCl
2
 + Na
2
CO
3
 + 6NaCl .............................................................................. 18 
Figure 13   XRD patterns of ZnCl
2
 + Na
2
CO
3
 + 4NaCl as milling progressed (zirconium oxide as milling media, no 
added catalyst) .................................................................................................................................................. 19 
Figure 14   XRD patterns of as milled 5hr, milled 5hr and leeched (zirconium oxide as milling media, no added 
catalyst);  milled  5hr  and  leeched,  milled  5hr,  calcined,  and  leeched  (tungsten  carbide  as  milling  media,  no 
added catalyst) ) ‐ ZnCl
2
 + Na
2
CO
3
 + 4NaCl ........................................................................................................ 20 
Figure 15   XRD patterns of ZnCl
2
 + Na
2
CO
3
 + 8NaCl as milling progressed (zirconium oxide as milling media, no 
added catalyst) .................................................................................................................................................. 21 
Figure 16   XRD patterns of as milled 5hr, milled 5hr and leeched (zirconium oxide as milling media, no added 
catalyst);  milled  5hr  and  leeched,  milled  5hr,  calcined,  and  leeched  (tungsten  carbide  as  milling  media,  no 
added catalyst) ) ‐ ZnCl
2
 + Na
2
CO
3
 + 8NaCl ........................................................................................................ 22 
Figure  17      Crystallite  size  of  zinc  chloride  as  a  function  of  milling  time  (zirconium  oxide  as  milling  media,  no 
added catalyst) ‐ ZnCl
2
 + Na
2
CO
3
 + 6NaCl. ......................................................................................................... 23 
Figure 18   Crystallite size of sodium carbonate as a function of milling time (zirconium oxide as milling media, 
no added catalyst) ‐ ZnCl
2
 + Na
2
CO
3
 + 6NaCl. .................................................................................................... 23 
Figure 19   Crystallite size of zinc oxide as a function of milling time (zirconium oxide as milling media, no added 
catalyst) ‐ ZnCl
2
 + Na
2
CO
3
 + 6NaCl. .................................................................................................................... 24 
Figure 20   SEM image with 2000 times of magnification (zirconium oxide as milling media, no added catalyst) ‐ 
ZnCl
2
 + Na
2
CO
3
 + 6NaCl; 5 hours of milling, calcined at 600°C for 2 hours, subsequently washed. .................... 25 
List of Figures 
P a g e  | V 
 
Figure 21   SEM image with 15000 times of magnification (zirconium oxide as milling media, no added catalyst) 
‐ ZnCl
2
 + Na
2
CO
3
 + 6NaCl; 5 hours of milling, calcined at 600°C for 2 hours, subsequently washed. .................. 26 
Figure 22   Effect of NaCl/ZnCl
2
 molar ratio, x, on product crystallite size (ZnCl
2
 + Na
2
CO
3
 + xNaCl) – 1st category 
(leeched after 5 hours of milling) ...................................................................................................................... 27 
Figure  23    Effect  of  milling  media  and  NaCl/ZnCl
2
  molar  ratio,  x,  on  product  crystallite  size  (ZnCl
2
  + Na
2
CO
3
  + 
xNaCl).  Zirconium  oxide  media  –  (leeched  after  5  hours  of  milling);  Tungsten  carbide  media  –  (milled  for  5 
hours, calcined at 600°C for 2 hours in air, subsequently washed) ................................................................... 28 
Figure 24   Comparison between tungsten carbide media with and without added zirconium oxide powder as 
catalyst ............................................................................................................................................................. 30 
 
 
1 Introduction 
 
P a g e  | 1 
 
1 Intiouuction
Nanocrystalline  material  often  exhibit  superior  properties  than  micro‐scale  of  its  own.  Zinc  oxide 
nano‐crystallite is being discussed in this report. 
Typical applications of this product are in pharmaceutical, nano‐electronics, sun screen lotions, ultra 
violet  (UV)  screens  etc  (X.  Zhao,  1997).  There  are  a  wide  variety  of  methods  that  can  be  used  to 
synthesis  nano‐structured  material  which  include  vapor  decomposition,  sputtering,  precipitation, 
thermal  decomposition  and  mechanochemical  processing  (MCP).  MCP  is  preferred  because  it  is  a 
room temperature process and cheaper to operate. 
Generally,  there  are  three  processing  stages  to  synthesis  nano‐crystalline  zinc  oxide  which  are  ball‐
milling, calcinations, and  selective  leeching. X‐ray diffraction (XRD) analysis  is conducted on each of 
the processes sampling specimens. This is then used to determine size of nanocrystalline zinc oxide. 
Specimen  after  leeching  is  examined  using  scanning  electron  microscopy  (SEM)  to  study  the 
morphology of the nanocrystal. 
 
Numerous  reports  are  available  on  MCP  of  nanocrystalline  zinc  oxide  but  none  of  them  have 
investigate the effect of different milling material on synthesizing of the product (H. M. Yang, 2004; 
L.  C.  Damonte,  2004;  T.  Tsuzuki,  2000;  Weiqin  Ao,  2006).  This  is  the  first  attempt  on  studying  the 
effect of different milling media on synthesizing zinc oxide. 
The  present  investigation  has  also  resulted  in  direct  formation  of  nanocrystalline  zinc  oxide  as  a 
result of MCP. In other words, the high temperature calcinations stage is eliminated. This is the first 
report  on  direct  synthesis  of  nanocrystalline  zinc  oxide  by  MCP.  However,  experiments  being 
conducted to show the growth of zinc oxide just after MCP. This mechanism of growth is discussed in 
report. 
 
 
2 Aim 
 
P a g e  | 2 
 
2 Aim
The aim of this project is to synthesis nanocrystalline zinc oxide efficiently and economically. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

3 Objectives 
 
P a g e  | 3 
 
S 0bjectives
To understand the mechanochemical processing. 
To  understand  the  techniques  such  as  XRD  and  SEM  used  to  characterize  the  nanocrystalline 
materials. 
To  investigate  the  effect  of  different  type  of  milling  media  (materials)  on  synthesis  of 
nanocrystalline zinc oxide. 
To investigate the effect of catalyst on synthesis of nanocrystalline zinc oxide. 
To investigate the effect of reactants’ concentration on the size of nanocrystalline zinc oxide. 
To investigate the effect of milling time on the size of nanocrystalline zinc oxide. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
4 L
4.1
Mechano
Planetary
MCP. 
Figure 1   Pl
(Source: Gm
 
The  plane
four  bow
grinding  b
placed int
 
Grinding m
to be desc
1. Grind
2. This c
3. Centr
bowls
Liteia
Mechan
chemical  pro
  ball  mill  ma
anetary ball mi
mbh, Fritsch, 199
etary  ball  mil
l  holders  whi
balls  are  plac
to the bowl h
mechanisms o
cribed. 
ing bowls and
causes them t
rifugal  force  p
s. 
atuie
nochemi
ocessing  (MC
achines  such 
ll, Fritsch Pulver
99) 
ll  is  so  called
ich  are  moun
ced  inside  th
olders and se
of planetary b
d supporting 
to rotate arou
produced  by 
Revie
cal Proc
P)  can  be  de
as  the  one 
 
risette‐5.  F
G
d  because  of 
nted  on  a  com
he  grinding  b
ecured by clam
ball mill are d
disc are arran
und their own
these  planet
4 Literature
ew
cessing (
escribed  as  m
shown  in  (Pu
Figure 2   Movem
Gmbh, Fritsch, 1
its  planet‐lik
mmon  sun/su
bowls  and  clo
mps. Figure 1
described as f
nged on a spe
n axes but in o
tary  moveme
e Review – 4.1 M
MCP) 
mechanically 
ulverisette‐5)
ment of grinding
1999) 
ke  movement
upporting  disc
ose  with  lids
1 shows the p
follow. Figure
ecial drive me
opposite dire
ent  acts  on  t
Mechanochemica
induced  chem
  are  employ
g bowl and sun 
t.  Pulverisette
c.  Powder  to
s.  Grinding  b
picture of Pulv
e 2 illustrate t
echanism. 
ection. 
the  content  o
al Processing (MC
P a g e |
mical  reactio
ed  to  perfor
disc. (Source: 
e‐5  consists  o
  be  milled  an
bowls  are  the
verisette‐5. 
the mechanis
of  the  grindin
CP) 
 4
n. 

of 
nd 
en 

ng 
4 Literature Review – 4.1 Mechanochemical Processing (MCP) 
 
P a g e  | 5 
 
4. Rotation of the grinding bowls causes its content to run inside the wall of the bowl. 
5. Concurrently,  the  grinding  bowls’  content  is  lifted  off  and  travelling  freely  through  the  inner 
chamber. 
6. Grinding balls and substance are then collided against the opposite inner wall of bowl. 
 
There  is  a  certain  amount  of  powder  trapped  in  between  two  balls  whenever  they  collide.  This  is 
illustrated in Figure 3. 
 
 
Figure 3   Ball‐powder‐ball collision during milling. Source: (Suryanarayana, 2001) 
 
Force  from  the  impact  plastically  deforms  the  trapped  powder  which  is  then  undergoes  work‐
hardening  and  fracture.  The  new  surfaces  created  are  then  enabling  nearby  particles  to  be  welded 
together. This causes them to agglomerate which tend to form a bigger particle size. 
However, the tendency to fracture is predominate over agglomeration during later stages of milling. 
This  is  caused  by  the  fatigue  failure  mechanism  and/or  fragmentation  of  fragile  flakes.  Fragments 
formed by this mechanism continue to decrease in size until the rate of cold‐welding and the rate of 
fracturing reaches steady state equilibrium (Suryanarayana, 2001). 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
4 Literature Review – 4.1 Mechanochemical Processing (MCP) 
 
P a g e  | 6 
 
Figure 4 at shows the particle size distribution against milling time. The particles size distribution at 
later stage of milling is much more narrow because the particles larger than average are reduced in 
size at the same rate as increased in size of smaller than average particles due to agglomeration. 
 
 
Figure 4   Narrow particle size distribution caused by tendency of small particles to weld together and large particles to 
fracture under steady state conditions. Source: (Suryanarayana, 2001) 
 
 
   
 
4 Literature Review – 4.2 Synthesis of Nanocrystalline Zinc Oxide 
 
P a g e  | 7 
 
4.2 Synthesis of Nanocrystalline Zinc Oxide 
In  this  section,  the  processes  to  produce  the  final  product  (zinc  oxide)  are  discussed  briefly.  Three 
stages that involved in synthesizing zinc oxide are MCP, heat treatment, and washing. These can be 
summarized as in Figure 5. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Three types of compounds
2
 (ZnCl
2
, Na
2
CO
3
, NaCl)
3
 are mixed together and ball milled to undergo the 
MCP  reaction.  Zinc  chloride  reacts  with  sodium  carbonate  to  form  zinc  carbonate  and  sodium 
chloride. 
Excess  sodium  chloride  which  is  added to  the  initial  mixture  does not  involved  in the  MCP reaction 
but act as a process control agent (PCA). Amount of  PCA added to the initial  mixture is determined 
by  the  value  of  molar  ratio;  x.  It  is  added  to  the  reactants  to  reduce  the  agglomeration  of  the 
product. 
The  added PCA lowers the concentration of reactants in the  initial mixture.  This  is translated  into a 
lower  population  of  reactants  in  a  given  volume  of  the  powder.  Thus,  the  reactants  are  finely 
dispersed in the powder matrix which inhibits agglomeration. 
After  the  MCP,  heat  treatment  is  carried  out  between  600°C  and  800°C  for  2  hours  to  decompose 
zinc carbonate into zinc oxide and carbon dioxide (escaped into atmosphere). 
PCA  (excess  sodium  chloride)  is  then  removed  from  the  mixture  by  solute  it  with  large  amount  of 
distilled water. Product (zinc oxide) is obtained by drying the sediment. 
                                                           
2
 All compound are in dry powder form. 
3
 ZnCl
2
 – zinc chloride; Na
2
CO
3
 – sodium carbonate; NaCl – sodium chloride; ZnCO
3
 – zinc carbonate; ZnO – zinc 
oxide. 
Figure 5   Processes and reactions in synthesizing zinc oxide
Reactions  Processes 
ZnCl
2
+ No
2
C0
3
+ xNoCl
McchunochcmìcuI P¡occssìng
------------------------ ZnC0
3
+ (x + 2)NoCl 
ZnC0
3
+(x + 2)NoCl
Hcut 1¡cutmcnt
------------- Zn0 + C0
2
+ (x +2)NoCl 
Zn0 + (x + 2)NoCl
wushìng
------- Zn0 
Mechanochemical 
Processing 
Heat Treatment 
Washing 
5 Experiments and Analysis – 5.1 Synthesis of Zinc Oxide 
 
P a g e  | 8 
 
S Expeiiments anu Analysis
5.1 Synthesis of Zinc Oxide 
Generally, the MCP experiments are arranged into three main categories as shown in Table 1. 
Table 1   Categories of experiments 
Categories  1
st
  2
nd
3
rd
 
Milling media  Zirconium oxide  Tungsten carbide  Tungsten carbide 
Catalyst – ZrO
2
  No  No  Yes 
 
# 1
st
 and 2
nd
 categories (Both different type of milling media, both without catalyst) # 
The purpose of these two sets of experiments is to investigate the effect of different type of milling 
media (zirconium oxide, tungsten carbide) on synthesis of nanocrystalline zinc oxide. 
 
# 2
nd
 and 3
rd
 categories (Both identical milling media, one with catalyst) # 
The  purpose  of  these  two  sets  of  experiments  is  to  investigate  the  effect  of  catalyst  (zirconium 
oxide
4
) on synthesis of nanocrystalline zinc oxide. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
                                                           
4
 ZrO
2
 – zirconium oxide. 
5 Experiments and Analysis – 5.1 Synthesis of Zinc Oxide 
 
P a g e  | 9 
 
The operating parameters for MCP experiments are shown in Table 2 and Table 3. 
 
Table 2   Operating parameters of 1
st
 and 2
nd
 categories 
  Categories  1
st
   2
nd
  
F
i
x
e
d
 
C
o
n
f
i
g
u
r
a
t
i
o
n
 
 Ball‐mill model (Fritsch planetary mill)  Pulverisette‐6  Pulverisette‐5 
 Milling media (vial and balls)  Zirconium oxide  Tungsten carbide 
 Vial’s volume (ml)  250  250 
 Balls (mass and quantity)  23.88 gram/each, 10  8.20 gram/each, 50 
 Radius of grinding balls, r
b
 (mm)  10  5 
 Radius of vial’s inner wall, R
¡
 (mm)  37.5  37.5 
 Radius of planetary path, R
p
 (mm)  60  120 
O
p
e
r
a
t
i
o
n
 
V
a
r
i
a
b
l
e
s
 
 Angular velocity of plate and vial, Ω¡ω (rpm)  500/1000  360/792 
 Ball to powder mass ratio  10  10 
 Mass of powder, m
p
 (gram)  23.88  41.00 
 NaCl/ZnCl
2
 molar ratio, x  4, 6, 8  4, 6, 8 
 Milling sequences (hr)  0, ½, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5  0, ½, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 
 Heat treatment (temperature and time)  600 °C/2hr  600 °C/2hr 
 
Table 3   Operating parameters of 3
rd
 category 
Operating Parameters 
Experiments 
I II
Mass of added catalyst (gram)  1.85  8.92 
Percentage volumetric of added catalyst (%)  1.747  7.90 
Milling time, t (hr)  5  5 
 
 
Operating parameters of 3
rd
 category are same as 2
nd
 category, except that small amount of catalyst 
is added to the initial mixture. 
 
 
 
 
5 Experiments and Analysis – 5.1 Synthesis of Zinc Oxide – 5.1.1 Calculation of Milling Energy 
 
P a g e  | 10 
 
5.1.1 Calculation of Milling Energy 
MCP  requires  high  mechanical  energy  to  initiate  chemical  reaction.  Parts  of  the  energy  input  are 
translated into kinetic, strain, and heat energy. 
Powder  particles  are  work‐hardened  during  cold‐welding  and  fracturing  processes.  This  cause  the 
forces  (kinetic  energy)  imparted  on  the  powder  particles  being  stored  in  the  form  of  strain  energy. 
The amount of kinetic energy possessed by a grinding ball (E
b
) is estimated
5
 as follow: 
Equation 1 
E
b
= u.Sm
b
:
b
2

Equation 2 
:
b
=
2n
6u
jR
p
2

2
+ (R
¡
- r
b
)
2
æ
2
]1 +2 [
æ

¸¿[
1
2
,
 
 
While the total amount of energy exerted by the grinding balls to the powder (E
t
) is: 
Equation 3 
E
t
=
E
b
n
b
¡
b
t
m
p
 
Equation 4 
¡
b
=
K(æ - Ω)
2n
 
 
m
b
  : mass of a grinding ball  æ  : angular velocity of vial 
:
b
  : velocity of a grinding ball  n
b
  : number of balls 
R
p
  : radius of planetary path  ¡
b
  : shock frequency 
Ω  : angular velocity of plate  t  : milling time 
R
¡
  : radius of vial inner wall  m
p
: mass of powder 
r
b
  : radius of grinding ball  K  : energy dissipation time constant (~ 1) 
Both the 1
st
 category and 2
nd
 category experiments are conducted by using different ball mill, namely 
Pulverisette‐6  and  Pulverisette‐5  respectively.  Configurations  for  both  the  machines  such  as 
dimensions of mechanical component and type of milling material are different. 
                                                           
5
 Reference: (M. Abdellaoui, 1995) 
5 Experiments and Analysis – 5.1 Synthesis of Zinc Oxide – 5.1.1 Calculation of Milling Energy 
 
P a g e  | 11 
 
Equal amount of energy exerted by the grinding balls to the powder (E
t
) can be achieved for both of 
the  machines  by  adjusting  the  rotational  speed.  Angular  velocity  of  plate  (Ω)  for  Pulverisette‐6  has 
been fixed at 500 rpm. 
Equation  1  to  Equation  4  is  used  to  determine  the  suitable  angular  velocity  of  plate  (Ω)  for 
Pulverisette‐5. It has to possess the equivalent amount of energy exerted by the grinding balls to the 
powder (E
t
) of Pulverisettte‐6 which runs at 500 rpm. 
Table  4  shows  the  typical  computer‐generated  results  for  the  calculation  of  amount  of  energy 
exerted  by  the  grinding  balls  to  the  powder  (E
t
)  of  Pulverisettte‐6  and  Pulverisettte‐5.  Time  of 
milling has been set at 300 minutes (5 hours). 
 
Table 4   Ball mill energy calculations 
  Pulverisette‐6 Pulverisette‐5 
C
o
n
f
i
g
u
r
a
t
i
o
n
s
 
Planetary radius, R
p
 (mm)  60 120 
Vial radius, R
v
 (mm)  37.5 37.5 
Ball radius, R
b
 (mm)  10 5 
Planetary angular velocity, Ω (rpm)  500 360 
Vial angular velocity, ω (rpm)  1000 792 
Number of ball, N
b
  10 50 
Mass of each ball, m
b
 (g)  23.88 8.20 
Mass of total powder, m
p
 (g)  23.88 41.00 
Time of milling, t (min)  300 300 
Energy dissipation time constant, K  1 1 
C
a
l
c
u
l
a
t
i
o
n
s
 
Velocity of ball, v
b
 (m/s)  7.16 7.73 
Energy of ball per impact, E
b
 (J)  0.613 0.245 
Shock frequency, f
b
  79.6 68.8 
Total kinetic energy of balls, E
t
 (MJ)  367.66 369.42 
 
The nearest suitable angular velocity of plate (Ω) for Pulverisette‐5 is 360 rpm
6
 as shown in Table 4. 
Percentage error from the difference of this typical example (as well applied to any milling time) is: 
e =
|S69.42 - S67.66|
S67.66
× 1uu% 
e = u.S% 
Thus, angular velocity of plate (Ω) for Pulverisette‐5 which is set at 360 rpm is justified. 
                                                           
6
 Smallest speed stepping of both Pulverisette‐5 and Pulverisette‐6 is 10 rpm. 
 
5.2
5.2.1
This  meth
2001). Int
over a ran
The  diffra
they  are 
destructiv
x‐ray sour
The effect
 
 
A set of p
to the cry
first crysta
There  is  a
reflected 
waveleng
the Bragg
Equation 5  
 
                  
7
 Monochr
Charact
X­ray Diff
hod  involved 
tensity of the
nge of inciden
acted  beam  c
hit  by  the  i
ve interferenc
rce, and the s
t of diffracted
parallel crysta
ystal at an an
al plane. The 
a  path  differe
rays  will  rei
th, λ. The pa
g law is expres
 Bragg law 
                       
romatic x‐ray m
5 Experim
terizatio
fraction (X
the  diffracti
 diffracted be
nt/diffraction
consists  of  e
ncident  x‐ray
ce with each 
spacing betwe
d waves can b
F
al planes is sh
gle of θ. In B
x‐rays are de
ence  betwee
nforce  each 
ath difference
ssed as, 
                   
means single w
ments and Analy
on of Zin
XRD) 
on  of  monoc
eam is measu
 angle. 
lectromagnet
y  beam.  The
others. This
een atoms in 
be described 
Figure 6   Illustra
hown in Figur
ragg law, it is
eflected at an
en  the  ray  re
other  only  if
e is two times
wavelength x‐ra
ysis – 5.2 Characte
c Oxide 
chromatic
7
  x‐
ured by an x‐r
tic  radiations
ese  diffracted
depends on t
the crystal (R
by Bragg law
ation of the Bra
re 6. An x‐ray
s assumed th
 angle equiva
flected  by  pl
f  the  path  d
s of   w
 
ay. 
terization of Zinc O
 
‐ray  by  powd
ray detector.
s  which  are  e
d  waves  can 
the angle of i
Raghavan, 20
which is show
gg law 
y beam with w
at part of the
alent to the in
ane  1  and  th
ifference  is  a
where   is the
Oxide – 5.2.1 X‐ra
der  specimen
This procedu
emitted  by  e
be  either  c
incident, the 
04). 
wn at below. 
 
wavelength o
e x‐rays passe
ncident angle
he  adjacent  p
an  integral  m
e interplanar 
ay Diffraction (XR
P a g e | 1
n  (B.  D.  Cullit
ure is repeate
electrons  whe
constructive  o
wavelength 
of λ is directe
ed through th
, θ. 
plane  2.  Thes
multiple  of  th
spacing. Thu
RD) 
12
ty, 
ed 
en 
or 
of 
ed 
he 
se 
he 
us, 
5 Experiments and Analysis – 5.2 Characterization of Zinc Oxide – 5.2.1 X‐ray Diffraction (XRD) 
 
P a g e  | 13 
 
where 
n  : Positive integer. 
z  : Wavelength of radiation source.
J  : Interplanar spacing 
0  : Incident angle 
 
Given  an  interplanar  spacing  (J)  of  2Å, the first-ordered ray reflection (n = 1) limits the maximum
radiation source wavelength (λ) to be 4Å.
8
This means that the reflected ray will be reinforced if and
only if the radiation source wavelength is less than or equal to 4Å. There will be no reflected ray if λ
is greater than 4Å (radiation source wavelength is too big to squeeze through the narrow crystal
interplanar space).
Thus,  a  set  of  diffracted  x‐rays  ranged  from  weak  to  strong  intensity  is  obtained  when  the  incident 
angle  is  being  varied.  Graph  of  diffracted  beam  intensity  is  plotted  against  the  Bragg’s  angle  (2θ). 
This is called as x‐ray diffraction pattern. 
Every  compound  has  its  own  unique  XRD  pattern  as  if  it  is  fingerprint  recognition.  That  is,  no  two 
compounds have identical XRD pattern. 
 
Figure  7  and  Figure  8  shows  the  zinc  oxide  XRD  patterns  from  experimental  specimen  and  the 
International Centre for Diffraction Data (ICDD) respectively. 
 
Figure 7   X‐ray diffraction pattern of zinc oxide experiment specimen 
                                                           
8
 1 angstrom (Å) = 0.1 nm. Take the maximum value of sinθ to be 1. 
5 Experiments and Analysis – 5.2 Characterization of Zinc Oxide – 5.2.1 X‐ray Diffraction (XRD) 
 
P a g e  | 14 
 
 
Figure 8   X‐ray diffraction pattern of zinc oxide (ICDD ‐ PDF#89‐0510) 
 
Three  strongest  intensity  lines  from  the  ICDD  Powder  Diffraction  File  (PDF)  #89‐0510  in  Figure  8
9
 
match exactly to the corresponding three highest peaks in Figure 7. Intensity lines other than those 
three strongest are match to the others too.  
Thus,  XRD  pattern  can  be  used  to  determine  the  identity  of  known  compound  presents  in  the 
specimen.  Quantitative  information  such  as  crystallite  size  and  strain  can  be  obtained  from  XRD 
analysis too. 
Rigaku D/Max 2200 PC x‐ray diffractometer with Cu‐K
α
 radiation
10
 is utilized to examine specimens. 
It is operated at a scanning step of 0.020 degree angle with scanning interval of 0.3 second. 
 
 
                                                           
9
 The range of incident/diffraction (2θ) angle has been truncated for the ease of visualizing. 
10
 Wavelength of Cu‐K
α
 radiation is 1.5409 Å. 
5 Experiments and Analysis – 5.2 Characterization of Zinc Oxide – 5.2.2 Calculation of Crystallite Size 
 
P a g e  | 15 
 
5.2.2 Calculation of Crystallite Size 
XRD  pattern  contains  useful  information  such  as  crystallite  size  and  strain.  The  average  crystallite 
size  can  be  estimated  by  using  Scherrer’s  formula.  Figure  9  shows  a  typical  shape  of  XRD  pattern 
Bragg’s peak commonly obtained by experiments. 
 
Figure 9   Typical shape of an XRD Bragg’s peak – relevant annotations are applied in Equation 6 to calculate crystallite 
size. 
 
Equation 6 is the Scherrer’s formula corresponding to the annotations in Figure 9. 
Equation 6   Scherrer's formula 
Ð =
u.9z
[cos0
[
 
 
where 
D  : Approximated crystallite size. 
λ  : Wavelength of radiation source. 
β  : Full width at half maximum intensity. 

β
  : Bragg’s angle. 
 
 
6 Results and Discussion – 6.1 Evolution of NanoCrystalline Zinc Oxide 
 
P a g e  | 16 
 
6 Results anu Biscussion
6.1 Evolution of NanoCrystalline Zinc Oxide 
Powder from the sampling sequence of ½, 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5
th
 hour are characterized by XRD method. 
The  XRD  patterns  for  the  1
st
  category  (zirconium  oxide  as  milling  media,  no  added  catalyst)  with 
NaCl/ZnCl
2
 molar ratio of 6 are shown in Figure 10. 
 
Figure  10      XRD  patterns  of  ZnCl
2
  +  Na
2
CO
3
  +  6NaCl  as  milling  progressed  (zirconium  oxide  as  milling  media,  no  added 
catalyst) 
 
All  the  starting  materials (sodium  chloride,  sodium  carbonate, zinc  chloride)  are  clearly  present
11
  in 
the powder before being milled (0 hr). 
The reactants (sodium carbonate, zinc chloride) are being consumed to form final product and its by‐
product as milling progressed. The product that formed in this experiment is zinc oxide while the by‐
product is sodium chloride. 
                                                           
11
 ICDD – PDF#: NaCl = 88‐2300; Na
2
CO
3
 = 77‐2082; ZnCl
2
 = 74‐0517; ZnO = 89‐0510; ZrO
2
 = 89‐9069. 
6 Results and Discussion – 6.1 Evolution of NanoCrystalline Zinc Oxide 
 
P a g e  | 17 
 
Zinc  oxide  started  to  form  at  2
nd
  hour  of  milling  with  its  two  most  intense  peaks  (between  30°  and 
40°)  as  evidence.  Intensities  of  these peaks  are  getting  stronger with  further  milling  up  to  5
th
  hour. 
This shows that the zinc oxide is formed progressively through the whole milling process. 
 
Figure  11  shows  the  XRD  patterns  of  various  combinations  of  heat  treatment  process  and  washing 
process after 5 hr of ball milling. 
 
Figure 11   XRD patterns of milled 5hr; milled 5hr and calcined; milled 5hr, calcined and leeched; milled 5hr and leeched 
(zirconium oxide as milling media, no added catalyst) ‐ ZnCl2 + Na2CO3 + 6NaCl 
 
XRD pattern of as milled 5hr shows the strong presence of sodium chloride and zinc oxide. The XRD 
pattern of milled 5hr and calcined does not differ much from the as milled 5hr. This concludes that 
there  is  no  presence  of  zinc  carbonate  in  the  as  milled  5hr  powder.  The  milled  5hr,  calcined,  and 
leeched XRD pattern show the presence of zinc oxide only. 
There  is  no  difference  between  the  XRD  pattern  of  milled  5hr  and  leeched  with  the  previous.  This 
concludes  that  zinc  oxide  can  be  obtained  without  heat  treatment  by  using  zirconium  oxide  as 
milling media.  
6 Results and Discussion – 6.1 Evolution of NanoCrystalline Zinc Oxide 
 
P a g e  | 18 
 
Figure  12  shows  the  XRD  patterns  of  milled  5hr  and  leeched  compared  to  milled  5hr,  calcined,  and 
leeched  under  the  2
nd
  category  (tungsten  carbide  as  milling  media,  no  added  catalyst)  with 
NaCl/ZnCl
2
 molar ratio of 6. 
 
Figure 12   XRD patterns of milled 5hr and leeched; milled 5hr, calcined, and leeched (tungsten carbide as milling media, 
no added catalyst) ‐ ZnCl
2
 + Na
2
CO
3
 + 6NaCl 
 
XRD  pattern  of  milled  5hr  and  leeched  does  not  shows  a  strong  presence  of  zinc  oxide.  There  are 
many  unidentified  peaks  which  are  not  the  reactants,  PCA,  nor  product.  These  may  be  the 
intermediate  product  phase  formed  during  milling  (Suryanarayana,  2001)  which  can  be  any 
combination of the elements (Na, Zn, C, Cl, O) present in the initial mixture. 
However,  XRD  pattern  of  milled  5hr,  calcined,  and  leeched  shows  the  presence  of  zinc  oxide  only. 
The comparison between them draws to a conclusion that zinc oxide has not been able to synthesis 
by milling alone but heat treatment is needed to complete the chemical reaction. 
Notice  that  the  formation  of  zinc  oxide  is  completed  in  the  5  hour  milling  using  zirconium  oxide  as 
media  compared  to  incomplete  of  chemical  reaction  for  tungsten  carbide  with  the  similar  milling 
time.  Thus,  zirconium  oxide  may  be  a  catalyst  for  the  ball  milling  process.  This  argument  is 
investigated in section 6.5 at page 30. 
6 Results and Discussion – 6.1 Evolution of NanoCrystalline Zinc Oxide 
 
P a g e  | 19 
 
The XRD results for the NaCl/ZnCl
2
 molar ratio of 4 and 8 are shown from Figure 13 to Figure 16. The 
results  are  quite  similar  to  the  explanations  as  for  the  one  explained  previously  except  that  heat 
treatment  is  not  carried  out  for  the  experiments  using  zirconium  oxide  as  milling  media.  Heat 
treatment is unnecessary in this case since zinc oxide has formed during ball milling process.  
 
 
Figure  13      XRD  patterns  of  ZnCl
2
  +  Na
2
CO
3
  +  4NaCl  as  milling  progressed  (zirconium  oxide  as  milling  media,  no  added 
catalyst) 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
6 Results and Discussion – 6.1 Evolution of NanoCrystalline Zinc Oxide 
 
P a g e  | 20 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Figure 14   XRD patterns of as milled 5hr, milled 5hr and leeched (zirconium oxide as milling media, no added catalyst); 
milled 5hr and leeched, milled 5hr, calcined, and leeched (tungsten carbide as milling media, no added catalyst) ) ‐ ZnCl
2
 
+ Na
2
CO
3
 + 4NaCl 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
6 Results and Discussion – 6.1 Evolution of NanoCrystalline Zinc Oxide 
 
P a g e  | 21 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Figure  15      XRD  patterns  of  ZnCl
2
  +  Na
2
CO
3
  +  8NaCl  as  milling  progressed  (zirconium  oxide  as  milling  media,  no  added 
catalyst) 
6 Results and Discussion – 6.1 Evolution of NanoCrystalline Zinc Oxide 
 
P a g e  | 22 
 
 
Figure 16   XRD patterns of as milled 5hr, milled 5hr and leeched (zirconium oxide as milling media, no added catalyst); 
milled 5hr and leeched, milled 5hr, calcined, and leeched (tungsten carbide as milling media, no added catalyst) ) ‐ ZnCl
2
 
+ Na
2
CO
3
 + 8NaCl 
XRD pattern of milled and leeched powder with tungsten carbide media shows the presence of zinc 
oxide,  as  shown  in  Figure  14  and  Figure  16.  However,  there  are  other  unidentified  strong  peaks 
which  do  not  belong  to  the  zinc  oxide  too.  Thus,  it  can  be  concluded  that  5  hours  milling  with 
tungsten carbide media does not produce zinc oxide completely. 
It  may  be  due  to  the  high  kinetic  energy  imparted  to  the  powder  causes  local  temperature  to  rise. 
This  is  justified  by  experimental  observation  of  hot  grinding  bowl  surface  after  milling.  The  powder 
that is deformed in ball‐powder‐ball collision can achieved a very high microscopic temperature rise, 
often exceeds the melting points of the reactants (Suryanarayana, 2001). Decomposition of the zinc 
carbonate is then made possible by this high microscopic temperature. 
It is too early in this stage to draw up conclusion that the direct formation of zinc oxide rather than 
zinc  carbonate  is  due  to  the  heat  treatment  made  possible  by  high  microscopic  temperature. 
However, the fact that zirconium oxide is very effective as a catalyst is undeniable. This is proven by 
the  XRD  pattern  of  5  hours milling  with  zirconium  oxide  media  (Figure  14  and  Figure  16)  which  has 
only  zinc  oxide  presence  while  there  is  other  unidentified  peaks  in  the  using  of  tungsten  carbide 
media. 
6 Results and Discussion – 6.2 Effect of Milling Time on Crystallite Size 
 
P a g e  | 23 
 
6.2 Effect of Milling Time on Crystallite Size 
Crystallite  sizes  of  reactants  and  product  can  be  calculated  from  the  XRD  patterns  as  a  function  of 
milling time. Method that commonly used is Scherrer’s formula. 
The crystallite size of reactants and product as a function of milling time are shown at below: 
 
Figure 17   Crystallite size of zinc chloride as a function of milling time (zirconium oxide as milling media, no added 
catalyst) ‐ ZnCl
2
 + Na
2
CO
3
 + 6NaCl. 
 
 
Figure 18   Crystallite size of sodium carbonate as a function of milling time (zirconium oxide as milling media, no added 
catalyst) ‐ ZnCl
2
 + Na
2
CO
3
 + 6NaCl. 
6 Results and Discussion – 6.2 Effect of Milling Time on Crystallite Size 
 
P a g e  | 24 
 
 
Figure 19   Crystallite size of zinc oxide as a function of milling time (zirconium oxide as milling media, no added catalyst) 
‐ ZnCl
2
 + Na
2
CO
3
 + 6NaCl. 
 
Both  the  crystallite  size  of  reactants  (zinc  chloride,  sodium  carbonate)  decreased  with  increased 
milling time while the crystallite size of product (zinc oxide) increased with increased milling time. 
The  crystallite  size  of  sodium  carbonate  decreased  exponentially  to  a  saturated  20  nm  while  the 
crystallite size of zinc chloride drop to about 26 nm as milling continues up to 1
st
 hour. 
Phenomenon  of  this  exponential  trend  of  crystallite  growth  can  be  explained  as  followed.  Surface 
area  of  the  reactants  is  increased  rapidly  by  the  exponential  decreasing  of  the  reactants’  crystallite 
size.  This  rapidly  growth  of  reactants’  surface  area  causes  the  contact  surface  between  them  to  be 
increased. As a result, the reaction process is being accelerated. 
The evidence of this accelerated process is observed in the exponential growth of product crystallite 
size  in  Figure  19.  The  size  of  zinc  oxide  is  increased  tremendously  in  the  2
nd
  and  3
rd
  hour  of  milling 
and gradually reached a saturated size of about 20 nm. 
 
Crystallite size of zinc oxide has found to be increased by exponential decay as opposed to research 
done  by  others.  H.  M.  Yang  (2004)  has  found  that  the  crystallite  size  of  zinc  oxide  decreased  by 
exponential  decay  and  reaches  saturated  size  at  longer  milling  time.  However,  this  is  contradicting 
with experimental finding as shown in Figure 19. 
This  is due to the  fact that zinc carbonate is  formed  before being  decomposed  into zinc oxide  in H. 
M. Yang (2004) works which is different from this experimental finding. Experiments show that zinc 
oxide is directly formed instead of zinc carbonate. This can be explained by the successive nucleation 
6 Results and Discussion – 6.2 Effect of Milling Time on Crystallite Size 
 
P a g e  | 25 
 
of zinc oxide is deposited on the surface of zinc oxide particle that has been formed. This is the effect 
of ‘snow‐ball’ which then increases the crystallite size progressively. 
Size  of  the  zinc  oxide  particle  will  continue  to  increase  till  the  critical  size  is  reached.  This  occurred 
when  the  rate  of  fracturing  (breaking  of  particle  into  smaller  bits)  is  equal  to  the  rate  of 
agglomeration (deposition of newly nuclei zinc oxide onto the existing particle). 
 
Figure  20  shows  the  2000  times  magnification  of  a  specimen  from  1
st
  category  experiment  (ZnCl
2
  + 
Na
2
CO
3
 + 6NaCl); 5 hours of milling, calcined at 600°C for 2 hours, and subsequently washed. 
 
Figure 20   SEM image with 2000 times of magnification (zirconium oxide as milling media, no added catalyst) ‐ ZnCl
2
 + 
Na
2
CO
3
 + 6NaCl; 5 hours of milling, calcined at 600°C for 2 hours, subsequently washed. 
 
 
 
 
 
6 Results and Discussion – 6.2 Effect of Milling Time on Crystallite Size 
 
P a g e  | 26 
 
Figure 21 shows the 15000 times magnification of a specimen from 1
st
 category experiment (ZnCl
2
 + 
Na
2
CO
3
 + 6NaCl); 5 hours of milling, calcined at 600°C for 2 hours, and subsequently washed. 
 
Figure 21   SEM image with 15000 times of magnification (zirconium oxide as milling media, no added catalyst) ‐ ZnCl
2
 + 
Na
2
CO
3
 + 6NaCl; 5 hours of milling, calcined at 600°C for 2 hours, subsequently washed. 
 
Figure  20  shows  various  shapes  of  zinc  oxide  particle  present  in  the  SEM  image.  The  mean 
agglomerate size is approximated around 10 µm. 
However,  further  magnification  of  this  specimen  shows  a  uniform  narrow  distribution  of  zinc  oxide 
particle  as  in  Figure  21.  It  is  characterize  as  spherical  shape  particle  with  a  diameter  of  around  100 
nm. 
The  average  crystallite  size  obtained  is  about  19  nm.  Thus,  there  is  about  five  nanocrystalline  zinc 
oxide in each of the particles. 
 
6 Results and Discussion – 6.3 Effect of Molar Ratio on Crystallite Size 
 
P a g e  | 27 
 
6.3 Effect of Molar Ratio on Crystallite Size 
Amount of PCA inside of the initial mixture is varied to investigate its effect on the product crystallite 
size. Values of the NaCl/ZnCl
2
 molar ratio, x being controlled are 4, 6, and 8. 
Figure 22 shows the trend of this effect with NaCl/ZnCl
2
 molar ratio, x – (4, 6, 8). 
 
 
Figure 22   Effect of NaCl/ZnCl
2
 molar ratio, x, on product crystallite size (ZnCl
2
 + Na
2
CO
3
 + xNaCl) – 1st category (leeched 
after 5 hours of milling) 
 
Crystallite size of zinc oxide decreased when the molar ratio is  increased from 4 to 6 and  increased 
with molar ratio being  increased to  8.  This result  is  confirmed with the works done by  (H.  M.  Yang, 
2004). 
A  smaller  crystallite  size  (18.7  nm)  can  be  obtained  by  using  NaCl/ZnCl
2
  molar  ratio,  x  of  5.6  by 
interpolation through the second‐ordered polynomial fitted curve as shown in Figure 22. 
 
6 Results and Discussion – 6.4 Effect of Different Milling Media on Crystallite Size 
P a g e  | 28 
 
6.4 Effect of Different Milling Media on Crystallite Size 
Two  type  of  milling  media  (zirconium  oxide,  tungsten  carbide)  have  been  used  to  investigate  the 
effect  of  different  milling  media  on  the  product  crystallite  size.  Figure  23  shows  the  trend  of  this 
effect with NaCl/ZnCl
2
 molar ratio, x – (4, 6, 8). 
 
Figure 23   Effect of milling media and NaCl/ZnCl
2
 molar ratio, x, on product crystallite size (ZnCl
2
 + Na
2
CO
3
 + xNaCl). 
Zirconium oxide media – (leeched after 5 hours of milling); Tungsten carbide media – (milled for 5 hours, calcined at 
600°C for 2 hours in air, subsequently washed) 
 
Table 5   Crystallite sizes, D as refer to Figure 23 
Milling media 
NaCl/ZnCl2 molar ratio, x
4  6  8 
Crystallite size of zirconium oxide (nm)  21  19  24 
Crystallite size of tungsten carbide (nm)  30  24  41 
 
By  comparison,  zirconium  oxide  media  yield  smaller  product  crystallite  size  than  using  tungsten 
carbide media. 
 
 
 
6 Results and Discussion – 6.4 Effect of Different Milling Media on Crystallite Size 
P a g e  | 29 
 
Trend lines for both the media have been fitted through experimental data points by using a second‐
order  polynomial  curve  fitting  analysis.  Optimum  value  of  NaCl/ZnCl
2
  molar  ratio,  x,  and  its 
corresponding product crystallite size is tabulated at below: 
 
Table 6   Optimum values for the interpolation of Figure 23 
Milling media  Zirconium oxide Tungsten carbide
Interpolated optimum NaCl/ZnCl
2
 molar ratio, x  5.6  5.5 
Corresponding product crystallite size, D
opt
 (nm)  18.7  23.8 
 
Both  the  trend  lines  for  zirconium  oxide  and  tungsten  carbide  media  are  placed  smoothly  distant 
apart with the least at about 5 nm around the optimum NaCl/ZnCl2 molar ratio, x (5.5 – 5.6). 
Thus, crystallite size that is obtained using zirconium oxide milling media will be at least 5 nm smaller 
than tungsten carbide milling media.  
6 Results and Discussion – 6.5 Effect of Catalyst – Zirconium Oxide Powder 
P a g e  | 30 
 
6.5 Effect of Catalyst – Zirconium Oxide Powder 
Zinc oxide has been successfully obtained in the experiment by using zirconium oxide media and no 
added catalyst without going through heat treatment process. 
Contrary,  only  zinc  carbonate  is  produced  if  heat  treatment  is  not  being  carried  out  (H.  M.  Yang, 
2004) if using tungsten carbide media and no added catalyst. 
The purpose of the 3
rd
 category experiment is to verify whether zinc oxide is a suitable catalyst in the 
MCP.  Catalytic  effect  can  be  either  accelerates  reaction  process  or  lowers  the  activation  energy  of 
reaction or both. 
Thus, a small amount of zirconium oxide powder is added to the initial mixture which is then milled 
with tungsten carbide media. The amount of added zirconium oxide powder is varied to observe the 
effect of catalyst concentration (volumetric). 
 
Figure 24   Comparison between tungsten carbide media with and without added zirconium oxide powder as catalyst 
 
All the experiment (a) to (d) in Figure 24 is conducted by using tungsten carbide as milling media. 
6 Results and Discussion – 6.5 Effect of Catalyst – Zirconium Oxide Powder 
P a g e  | 31 
 
The  XRD  pattern  of  Figure  24  (a)  does  not  shows  the  confident  presence  of  zinc  oxide.  It  has  other 
strong peaks that do not corresponded to any reactants, zinc carbonate, nor by‐product. 
Experiment  of  Figure  24  (a)  is  repeated  by  adding  a  small  amount  of  zirconium  oxide  powder 
(1.747%  volumetric)  to  the  initial  mixture.  XRD  pattern  of  Figure  24  (b)  shows  the  presence  of  zinc 
oxide and zirconium oxide. However, there are few peaks which cannot be identified
12

Experiment  of  Figure  24  (b)  is  repeated  again  and  is  heat‐treated.  Result  from  the  XRD  pattern  in 
Figure 24 (c) shows the same unidentified peaks as in Figure 24(b). These unidentified peaks do not 
match to any of the reactants, PCA, nor product. 
 
Thus,  composition  with  1.747%  volumetric  of  zirconium  oxide  powder  does  not  have  adequate 
catalytic  effect.  Another  experiment  similar  to  experiment  of  Figure  24  (b)  is  conducted  by  using 
7.90% volumetric of zirconium oxide and with the similar milling time. 
The XRD pattern of this experiment is shown in Figure 24 (d). All the peaks are matched to zinc oxide 
and  zirconium  oxide.  Furthermore,  it  does  not  have  any  unidentified  peaks.  This  concluded  that 
composition with 7.90% volumetric of zirconium oxide is able to obtain the full catalytic effect within 
similar  amount  of  milling  time.  Average  size  of  the  nanocrystalline  zinc  oxide  from  this  specimen  is 
about 17 nm. The smaller crystallite size obtained is because the added zirconium oxide not only acts 
as catalyst but PCA too. Increased PCA will disperse the zinc oxide finer within the powder matrix. 
 
The purpose of this 3
rd
 category experiment has been achieved. Zirconium oxide is a suitable catalyst 
to accelerate the MCP in synthesis of nanocrystalline zinc oxide. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
                                                           
12
 Unidentified peaks may be intermediate product phase. 
6 Results and Discussion – 6. 5 Effect of Catalyst – Zirconium Oxide Powder – 6.5.1 Catalytic Effect of Zirconium Oxide 
P a g e  | 32 
 
6.5.1 Catalytic Effect of Zirconium Oxide 
3
rd
  category
13
  experiments  are  designed  to  show  its  catalytic  effectiveness  difference  to  be 
compared with 1
st
 category experiments. 
Explanations for the inadequate effect of composition 1.747% volumetric as catalyst are as followed. 
1
st
  category  experiments  are  conducted  with  zirconium  oxide  as  milling  media.  Thus,  the  reactants 
are fully exposed to the catalytic surface throughout the whole milling process. 
However, the 3
rd
 category experiments is conducted with tungsten carbide as milling media and only 
a small amount of zirconium oxide powder is added to the initial mixture. Thus, the zirconium oxide 
powder  is  evenly  distributed  in  the  total  mixture.  This  decreased  the  probability  of  reactants  to 
come into contact with the zirconium oxide powder. 
However,  the  chance  for  the  reactants  to  be  catalyzed  by  the  zirconium  oxide  powder  can  be 
increased by increasing the percentage composition of zirconium oxide powder in the mixture. This 
has  been  proven  in  the  3
rd
  category  experiments  in  which  7.90%  volumetric  composition  has  100% 
catalytic chance while 1.747% volumetric composition does not have full catalytic chance. 
 
 
                                                           
13
 1
st
 category – Zirconium oxide as milling media, no added catalyst. 
    2
nd
 category – Tungsten carbide as milling media, no added catalyst. 
    3
rd
 category – Tungsten carbide as milling media, with added catalyst. 
7 Conclusions 
P a g e  | 33 
 
7 Conclusions
Nanocrystalline zinc oxide is successfully synthesized by MCP. 
Heat  treatment  process  that  requires  high  temperature  treatment  for  several  hours  has  been 
eliminated. It has been incorporated into MCP process. This results in huge monetary savings. 
Heat treatment process can be achieved by high microscopic temperature during MCP. This can 
be  achieved  by  having  high  kinetic  energy  balls  imparting  tremendous  force  on  the  trapped 
powder in between them. 
Zirconium oxide is suitable to be used as a catalyst in accelerating MCP process. 
Crystallite  size  of  zinc  oxide  synthesized  by  using  zirconium  oxide  milling  media  is  smaller  than 
using tungsten carbide milling media. 
There is an optimum reactants’ concentration which affects the crystallite size of zinc oxide. The 
crystallite size will get  larger if the reactants’ concentration is reduced or increased beyond the 
optimum value. 
Growth  of  zinc  oxide  crystallite  size  is  characterized  as  increasing  by  exponential  decay.  Initial 
growth  of  crystallite  is  fast  while  slowing  down  at  intermediate  milling  time.  Crystallite  size 
saturated at further milling. 
 
 
References 
 
P a g e  | i 
 
Refeiences
B. D. Cullity, &. S. (2001). Elements of x‐ray diffraction (3rd ed.). Upper Saddle River, New Jersey: 
Prentice‐Hall, Inc. 
Gmbh, Fritsch. (1999). Download PULVERISETTE 5. Retrieved October 9, 2008, from Fritsch Gmbh ‐ 
Milling and Sizing: http://www.fritsch.de/uploads/media/BA_055000_0492_e.pdf 
H. M. Yang, X. C. (2004). Formation of zinc oxide nanoparticles by mechanochemical reaction. 
Materials Science and Technology , 20, 1493‐1495. 
L. C. Damonte, L. A. (2004). Nanoparticles of ZnO obtained by mechanical milling. Powder 
Technology , 148, 15‐19. 
M. Abdellaoui, &. E. (1995). The physics of mechanical alloying in a planetary ball mill: Mathematical 
treatment. Acta Metall. Mater. , 43 (3), 1087‐1098. 
Raghavan, V. (2004). Materials science and engineering (5th ed.). New Delhi, India: Prentice‐Hall of 
India. 
Suryanarayana, C. (2001). Mechanical alloying and milling. Progress in Materials Science , 46, 1‐184. 
T. Tsuzuki, &. P. (2000). Synthesis of metal‐oxide nanoparticles by mechanochemical processing. 
Materials Science Forum , 343‐346, 383‐388. 
Weiqin Ao, J. L. (2006). Mechanochemical synthesis of zinc oxide nanocrystalline. Powder 
Technology , 168, 148‐151. 
X. Zhao, S. C. (1997). Journal of Materials Synthesis and Processing , 227 (5).