Contents

The Raw Foods Diet: Your Ticket to Health and Vitality ............................................................................ 5
Benefits ............................................................................................................................................... 5
Why Do Raw Foods Diets Work? .......................................................................................................... 6
History of the Raw Foods Diet.............................................................................................................. 6
Getting Started .................................................................................................................................... 7
A Few Things to Know.......................................................................................................................... 8
40 Quick and Simple Raw Foods Recipes.................................................................................................. 9
Juices and Smoothies............................................................................................................................... 9
Berry Green Smoothie ......................................................................................................................... 9
Strawberry Lemonade ....................................................................................................................... 10
Green Energizer ................................................................................................................................. 10
Orange Dream ................................................................................................................................... 11
Blueberry Wake-Up ........................................................................................................................... 11
Breakfast ............................................................................................................................................... 13
Raw Breakfast Cereal ......................................................................................................................... 13
Sprouted Whole-Grain Cereal ............................................................................................................ 13
Raw Granola ...................................................................................................................................... 14
Berry Bonanza ................................................................................................................................... 16
Refreshing Melon Medley .................................................................................................................. 16
Appetizers ............................................................................................................................................. 17
Peach Salsa ........................................................................................................................................ 17
Raw Foods Spring Roll........................................................................................................................ 19
Raw Bruschetta ................................................................................................................................. 20
Marinated Mushrooms ...................................................................................................................... 20
Refreshing Soups ................................................................................................................................... 22
Berry Soup ......................................................................................................................................... 22
Autumn Butternut Squash Soup......................................................................................................... 23
Zesty Gazpacho ................................................................................................................................. 25
Cool as a Cucumber Soup .................................................................................................................. 26


Fresh Vegetable Soup ........................................................................................................................ 27
Super Salads .......................................................................................................................................... 29
Quick and Zesty Asian Salad ............................................................................................................... 30
Winter Salad ...................................................................................................................................... 31
Caesar Salad Gone Raw ..................................................................................................................... 32
Strawberry Lettuce Salad ................................................................................................................... 34
Broccoli-Raisin Coleslaw .................................................................................................................... 35
Southwestern Corn Salad................................................................................................................... 36
Antipasto Salad.................................................................................................................................. 37
Avocado Salad ................................................................................................................................... 38
Best of Greens Salad .......................................................................................................................... 39
Greek Salad ....................................................................................................................................... 40
Satisfying Main Dishes ........................................................................................................................... 42
Spaghetti Squash Marinara ................................................................................................................ 42
Pureed Sweet Potato ......................................................................................................................... 43
Wild Rice Salad .................................................................................................................................. 43
Sprouted Quinoa Salad ...................................................................................................................... 45
Stuffed Peppers ................................................................................................................................. 46
Desserts ................................................................................................................................................ 47
Lemon Slush ...................................................................................................................................... 47
Strawberry Slush................................................................................................................................ 47
Chocolate Pudding............................................................................................................................. 49
Peach Shake ...................................................................................................................................... 49
Raw Chocolate Ice Cream .................................................................................................................. 51
Cranberry Chocolate Cookies ............................................................................................................. 51
Almond Balls...................................................................................................................................... 52
References ............................................................................................................................................ 53
Resources .............................................................................................................................................. 54





















The Raw Foods Diet: Your Ticket to Health and Vitality

You’ve heard about the raw foods diet and you may be wondering: “Is this just another crazy,
half-baked diet fad?” Actually, the first humans on earth consumed a raw foods diet. Only with
the discovery of how to create fire did humans begin cooking their food. The raw foods diet may
seem extreme, but in this book, you’ll learn that it’s one of the simplest diets you can eat. Meals
take 10 minutes or less to prepare, with less mess and clean-up than traditional cooking
methods.
Another common aspect of the raw foods diet is its longevity in people’s lives. Fad diets promise
quick weight loss, usually with disappointing results. A fad diet may encourage you to cut
calories or eat a few foods exclusively for a few weeks. Not so with the raw foods diet. You
won’t feel hungry because you can eat as much as you want. At the same time, you’ll slowly
lose weight because you’re eating foods that are naturally low in calories and high in nutrients.
You’ll also eat a diet with more variety than you’ve ever eaten before. Foods are delicious and
full of flavor. Most people who try the raw foods diet love it so much that they continue it—for
life. The raw foods diet is a way of living, rather than a temporary diet. If this sounds like what
you’ve been searching for, read on to learn more about the raw foods way of life.
Benefits
You probably already know that you should be eating more fruits and vegetables for health and
weight maintenance. But when you eat most of those foods raw, you’ll see even better results,
such as:
Wei ght l oss. One of the most immediate benefits of the raw foods diet is steady, consistent
weight loss that stays off for life. In a German study of 513 participants, the average weight loss
for men on a raw foods diet was 22 pounds, while women averaged a weight loss of 25 pounds.
A U.S. study found that not only do raw foods enthusiasts weigh less, but their Body Mass Index
(BMI) remains at healthy levels and they consume fewer calories than most Americans. The
average calorie intake for participants in this study was around 1,900 per day. Most of the men
had a BMI of 14 percent, while women had a BMI of 24 percent. The men in the control group
had a BMI of 21, while women in the control group had a BMI of 34 percent, well above the
recommended range of 18.5 to 24.9 percent.
Overal l heal th. Although few studies have documented the long-term changes people feel in
health, many raw foods dieters have noticed increased feelings of energy, vitality and focus as
they switch to a raw foods diet. Allergy sufferers’ symptoms improve because they’re not eating
those foods most likely to cause allergies. Your skin’s appearance will also improve—acne
subsides and wrinkles seem less pronounced. You may also notice that your eyes seem
brighter.


Reduced ri sk of chroni c di sease. Numerous studies have found that a plant-based diet can
reduce your risk of many chronic diseases. New studies confirm that eating more raw plant
foods provides even more benefits. For example, a U.S. study followed 20 women suffering
from fibromyalgia for seven months. Fifteen of the participants noticed a 46 percent reduction in
severity of symptoms after switching to a raw food diet. After seven months, these participants
had health scores similar to women without fibromyalgia.
Other studies have confirmed that a plant-based, raw foods diet can dramatically reduce
symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis and even prevent cancer, heart disease and diabetes.
Why Do Raw Foods Diets Work?

So, what exactly is it about a raw foods diet that makes it so healthy? Raw, living foods contain
over 1,000 plant compounds known to improve health. The more you handle foods, the more
likely these plant compounds are to be damaged or destroyed. Read on to learn more:
 When you’re eating a raw foods diet, you’re eating foods rich in phytochemicals. These
compounds are known to lower blood sugar levels and prevent oxidation by free radicals
which causes aging and chronic disease. Cooking reduces phytochemicals in food.
 Raw foods diets are free of toxic chemicals, including Acrylamide and Advanced
Glycation End Products (AGEs), which occur during the cooking process. These toxic
substances are more prevalent in processed foods and foods cooked at very high
temperatures, such as roasting and grilling. Both are known carcinogens.
 A raw foods diet changes the flora, or bacteria, in your gut. These changes improve
digestion so your body can absorb more nutrients. You’ll have more energy because
your body isn’t working so hard at digestion.
 Your liver is the most important organ for processing toxins. When it becomes
overloaded, you feel sluggish and gain weight. You’re also more at risk for developing
chronic diseases, such as type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. A raw foods diet
constantly cleanses the liver of toxins so it functions as it should.
In her excellent book, The Raw Food Detox Diet, Natalia Rose compares the cells in your body
to rooms in a house. Over time, the rooms (or cells) become dirty and cluttered. Consider the
enzymes and phytochemicals found in raw foods as your own personal cleaning team. Every
day, they work hard to clean cells, along with the liver and blood vessels to keep your body
running in tip-top shape.
History of the Raw Foods Diet
Sylvester Graham, whom the graham cracker and graham bread were named after, is
considered the father of the modern raw foods movement. In the 1830s, he watched as a
cholera epidemic swept through Asia and Europe, killing thousands.
Long an advocate of a natural, vegetarian lifestyle, he traveled throughout New England
preaching healthy living and eating. Those who followed his advice survived the cholera
epidemic and saw improved health.


Other early reformers include Bernarr Macfadden (1868-1955), a publishing tycoon and
presidential candidate. Even into his 80s, Macfadden remained vigorously active-- parachuting
out of airplanes to show his superb health. Herbert Shelton (1895-1985), one of Macfadden’s
writers, opened health schools in New York and Texas. He believed in the theories of natural
hygiene espoused by Hippocrates and urged followers to fast occasionally and eat a light diet of
nuts, seeds and raw fruits and vegetables.
In the 20
th
century, Norman Walker played an important role in developing the raw foods
movement. Raised on a steady diet of animal flesh and starches, Walker suffered from chronic
poor health as a child. His doctor urged him to travel to rural France to live with a peasant
family. There, he lived with an elderly couple who ate mostly fresh vegetables and fruit. Walker’s
health quickly improved and he became a convert of the raw foods diet. He invented the first
juicer and wrote the popular book, Becoming Younger.
Getting Started
If you’ve never tried a raw foods diet before, we suggest you start slowly. Try fresh fruit,
smoothies or fresh vegetable juices for breakfast. Slowly replace sandwiches and fast food with
fresh salads and vegetables for lunch. Finally, start eating more and more raw foods for dinner,
as well. Initially, you may only be eating 50 to 75 percent raw. Eventually, aim for a level more
around 80 to 90 percent.
You’ll no longer need many of the pieces of equipment you currently have in your kitchen, but
you’ll probably want to invest in a few new ones. Below, are some of the tools that make a raw
diet simpler and more enjoyable:
1. A good knife and cutting board. This is your absolutely most essential piece of
equipment because you’ll use it every day.
2. A high-powered blender, such as K-Tec Champ or Vitamix, capable of crushing ice and
root vegetables. With this, you can instantly make smoothies, soups and salad
dressings.
3. A juicer. Look for one that extracts the pulp so you don’t have to spend time cleaning it.
Breville makes several models in different price points.
4. A dehydrator. You probably won’t need this immediately, but many raw foodists use a
dehydrator to make raw breads, raw grains and other healthy treats.
5. A sprouting jar. Also, not a necessity immediately, but something worth considering in
the future.
Saving Money on the Raw Foods Diet

You might think a raw foods diet would be expensive, but most raw foodists actually save
money on their grocery bill. Think about it. Traditionally grown produce typically costs between
$1 and $2 per pound; organic produce costs about twice that. Traditionally grown meat costs
between $2 and 8 per pound; again, organic meat costs double. Right off the bat, you’re saving
more per pound by eating produce instead of meat products. And, you’ll no longer spend money
on processed foods, soda, bread or baking products. Read on for more money saving tips for
the raw food diet:



 Buy produce in season. Even organic produce is less expensive when its grown in
season locally. It will taste better and have more of the nutrients intact because it wasn’t
shipped across the country.
 Sign up for a CSA (community supported agriculture) or a produce club, such as
Bountiful Baskets.
 Don’t forget warehouse stores. Costco, for example, sells fresh organic apples, kale,
spinach and lettuce, as well as many traditionally grown vegetables. The quality is
always excellent and the prices are reasonable, too. You’ll also find cold-pressed olive
oil and organic frozen vegetables here for a steal.


A Few Things to Know
As you begin your exploration of the raw foods diet, you might find yourself confounded by
contradictory or confusing information. Look for books and websites that back up any claims or
advice with solid research studies. Keep your raw foods diet as quick and simple as possible.
You won’t stick with any diet that requires long preparation or expensive food or equipment.
Consider taking a B12 supplement. A raw foods diet provides ample amounts of most nutrients,
but many raw foodists find it hard to get enough of this important nutrient. A high-quality
supplement can solve that problem.
Consider the pH quality of the food you choose. All foods have either an acidifying or
alkalinizing effect on the fluids in your body. A pH level between 0 and 7.0 is considered acidic,
while anything above 7.0 is considered alkaline. Why does this matter? Acidifying foods, such
as meat products, grain and processed foods, put a tremendous strain on your liver and kidney.
They’re one of the major causes of kidney stones. The resulting condition, acidosis, causes a
host of symptoms, including stress headaches, sinus congestion, acne, itchy skin, lethargy and
irritability.
Now certainly, all fruits and vegetables are healthier for you than processed foods or meats.
Some raw foods, though, are acidic, while others are alkaline. Eat acidic foods in moderation
and choose alkaline foods most of the time.
Aci d-Producing Foods
Fruits:
Blueberries, pineapple, plums and prunes, strawberries
Vegetables:
Rhubarb, sauerkraut
Grains:
Barley, kamut, oats, rice, rye, spelt, wheat
Beans:
Azuki beans, black beans, garbanzo beans, kidney beans, lentils, mung beans, navy beans,
pinto beans, red beans
Nuts and seeds:
Brazil nuts, cashews, hazelnuts, macadamias, peanuts, pecans, pistachios, pumpkin seeds,
sunflower seeds



Al kali -Producing Foods
Fruits:
Apples, apricots, avocados, bananas, berries, cantaloupe, citrus fruits, currants, dates, figs,
grapes, guava, kiwi, kumquats, mangoes, melons, nectarines, olives, papayas, passionfruit,
peaches, pears, plums, pomegranates, raisins
Vegetables:
Algae, artichokes, asparagus, beets, broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cabbages, carrots, cauliflower,
celery, collard greens, corn, cucumbers, eggplant, endive, garlic, horseradish, kale, kohlrabi,
leeks, lettuce, mushrooms, mustard greens, okra, onions, parsley, peas, peppers, potatoes,
pumpkins, radishes, rutabagas, spinach, sprouts, squash, string beans, sweet potatoes,
Grains:
Buckwheat, millet, sprouted grains
Beans:
Lima beans, mung bean sprouts
Nuts and seeds:
Almonds, coconuts, sesame seeds
Adapted from Rawsome, by Brigitte Mars


40 Quick and Simple Raw Foods Recipes
Juices and Smoothies

Berry Green Smoothie
New to raw foods? Try this smoothie. It’s packed with the phytochemicals and enzymes your
body needs to fight disease and remain more youthful, yet the berries hide any hint of veggies.
Even finicky kids will happily drink this one!
Serves 2
1 cup frozen or fresh raspberries or blackberries
1 cup spinach or kale leaves
2 cups almond milk or fresh juice
1 tablespoon raw honey
½ teaspoon almond extract


Combine all the ingredients in a blender and blend until smooth and creamy. If the smoothie is
too thick, add more liquid. Note: blackberries or raspberries have an alkalizing effect;
blueberries are acidic and should be used in moderation or avoided.


Strawberry Lemonade
Even picky kids will love this fresh take on an old favorite. Both citrus fruits and strawberries are
high in vitamin C, for a drink you can feel good about.
Serves 2
½ cup strawberries
½ cup lemon juice
2 cups water
2 tablespoons raw honey or 3 packets stevia
Combine all the ingredients in a blender and blend until smooth.


Green Energizer
Your liver is designed to efficiently process and remove toxins from your body, but when it
becomes overloaded by daily life, it doesn’t work properly. Excess toxins are stored as fat. Raw
greens of any kind sweep away toxins, allowing your liver to function as it should. A healthy liver
means more energy and increased weight loss. Perhaps you’ve turned up your nose at “green”
drinks or wheat grass shots in the past because of their odor and taste. Well, you’re going to
love this sweet, zesty drink. Make a big batch and store it in the refrigerator to sip throughout
the day.
Serves 2
1 head Romaine lettuce
5 stalks kale, collards or spinach
1 lemon, unpeeled
2 apples
Place one vegetable at a time through the mouth of your juicer. The green juice will come out
the spout, while the remaining plant matter will be ejected into a container.


Orange Dream
This fresh smoothie tastes like an Orange Julius, without all the sugar. Oranges might seem
acidic, but they have an alkalizing effect in the body, making them a great choice for a raw foods
diet.
Serves 2
1 cup fresh orange juice
1 cup almond milk
2 tablespoons raw honey
1 teaspoon vanilla
1 cup ice
Combine all the ingredients in a blender and mix until smooth. Delicious!


Blueberry Wake-Up
This morning shake has almond butter and sunflower seeds, which provides a healthy dose of
protein to get your morning going. Soak the sunflower seeds the night before if you have time
for better nutrient absorption.
Serves 2
2 tablespoons raw almond butter
3 tablespoons sunflowers (soaked overnight and rinsed)
1 ½ cups fresh or frozen blueberries or strawberies
1 cup chopped kale, spinach or Romaine lettuce
1 frozen or fresh banana
1 teaspoon ground flaxseeds
1 cup water, fresh juice, coconut water or almond milk
Combine all the ingredients in a blender and mix until very smooth.





Breakfast

Raw Breakfast Cereal
This raw muesli makes a satisfying breakfast with a bit of almond milk and some maple syrup or
eat it as a trail mix for snack. Either way, it’s delicious and healthful
Serves 4
1 cup chopped dried apples
1 cup dried raspberries or cranberries
½ cup raw sunflower seeds
1 cup chopped raw pecans
½ teaspoon cinnamon
¼ teaspoon ground cloves
Combine all the ingredients in a bowl and store in an airtight container.



Sprouted Whole-Grain Cereal
When you’re craving a hearty breakfast cereal, try this one. Any whole-grain can be sprouted,
including barley, rye, spelt, triticale, kamut or wheat. For extra flavor, try sprouting a combination
of whole grains.
Serves 4
½ cup sprouted grain
1 teaspoon ground flaxseed
1 tablespoon raw honey
¼ cup almond milk
½ cup fresh or frozen berries




Sprouting 101
Growing sprouts at home is an inexpensive and easy way to expand your raw foods diet. And,
raw sprouts are packed with nutrition. Broccoli, for example, contains more than 50 times the
antioxidants as mature broccoli.

To get started, you’ll need some sprouting seeds, available at natural food stores or online
vendors. Use organic seeds whenever possible. You’ll also need some cheesecloth, a mason
jar and a lid.

Fill the mason jar with cool water (use filtered or spring water if possible). Add 2 tablespoons of
seeds to the jar and soak for 8 hours. Place the cheesecloth over the mason jar and secure with
the lid. Drain the water and rinse twice with clean, cool water. Soak for another 8 hours and
repeat the process. The sprouts are ready as soon as you can see a tail emerging from the
seed head, but you can let the sprouts grow as long as you want. Rinse and drain again and
store in the refrigerator for several days.

Tips for success:
Set the soaking seeds out of direct sunlight. Once the sprouts emerge, you can place the jar in
sunlight to encourage faster growth.

Sprouts need air to grow. Don’t cover the jar with anything but cheesecloth or a metal screen.

If you prefer, buy a sprouting jar made specifically for the job.




Raw Granola
Granola, once the province of health nuts and hippies, is now a favorite mainstream breakfast
food. Most granola recipes call for heavy amounts of sweeteners and oils. This updated version
is healthier and works well for a raw foods diet. For added crunch, you can spread the granola
in a food dehydrator and dry it for up to 24 hours until crispy.
Serves 16
10 cups rolled oats
1 cup chopped almonds
1 cup chopped walnuts
¼ cup ground flaxseeds
1 cup pumpkin seeds
1 cup sunflower seeds


1 cup unsweetened shredded dried coconut
1 cup dried raspberries, blueberries or strawberries
½ cup dried apples
1 teaspoon cinnamon
Combine all the ingredients in a large bowl and store in an airtight container. Serve with almond
milk.










Berry Bonanza
If you ate yogurt for breakfast in the past, you might be missing that creamy texture. Try this
substitute, rich in good fats and nutrients your body needs.
Serves 1
1 cup raspberries, blackberries or strawberries
1 avocado
J uice of one orange
Combine all the ingredients in the blender until smooth.


Refreshing Melon Medley
Buy melons when they’re in season for a sweet wake-me-up. Melons are mostly water, but
they’re also an excellent source of vitamin C, vitamin A and potassium.
Serves 4
1 cup honeydew melon, cubed
1 cup cantaloupe melon, cubed
1 cup casaba or watermelon, cubed
J uice of 2 limes
¼ cup packed mint leaves, chopped
3 tablespoons raw honey
Combine the melons in a bowl. In another bowl, whisk together the lime juice, mint leaves and
honey. Pour the lime juice mixture over the melons and toss gently.






Appetizers

Peach Salsa
Serve this zesty salsa with julienned jicama or greens for a sweet, savory snack.
Serves 6
2 ripe peaches, peeled, pitted and diced
1 tomato, diced
2 green onions, diced
1 jalapeno chili, minced
½cup packed cilantro, chopped
3 tablespoons pure maple syrup
2 tablespoons apple cider vinegar
½teaspoon sea salt
½teaspoon black pepper
Combine all the ingredients in a bowl. Serve immediately or refrigerate to blend the flavors.



















Raw Foods Spring Roll
Peanuts are not really nuts at all, but legumes. They’re also among the most mucous forming
foods you can eat and they cause allergic reactions in many people. This recipe replaces
peanuts with almonds for an authentic flavor and crisp, fresh texture. You won’t miss the
peanuts, we promise!
Serves 4
Dipping sauce:
1 ½ cups raw almond butter
½ inch piece fresh ginger, peeled
½ cup water
J uice from one lemon
4 tablespoons maple syrup
¼ cup soy sauce
2 teaspoons sesame oil
2 cloves garlic, peeled
½ japaleno chile
Combine all the ingredients in a blender and mix until smooth. Dip the spring rolls in the sauce
and save any leftovers for cut vegetables or as a tasty salad dressing.
Spring rolls:
10 cabbage leaves
1 large carrot, julienned
1 red bell pepper, julienned
1 small zucchini, julienned
1 bunch cilantro leaves, chopped
2 green onions, chopped
Combine all the ingredients except the cabbage leaves in a small bowl. Place a mounded
tablespoonful of the vegetable mixture on each cabbage leaf and roll the leaf up.




Raw Bruschetta
Olive oil, tomatoes and basil combine in this classically flavored bruschetta. Use endive instead
of bread as the base for a fresh twist on an old favorite.
Serves 6
2 tablespoons olive oil
3 Roma tomatoes, diced
1 clove garlic, peeled and minced
¾ cup packed fresh basil, chopped
1 head endive, separated into individual leaves
Sea salt and black pepper to taste
Combine the olive oil, tomatoes, garlic and basil in a bowl. Scoop a tablespoonful of the mixture
into each endive leaf. Top with a dusting of salt and pepper.


Marinated Mushrooms
Marinated mushrooms make an elegant appetizer on their own or serve them atop a green
salad.
Serves 6
4 white or portabello mushrooms, stemmed and sliced
¼ cup white onion, diced
¼ cup cold-pressed olive oil
¼ cup balsamic vinegar
¼ cup pure maple syrup
1 clove garlic, minced and peeled
¼ teaspoon sea salt
¼ teaspoon black pepper
Combine all the ingredients except the mushrooms in a bowl. Add the mushrooms and
refrigerate for at least four hours to allow the flavors to blend.


















Refreshing Soups

Berry Soup
Serve this energizing soup as a first course or a light snack. It whips up in less than 10 minutes
and can be refrigerated for up to two days.
Serves 4
2 cups fresh raspberries
½ cup fresh orange juice
1 cup alfalfa sprouts
4 teaspoons raw honey
1 head Romaine lettuce or spinach
Pour all the ingredients in a blender and blend until very smooth. Serve immediately.


















Autumn Butternut Squash Soup
Butternut squash is a hard winter squash full of beta carotene and fiber. To cut through a whole
squash, set it on a cutting board and use a large knife to cut the squash in half. Scoop out the
seeds. Then cut the squash into manageable pieces and remove the peel with a smaller knife.
To save time, look for cubed frozen or fresh squash at a natural food store. Some warehouse
stores even carry cubed butternut squash.
Serves 4
2 cups cubed butternut squash (can substitute pumpkin)
1 ½ cups coconut water or almond milk
1/3 cup pure maple syrup
½ teaspoon cinnamon
½ teaspoon nutmeg
½ teaspoon cloves
Combine all the ingredients in a blender and blend until smooth. Serve immediately or
refrigerate.

















Zesty Gazpacho
Gazpacho, that classic cold vegetable soup, fits beautifully into a raw foods diet. Some people
prefer a completely smooth gazpacho; others like it a bit chunky. You get to decide.
Serves 4
5 large tomatoes, quartered
½ cucumber, peeled and coarsely chopped
½ red bell pepper, coarsely chopped
1 clove garlic, peeled and chopped
½ cup packed basil leaves
¼ cup apple cider vinegar
2 tablespoons olive oil
½ teaspoon cayenne pepper
½ teaspoon sea salt
½ teaspoon black pepper
Place all the ingredients in a food processor or blender and blend to the desired consistency.














Cool as a Cucumber Soup
This refreshing soup flavored with raw cucumbers makes an ideal choice for a summer meal.
Serve it with a green salad.
Serves 4
2 cucumbers, coarsely chopped
1 ripe avocado
2 cups organic vegetable broth
½ teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon dried dill
Scoop the fruit from the avocado and combine all the ingredients in a blender until smooth and
creamy.


















Fresh Vegetable Soup
This soup might remind you of V-8 juice, but so much better! Filled with liver-cleansing greens
and high nutrition vegetables, it will fill you up while helping you lose weight.
Serves 4
1 cup spinach, Romaine lettuce or red lettuce
2 stalks celery, coarsely chopped
1 red sweet pepper, seeded and coarsely chopped
¼ cup chopped fresh parsley
¼ cup chopped cilantro
2 tomatoes, coarsely chopped
1 avocado
J uice of one lemon
1 cup water or vegetable broth
1 small clove garlic, peeled
1 teaspoon salt
½ teaspoon black pepper

Combine all the ingredients in a blender and blend until smooth. You may have to do this in
batches and then stir the mixture together in a large bowl.
























Super Salads











Quick and Zesty Asian Salad
Asian flavors are naturally suited to a raw diet. Fresh vegetables, crunchy textures and sweet
and savory sauces add up to great taste, in a snap.
Serves 4
Dressing:
¼ cup apple cider vinegar
J uice of one lime
1 inch ginger, minced
¼ teaspoon sea salt
1 clove garlic, peeled and minced
2 teaspoons raw honey
2 tablespoons Nama Shoyu soy sauce
¾ cup cold-pressed olive oil
2 teaspoons sesame oil
Combine the vinegar, lime juice, ginger, sea salt, garlic, honey and soy sauce in a bowl and
whisk until smooth. Add the oils slowly and continue whisking until the dressing becomes thick
and creamy.
Salad:
2 cups shredded purple or green cabbage
1 cup sugar snap peas, cut in half
1 cup red bell pepper, diced
1 cup mung bean sprouts
2 green onions, chopped
2 carrots, julienned
Toss all salad ingredients together and combine with the dressing. Serve immediately or
refrigerate for several hours to meld the flavors.




Winter Salad
Raw food living is about eating the foods that are in season. In the winter, that means root
vegetables, apples, citrus and pomegranates. This flavorful recipe combines all those fresh
ingredients for a salad that’s high on taste and nutrition.
Serves 4
Dressing:
J uice of one orange
2 tablespoons cold-pressed olive oil
¼ teaspoon dried rosemary
½ teaspoon salt
¼ teaspoon black pepper
Whisk the dressing ingredients together in a small bowl.
Salad:
2 cups grated carrots
2 cups grated beets
1 cup diced tart apples
¼ cup dried cranberries
¼ cup diced raw walnuts
¼ cup pomegranate seeds
1/8 cup chopped flat parsley
Combine the salad ingredients in a bowl and toss with the dressing.









Caesar Salad Gone Raw
If you love Caesar salad, you’ll appreciate the fresh, authentic taste of this one.
Serves 4
Dressing:
J uice of one lemon
2 cloves garlic, peeled
1/3 cup water
1 tablespoon Dijon mustard
2 tablespoons tahini
2 tablespoons cold-pressed olive oil
½ teaspoon salt
Combine all the dressing ingredients in a blender until smooth and creamy.
Salad:
2 heads Romaine lettuce or baby greens
¼ cup grape tomatoes
1 carrot, shredded
½ cup pitted Kalamata olives







Strawberry Lettuce Salad
This salad is full of liver cleansing greens and it’s pretty enough to serve to company or even as
a holiday dish.
Serves 4
J uice of one orange
¼ cup pure maple syrup
¼ cup apple cider vinegar
1 tablespoon Dijon mustard
1 teaspoon poppy seeds
½ cup cold-pressed olive or flaxseed oil
Whisk the ingredients together or blend them in a blender until this dressing is thick and creamy.
Salad:
4 cups mixed baby greens or spinach
2 cups strawberries, sliced and hulled
¼ cup red onion, thinly sliced
4 button mushrooms, sliced
½ cup raw sliced almonds
Combine the salad ingredients and toss with the dressing. Serve immediately.














Broccoli-Raisin Coleslaw
This salad resembles a traditional broccoli salad, but we’ve skipped the mayonnaise and sugar
dressing in favor of a light, lemony dressing. You’ll love this salad’s bright color and refreshing
crunch. Best of all, this salad can help ward off disease. Garlic, ginger and honey all have anti-
microbial properties, and are often recommended by naturopaths for fighting minor colds and
illnesses.
Serves 4
Dressing:
2 cups fresh lemon juice
3 tablespoons soy sauce
1 tablespoons raw honey
1 inch fresh ginger, peeled and minced
2 cloves garlic, peeled and minced
1 ½ cups cold-pressed olive oil
Blend all the ingredients together in a blender or whisk them in a bowl. Slowly add the olive oil
and blend or whisk until the dressing becomes creamy.
Salad:
2 cups broccoli, washed and chopped
1 red bell pepper, chopped
2 tablespoons minced red onion
½ cup raisins
½ cup alfalfa sprouts
¼ cup raw sunflower seeds
Combine all salad ingredients in a bowl and toss with the dressing. Serve immediately or
refrigerate.


Southwestern Corn Salad
Finally, a taco salad you can feel good about. This one’s as healthful as it is delicious. Loaded
with corn, greens and jicama for crunch, it’s topped with a creamy ranch dressing.
Serves 4
Dressing:
1 cup whole, raw almonds
½ cup fresh lemon juice
1 tablespoon sea salt
1 teaspoon dried chives
1 teaspoon dried rosemary
1 teaspoon black pepper
1 clove garlic, peeled
½ teaspoon cayenne pepper
½ teaspoon cumin
½ teaspoon chipotle chile powder
1/3 cup cold-pressed olive oil
Combine all the ingredients in a blender and blend until smooth. Add water, as needed, to
achieve the right consistency.
Salad:
1 large head Romaine lettuce
Corn cut from 2 ears
½ cup grape tomatoes
½ red bell pepper, diced
½ cup cooked black beans (optional)
½ cup jicama, julienned
2 green onions, diced
Toss the salad ingredients with the dressing and serve immediately.



Antipasto Salad
Italian flavors permeate this simple tomato and broccoli salad. Researchers have found that a
diet rich in tomatoes can reduce your risk of certain types of cancers, heart disease and even
diabetes. When paired with broccoli, the benefits go up even more.
Serves 4
Dressing:
1/4 cup sundried tomatoes
¼ cup fresh basil
2 garlic cloves minced
1 teaspoon sea salt
½ teaspoon black pepper
½ cup cold-pressed olive oil
Combine the dressing ingredients in a blender until completely mixed.
Salad:
1 head Romaine lettuce
1 cup spinach leaves
3 Roma tomatoes, coarsely chopped
2 yellow bell peppers, coarsely chopped
1 zucchini, diced
½ cup thinly sliced red onion
¼ cup pitted Kalamata olives (optional)
Toss the salad ingredients with the dressing and serve immediately.








Avocado Salad
Avocados have an undeserved reputation for being fatty. The 14 grams of monounsaturated fat
they contain are actually good for your health and can even help you lose weight. Avocados are
also loaded with active enzymes and vitamin K, folate, magnesium and potassium.
Dressing:
Serves 4
J uice of 2 limes
½ teaspoon sea salt
¼ cup chopped cilantro
1 clove garlic, peeled and minced
¼ teaspoon cayenne pepper
¼ teaspoon black pepper
¼ teaspoon chipotle chile powder
1 teaspoon raw honey
1 tablespoon cold-pressed olive oil
Whisk all the dressing ingredients together in a small bowl.
Salad:
3 avocados, pitted, peeled and chopped
¼ cup minced red onion
4 plum tomatoes, coarsely chopped
½ red bell pepper
Corn cut from 1 ear
¼ cup canned black beans (optional)
Combine all salad ingredients and toss gently with the dressing. Serve immediately.



Best of Greens Salad
Did you know greens are one of the best vegetable sources of calcium? Build strong bones with
this delicious salad. Remove the ribs from kale or collard greens. They’re tough and hard to
chew.
Serves 4
Dressing:
½ cup fresh apple juice
2 tablespoons apple cider vinegar
1 tablespoon Dijon mustard
1 clove garlic, minced
1 teaspoon black pepper
½ teaspoon salt
¾ cup cold-pressed olive or flaxseed oil
Whisk together all the ingredients but the oil. Slowly add the oil and whisk for 30 seconds, or
until it becomes creamy.
Salad:
3 cups thinly sliced kale or collard greens
2 cups Romaine or red lettuce
1 cup broccoli florets, cut small
2 cups chopped napa cabbage
1 red onion, thinly sliced
1 red bell pepper, cut into strips
Toss the salad ingredients together in a large bowl and drizzle with the Dijon dressing.








Greek Salad
Here’s a more healthful take on an old favorite—cool, refreshing and completely satisfying.
Dressing:
J uice of 2 lemons
¼ cup apple cider vinegar
½ teaspoon salt
½ teaspoon black pepper
1 teaspoon dried dill
½ cup cold-pressed olive oil
Whisk all the ingredients but the olive oil together. Slowly add the oil and continue whisking until
creamy and thick.
Salad:
4 Roma tomatoes, quartered
2 cucumbers, coarsely chopped
½ cup Kalamata olives
Toss the salad with the dressing to serve.







Quick Tips
Think you don’t have time for a raw foods diet? Raw meals are actually much simpler to prepare
than traditional meals because you have no cooking time. The bulk of your preparation involves
cutting vegetables. Read on for a few more time-saving tips.
 Good equipment is essential. Invest in a set of high-quality knives and a cutting board, or
maybe even a mandolin for slicing vegetables. Take a class on vegetable prep or read a
classic French cookbook to learn the basics.
 Make sauces and dressings the night before.
 Use frozen vegetables and fruit for smoothies and soups.






Satisfying Main Dishes

Spaghetti Squash Marinara
This fresh alternative to carb-riddled pasta is chock-full of liver cleansing vegetables. You’ll feel
energized and lose weight.
Serves 4
5 Roma tomatoes
1 cup spinach leaves
½ red bell pepper
¼ cup packed basil leaves
2 cloves garlic, peeled
1 tablespoon raw honey
½ teaspoon sea salt
½ teaspoon black pepper
¼ cup cold-pressed olive oil
¼ cup red wine
1 large spaghetti squash
Combine all the ingredients except the spaghetti squash in a blender and mix until smooth and
creamy. Cut open the spaghetti squash and scoop the contents into a large bowl. Top with the
marinara sauce.










Pureed Sweet Potato
Remember Thanksgiving sweet potatoes, thick with marshmallows and brown sugar? Yuck!
This wholesome recipe combines pureed sweet potatoes with apples for a sweet, creamy dish.
You won’t miss the marshmallows—we promise!
Serves 4
2 sweet potatoes, peeled and cubed
1 tart apple, peeled, cored and quartered
J uice of one orange
1 avocado
2 tablespoons raw honey
1 teaspoon cinnamon
Combine all the ingredients in a blender and mix until smooth. Add more juice if the mixture is
too thick.

Wild Rice Salad
Wild rice is not really rice at all, but a seed. It is full if fiber, nutrients and protein. In this recipe,
you’ll soak the rice under low heat to soften it. Low heat preserves the live enzymes, while
creating a delicious, hearty meal.
Serves 4
Dressing:
J uice and zest of 2 oranges
½ inch fresh ginger, grated
¼ cup mint, chopped (optional)
½ teaspoon salt
¼ teaspoon pepper
¼ teaspoon dried rosemary
½ cup cold-pressed olive oil
Whisk the dressing ingredients together until creamy and smooth.


Salad:
2 cups bloomed wild rice (see below)
1 green onion, chopped
½ cup chopped pecans
½ cup dried cranberries or raspberries
½ cup finely chopped kale
½ cup shredded carrots

To bloom wild rice, place 1 cup rice in a quart jar. Fill the jar with water. Set the jar in a food
dehydrator at 110 degrees (no higher than 115 degrees). Dehydrate for 24 hours or until the rice
is softened. Start the rice in the evening after dinner and it will be ready for the next evening
meal.








Sprouted Quinoa Salad
Quinoa has been cultivated in Peru for thousands of years, and is often called a superfood
because of its high levels of protein, nutrients and amino acids. In this recipe, quinoa pairs with
fresh vegetables for a satisfying main-dish salad.
Serves 4
Dressing:
¼ cup apple cider vinegar
1 clove garlic, peeled and minced
J uice and zest of one lemon
1 teaspoon salt
½ teaspoon black pepper
½ cup cold-pressed olive oil
Whisk all the ingredients except the oil together in a small bowl. Slowly add the oil, whisking
until creamy and smooth.
Salad:
2 cups sprouted quinoa
¼ cup chopped pecans
½ cup cucumber, julienned
¼ cup snow peas
½ cup red bell pepper, chopped
¼ cup chopped red onion
½ cup grated carrots
Combine the salad ingredients in a large bowl and toss with the dressing.






Stuffed Peppers
Soaking nuts softens them and imparts a satisfying meaty texture. In this recipe, nuts replace
meat for a tasty main dish.
Serves 4
2 red or green peppers seeded and cut in half
1 cup almonds, soaked overnight and rinsed
½ cup walnuts, soaked overnight and rinsed
1 cup softened sun-dried tomatoes
½ cup zucchini
1 carrot
¼ onion
1 clove garlic, peeled
½ teaspoon salt
¼ teaspoon black pepper
½ teaspoon dried cumin
¼ teaspoon dried rosemary
Combine all the ingredients except the peppers in a blender or food processor and mix until
smooth. Scoop the puree into the bell peppers and serve.









Desserts

Lemon Slush
Commercial sorbets usually contain little juice, but lots of high fructose corn syrup. This one
contains no sugar, but is chock-full of lemon flavor. Lemons are a rich source of vitamin C and
cleanse the liver while they energize you.
Serves 4
2 lemons, peeled
1 ½ cups ice
4 packets stevia or 2 tablespoons raw honey
½ cup fresh apple juice
Combine the ingredients in a blender and blend until smooth.



Strawberry Slush
Strawberries are more acidic than most berries, so eat them as an occasional treat. In this
recipe, they’re paired with lime for a fresh, wake-you-up flavor.
Serves 4
2 limes, peeled
1 cup strawberries, hulled
¼ cup mint leaves (optional)
2 tablespoons raw honey or 2 packets stevia
1 cup ice
1 cup fresh apple juice
Combine all the ingredients in a blender and blend until smooth.








Chocolate Pudding
What’s creamy, sweet and good for you? Avocados.This chocolate pudding recipe tastes like
the real thing, but gets its creamy flavor from avocados instead of milk and eggs. Delicious and
quick!
Serves 4
1 avocado
¼ cup pure cocoa powder
5 dates
Scoop the avocado flesh into a blender. Add the remaining ingredients and blend until smooth.



Peach Shake
Take advantage of fresh peach season with this fast and satisfying dessert. Like the chocolate
pudding recipe, it gets its creaminess from avocado instead of dairy products.
Serves 4
2 ripe peaches, peeled and pitted
1 cup almond milk
1 avocado
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
3 packets stevia or 2 tablespoons raw honey
Combine all the ingredients in a blender and mix until smooth.








Substitute any fruit for the peaches in this recipe.










Raw Chocolate Ice Cream
When you’re craving something decadent, reach for this ice cream recipe. Ice cubes freezes the
mixture without an ice cream maker or prolonged time in the freezer. All you need is a blender
to make quick, delicious ice cream.
Serves 4
2 bananas
1 avocado
4 tablespoons pure cocoa powder
6 packets stevia
6 organic pitted dates
3 cups ice cubes
Combine all the ingredients but the ice in a blender and mix. Slowly add the ice cubes a few at a
time until the mixture is thick and creamy. If it becomes to thick, thin it with a little almond milk or
coconut water.

Cranberry Chocolate Cookies
These soft, fudgy cookies will store in the refrigerator for up to 1 month, or the freezer for 3
months. They’re pretty enough to share at the holidays—if there are any left.
Makes 40 balls
2 cups pitted dates
1 cup raw almond butter
¼ cup pure cocoa powder
1 cup finely chopped pecans
½ cup dried cranberries
½ cup unsweetened shredded coconut
Combine the dates, almond butter and cocoa powder in a food processor in a food processor
and blend until smooth. Stir in the pecans and cranberries. Roll the dough into 1 inch balls and
roll the balls in the coconut.





Almond Balls
These sweet cookies are delicately flavored with almonds and apricots. Store them in the
refrigerator or freezer.
Makes 40 balls
2 cups dried apricots
1 cup raw almond butter
½ teaspoon almond extract
1 cup finely chopped raw almonds
½ cup finely chopped dried apricots
Combine the apricots, almond butter and almond extract in a food processor and process until
very smooth. Stir in the dried apricots and chopped almonds. Roll the dough into 1 inch balls.













References
Avocado.org: Avocado Nutrients; http://www.avocado.org/avocado-nutrients/
Becoming Raw, Brenda Davis, RD, Vesanto Melina, MS, RD and Rynn Berry, 2010
Purdue University: Exploring California Melons;
http://www.sde.idaho.gov/site/cnp/ffvp/fruit_veg/Cantaloupe.pdf
Rawsome, Brigitte Mars, 2004
The Raw Food Detox Diet, Natalia Rose, 2005
Tomato Wellness:Tomatoes: One of the World’s Healthiest Foods;
http://www.tomatowellness.com/health/tomato-are-healthy














Resources
Books:
Becoming Raw, Brenda Davis, RD, Vesanto Melina, MS, RD and Rynn Berry, 2010
The Raw Food Detox Diet, Natalia Rose, 2005
Food and Product Sources:
Living Light Marketplace and Online Store; rawfoodchef.com/store/marketplace.html
Mail Order Catalog; healthy-eating.com/sproutman.html
The Raw Food World; therawfoodworld.com
Vega; shop.sequelnaturals.com