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TREATMENT

Marianna & Meli

Film Title: Running Time: 5 minutes
Synopsis
Beginning:
The film begins with a family of three; a mother and her two children, represented in a 1940’s
rural family sitting room. The youngest child (girl) is represented to the audience sitting on a
wooden chair, holding onto a teddy bear, her mother is standing behind her plaiting her hair
into a pigtail. The young girl portrays a sense of worry and emotion as she knows she will not
see her mother for a while due to the war, her mother senses this and states, ‘be brave, for me’.
The location then changes to an old train station with other evacuees and parents, the mother
kisses both her children on the head, further saying, ‘I’ll miss you’ with a tear rolling down her
face. The children are then sent along by the teacher supervising the evacuation, however, as
the young girl and her brother move away within all of the crowed she drops her beloved
teddy bear; the scene ends with the moving train and the mother waving in the background,
clutching onto the teddy her daughter had dropped.

Middle:
The children arrive at a suburban house as they arrive on foot with the person they will now
be living with, the lady sends the young girl inside for a glass of milk, whilst she asks the boy
to stay behind outside of the house. The young girl looks through the front curtain of the
house where she watches her brother get sent away with another older lady, Mrs.Jones. The
young girl runs outside whilst the women Mrs.Smith who is looking after her pulls her inside.
The young boy (young girls sibling) is portrayed writing a letter which gets sent to his sister.
The letter is sealed and is represented in a scene with the young girl reading it, as she reads
the letter the things that the boy states he has been doing is played over, for example, the
farming. Soon after this the young girl writes a letter back to her brother, which represents
what she has done through the day, such as the cooking and cleaning. Within the boys letter
he states a time and date when he will be coming to get the girl in order for them to run away
with one another to find their mother. The two children set off during the day where there is a
representation of them sleeping under a tree; they then set off again in the morning.

Resolution:
The children arrive back at the central town of London where bombings have occurred, there
hometown has been destroyed and their house unrecognisable within all the bricks and gravel.
However, the young girl spots her beloved teddy bear laying on top of the stones, she runs
towards it whilst losing grip of her brothers hand as she picks up her teddy the girl notices an
arm, she calls her brother over and after a while of throwing and lifting the bricks away their
mother is revealed half dying underneath it all.

End:
Both children kiss their mother on the head, where the youngest states, ‘be brave, for me’ and
both children say ‘I’ll miss you mummy’ as the mother closes her eyes.


TREATMENT
Marianna & Meli

Certification:
We have chosen the certification of the film at a 12A; this certification has been chosen as the
film does have various scenes of an unsettling nature in the way it makes the audience feel as
some may be very upset at the sight of a mother dying. However, the film boarder on a 12A as
moderate violence is portrayed but it does not dwell on the detail. There is no emphasis on
injuries or blood, but occasional gory moments may be permitted if they can be justified by
their context (for example the death of the mother due to war).

Action sequences and weapons may be present at 12 or 12A, and there may be long fight scenes
or similar. Weapons which might be easily accessible to 12 year olds should not be glamorised
in 12A and 12 works, this has been stated by the BBFC certification board. Our production
therefore will not contain any elements of sex or violence. The BBFC further state that sexual
violence, such as scenes of rape or assault, may only be implied or briefly and discreetly
indicated at 12A. Such scenes must also have a strong contextual justification. Our film does
not breach any of this, which therefore, makes it suitable to viewers of a 12a. those at the age
of a 12 need to be accompanied by an adult in order to watch a 12A, which moves the
responsibility to the parent as they are able to decide whether they believe the film will be
suitable for a child of that age.

We have conformed to a 12A as we believe the scenes do not breach any form of unsettling
nature and the actions that may be seen as unsettling are permitted as they are able to be
justified by their context (e.g war).

Target audience:
Our target-audience is 12+ as of the certification that we have implemented. Our film will
appeal to both male and female, as it is not aimed towards one specific gender. Though the
cast are represented by mainly female actors, the male ones do hold dominance which will
appeal to the stereotypical ‘strong man’. Our film targets a wide range of audiences as it goes
back to the World War 2 era which will be enticing for people who have had ancestors or
family members participate in the war, whether that was due to the main aspect of the Nazi
concentration camps of due to the family members who died and those who were evacuated.
From ones point of view we are telling the story of the lives of the evacuees and the impact
they had felt, which will be interesting to those who portray an interest in history. Young
children will appeal to the film as it has the modern twist of being filmed within the 20
th

century and with the new technologies that have evolved over time.

Furthermore, within the social grade, our film will appeal to everyone from A-E as of the
context provided, this is due to it appealing to all ranges, for example, to the lower class as of
the entertainment and drama aspect, all the way up to the upper class due to the deep
emotion and trauma the children experience due to the war and their way of life.

In terms of social groups the ones that would be most suited to be entertained by our short
film are Strugglers, Mainstreamers, Explorers and Reformers as their characteristics of life will
entice and attract them to watch the film. Our film will attract the Struggler’s class because
they can relate and identify with the characters, which will thus create complex relationships
between them. The characters will be represented as likeable and relatable which will make
the audience like certain parts of their personality and will therefore, want to see where the
narrative is going. Reformers as well as Explorers will also be targeted for our film because our
film will offer a very deep and emotional narrative to do with a subject manner that is not
TREATMENT
Marianna & Meli

discussed that much. This therefore will attract those groups because they support the growth
of new product categories, e.g war/drama that is aimed at getting an emotional reaction out of
the audience. This is especially apparent with the Explorers as they like adventure and
journeys that have an emotional narrative. Moreover, the Mainstreamer category will be
attracted to our film because they like questions and answers as they are a very ‘curious’
category. Our film will provide the audience with this, as the basic narrative enables them to
question whether the children will reunite with their mother again. As our film will depend
on highly emotional themes such as family, death and reality (as it’s conventional to the
genre), it will engage the viewers for the immersed plot as they can escape their own reality
and really identify with the realistic characters.

Key scenes:
Scene One:
The film begins with a long shot of a family of three; a mother and her two children,
represented in a 1940 rural family sitting room. The youngest child (girl) is represented to the
audience sitting on a wooden chair, holding onto a teddy bear prop through the use of a high
angle; her mother is standing behind her plaiting her hair into a pigtail which will be
portrayed to the audience through a mid/two-shot. The young girl portrays a sense of worry
and emotion which the audience come to recognise from a close up of the child’s face, her
mother senses this and states, ‘be brave, for me’, which is again represented as a mid-shot. In
terms of mise-en-scene the lighting will be high key; the costume will be old, traditional style
to go with the time period.

Scene two:
The next scene is then introduced by the transition of a fade where the audience can see that
the location has changed to an old train station, portrayed through an establishing shot with
other evacuees and parents, the mother kisses both her children on the head, represented by a
long shot with the train behind them, further saying, ‘I’ll miss you’ with a tear rolling down
her face, portrayed as a close up. The children are then sent along by the teacher supervising
the evacuation, this will be represented through a long shot, however, as the young girl and
her brother move away within all of the crowed she drops her beloved teddy bear; the
audience are able to identify with this from scene one and again through the use of an extreme
close up, the scene ends with the moving train and the mother waving in the background,
clutching onto the teddy her daughter had dropped again portrayed through a long shot. The
lighting will stay the same as high key and the prop of the teddy bear will still be applied.
Again, the costume will still be the old, traditional style of the era.

Scene three:
The children arrive at a suburban house as a location. As they arrive on foot with the person
they will now be living with, this will be represented through a tracking shot, the lady sends
the young girl inside for a glass of milk, as she speaks to the child the audience are portrayed
with a long, three way shot of the young girl, the women and her brother, however, as the girl
walks into the house the audience are presented with a point of view shot from the young girl.
The boy has been told to stay behind and the scene ends with the young girl glimpsing to look
back at her brother.
TREATMENT
Marianna & Meli


Scene four:
The young girl looks through the front curtain of the house, first represented from a point of
view shot of the audience with Mrs. Smith talking to her brother, which then fades into a mid-
shot in order for the audience to grasp the conversation, the shot will change once more into a
point of view shot from the young child inside the house where she watches her brother get
sent away with another older lady, Mrs.Jones.

Scene five:
The young girl runs outside, presented to the audience through a point of view shot of the
child, whilst the women Mrs.Smith who is looking after her pulls her inside the shot then
changes to a point of view from an onlooker, meaning the audience are represented with the
shot to the side of Mrs.Smith pushing the daughter inside.

Scene six:
The young boy (young girls sibling) is portrayed with a close/extreme close up writing a letter
which gets sent to his sister. The letter is sealed with an extreme close up of him stamping the
letter with wax. The lighting will be low key and the camera will only focus on the siblings as
the foreground will be dark and them, light.

Scene seven:
The young girl is represented in a close up reading the letter, as she reads the letter the things
that the boy states he has been doing is played over, for example, the farming represented
through a long shot. A voice over will be used of the boys voice in order for the audience to
identify with what is being read in the letter. The locations that will be used is a farm and a
small outside area which includes a tub. The lighting for the locations will be light which
contrasts with the darkness of the room where they are writing the letter.

Scene eight:
Soon after this the young girl writes a letter back to her brother, again portrayed in a close up,
which represents what she has done through the day, such as the cooking and cleaning. These
will be represented by a long/mid shot of her complying to these chores. The chores being
shown will again change the mise-en-scene location to the old house, which is portrayed as a
sunny day.

Scene nine:
The two children set off during the day with a still camera representing them walking off into
the distance. There is a representation of them sleeping under a tree portrayed through long
shot of them lying under a tress with a blanket; once they awaken the audience are able to
have an insight of the boys perspective through a point of view shot where he looks around to
wake his sister up in order for them to continue their journey. For this scene as they are under
a tree shadows will be apparent from the tree branches. This scene again is a sunny day
representing hope. Ambient sound may be used such as birds chirping.
TREATMENT
Marianna & Meli


Scene ten:
The children arrive back at the central town of London where bombings have occurred, there
hometown has been destroyed and their house unrecognisable within all the bricks and gravel,
represented through a long/establishing shot in order for the audience to identify with the
location. A POV shot may also be used to show the audience their point of view. The setting of
the location will have a miserable sense as the atmosphere is quite still and misty.

Scene eleven:
The young girl spots her beloved teddy bear prop laying on top of the stones, she runs towards
it whilst losing grip of her brothers hand. She picks up her teddy through a point of view shot
the girl notices an arm, she calls her brother over and after a while of throwing and lifting the
bricks away their mother is revealed half dying underneath it all, this will be represented from
a high angle in order to represent vulnerability. The mother’s costume through make up will
show her to the audience as being covered with dust and dirt. The lighting is still the misty,
dark sense as before.

Scene twelve:
Both children kiss their mother on the head, where the youngest states, ‘be brave, for me’ and
both children say ‘I’ll miss you mummy’ as the mother closes her eyes, where both children
have tears in their eyes, this last scene will be represented through a mid-shot of all the
characters. The mise-en-scene will still apply as before.

Main characters:
Name: Mother Age: 35
Personality traits: worried, frantic mum of the world war two era.
Physical appearance: blonde, blue eyed, smartly dressed

Name: Mae (young girl) Age: 13
Personality traits: fragile, vulnerable, quiet girl
Physical appearance: has the appearance of a 13 year old girl, brown hair and eyes, always
represented in pigtails.

Name: James (young boy) Age: 14
Personality traits: strong hearted and acts as though he is the male figure within the family,
more dominating character
Physical appearance: appearance of a 14 year old boy, brown hair and eyes

Name: Mrs.Smith Age: 45
Personality traits: represents herself as the loving neighbour and patriotic citizen by taking
on evacuees
Physical appearance: well-rounded women, with heavy red lipstick

Name: Mrs.Jones Age: 45
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Marianna & Meli

Personality traits: generally quiet character, has a cold aspect to her
Physical appearance: sophisticated, country women who likes to portray herself as the
wealthiest of them all.

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