BY DAN KOLLER

Staf Writer
’Twas the night before
Christmas, and all through
the town, not a pedicab was
stirring; their application
was turned down.
The Hi ghl and Park
Town Council on Monday
approved an ordinance
that prohibits pedicab
businesses. The legislation
came after one company
sought a permit to run
pedicab tours through the
town’s streets during the
Christmas season.
“We just didn’t see that
there was a crying need for
these types of things in our
community, as a business,”
Mayor Joel Williams said.
For the uni ni ti ated,
a pedicab is a passen-
ger vehicle powered by a
cyclist. Robert Tobolowsky
of Dallas Pedicabs, the
company that applied for
a permit, was understand-
ably disappointed by the
council’s decision.
“We’re not happy. We
were tryi ng to meet a
demand we saw for our
services,” he said in a
phone interview.
Tobolowsky’s company,
which he co-owns with
four fellow SMU gradu-
ates, operates pedicabs
in Uptown, downtown,
Victory Park, and Deep
Ellum. He said he and his
partners wanted to expand
to Highland Park for the
holiday season, to com-
pete with the horse-drawn
carriage tours inspired
by the town’s extensive
Christmas-light displays.
“We’re obviously not as
Oak Cliff
Preston Hollow
Preston Hollow
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The 2012 Texas Rangers have broken
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BY GEORGIA FISHER
Staf Writer
Some people think Love
Field’s name is a tribute to
Southwest Airlines; a nod
to the company’s heart
logo, perhaps, or its “LUV”
ticker symbol, or the brand
of all-around lovey-dovi-
ness that has endeared it
to discount flyers since the
early 1970s.
Not so. The airline’s
branding was inspired by
the field, not the other way
around. And the field is
named for a person. And
the person — one Moss
Lee Love, a first lieuten-
ant in the 11th Calvary,
who died in a 1913 prac-
tice flight over San Diego
— will be honored all over
again when a permanent
art installation comes to
the airport on Oct. 26.
Back in a Moment, Love
Field’s new interior court-
yard from Dallas sculptor
Town Prohibits Pedicab Businesses
Highland Park may alter rules for horse carriages
See PEDICABS, Page 15A
Women
Fight For
Diluted
Gender
Band Now Looks as
Good as it Sounds
PHOTO: RANDY HAGENS
The Highlander Band debuted new uniforms last week that feature tartan
plaid fabric acquired directly from Scotland. Story on Page 10A
BY ANDREW PLOCK
Staf Writer
About two and a half
years ago, Beverly Hill
awoke from a dream that
was hard to forget.
She was left with a vivid
image of a clothesline
suspended high off the
ground, with pairs of baby
booties dangling from the
strand. The shoes hung
on the line, one foot apart,
as far as the eye could see
in either direction. As a
sculptor, ideas like this
could be inspiration for
Hill’s next piece. But she
knew it was reserved for
one thing — something she
had been rallying against
for quite some time.
“The dream woke me up
in the middle of the night,”
Hill said. “I thought, ‘I
know this is about gender-
cide.’ ”
Nine months later, the
University Park resident
began the Gendercide
Awareness Proj ect , a
group designed to raise
awareness of the elimina-
tion of millions of females
BY BRADFORD PEARSON
Staf Writer
The Hi ghl and Park
Community League has
been fined $200, after a
Texas Ethics Commission
investigation revealed that
the group violated various
campaign laws.
In its Aug. 30 decision,
the commission deter-
mined that the league
“represented in campaign
communications that a
candidate held an elec-
tive public office that he
did not hold and did not
include the highway right-
of-way notice on political
advertising.” The candi-
date in question is cur-
rent Mayor Joel Williams.
The sign read “Highland
Park Community League
Endorses Mayor: Joel
Williams,” then listed the
other candidates for the
Town Council. The com-
mission held that the sign
should have included the
word “for,” as in “Highland
Park Community League
Endorses Joel Williams
For Mayor.”
In the resolution, the
HP Election Signs
Lead to Small Fine
PHOTO: BRADFORD PEARSON
The signs should have made it
clearer that Joel Williams was
not the mayor, the ruling said.
League implied
Williams was
already mayor
Airport’s New Piece
Inspired by Lt. Love
Sherry Owens is creating seven 12-foot trees for Back in a Moment,
an art installation she will soon bring to Love Field.
Installation will
include tribute
to its namesake
See LEAGUE, Page 14A
See LOVE, Page 14A
Group aims to
raise awareness
of gendercide
See GENDERCIDE, Page 13A
Couple Puts New Spin on Old Furnishings
BY WILLIAM JAMES GERLICH
Staf Writer
After a trip to London
decades ago, University
Park residents Dudley
and Aimee Simms became
obsessed with Old English
design. So much so, that
they wanted people in
Dallas to enjoy it as well.
You may remember
Highgate House as a pop-
up shop in Highland Park
Village or Snider Plaza,
but the antique store now
has a permanent home in
the Design District, which
attests to the owners’ pas-
sion to building their busi-
ness and brand.
Approaching the first
anni versary f or thei r
Dragon Street location,
the Simms have branched
out f rom t hei r ori gi -
nal aesthetic, featuring
contemporary artists in
their store. On Saturday,
dovetailing with Dragon
Street’s annual gallery
walk, Highgate House will
have an artist reception
for three painters who
Dudley said complements
the store’s English aes-
thetic beautifully.
“We recently transi-
tioned to selling contem-
porary art, because it looks
great with our traditional
dark furniture we sell in
Contemporary
artists displayed
at antique store
PHOTO: EMILIA GASTON
A trip to London inspired Dudley and Aimee Simms of University
Park to launch their store, Highgate House.
See HIGHGATE, Page 15A
News
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messy as a horse carriage,”
Tobolowsky said. “We
don’t smell as bad.”
Odors aside, Highland
Park i s consi deri ng a
change to the ordinance
t hat regul at es horse-
drawn carriages.
Applicants for carriage
licenses would be required
to provide daily schedules
detailing how many car-
riages would be on the
streets and when. (The
current ordinance prohib-
its carriages from oper-
ating between 12:30 a.m.
and 5 p.m.) The hope is
that such schedules would
allow town officials to limit
traffic congestion.
No action was taken on
the carriage ordinance
Monday, but related issues
were discussed. Carriage
licenses are good 365 days
a year, and the mayor
wants to limit that.
“They’ re real l y j ust
used in the holiday sea-
son,” Williams said, “but
the holiday season seems
to expand, starting earlier
every year.”
Department of Public
Saf ety Di rector Chri s
Vinson said the only times
he’s seen horse-drawn
carriages operate out-
side the Thanksgiving-to-
New-Year’s window were
a couple of weddings and
the occasional Halloween
hayride.
Williams also discussed
raising the fees for car-
riage operators, who are
charged $50 for a license,
plus $50 for each carriage
and $25 for each driver.
“To me, they’ re kind
of nui sance charges,”
Williams said. “It’s not
very much.”
Vi nson sai d that fee
schedule was designed just
to offset the cost of pro-
cessing carriage operators’
paperwork.
But he and Williams
agreed that the fees should
be raised to help cover the
cost of repairing street
damage caused by metal
horseshoes. Vinson also
suggested that the town
could require “some kind
of rubber- composi t e”
horseshoe, but Williams
said some carriage opera-
tors have said such shoes
are unsafe, because horses
wearing them can slip on
slick streets.
The mayor, the council,
and the town’s staff agreed
that raising the fees for this
holiday season would be
unfair to the carriage oper-
ators, because they haven’t
had a chance to budget for
higher fees and at least
two of them have already
paid in full. But operators
should consider them-
selves warned: Higher fees
are on the way.
“The town is, in effect,
subsidizing the carriage
operators,” Williams said.
The pedicabs ordinance
approved Monday also
prohibits the commer-
cial use of “neighborhood
electric vehicles,” which
are not to be confused
with golf carts. NEVs can
be outfitted with doors,
and some models resem-
ble conventional vehicles,
even though they can’t
exceed 45 mph.
Ri ck Pyl e, assi st ant
director of the Department
of Publ i c Saf et y, sai d
Highland Park has not
received an application
to operate such a busi-
ness. NEVs were added
to the pedicabs ordinance
simply because town offi-
cials noticed that many
other municipalities have
lumped the two together.
Email dan.koller@
peoplenewspapers.com
Pedicabs
Continued from Page 1A
the store,” Dudley said.
“The art we’re featuring at
the event is new, fresh, and
vibrant. It ties everything
together.”
But tieing everything
together in the boutique is
no easy task, Dudley said.
Their store is packed with
whatnots. Most of their
inventory is comprised
of reproduction furni-
ture — tables and desks
— handmade in England.
They also have a variety of
home furnishings that they
import from England, and
custom-made lamps he
and his wife create.
“The majority of our
f urni ture comes f rom
England, and we supple-
ment our inventory with
t hi ngs we f i nd f r om
antique fairs here in the
country,” Dudley said. “We
don’t go to abroad much
now, because we have
built relationships with
English dealers and trust
what they send us. There,
we have skilled craftsmen
build 19th-century-style
tables that look old and
distressed, but are not rick-
ety, like true antique tables
are.”
The tables, which run
from $3,000 to $6,000, are
quality. Naturally, since
the heavy tables are from
abroad, a chunk of the
cost goes to shipping. But
Dudley said he has not
found a better craftsman
in the states. For the past
20 years, he has been sell-
ing tables from the English
furniture maker in Dallas,
and the family who pur-
chased one of the first
tables he sold still use it
today, he said.
Ai mee, an i nt er i or
designer by trade, reuphol-
sters a lot of the vintage fur-
niture they sell at Highgate
House. Dudley said she is
busy playing many roles,
including being the store’s
chief curator, as well as a
mom of four.
The Simms’ house on
Southwestern Boulevard
matches their store and
has numerous reproduced
tables in it. They also
have a number of antiques
that Dudley said they had
intended to sell in the store,
but couldn’t part with.
“Our house is the same
aesthetic as the store, but
since we’ ve opened up
shop, we’ve had to shift
our attention to starting
the business,” Dudley said,
claiming their home hasn’t
seen many updates in the
last year. “But our house is
a kid-friendly place. And
there we have a lot of sen-
timental pieces that have
history. That’s one of the
things we like to provide
our customers: history
behind each piece of furni-
ture we sell.”
Email william.gerlich@
peoplenewspapers.com
Highgate
Continued from Page 1A
IF YOU GO
What: Reception for
Dominique Jordan, Amy
McKenzie, and Lindsey
Meyer
When: 6 p.m. Saturday
Where: Highgate House,
1230 Dragon St.
For more information:
Visit highgatehouseonline.
com.
PHOTO: EMILIA GASTON
If you like Highgate House’s aesthetic, then you’ll love the look of owners Dudley and Aimee Simms’
University Park home. Dudley said it features antiques they intended to sell but couldn’t part with.

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