Thursday, May 1, 2014 • Vol. 132, No. 39 • Stoughton, WI • ConnectStoughton.

com • $1
Courier Hub
The
Stoughton
Courier Hub
City of Stoughton
Engelberger elected
council president
BILL LIVICK
Unified Newspaper Group
At its April 15 reorga-
nizational meeting, the
Common Council elected
Ald. Mike Engelberger to
serve as its new president.
Engelberger (D-2) edged
o u t t h e
i ncumbent
pr esi dent ,
Eric Hohol
( D- 4) , i n
a 5-4 vote
conduct ed
by s ecr et
paper bal-
lot.
H o h o l
and Ald. Tom Majewski
(D-3) did not attend the
meeting.
Engelberger, who was
elected to the council in
April 2012, did not seek
the position.
He was nominated by
Ald. Tom Selsor (D-4),
who told the Hub he thinks
it’s good to “move that
position around, at least
every other year, because
it gives a fresh perspec-
tive and a different way of
doing things.”
Engelberger and Sel-
sor both told the Hub they
were surprised at the out-
come of the vote.
“It was a surprise to
me, ” Engelberger said.
“A couple hours before
the meeting, I got a call
from one of the council
members (Selsor) asking
if I want to be the council
president. I said I’m not
going to pursue it, but if I
get nominated and elected
I would serve. I didn’t go
out and recruit votes or
anything like that.”
The council president
Rally sends message of ‘love’
Community shows support for family who
received lynching threat
VICTORIA VLISIDES
Unified Newspaper Group
It didn’t take long for
members of the Stoughton
community to show support
to a family threatened by
racially charged hate mail
more than two weeks ago.
Ar ound 100 pe opl e
packed into Criddle Park
on Monr oe St r eet l ast
Wednesday after a resi-
dent led efforts to organize
the “Just Love” rally for
the Hale family. The Hales
announced to local media
the week before that they
had received a letter depict-
ing their son being lynched.
Two l o c a l c h u r c h -
es , St ought on Uni t ed
Met hodi st and St . Ann
Catholic Church, joined
other individuals in dis-
seminating the flier for the
rally both on paper and via
email. The word spread
online starting last Tues-
day evening to community
members in the Stoughton
Area School District and to
local civil rights groups.
Within about a day after
it was announced, the vigil
allowed concerned people
to join Hester and Harry
Hale in making a public
statement that Stoughton
doesn’t tolerate this type of
behavior.
With several local news
outlets watching, people at
the rally conversed about
the incident, gave hugs and
offered kind words of sup-
port during the tranquil,
rather quiet gathering.
Hester Hale, whose fam-
ily has lived on Madison
Street for six years, said the
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Syttende Mai 2014
Deadlines near for
annual festival
Brochures, buttons
available this week
MARK IGNATOWSKI
Unified Newspaper Group
It might be hard still
to imagine sitting along-
side Main Street watch-
ing a parade or cheering
on canoe racers as they
paddle down the Yahara
River, but Syttende Mai is
just two weeks away.
The registration dead-
line for some events at the
annual Norwegian heritage
festival are creeping up,
but planning for the event
seems to be going smooth-
ly, event coordinator Lau-
ra Trotter told the Hub this
week.
“It’s a lot easier with it
being my second year,”
Trotter said.
Ther e haven’ t been
any major hiccups so far.
Trotter is in the midst of
getting the new festival
tent planned out for the
corner of Division Street
at Main Street. The tent
will house the opening cer-
emonies and other events
throughout the weekend.
She’s been working on
details of the newer events
like the strongman compe-
tition and geocaching hunt.
Race fees for the Lil’
Run increase May 5 and
prices for the longer run/
If you go
What: Syttende Mai
heritage festival
When: May 16-18
Where: Various
locations throughout
Stoughton
Info: stoughtonwi.com
Turn to Festival/Page 2
Turn to Council/Page 3
Hester Hale gets interviewed by WISC TV-3 at the rally of support. The
Hub and several local TV news stations were on the scene and have
provided continuing coverage of the incident since last Wednesday.
Photos by Victoria Vlisides
Mayor Donna Olson is one of the Stoughtonites who came out to show support for Harry Hale and his family after they received hate mail
directed toward their son.
Turn to Rally/Page 7
Engelberger
2
May 1, 2014 Courier Hub ConnectStoughton.com
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EARLY DEADLINES
Due to the Memorial Day holiday,
the display ad deadline for the May 28, 2014
Great Dane Shopping News
will be Wednesday, May 21 at 3 p.m.
Classified ad deadline will be Thursday, May 22 at Noon
Deadlines for the May 29, 2014
Oregon Observer, Stoughton Courier Hub and Verona Press
will be Friday, May 23 at Noon
In observance of the holiday,
our offices will be closed Monday, May 26.
walk were slated to jump
May 1. Those who wish to
join the canoe race should
get their registration in
before noon Thursday, May
15. The sooner the better,
Trotter said.
“People always push that
(deadline),” she said.
Det ai l s about al l t he
events can be found in the
annual Syttende Mai bro-
chure, which will be avail-
able this week at many
local merchants. There will
also be buttons and coins
for sale. The weekend this
year focuses on the 200th
anniversary of Norwegians
signing their constitution.
Artwork on the buttons will
focus on that theme.
Trotter said purchasing
a button is one of the best
ways to help the festival
succeed.
“Because we’re so weath-
er-dependent, getting those
buttons sales is very impor-
tant,” she said.
In addition to financial
support, the festival is still
looking for some volunteers
for different events. People
are needed to help moni-
tor intersections during the
race on Saturday morning.
Sunday’s parade also needs
more people along the route
to make sure the entries are
moving along at the right
clip.
“You get a front -row
spot for the parade and
cool T-shirt,” Trotter said.
“Those volunteers are cru-
cial.”
Questions about volun-
teers can be directed to
the Stoughton Chamber of
Commerce at 873-7912.
Festival: Buttons, brochures on sale now
Continued from page 1
Photo submitted
Big smiles under the big top
The Stoughton High School junior class held its junior prom on
Saturday, April 26, at the Overture Center in Madison. With a theme
of “Under the Big Top,” juniors Colin Davis and Kristen Nett were
crowned king and queen, respectively. Above, Davis and Nett share
a dance after being crowned the royalty of the dance.
POLICE REPORT
Reports collected from the
log book at the Stoughton
Police Department.
March 16
1:56 a.m. A fight was
reported at Sonny’s Bar and
Grill. Two men were pushing
each other in the bar. Both
left before police arrived.
2:09 a.m. A 39-year-old
man was cited for OWI on
North Division Street near
Forton Street.
March 17
12:18 p.m. A 17-year-old
was cited for battery after an
assault on another minor at
Stoughton High School.
3:33 p.m. Officers
received a call of a man ask-
ing children to get into his
car on Lincoln Avenue near
Greig Trail. Officers made
contact with the car’s owner
but no charges were filed.
March 18
3:58 p.m. Police respond-
ed to a domestic disturbance
between a mother and her
minor son on Greig Trail.
March 19
2:05 p.m. Police were
called to Sandhill Elementary
School on a report of bully-
ing. Two 5-year-olds were
pushing each other. It was
decided to let the school and
parents handle the issue.
4:37 p.m. Police were
asked by a man’s wife to
remove the husband from
a home on Jackson Street
because he had been drink-
ing. No physical abuse was
reported but the man “never
shuts up.” Police were unable
to intervene in the matter.
March 20
8 a.m. A 13-year-old stu-
dent was cited for retail theft
after taking food from River
Bluff Middle School.
March 24
1:25 a.m. A suspicious
person was seen behind
Whatever Bar walking with
their hood up. The person
told police he was picking
up cigarette butts to recycle
them.
2:02 a.m. A 34-year-old
man was cited for his second
OWI on South Page Street.
3:46 p.m. A 34-year-old
man was arrested for pos-
session of heroin and drug
paraphernalia on Hwy. B near
North Page Street.
March 25
4:04 p.m. Police assisted
Dane County Sheriff’s depu-
ties with traffic control for a
crash at Rutland Dunn Town-
line Road and Hwy. 51.
– Mark Ignatowski
Online gallery
View and order photos from
Prom online:
ungphotos.
smugmug.com
May 1, 2014 Courier Hub ConnectStoughton.com
3
City of Stoughton
11 streets
get special
assessments
BILL LIVICK
Unified Newspaper Group
The Common Council last
week unanimously approved a
plan to replace sidewalk, curb
and gutter, and some drive-
way aprons on parts of almost
a dozen streets in the city and
charge property owners for the
cost of improvements.
The council adopted a
resolution stipulating that the
amount assessed against any
parcel “shall not be greater
than the benefits” that a prop-
erty derives from the work.
The work will begin in late
June or early July at proper-
ties on Church Street, Forton
Street, Sundt Lane, Oakwood
Court, Smedal Drive, Palmer
Drive, Lincoln Avenue, Chap-
in Lane, East Main Street,
North Page Street and Ridge
Street.
Street and Parks Depart-
ment director Karl Man-
the said Church Street and
Ridge Street will receive the
most improvements. Most of
Church Street will be widened
and angle parking on the street
will be eliminated, Manthe
said.
“Both sides will be getting
new curb and gutter,” he said.
“We’re going to widen the
west side of the street, so that
will have all new curb and gut-
ter.”
Manthe said the work
planned for this summer is
nothing out of the ordinary.
“It’s a typical year,” he said.
“It’s our basic pulverization
project for most of it. Some
are a full reconstruction proj-
ect like Ridge and Church
Street.”
He noted most of the streets
and sidewalks identified for
improvements will be limited
to specific locations that are in
the worst shape.
“Wi t h t he new ADA
(Americans with Disabilities
Act) measures, whenever we
do any street work we’ve got
to look at the intersections to
make sure that if it doesn’t
have a ramp, that a ramp gets
put in,” Manthe said. “Other-
wise we’re just upgrading and
making sure we’re in compli-
ance.”
The city allows property
owners to pay for most of the
work on or before Nov. 1. If a
property has more than $200
worth of improvements, the
property owner can makes
payments in five installments,
at 3.75 percent interest. If
the assessment is more than
$1,500, a property owner can
make 10 annual installments
at the same interest rate. The
council also has the ability to
defer payments.
The city will hold a public
hearing to explain the planned
improvements at 7 p.m. Tues-
day, May 13, at the Public
Safety Building in the council
chambers.
does not have a l ot of
duties, Engelberger said.
He r uns Commi t t ee of
the Whole meetings and
conduct s counci l meet-
ings when the mayor can-
not attend. He may also be
asked to represent the city
at events when the mayor is
absent.
Mayor Donna Ol son
described the council presi-
dent position as “an impor-
tant leadership role” in the
city.
Engelberger’s election
takes on added significance
because he has consistently
opposed the proposed Ket-
tle Park West development.
Hohol has consistently sup-
ported it.
Engel ber ger s ai d he
t hi nks hi s nomi nat i on
“probably came up because
of a little bit of a divide the
council has over a couple
of issues, mainly Kettle
West. I don’t think that this
is going to do anything to
change that.”
He thinks Hohol “was
unbiased with regard to his
council duties” and did a
good job as council presi-
dent.
Engelberger acknowl-
edged that Hohol has been
a strong supporter of Mayor
Olson and added, “I also
support the mayor.”
“We just differ on Kettle
West,” he explained. “Basi-
cally, the only place I differ
with them is I don’t think it
(the development) should
be subsidized. I just think
it’s a bad idea to subsidize
retail for our city. I think if
you look around you’ll see
that most municipalities
don’t subsidize those types
of developments.”
Engel ber ger s ai d he
woul d cont i nue t o “do
everything I can to turn
people’s opinions on it.”
He’ll be up for re-elec-
tion next April.
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St. Ann School:
An Investment for the Future
A quality, faith-flled elementary and middle
school education will build a solid foundation for a
successful academic experience.
St. Ann School is now enrolling students for the
2014-15 school year in 3-year-old Pre-Kindergarten
and Kindergarten through Grade 8.
324 N. Harrison St. Stoughton, WI 53589
608-873-3343
email: stanns@stanns-school.org
www.stanns-school.org
SAINT ANN
SCHOOL
— putting faith in education —
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Stoughton Area School District
Summer school registration open
EXCEL program
offers variety of
learning, fun
SCOTT DE LARUELLE
Unified Newspaper Group
This isn’t your mother or
father’s summer school.
Thi s year, St ought on
Area School District stu-
dents can learn about top-
ics ranging from Greek
mythology, fencing and
environmental art to cook-
ing, CPR and even learning
how to play the guitar. Or
maybe they want to learn
about making stop-motion
animation, or producing
videos using iPads, or mak-
ing wheel-thrown ceram-
i cs. Or maybe t hey’re
more interested in “Around
the World in 18 Days,”
where students “travel”
to 18 different countries,
learning about a country’s
geography, people, food,
wildlife, traditions and lan-
guage.
Stoughton Area School
District EXCEL coordina-
tor Chris Keenan said both
academic and enrichment
courses are available for
students in the district from
4K to high school juniors.
They include technology,
art, activities, academics,
cultural learning and life
skills.
She said the classes are
designed for all district stu-
dents to participate.
“Every student should
have the opportunity to
extend their practice in
math and reading in that
18 days – all students who
really love reading and
math, not just ones who
need extra work,” Keenan
said.
The idea of the classes
is to offer coursework in
language arts, reading and
math, as well as “engaging
topics they might not oth-
erwise experience during
the regular school year.”
Keenan said when select-
ing courses, school offi-
cials consider many fac-
tors, like not including too
many classes in a specific
genre.
“We like to encourage
our teachers to regularly
propose new courses to
ensure our learners are
engaged,” she said. “I am
grateful for all the wonder-
ful staff that are involved
with the program.”
Sign-up deadline is May 4
The SASD summer EXCEL classes for students
now in grades K-11 are set for two sessions: one
from June 16-26 and one from June 30 to July
11. Four-week classes will run from June 16 to
July 11, with no classes scheduled for June 27
and July 4. The class hours run from 8-10:55 a.m.
at Stoughton High School. Classes for 4K and 5K
students will be held at Fox Prairie Elementary
School from 8:15-10:45 a.m.
Registration is open until May 4.
Stoughton Trailers files trade
petition against China
SCOTT GIRARD
Unified Newspaper Group
Stoughton Trailers recently
filed an unfair trade petition
against Chinese competitors it
alleges are using government
subsidies and currency manip-
ulation to undercut the market.
The allegations center on
“53-foot domestic dry contain-
ers,” used on trains, a market
that has grown to 95 percent
Chinese manufacturers in the
last several years, according to
a press release from Stoughton
Trailers.
Stoughton Trailers is the
only current U.S. manufactur-
ing company to produce the
containers, according to the
press release, although market-
ing manager Scott Nachreiner
told the Courier Hub that there
were more competitors in past
years until the Chinese compa-
nies began cornering the mar-
ket.
Nachreiner said that alleged
subsidies from the Chinese
government along with cur-
rency manipulation make it
hard for U.S. companies to
compete.
“It’s extremely hard to gain
any orders when they’re way
below the cost that we’re even
paying for material,” Nach-
reiner said.
He added that the effects
have hit local employment,
with the product produced
at the company’s Evansville
plant. He said when the com-
pany was at its busiest with the
containers in the late 1990s,
there were 400 employees at
the plant, which now has about
100.
The company filed the peti-
tion with the U.S. Department
of Commerce and the Interna-
tional Trade Commission to
request the government inves-
tigate the alleged practices and
apply tariffs on the product to
equalize the competitive mar-
ket.
He said a successful peti-
tion won’t necessarily bring
back a set number of employ-
ees, though the company is
“trying to continue to expand
our employee base” in Evans-
ville.
Nachreiner said he expects
the process to play out within
a 12-month timeframe.
“We’re not saying it’s a
fact or set in stone that this
is the way it’s going to turn
out,” he said. “But it’s the
first step in helping ourselves
regain a little bit of a share in
that market.”
Traffic stop leads to heroin charge
A 23-year-old McFar-
land man was arrested
for possession of heroin
following a traffic stop in
late March on North Page
Street in Stoughton.
Spencer H. Williams
faces up to 3.5 years in
prison for possession of
narcotics.
According to a criminal
complaint filed in Dane
County Circuit Court:
Pol i ce st opped Wi l -
liams because the regis-
tration tag on his vehicle
was not associated with
the car. Officers discov-
ered Wi l l i ams had an
outstanding warrant and
he was arrested. During
the arrest, police found a
clear baggie containing
what was later tested to
be heroin. A syringe and
bottle cap used to cook
the drug was also found in
the car. Williams initially
denied that the drug was
his, but later told police
he had bought the heroin
for $50 in Madison.
Online court records
s how Wi l l i a ms wa s
released on a $1,000 sig-
nature bond.
– Mark Ignatowski
Council: Engelberger earns
leadership role on 5-4 vote
Continued from page 1
If you go
What: Public hearing on
2014 special assessments
for property improvements
When: 7 p.m. Tuesday,
May 13
Where: Council cham-
bers in Public Safety
Building, 321 S. Fourth St.
Info: Call city clerk Pili
Hougan, 646-0423
4
May 1, 2014 Courier Hub ConnectStoughton.com
Courier Hub
Thursday, May 1, 2014 • Vol. 132, No. 39
USPS No. 1049-0655
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POSTMASTER: Send Address Corrections to
Stoughton Courier Hub, 135 W. Main St., Ste. 102, Stoughton, WI 53589.
Phone: 608-873-6671
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Stoughton Courier Hub
Oregon Observer • Verona Press
NATIONAL NEWSPAPER
ASSOCIATION
Opinion
General manager
David Enstad
david.enstad@wcinet.com
Advertising
Catherine Stang
stoughtonsales@wcinet.com
Classifieds
Diane Beaman
hubclassified@wcinet.com
Circulation
Carolyn Schultz
ungcirculation@wcinet.com
News
Jim Ferolie
stoughtoneditor@wcinet.com
Sports
Jeremy Jones
ungsportseditor@wcinet.com
Website
Victoria Vlisides
communityreporter@wcinet.com
Reporters
Scott Girard, Bill Livick, Anthony Iozzo,
Mark Ignatowski, Scott De Laruelle
Letters to the editor
Wisconsin should outlaw TIF
Ini t i al l y st art ed wi t h good
intentions in mind, tax-increment
financing (TIF) has turned into
nothing more than a power grab
for city officials by taking money
from schools and other important
urban services and giving it to
politically connected developers.
Regardless if we need new
development or not in Stoughton.
TIF is not the way to do it and it
is not needed for new growth in
this city. Some say there has been
no economic growth in Stoughton
over the past 10 years. This is just
not true. I know of at least a dozen
businesses that popped up recent-
ly (gotta love that Taco Bell/KFC)
and I see new construction going
on down town also out past Wal-
mart their installing a new bank.
No, people, Stoughton has grown
and is still growing rapidly, not
including the TIF project.
California was the first state to
legalize TIF and is also the first
state to make TIF illegal. The rea-
son being is that the California
Supreme court found TIF unconsti-
tutional, saying cities do not have a
constitutionally-given right to steal
money from schools and other tax
districts to use for their crony capi-
talism and social engineering. The
problem in California was a lot of
communities were in serious debt
after failed TIF development.
I think Wisconsin should fol-
low suit and make TIF illegal to
free up tax dollars that should be
going to our K-12 schools and
other community programs. TIF is
not a morally right thing to do –
it’s a gamble and our schools are
at stake.
Robby Ree
City of Stoughton
Be proud of our RSVP drivers
As the volunteer driver coor-
dinator for RSVP services in
Stoughton, I felt it my duty to tell
everyone more about our RSVP
volunteers.
There are approximately 15
drivers who receive assignments
from me to drive local residents to
various medical and other neces-
sary appointments here in Stough-
ton and throughout Dane County.
There is no charge for this service,
although donations are welcome.
They provide a valuable service,
but in most cases they seek no
recognition. They are courteous,
friendly, punctual and reliable.
Many of them refuse to submit
mileage reimbursement requests
for themselves.
I hope everyone will take the
time to thank our local volunteers.
I can’t say enough about their
willingness to serve. They are
your neighbors and friends.
Personally, I can’t thank them
enough for what they do. I am
very proud to serve Stoughton
through RSVP but I am even
prouder of my drivers.
Thank you, all of you.
Richard R. Hoffman
RSVP Stoughton driver
services coordinator
Honorees help build a better Stoughton
The Ci t y of St ought on
announced its volunteer, business
and friend of youth of the year
in April for National Volunteer
Week.
A reception was held April 15
to honor community members at
Stoughton City Hall.
The ceremonies recognized
“everyone who volunteers their
time and energy to help build a
better Stoughton,” according to a
news release by the city.
This year, the city had two
Volunteers of the Year honor-
ees: Melvin “Red” Benschop
and a group of volunteers at the
Stoughton Area Senior Center.
The Friend of Youth award was
given to Brad Milbauer and the
Business of the Year was award-
ed to Thomas Fendrick at Edward
Jones.
Volunteers of the year
Benschop retired after 58 years
as a member of the Stoughton
Fire Department in March. He
was the 2007 State of Wiscon-
sin American Legion Firefighter
of the Year. He has served on
the Cooksville Lutheran Church
Council and the First Lutheran
Church Council.
He is a member of First Luther-
an Church and he is actively
involved in the community. He
is a member of the Wisconsin
Health Care Association and was
employed at Stoughton Hospital
for 29 years. He was an Eagle
Scout, and as a teen was honored
by the Boy Scouts of America as
well as the Red Cross for saving
Andrea Juve from drowning.
He and his wife Beverly are
always willing to lend a hand
whenever they are asked.
Al l t he empl oyees at t he
Stoughton Area Senior Center are
so grateful for the senior center
volunteers, including assistant
director Hollee Comacho.
“The senior center volunteers
contribute largely to the senior
center’s core services including
meal preparation and delivery,
transportation to appointments,
program organization and lead-
ership, cleaning, reception help,
committee service, etc.,” Coma-
cho said. “Without them, these
services would not be possible in
the current capacity they exist.”
A few of the items volunteers
help out with are organizing and
leading programs, front desk
reception, committee participa-
tion, helping with office tasks,
nutrition site, gardening, distrib-
uting publications, decorating
and other projects.
Opportunities range from one
time tasks to ongoing projects.
Many hours of volunteer work
are devoted to older adults in the
community who do not even set
foot in the Senior Center.
The RSVP driver service is
a program in which volunteer
drivers deliver meals or provide
rides to medical appointments
for people 60 years and older.
The center thanks one member in
particular, Richard Hoffman, for
his 621 hours toward coordinat-
ing and driving for this program.
These volunteers, including those
who deliver meals or food pan-
try items, report back to our staff
when clients may need extra sup-
port or assistance.
Youth volunteer
Brad Milbauer has positively
impacted the Stoughton Area
Youth Center (SAYC) throughout
the years. Youth center director
Greg Hoyte said Milbauer stops
in at least twice a month to offer
assistance and to see what needs
the SAYC has. Additionally, he is
constantly seeking out new ways
to help and plays an active role in
the success of the SAYC.
He has donated not only his
time, but also a 50 gallon fish
tank, a foosball table, and helped
build an outdoor skating rink. He
facilitates a golf outing every year
and is always proactively seeking
out new ideas to help the SAYC.
“He is all about kids,” Hoyte
said. “I wish all of my volunteers
would be as amazing as Brad.”
Business person of the
year
Thomas Fendrick, from Edward
Jones, was born and raised in
Stoughton and has owned his own
business for 16 years.
He is involved in the com-
munity by donating his time to
the Stoughton Holiday Fund, the
Food Pantry, START program,
Syttende Mai and many other
community events. He has spon-
sored at least one youth ball team
every year, many local golf out-
ings and Relay For Life. He is a
proud supporter of the Stoughton
Schools, The Senior Center, Girl
and Boy Scouts (he was once a
Boy Scout leader), and many oth-
er events/programs in Stoughton.
He is a Rotarian and also is cur-
rently involved and working on a
Food 4 Kidz project. He believes
in supporting local businesses and
he is always offering to help the
people around him.
Nat i onal Vol unt eer Week
reflects the power that volunteers
and extraordinary business own-
ers have to inspire by example –
volunteers both encourage those
they help and motivate others to
serve.
Photo submitted
Volunteers are, from back left to right: Thomas Fendrick- Edward Jones-
Business of the Year Winner; Brad Milbauer- Friend of Youth Winner, with mayor
Donna Olson; Melvin “Red” Benschop- Volunteer of the Year Winner (front
row) Ruby Hauge and Donna Onsrud- Senior Center Volunteer representatives-
Volunteer of the Year Winner.
May 1, 2014 Courier Hub ConnectStoughton.com
5
Kegonsa students featured
in opera performance
A group of Kegonsa Ele-
mentary School students
showcased their skills with
professional opera singers
on stage April 13.
Kegonsa’s Working for
Kids and Madison’s Opera
for the Young worked with
Kegonsa’s Lissa Benson
to prepare students for
the opera “The Barber of
Seville” by Gioachino Ros-
sini. The opera was per-
formed at the Stoughton
Opera House.
For those who missed the
April 13 performance but
would still like to catch the
students in action, it will
happen again on from 9-10
a.m. May 2, at the Com-
munity Building Gym. All
of district’s K-5 students
will attend, and community
members are welcome.
Kegonsa’s involvement
in the Opera for the Young
is a long-standing tradition
that started when Cheryl
Frazier taught elementary
music here, Benson said.
“Kegonsa Working for
Kids funds our participa-
tion in the opera program
every year,” Benson says.
“Every year, our 4th and
5th grade students audition
with me to be part of the
opera. I get to choose up
to 16 students to sing on
stage with the professional
opera singers. 2 of those 16
students had a special solo
speaking part this year. I
also got to choose up to 16
students to be part of an
off-stage chorus that sup-
ports the on stage perform-
ers by singing, but does
not move around on stage
with the opera singers. The
students learn most of the
singing and speaking parts
with me and then are taught
movements and staging by
professional opera singers
in the 45 minutes prior to
the show.”
Friday, May 2 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Saturday, May 3 8 a.m. to 2 p.m.
GREAT STUFF AT GREAT PRICES! LUNCH AVAILABLE
Christ Memorial
Annual
Rummage Sale
2833 Raritan Road • Fitchburg • 271-2811
Hwy. PD to Richardson to Raritan
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Gift & Plant Fair
Saturday, May 3, 2014
9:00 a.m. - 2:00 p.m.
ST ANN’S GYM
324 N Harrison St. • Stoughton, WI
Over 30 vendors will be available with gift items perfect for
Mother’s Day, Father’s Day, Graduations, Weddings, Spring &
Summer Birthdays, etc.
Baskets of flowers, individual annuals and greenery will be available.
Proceeds benefit Journey of the Heart
Mission Trip to Marvell, Arkansas in July 2014.
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VFW Badger Post 328 Inc.
200 Veterans Rd., Stoughton
Friday Night
All-You-Can-Eat Fish Fry
Dine-in only. Regular menu also available
Also Serving Barbecue Ribs Dinner Special
Come in and check out new updated dining area and lunch special.
Purchase 8 daily Lunch Specials get the 9th free.
Month of May Free dessert with meal
Big Johnson Karaoke
Up Coming
Sunday, May 4 • Blue Grass Jam • 12 p.m.
Tuesday, May 6 • Bartenders Dinner • 5 p.m.
Every Friday Night Meat Raffe starts at 5 p.m.
Every Thursday night Bingo starting at 7:00 p.m.
Serving Lunch Tuesday-Friday 11:00 a.m.-1:30 p.m.
Open to the Public
www.stoughtonvfw.org Like us on Facebook
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May 10, 2014
Richland Center, WI - Fairgrounds
$10 Admission • 12 and under Free
11:00am ....Snowmobile Grass
Drags
11:00am ....ATV Drags
11:00am ....Dirtbike Drags
11:00am ....Mud Bog
1:00pm .......Badger State Dirt
Flingers & American Mini Pullers
2:00pm ......Kids Pedal Tractor Pull
2:00pm ......Demo Derby
5:00pm.......Truck/Tractor Pull
9:00pm.......Car/Truck Drags
www.hybridredneck.com / 608-604-5068
‘First Saturdays’
aim to draw
visitors downtown
Arts, entertainment
will compliment
shopping
MARK IGNATOWSKI
Unified Newspaper Group
Main Street looks to be
bustling Saturday as down-
town businesses work with
local artists and musicians to
bring a “party atmosphere”
to the city’s core.
The goal is to use Stough-
ton’s vibrant art scene to
help promote its downtown
shopping destinations by
giving people a chance to
check out both at the same
time. Stoughton Yoga own-
er Marlene Widra, who said
about two dozen businesses
have signed on to have some
sort of promotion, is spear-
heading the event.
“It will be like a street fair
atmosphere,” Widra said.
“There will be scattered
musicians, artists, sales and
food.”
The first event runs from
10 a.m. until noon Saturday,
May 3, along Main Street
in the city’s downtown core
area. Details of what artists
will be where were still being
worked out, but some shops
had already confirmed that
they’d be hosting an artist.
For example, you’ll find
the Hootenanny open jam
band outside the Yahara
River Grocery Co-op. This
musical group is open to
acoustic musicians of all
abilities and has been jam-
ming inside the co-op all
winter long. They’ll take
their act outdoors this week-
end, Widra said. There will
be handmade jewelry, tex-
tiles and artwork outside
other shops. Demonstrations
on jewelry making and fur-
niture painting can also be
found.
“This kind of event is
good for people who might
not go to galleries or things
like that,” Widra said. “This
is event is friendly for
everyone – for people who
want to feel that buzz down-
town.”
Widra said there would be
similar events planned for
the first Saturday of every
month through September.
The events are still evolving
and there’s time for new art-
ists and businesses are wel-
come to join in the events
anytime.
This isn’t the first time
Stoughton’s downtown has
been the focus of shopping
and entertainment special
events. The Chamber of
Commerce has been work-
ing to promote Third Thurs-
days where stores stay open
late one night each month to
encourage more foot traf-
fic at downtown retail loca-
tions.
The First Saturdays events
were also promoted before
– in 2008 – but lacked the
staffing necessary to suc-
ceed, Widra said. The First
Saturdays of half a decade
ago also lacked the arts and
entertainment component.
Widra – who recently
joined the Stoughton Arts
Council – said there’s a
thriving group of artists in
the community and that
these types of events are the
perfect way to show that the
city’s downtown is alive and
open for business.
If you go
What: First Saturdays
shopping and entertain-
ment
When: 10 a.m. – noon,
Saturday, May 3 (and every
first Saturday of the month
through September)
Where: Downtown
Stoughton
Info: marlenewidra@
yahoo.com
Feedback sought for
SASD Science programs
The St ought on Area
School District is seeking
public input about how to
strengthen its Science and
Engineering programs and
would like your feedback.
This spring, the Stough-
ton Area School District is
reviewing those programs
and collaborating with
professionals in businesses
and industry, educators
from public schools and
universities and commu-
nity members to study data
and seek input from par-
ents, teachers and students
in the district. The cul-
mination of this program
review will inform work
to define new textbooks,
technology and courses.
The district has also
scheduled two listening
session forums to gather
more input: Wednesday,
May 7 at 6:30 p.m., or
Thursday, May 8 at 8 a.m.
Both sessions will take
place in the Staff Develop-
ment Center at the Admin-
istration & Educational
Services Center (AESC)
at 320 North Street in
Stoughton.
If you have any further
questions or comments
about the Science Program
Review, please contact:
Judy Singletary, Direc-
t or of Cur r i cul um &
Inst ruct i on, St ought on
Area School District, at
judy.singletary@stough-
ton.k12.wi.us or 608-877-
5031.
SHS variety
show Saturday
‘Composers
Concert’ new
feature this year
Stoughton High School
Music students will renew
a longtime tradition Satur-
day night, and hopefully
start a new one.
First, the 46th annual
Band Variety Show will
take place at 7 p.m. Satur-
day, May 3, at Stoughton
High School. The tradition
began with former SHS
band director Roger Gohl-
ke and has continued to this
day, says Dan Schmidt, the
current director of bands at
Stoughton High School.
The theme of this year’s
show is “Channel Surfing,”
and the Concert, Sym-
phonic, Marching, and Jazz
Bands will all be perform-
ing music pertaining to that
theme and other to com-
memorate another success-
ful year of performance.
The Variety show is one
of the few with a ticket
charge. Tickets can be
ordered ahead of time from
Schmidt or at the door.
Tickets cost $8 for adults
and $6 for K-12 students.
Children under 5 are admit-
ted for free. Proceeds from
the Variety Show help to
fund SHS Marching and
Concert Bands, as well pro-
gram costs such as trans-
portation and sheet music
purchases.
The department will fol-
low that show with a SHS
Composer’s Concert at 7
p.m. May 23 at the Stough-
ton Village Players The-
ater.
The performance will
feature all original works
composed and performed
by SHS students. Schmidt
hopes it becomes an annual
event.
“It occurred to me that
st udent s i n [Advanced
Placement Music] Theory
were studying music in
a ‘theoretical’ way and
were not applying the con-
cepts learned to their daily
music-making or using that
same knowledge to create
music,” Schmidt said. “I
also believe that students in
our high school are capable
of creating great music.
We have many concerts
dedicated to performing the
works that others have cre-
ated but no concerts dedi-
cated solely to performing
the works that our students
have created. It is my hope
that the Composers’ Con-
cert will work to solve the
above three issues.”
This concert will be
presented free of charge.
The Village Players have
helped provide the space
for the concert.
“I think it’s important
that we get our music into
the community as much as
possible and the Village
Players venue is perfect for
this event,” Schmidt said.
6
May 1, 2014 Courier Hub ConnectStoughton.com
Skaalen Retirement
Services
400 N. Morris, Stoughton
(608) 873-5651
AFFILIATED WITH THE EVANGELICAL
LUTHERAN CHURCH OF AMERICA
Doctors Park
Dental Office
Dr. Richard Albright
Dr. Phillip Oinonen
Dr. Thor Anderson
Dr. Thane Anderson
1520 Vernon St.
Stoughton, WI
A Life
Celebration Center
873-4590
1358 Hwy 51, Stoughton
Mike Smits • Dale Holzhuter • Jodi Corbit
Laurie Dybevik, Pre-Need Specialist • Paul Selbo, Office Manager
Place your ad
here weekly!
Call 873-6671
to advertise in the
Courier Hub Church Page.
Place your ad
here weekly!
Call 873-6671
to advertise in the
Courier Hub Church Page.
221 Kings Lynn Rd.
Stoughton, WI 53589
(608) 873-8888
www.anewins.com
Thought for the week
Baha’i Faith
For information: Alfred Skerpan, 877-0911
or Gail and Greg Gagnon, 873-9225
us.bahai.org Stoughton study classes.
Bible Baptist Church
2095 Hwy. W, Utica
• 873-7077 • 423-3033
Sunday: 10 a.m. - Worship; 6 p.m. - Worship
Christ Lutheran Church
700 Cty Tk B, Stoughton
• 873-9353
• e-mail: office@clcstoughton.org
Sunday: 8 and 10:30 a.m. – Traditional Worship
9:10 a.m. – Family Express and Sunday School
Christ the King Community Church
401 W. Main St., Stoughton 877-0303
christthekingcc.org - Sunday: 10 a.m. - Worship
Christian Assembly Church
1844 Williams Drive, Stoughton
873-9106
Saturday, 6 p.m. worship; Sunday, 10 a.m. worship
The Church of Jesus Christ
of Latter-Day Saints
825 S. Van Buren, Stoughton
877-0439
Missionaries 877-0696
Sunday: 10 a.m. - 1 p.m. Sunday school and Primary
Cooksville Lutheran Church
Office: 882-4408 - Sunday: 9:30 a.m. - Worship
and Sunday School
Covenant Lutheran Church
1525 N. Van Buren St., Stoughton • 873-7494
covluth@chorus.net • covluth.org
Saturday: 5:30 p.m. Come As You Are Worship
Sunday: 9 & 10:30 a.m. Worship Sunday School:
9:30 a.m.
Ezra Church
ezrachurch.com
129 E Main St, Stoughton | 834-9050 - Sunday: 9
and 10:30 a.m.
First Lutheran Church
310 E. Washington, Stoughton • 873-7761
flcstoughton.com - Sunday: 8:30 & 10 a.m. worship
Fulton Church
9209 Fulton St., Edgerton
884-8512
Worship services 8, 10:30 a.m. -
coffee hour 9 a.m. - Sunday School 9:30 a.m. -
Varsity 12:07 p.m. - AWANA 3 p.m.
www.fultonchurch.org
Good Shepherd By The Lake
Lutheran Church
1860 Hwy. 51 at Lake Kegonsa, Stoughton
873-5924
Sunday Worship: 8:00 and 10:30 a.m.
Education Hour for all ages: 9:15 a.m.
LakeView Church
2200 Lincoln Ave., Stoughton
873-9838
lakevc.org
Sunday: 9, 10:45 a.m. - Worship
Seventh Day Baptist
Church Of Albion
616 Albion Rd., Edgerton
Worship Saturday 11- Sabbath School 10
Fellowship Meal follows service on first Sabbath
Phone: 561-7450 or email: albionsdb@gmail.com
forministry.com/USWISDBGCASD1
Stoughton Baptist Church
Corner of Williams Dr. & Cty. B, Stoughton
873-6517 Sunday: 10:30 a.m. - Worship;
6 p.m. - Evening Service
St. Ann Catholic Church
323 N. Van Buren St., Stoughton
Weekday Mass: At Nazareth House and
St. Ann’s Church - call 873-6448 or 873-7633.
Weekend Mass: Saturday - 5:15 p.m.;
Sunday - 8 and 10:30 a.m.
April 17 mass 7 p.m., April 18 service 1 p.m., April
19 mass 8 p.m. April 20 8 a.m.,10:30 a.m. masses
United Methodist of Stoughton
525 Lincoln Avenue, Stoughton
E-mail: Stoughtonumc@Wisconsinumc.org
Sunday: 8 a.m. - Short Service;
10 a.m. - Full Worship
West Koshkonong Lutheran Church
1911 Koshkonong, Stoughton
Sunday: 10:30 a.m. - Worship
Western Koshkonong
Lutheran Church
2633 Church St., Cottage Grove,
Sunday: 9:30 a.m. worship
11 a.m. Bible study
Admit When You’re Wrong
One of the barriers to good relations is when
people dig their heels in and refuse to admit
when they are wrong. Many an argument could
be shortened by the offending party simply
admitting his offense and sincerely asking for
forgiveness. In fact, many arguments could be
avoided by apologizing or admitting ahead of
time that you might be wrong. It is always a
good disarming tactic to let people know that
you could be wrong about something, or to
offer your apologies in advance for what you are
about to do. Moreover, people who refuse to
apologize even when they know they are wrong,
or who offer insincere apologies are seen as
pride-filled, dishonest, and not interested in
smooth relations. If you want to get along with
your family, friends and colleagues, be quick
to admit when you’re wrong. This advice also
applies to your relationship with God. That is,
admit to God when you have sinned and accept
His forgiveness just as readily.
–Christopher Simon via Metro News Service
Whoever conceals his transgressions will not
prosper, but he who confesses and forsakes
them will obtain mercy.
Proverbs 28:13
Community calendar
Coming up
Submit your community calendar
and coming up items online:
ConnectStoughton.com
Saturday, May 3
• 10 a.m.-noon, “First Saturdays,” downtown
Stoughton
• 2-3:30 p.m., kids make Mother’s Day bracelets,
library
• 5:30 p.m., Annual Relay For Life Cancer Survivors’
Dinner, American Legion Hall Otis Sampson Post 59,
803 North Page Street, Stoughton, 873-7455
• 7 p.m., SHS Band Variety Show “Channel Surfing,”
auditorium, 600 Lincoln Ave.
Monday, May 5
• 11 a.m.-1 p.m., annual luncheon, Stoughton United
Methodist Church, 873-3273
• 3 p.m. music appreciation class, Christ Lutheran
Church, Hwy. B, Stoughton
• 5:30-6:30 p.m., The Gathering Table free community
dinner, Senior Center, 248 W. Main St., 206-1178
• 7 p.m., orchestra concert, River Bluff Middle School,
877-5500
Tuesday, May 6
• 3:30-4:15 p.m., teens make artistic handprints for
Mother’s Day, library
• 6:30-8 p.m., Stoughton/McFarland/Oregon Relay For
Life planning team meeting, for location details call
220-8783
Thursday, May 8
• 6:30 p.m., “Thursdays With Murder,” featuring “The
Butler Did It!” at library
• 6:30 p.m., fourth and fifth grade orchestra concert,
SHS auditorium, 600 Lincoln Ave.
Sunday, May 11
• 8 a.m. to 1 p.m., Mandt Marketplace, Stoughton
Fairgrounds
Monday, May 12
• 7 p.m., Orchestra Theme Concert, SHS auditorium
Wednesday, May 14
• Noon, SHS Norwegian Dancers performance, State
Capitol
• 7 p.m., honors nights, Stoughton High School audito-
rium, 600 Lincoln Ave.
Thursday, May 15
• 6:30 p.m., Sandhill Elementary School third grade
concert, Sandhill Elementary, 1920 Lincoln Ave.
Friday, May 16-18
• Syttende Mai, downtown Stoughton
Stoughton’s First Saturdays
Enjoy downtown Stoughton’s street fair atmosphere on
the first Saturday of each month from May through Sep-
tember from 10 a.m. to noon, with live music, food, artists
and sales.
Disc golf tournament
The Stoughton Kiwanis will hold its 2014 Disc Golf
tournament Saturday, May 3.
The annual event includes different skill level brackets
like Men’s/Women’s Advanced Open, starting at 9 a.m.,
and beginner groups, starting at 10 a.m.
A new feature this year is that parents bringing a paid
K-12 entrant can play for free.
First 20 K-12 entrants will receive an official “tour-
nament-quality” disc. For more information, visit
stoughtonkiwanis.org.
Mother’s Day Bracelet workshop
Children are welcome to go to the Stoughton Public
Library Saturday, May 3, from 2-3:30 p.m. to learn how
to make a beaded bracelet as a Mother’s Day gift. Expe-
rienced crafter Kate Templin will lead the class. Children
ages 9 and up may attend alone, while children ages 6-8
may attend with adult assistance. For information contact
Amanda Bosky at 873-6281.
Cancer survivors’ dinner
The Annual Relay For Life Cancer Survivors’ Dinner
will be held Saturday, May 3, at American Legion Hall
Otis Sampson Post 59, 803 North Page Street, Stoughton
at 5:30 p.m.
Cancer survivors are invited to a social evening and a
free spaghetti dinner. Guests are welcome, and are asked
to contribute a good will donation at the door.
Call Kathy Horton at 873-7455 to reserve your seat.
You can also email Kathy at khort128@gmail.com.
Bluegrass series at the VFW
The Stoughton VFW will host a bluegrass event each
month October 2013 through June 2014.
Fritz’s Stoughton Bluegrass Jam in May is Sunday, May
4, at the VFW Post 328, located at 200 Veterans Road.
The Mill Road Band opens the stage starting at noon.
Musicians and pickers welcome. If you have questions,
Call Fritz Jaggi at 214-4286 or the VFW at 873-9042.
Relay For Life meetings
Stoughton/McFarland/Oregon Relay For Life will hold
planning team meetings May 6 and June 3. Each meeting
is 6:30-8 p.m. New members are always welcome. For
location details, call 220-8783.
Caregiver group
The group will talk about the topic of care in our later
years. Frailty and failing health will come to all if they
live long enough. The discussion will focus on how
to have a relaxed talk with the older adult in the family
about the future. Everyone is on this same journey, just at
different stages. So this discussion is one all can share in
as equals. Whether you are an older caregiver or a young-
er adult with concerns for older relatives, this discussion
is for you. The Caregiver Group’s next meeting will be on
Thursday, May 8, 4:30-6 p.m. at the senior center.
RD benefit
Want to enjoy the spring weather and get out and ride
motorcycles for a good cause? The RD benefit for mul-
tiple sclerosis is set for Saturday, May 10, at 714 Taylor
Lane. Registration for the ride goes from 11 a.m. until
noon, with a ride to follow until 4 p.m. Char Nelson will
provide entertainment from 5-6 p.m., with Back Country
Roads from 7-10 p.m. Food and beverages are available
after 4 p.m. There is a $20 registration fee.
Hunger Food Drive
Saturday, May 10, marks the 22nd anniversary of the
National Association of Letter Carriers’ “Stamp Out Food
Hunger Drive.” Carriers across the country will collect
non-perishable food donations to go to local food pantries.
Customers who receive bags in the mail are encouraged
to use them by leaving a non-perishable food donation in
the bag by their mailbox on Saturday, May 10.
Exploring World Cultures: Venezuela
Visit the Stoughton Public Library to hear Jose Pala-
cios, a current employe of Cummins, Inc. in Stoughton
who is from Venezuela, talk about Venezuela’s culture.
The event is from 1-2 p.m. Tuesday, May 13.
May 1, 2014 Courier Hub ConnectStoughton.com
7
vigil helped ease the fam-
ily’s distress, but the safety
concern hasn’t subsided.
She said they are consider-
ing moving away.
The letter, which they
received April 16, contained
an image they described as
their son Javon’s face super-
imposed on an image of
one of two lynching victims
hanging from a tree, Hes-
ter Hale told the Hub last
Wednesday afternoon.
It had no return address
and was addressed to Javon,
who had attended Stoughton
High School from 2009 to
2012 but moved to Sun Prai-
rie and graduated from Sun
Prairie High School in 2013.
The image also showed
blood, as well as white indi-
viduals “celebrating” among
the victims, Hester said. At
the bottom of the page it had
text reading, “Your days are
numbered,” she said.
Stoughton police chief
Greg Leck said the depart-
ment is exhausting local,
st at e and even federal
resources to investigate the
incident, which is ongoing.
The letter is being analyzed
at the state crime lab, Leck
confirmed Tuesday after-
noon.
Emotional toll
Hester said the incident
has weighed heavily on her
family, and it’s difficult to
watch their eight children
feel threatened.
“It’s just so hard,” she
said, choking back tears.
“I didn’t really know what
depression was or all that
anxiety stuff until …”
The incident has been
especially hard on Hester’s
85-year-old grandmother.
It has, Hester said, brought
up traumatic memories from
growing up in a racially
divided America devoid of
civil rights.
But among the distur-
bance, Hester said the fam-
ily finds comfort in the out-
pouring of support and from
their friendly neighborhood.
“On my block, we like
family,” she said.
Hester said Friday after-
noon that even though they
“l ove” St ought on, t hey
are considering moving
because of the fear-inducing
incident. Hester also said
they felt Stoughton police
weren’t sensitive enough to
what the family was going
through.
She said police officials
made her feel as though
they shouldn’t have gone to
the media during a meeting
with police, the family and
Mayor Donna Olson last
Tuesday.
“He made us feel as
we (were) doing things
wrong,” she said of Leck.
“And that we messed up the
investigation – that we were
putting the word out.”
They pl aced t he i ni -
tial 911 call at 5:37 p.m.
on Wednesday, April 16,
accordi ng t o St ought on
police records. The next
day, Hester and Harry went
public with the story, call-
ing local news stations like
WISC TV-3.
Leck said that his depart-
ment has been exhausting
resources to collect and
process evidence, as well as
do interviews for the case.
That got more difficult
when the case got “extra
attention and affected our
ability to talk to more peo-
ple,” Leck said. “Those
who were involved may not
be as cooperative due to the
attention.”
He al so sai d t hat , of
course, Hester is “justly”
concerned and offended by
the incident, but that these
investigations take time
because “we want them to
be accurate and thorough.”
“It takes time to get fin-
gerprints and DNA labs
done,” he said. “Hopefully,
we’ll get some results back
in the very near future.”
National agencies are
also involved in the case,
including the U.S. Postmas-
ter General and resources
from the FBI.
“We are doing everything
we possibly can to solve
this,” Leck said. “This kind
of stuff doesn’t happen
in Stoughton on a regular
basis. I want everyone to
know we are taking it very
seriously. We are using all
the resources available to
try to solve this.”
In an article in the Hub
last week, Lt. Pat Conlin
said one possible charge
for the person responsible
could be a felony – threat-
ening to injure someone.
Rally of support
While police investigate,
Hester and Harry have taken
it upon themselves to spread
awareness about the issue.
“I just want people to
know this is not a joke,”
Hester said. “It’s not funny,
at all. Not at all. And, you
know, if someone’s child
did that, people need to talk
to their kids and be aware of
things like this. You know,
this is not OK.”
Within a week, a sup-
portive response material-
ized, coming from not just
Stoughton residents, but also
civil rights supporters in the
Madison area, including a
call to action from the Madi-
son Institute for Healing
Racism to attend the vigil.
“It shows how much peo-
ple care here,” said Rev.
Dawn Jeffers Ramstad, who
is the pastor at Stoughton
United Methodist Church,
where the Hales attend
church.
Last Wednesday’s “Just
Love” vigil included prayer
led by Jeffers Ramstad and
pastor Jerry Hancock of
First Congregational United
Church of Christ in Madi-
son.
Ha r r y Ha l e , wh o m
neighbor Amber Schwenn
described as one of the
friendliest people you’ll
meet, brought the racially
diverse group together by
initiating a “group hug” with
everyone at the rally. After-
ward, attendees including
Mayor Olson marched to the
Hale residence a couple of
blocks away.
The crowd also included
concerned parent s who
brought their kids to the
rally.
Resident Justin Richter,
who is also a member of
Stoughton Fire Department,
brought one of his three chil-
dren who go to Stoughton
Area School District schools
to show him that “this type
of thing is not OK,” he said.
Other supporters includ-
ed Andrea Morton and her
daughter, who goes to Sand-
hill Elementary. Morton
found out about the rally
after she received a flier
from the school and attend-
ed with her friend Sassalee
Bluford.
Even though the residents
didn’t know the family per-
sonally, they said just to
think about the nature of the
letter was “upsetting,” and
they wanted to show sup-
port.
“I thought we were past
all this,” Bluford said.
CITY OF STOUGHTON
NOTICE OF ALDERMANIC VACANCY
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN BY
THE CITY OF STOUGHTON,
IN DANE COUNTY, WISCONSIN THAT:
Applications will be accepted from qualifed individuals living within the City of
Stoughton Aldermanic District 4 for appointment to a vacant seat on the Common
Council. The appointment term will cover a period from the date of appointment until
the Spring Election in April 2015. The seat will be up for election in April 2015 to fll
the remainder of the term which ends in April 2016.
If interested in being appointed, please submit your resumé and an aldermanic
appointment questionnaire to the City Clerk’s Offce. The questionnaire is available
on the City’s website or by request in the Offce of the City Clerk, 381 E. Main Street.
Candidates will be interviewed at the regular meeting of the Common Council on
May 27, 2014. It is anticipated that the appointed candidate will be seated and sworn
into offce at the selected meeting.
If you have questions, please contact the City Clerk’s Offce at (608) 873-6677
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Community Banking Since 1904
McFarland State Bank
Downtown Stoughton Office: 207 South Forrest Street, | 608.873.6681
Lake Kegonsa Office: 3162 County Road B | 608.873.2010
www.msbonline.com
NMLS# 596586
*Purchase transactions only. The following loan programs are not eligible for the closing cost credit: Federal VA,
FHA, Rural Development, WHEDA, Investment Property Loans and Construction Loans. The offer applies to loans
with an application date prior to August 1, 2014 and a closing date prior to November 1, 2014. The $500 closing cost
credit cannot exceed the actual amount of closing costs, prepaid interest and escrow reserves. This includes if the
credit is combined with a seller closing cost credit. First mortgages only (offer does not apply to 2nd mortgages or
home equity lines of credit). Must have an open, active McFarland State Bank checking account PRIOR to closing.
The checking account must have direct deposit set up for income or auto pay of mortgage payment PRIOR to
the loan closing. The credit will be applied at the time of the loan closing and will be refected on the Settlement
Statement (HUD-1). Not valid with any other offers.
McFarland State Bank can help you open the door to you dream home today! With local decision
making and local servicing - we can get your mortgage approved in minutes, rather than days
or weeks! We offer a variety of loan options to choose from including fixed rate mortgages and
adjustable rate mortgages. Visit our website, call or e-mail one of our mortgage professionals to
answer any of your questions or to ask for advice. We are here to help!
Community Banking Since 1904
SAVE $500
OFF YOUR
CLOSING COSTS.
Rally: Nearly 100 show support for family; investigation continues
Continued from page 1
Know something?
Anyone with information related to this incident
is encouraged to contact the Stoughton Police
Department at 873-3374.
Photo by Victoria Vlisides
Harry Hale (pictured center with black shirt and cap) initiates a group hug at a rally put on to support
his family. The rally was held Wednesday evening and around 100 people attended.
‘I just want people
to know, this is
not a joke. It’s not
funny, at all.’
Hester Hale
Kat Trio presents
concert at UMC
Stoughton United Meth-
odist Church will host The
Kat Trio at a concert after
its 10 a.m. church service
on Sunday, May 4.
The group, made up
of violin player Victoria
Gorbich, clarinet player
Vladislav Gorbich and
pianist Heidi Wiskur, is
named after the Russian
city of Ekaterinburg that
it was formed in. The
trio will play during the
church’s worship service
in addition to the 20-min-
ute concert afterward.
The group has played
over 600 concerts over
a full decade of tour-
ing around the United
States and has produced
10 CDs that include clas-
sical, inspirational and
pop music. To listen to
samples of their music
and watch videos of the
group’s performances,
visit thekattrio.net.
For information, con-
tact the Stoughton United
Methodist Church’s office
at 873-3273.
If you go
What: The Kat Trio
performance
When: Sunday, May
4, during 10 a.m. service
and afterwards
Where: Stoughton
United Methodist Church,
525 Lincoln Ave.
Info: 873-3273
8
May 1, 2014 Courier Hub ConnectStoughton.com
Mother’s Day Buffet
Reservations recommended, but required for groups of six or more.
Sunday, May 11th
Breakfast Seating — 9:00-11:30am
Eggs, quiche, bacon, ham, sausage, pancakes,
French toast, fruit, Danish and more .......................... Only
$
10
95
Lunch Seating — 12:30-3:00pm
Beef, ham, chicken, fish, potatoes, pasta,
vegetables, rolls, dessert and much more ..................... Only
$
16
95
Reduced prices for children 8 and under
Celebrate Mother’s Day at
3097 Sunnyside St.
Stoughton
(608) 205-9300
Full Dining will begin at 5pm
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MOTHER’S DAY
BRUNCH
May 11, 8:30am-1:30pm
Adults $10.50 • Children 10-5 $5.00 • 4 & under Free
Eggs • Bacon & Sausage • Fried Potatoes
Biscuits & Gravy • French Toast
Mashed Potatoes & Gravy • Roast Beef • Ham
Vegetable • Fresh Fruit • Dinner Roll
Please Make Reservations by calling
873-9042
Walk Ins Welcome
V.F.W. Badger Post 328
200 Veterans Road • Stoughton
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Murky waters
Digesters: Best hope despite drawbacks
Money, politics, spills raise questions about viability
JESSICA VANEGEREN
The Capital Times
It is no secret that cows produce
two things in abundance in the
Dairy State: milk and manure.
Wisconsin’s 1.27 million dairy
cows produce 3.2 billion gallons
of milk and enough manure to fill
almost 3,000 Olympic-size swim-
ming pools a year, said Steve Car-
penter, director of UW-Madison’s
Center for Limnology, who has
studied the water quality of Madi-
son’s lakes for 40 years.
“The automation, the technolo-
gies that farmers use today have
made them very successful,” said
Monte Lamer, a farm boy from
Tomahawk and former power
plant operator in Alaska who is
now plant manager for the Clear
Horizons community digester out-
side of Waunakee.
“At the same time, their success
is showing up in our waterways.”
According to experts, agricul-
ture accounts for roughly 70 per-
cent of the phosphorus runoff in
watersheds across the state, with
urban runoff accounting for the
remaining 30 percent.
It is closer to an 80-20 split in
the Yahara Watershed in Dane
County, said Carpenter, who
hopes to find a way for the dairy
industry to thrive while protecting
water quality.
The agricultural runoff that often
turns Madison’s lakes unpleasant
by creating algal blooms that look
and smell bad, clog boat motors
and close beaches is expected to
only get worse.
Climate change is the main rea-
son, experts say.
There were zero rain events of
more than 3 inches in the 1980s,
four rain events of more than 3
inches in 1990s and eight events
of more than 3 inches in the 2000s,
Carpenter said.
“A 3-inch rain event can move a
lot of manure and a lot of soil in
the lakes at once,” Carpenter said.
“And we are seeing more of those
big storms.”
U.S. Environmental Protection
Agency-driven regulations are
calling for the state to get phos-
phorus out of its lakes. Carpenter
and Lamer are among a growing
chorus of dairy industry support-
ers who see manure digesters as
key to lowering high phosphorus
levels in waterways to meet the
tougher regulations.
Since 2001, manure digesters
have been popping up across the
state. Wisconsin now has 34, the
most in the nation, with two more
scheduled to begin operating by
2015. In all these digesters, bacte-
ria eat biomass like manure, food
scraps or whey and emit energy in
the form of methane gas.
Manure digesters cannot remove
all the phosphorus from waste, nor
do they completely remove other
contaminants like hormones and
anti-microbials, said Sarah Yang,
a water evaluation toxicologist
with the Wisconsin Department of
Natural Resources.
The Dane County community
digester is designed to remove 60
percent of the phosphorus from the
processed manure, according to
the DNR.
“Compared to straight land
application, the digesters have
the ability to degrade those con-
taminants, somewhat,” Yang said.
“But they were really designed to
reduce pathogens, greenhouse gas
emission and minimize odor.”
‘A political compromise’
Now, however, a changed politi-
cal climate that is more hostile
to renewable energy is stalling
digester growth.
And spills are raising doubts
about digesters’ reliability.
Three recent well-publicized
spills of 435,000 gallons of liquid
manure from Wisconsin’s first
“community” manure digester, in
Waunakee, contaminated a creek
and led to notices of environmental
violations.
“Right now, the management
of the (manure) runoff is a politi-
cal compromise. And I understand
the sensitivities that need to be
addressed there,” Carpenter said.
“But if, as a society, we wanted to
have clean lakes, we could do it.”
Annual phosphorus runoff
into Lake Mendota has fluctu-
ated between 27,000 pounds and
178,000 pounds over the past 38
years with no apparent improve-
ments in water quality, Carpenter
said.
For years, Richard Lathrop, an
honorary fellow at UW-Madison’s
Center for Limnology and a retired
DNR research limnologist, has
been telling anyone who will listen
that farmers need help processing
their manure.
Best management practices —
planting cover crops to prevent
runoff, limiting manure spreading
during winter months, and follow-
ing nutrient management plans —
are helpful but will not cut phos-
phorus and nitrogen levels enough
to really impact water quality,
Lathrop said.
For example, Dane County
requires farmers to have a permit
to spread liquid manure on fro-
zen ground, said Kevin Connors,
director of Dane County’s depart-
ment of land and water resources.
Lathrop estimates that 40 percent
of that manure runs off snow or
frozen ground between January
and March and ends up in the
Yahara watershed.
“We have to think about a whole
new future — and manure is the
path to that future,” Lathrop said.
“Soil erosion reduction practices
are not going to solve water pollu-
tion.”
Farms across the state also put
together nutrient management
plans. The plans, often partially
paid for with government funding,
outline when and where farmers
spread their manure.
Impractical for some
Laurie Fischer, executive direc-
tor of the Dairy Business Associa-
tion, an organization that works to
build a positive image and politi-
cal environment for the state’s $26
billion dairy industry, said there
are 10,800 farms in Wisconsin and
manure digesters do not make eco-
nomic sense for some.
“The big solution for the phos-
phorus problem is the nutrient
management plans,” Fischer said.
“When farmers use these plans
and rotate their crops, they can
actually save money by not having
to buy (or buy as much) fertilizer.”
The group’s president, Jerry
Meissner, has a digester on his
farm and Fischer said it is impor-
tant to Meissner that other pro-
ducers in the state have access to
manure digesters.
“What’s happening right now.
It is definitely a concern,” Fischer
said.
Most farms lack the capacity
to store their manure through the
winter months. Farmers turn to
manure pits for storage, but those
have problems, too. The pits are
a source of methane emissions, a
potent greenhouse gas, Lathrop
said.
And the more manure is moved
around, the greater the risk for
spills.
In the past 10 years, 6.9 mil-
lion gallons of manure have
spilled across the state from tanker
trucks or digesters, or leaked from
lagoons, according to the DNR.
Shahla Werner, director of the
Sierra Club’s John Muir Chapter,
said the state needs to mandate
additional safeguards includ-
ing automatic shutoff valves and
alarms, and buffers to contain
manure leaks.
The Sierra Club, while con-
cerned about water quality, oppos-
es subsidies for digesters, Werner
said.
“We would rather see the farm-
ers who are profiting pay for them.
If any other waste producer was
producing a steady waste stream,
they would not be rewarded,” she
said.
This series, Murky Waters, was
produced collaboratively by The
Capital Times and Wisconsin Cen-
ter for Investigative Journalism as
part of Water Watch Wisconsin.
Murky Waters
A four-part series produced by
The Capital Times and Wisconsin
Center for Investigative
Journalism.
Part 1, April 24: Beach clo-
sures persist despite cleanup
efforts
This week: Manure digesters
could help, but reliability, cost,
politics are in the way
Part 3, May 7: The effect of
urbanization and the role of devel-
opers
Part 4, May 14: Hard realities
of biology, particularly at Lake
Kegonsa, threatens viability of
cleanup efforts.
Photo by Mike DeVries/Capital Times
The community digester located near Waunakee is the state’s first to process manure from more than one farm. Thousands of gal-
lons of manure from 2,400 cows on three nearby farms is pumped daily through underground pipes to the digester. Its purpose is
to keep phosphorus from polluting the Yahara watershed.
SPORTS
Jeremy Jones, sports editor
845-9559 x226 • ungsportseditor@wcinet.com

Thursday, May 1, 2014
Anthony Iozzo, assistant sports editor
845-9559 x237 • sportsreporter@wcinet.com
Fax: 845-9550
For more sports coverage, visit:
ConnectStoughton.com
Courier Hub
9
ANTHONY IOZZO
Assistant sports editor
Seniors Nathan Dhuey
and Dakota Andre were
both keys to a 3-0 week for
the Stoughton High School
boys lacrosse team, which
improved its record to 6-2
overall.
Dhuey scored nine goals
and picked up an assist in a
20-6 win April 22 at Madi-
son La Follette, while Andre
scored three goals in a 13-0
win at Baraboo last Friday.
Dhuey struck again against
Oregon last Tuesday with
five goals and two assists in a
13-5 win.
The Vikings host La
Crosse Central at 5 p.m. Fri-
day and they travel to DeFor-
est at 5 p.m. Tuesday, May 6.
Stoughton 20, La Follette 6
Besides Dhuey, Stoughton
had plenty of offense on April
22 against Madison La Fol-
lette.
Junior Dylan Wenker
scored five goals and fresh-
man Tanner Gutche added
three more goals.
Freshman Dylan Gross
added two goals and picked
up an assist, and sophomore
Parker Kruckenberg added
three assists.
Freshman Sam Onsager
scored a goal and had an
assist. Junior Andrew Ether
picked up two assists.
Senior Mitch Stuettgen,
junior Nick Baldukas and
Andre all added assists.
Sophomroe Jack Anderson
had four saves.
Stoughton 13, Baraboo 0
The Vikings followed that
game up with a 13-0 shutout
at Baraboo, led by Andre and
Dhuey (3 goals, 1 assist).
Kruckenberg added two
goals, while Gutche had a
goal and three assists.
Onsager added a goal and
two assists, and junior Hank
Guzman, Gross and Ether
added goals.
Gross and Wenker also had
assists.
Anderson picked up eight
saves.
Stoughton 13, Oregon 5
Stoughton finished the
week Tuesday in a steady rain
and knocked off Oregon 13-5
at Stoughton High School.
Besi des Dhuey, t he
Vikings also had contribu-
tions from sophomore Ethan
Olson and Gutche.
Gutche had three goals,
while Olson added two.
Anderson finished with
nine saves.
Boys lacrosse
Undefeated week for Vikes
Photo by Dave Taebel
Sophomore Ian Sutton hits from the bunker last Monday at Geneva National
Resort. The Vikings finished seventh overall at the invitational.
Boys golf
Hoaglin steps
down as girls
bball coach
ANTHONY IOZZO
Assistant sports editor
Rami Hoaglin has been
at the helm of the Stough-
ton High School girls bas-
ket ball program for t he
past few seasons, but she
decided to step down last
Friday.
This means that the pro-
gram is now in search of a
new coach.
Hoagl i n wi l l r emai n
teaching at SHS, but she
told athletic director Mel
Dow she had some limita-
tions that would prevent
her from coachi ng t hi s
season.
The gi r l s bas ket bal l
program has had success
under Hoagl i n, and t he
t eam has a young core
of players that will have
expectations of conference
and regi onal t i t l es next
year.
Hoagl i n coul d not be
reached for comment by
the Courier Hub’s Tues-
day deadline.
“ I h a v e b e e n v e r y
impressed with the girls
varsity players over the
past coupl e of year s, ”
Dow said. “I give coach
Hoaglin and the basketball
program a lot of credit for
Vikings finish 7th at Geneva National invite
ANTHONY IOZZO
Assistant sports editor
The Stoughton High School boys golf team
finished seventh out of 23 teams last Monday at
the Geneva National Invitational at the Geneva
National Resort.
The Vikings shot a 370 on the a rainy and windy
day, led by senior Max Fergus and freshman Sam
Anderson with a pair of 89s.
Sophomore Ian Sutton followed with a 90, while
sophomore Austin Kotlowski followed with a 102.
Waterford won the invite with a 339, and Wau-
nakee took second with a 351. Edgerton was third
with a 353.
Max Murphy (Waunakee), Zach Nash (Water-
ford) and Carter Ostrander (Clinton) all tied for
first place with a 79.
Stoughton hosts Oregon at 3:30 p.m. Thursday
at Stoughton Country Club in a makeup from last
Thursday’s rained out match and travels to the
Portage invite at Portage Country Club at 10 a.m.
Friday.
Stoughton then travels to Devils Head Golf
Course in Merrimac at noon Monday, May 5, and
to Koshkonong Mounds Country Club at 3:30 p.m.
Tuesday to take on Fort Atkinson.
Stoughton 165, Milton 184
The Vikings hosted Milton at Stoughton Coun-
try Club Tuesday in a steady rain and were able to
take down the Red Hawks 165-184.
Fergus led the way with a 39, while sophomore
Gunnar Goetz scored a 41. Sutton and Kotlowski
finished the scoring with a 42 and a 43, respective-
ly.
Milton was led by Drew Johnson with a 44,
while Joe Meyer and Alex Zainer each shot a 46.
C.J. Curtis finished the Red Hawks’ scoring with
a 48.
The Vikings’ JV team fell 179-203.
David Graffin led the junior varsity team with
a 49, while Milton’s JV was led by Dylan Swerig
with a 40.
Girls basketball
File photo by Anthony Iozzo
Rami Hoaglin (left) is stepping
down as Stoughton High School
head girls basketball coach.
Turn to Girls BB/Page 11
Photo by Joe Koshollek
Stoughton’s Nathan Dhuey (right) rips a goal shot past Oregon’s Trent Ricker. Dhuey’s goal was the eighth goal of the game for the
Vikings in the first half of the game. Stoughton won x-x.
10
May 1, 2014 Courier Hub ConnectStoughton.com
stoughtonhospital.com
Wednesday, May 7th at 10 a.m.
Stoughton Hospital
Bryant Health Education Center
(lower level)
To register for this free class,
please contact Sonja at 873-2356
or pr3@stohosp.com.
Cooking for
One or Two People
Susan Mawst, clinical dietician, will
help with tips, tricks and recipes for
preparing healthy meals for one or
two people.
stoughtonhospital.com
Wednesday, May 7th at 10 a.m.
Stoughton Hospital
Bryant Health Education Center
(lower level)
To register for this free class,
please contact Sonja at 873-2356
or pr3@stohosp.com.
Cooking for
One or Two People
Susan Mawst, clinical dietician, will
help with tips, tricks and recipes for
preparing healthy meals for one or
two people.
stoughtonhospital.com
Wednesday, May 7th at 10 a.m.
Stoughton Hospital
Bryant Health Education Center
(lower level)
To register for this free class,
please contact Sonja at 873-2356
or pr3@stohosp.com.
Cooking for
One or Two People
Susan Mawst, clinical dietician, will
help with tips, tricks and recipes for
preparing healthy meals for one or
two people.
stoughtonhospital.com
Wednesday, May 7th at 10 a.m.
Stoughton Hospital
Bryant Health Education Center
(lower level)
To register for this free class,
please contact Sonja at 873-2356
or pr3@stohosp.com.
Cooking for
One or Two People
Susan Mawst, clinical dietician, will
help with tips, tricks and recipes for
preparing healthy meals for one or
two people.
stoughtonhospital.com
Wednesday, May 7th at 10 a.m.
Stoughton Hospital
Bryant Health Education Center
(lower level)
To register for this free class,
please contact Sonja at 873-2356
or pr3@stohosp.com.
Cooking for
One or Two People
Susan Mawst, clinical dietician, will
help with tips, tricks and recipes for
preparing healthy meals for one or
two people.
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Parents & Grandparents
Celebrate Your
Graduate’s Achievement!
For that special keepsake
place an ad in the
Black & White Ad Color Ad
1 column x 3 inch ad:
$
15
$
39
2 column x 3 inch ad:
$
30
$
54
2 column x 5 inch ad:
$
50
$
85
Contact Diane Beaman
at (608) 873-6671
or insidesales@wcinet.com
for more information
Record highlights first Simpson Relays win in SHS history
ANTHONY IOZZO
Assistant sports editor
Last Thursday’s first-place in the
800-medley relay meant more than
helping the Stoughton High School
girls track and field team to its first
ever win at the Simpson Relays at
Monroe High School.
Junior Hannah Sonsalla, sopho-
more Maren Gryttenholm, fresh-
man Aly Weum and freshman Ken-
dra Halverson also picked up a meet
and school record time of 1 minute,
52.26 seconds.
Graduates Brianna Bower, Mack-
enzie Bower, Riley Jamison and
Amanda Staffen held the previous
school record with a time of 1:56.6.
Weum made the first-place in the
event possible by making up four
seconds on the final leg of the 400
to catch Monona Grove sophomore
Kaylee Hinson at the line.
“It was super-impressive that
they were able to do what they did,”
head coach Eric Benedict said.
The win also helped the Vikings
claim its first ever Simpsons Relays
title. The girls collected 101 points
with three other winners, six second
places and a third place.
The hurdle shuttle relay team of
junior Alexa Deutsch, sophomore
Shelby Orcutt and freshman Kylie
Lynch took first in 54.53. The
triple jump team of junior Megan
Reese, freshman Payton Kahl and
freshman Mya Lonnebotn won with
a distance of 94 feet, 11 inches, and
senior Maren Schultz, junior Han-
nah Posick and Kahl took the high
jump with a height of 14-6.
“This is a huge accomplishment
to win a meet that is really very
competitive with teams like Mono-
na Grove and Sun Prairie and Mon-
roe – teams that are very good track
programs,” Benedict said. “Relay
meets really show the depth of your
team, and I think it showed through
on Friday night.”
Posick, Gryttenholm, Sonsalla
and Halverson took second in the
4x200 (1:49.99), and junior Kelsey
Jenny, senior Katherine Rude,
junior Nikki Staffen and Reese were
runners-up in the distance medley
(13:27).
Gryttenholm, Staffen, Sonsalla
and Jenny also took second in the
4x400 (4:17.03), while Kahl, Res-
se and Lonnebotn were second in
the long jump (46-6 1/4). Juniors
Alexus Crokett, Savanna Smith and
Allie Niemeyer were runners-up in
the shot put (100-0), while junior Ila
Giese, Niemeyer and Smith were
second in the discus (272-5).
The 4x100 team of freshman
Corinne Olson, senior Mykala Con-
roy, freshman Isabel Dennis and
Deustch took third in 55.19.
Monona Grove took second with
84 points, while Sun Prairie was
third with 69.
Benedict said that the success
against conference teams in the last
few weeks shows the possibilities
the Vikings have, but he expects the
conference meet to be a lot different
in a month.
“A lot of schools have some very
good athletes that are doing good
things right now,” he said. “It might
not come down to who has the best
team but who has the best athletes
in certain events.”
Stoughton Quad
The Lady Vikings hosted Madi-
son Edgewood, Milton and Monroe
on Tuesday and won with 102 1/2
points.
Gryttenholm won the 100 (13.3),
while Weum took the 200 (27.26).
Deutsch won the 100 hurdles in
17.03 and Sonsalla won the 300
hurdles in 49.3.
Gryttenholm, Posick, Lonnebotn
and Kahl won the 4x200 in 1:55.5.
Crockett won the shot put with a
throw of 35-0, and Schultz won the
high jump in 4-10.
Weum added a second place in
the 1,600 in 5:50, while Staffen
took second in the 3,200 in 12:08.1.
Halverson (13-9) and Kahl (13-
9) took second and third in the long
jump, respectively.
Reese (30-11) and freshman
Marissa Robson (30-10 3/4) fin-
ished second and third in the triple
jump.
Smith was second in the discus
(97-10) and third in the shot put
(31-10). Posick tied for second in
the high jump (4-8).
Madison Edgewood finished sec-
ond with 85 points, while Miltoin
was third with 32. Monroe finished
last with 31 1/2 points.
The boys and girls track teams
travel to Oregon High School for a
relay invite at 4:30 p.m. Friday and
travel to Monroe for a quad with
Fort Atkinson, Monona Grove and
Monroe at 4:30 p.m. Tuesday, May
6.
BOYS
The Stoughton High School boys
track and field team took fourth at
the Simpson Relays with 46 points.
The 1600 medley team of soph-
omore Josh Hitchcock, senior
Jayce Yellow Bird, junior Giles
France and junior John McCune
led the Vikings with a second place
(3:38.25).
The 4x800 relay team of senior
Santiago Sarthou, junior Patrick
Reilly, France and McCune took
third in 8:36.31.
The high jump, pole vault and
discus teams all took third.
The high jump relay (senior Luke
Logan, junior Brad Graffin and
Hitchcock) had a height of 16-2,
and the pole vault relay (sophomore
Derek Schultz, sophomore Max
Quale and Logan) had a height of
32-6.
The discus relay (senior Kyle
Patun, sophomore Buck Krueger
and junior Ben Brandt) had a dis-
tance of 341-10.
Monona Grove won the meet
with 76 1/2 points, while Sun Prai-
rie (67) and Oregon (60 1/2) took
second and third, respectively.
Stoughton quad
The boys hosted Madison Edge-
wood, Milton and Monroe Tuesday
and finished last with 54 points.
Madison Edgewood won the
meet with 70 points, while Mil-
ton and Monroe each picked up 63
points.
Jackson Hampton, McCune,
France, and Reilly took first in the
4x800 relay. The quartet finished in
9:07.9.
Patun won the discus with a
throw of 120-1.
Yellow Bird took second in the
long jump (19-5 1/2), while senior
River Hoaglin took second in the
triple jump (36-3 1/2).
Junior Ryan Sperle took third in
the 400 (55.35). Sarthou was third
in the 800 (2:15.1) and Nathan Moll
was third in the 110 hurdles (19.33).
Patun added a third place in the
shot put (41-9) and Krueger was
third in the discus (118-2).
Graffin (5-4) and Adam Krum-
holz (5-4) was second and third,
respectively, in the high jump.
Track and field
Early second half goal
not enough in tough loss
ANTHONY IOZZO
Assistant sports editor
The St ought on Hi gh
School girls soccer team
hosted Badger South rival
Fort Atkinson last Thurs-
day and fell 2-1 after a
late goal by Brigette Jira.
Ji ra, who scored t he
first goal of the game,
was subbed in on a cor-
ner kick, and Stoughton
didn’t mark her in time –
allowing Jira to sneak into
the penalty box and get
the goal in the 69th min-
ute.
The Vi ki ngs t r ai l ed
1-0 at halftime, and head
coach Dave Wer mut h
said that he told his team
to possess the ball bet-
ter in the second half. It
only took 43 seconds into
the second for the girls to
heed that advice.
Maddie Posick knocked
in the equalizer with an
assist from Emma Holtan
in the 40th minute.
“We talked about get-
ting ourselves fired up
for the second half and
working on making those
good passes,” head coach
Dave Wermuth said. “It
couldn’t be any quicker
of a turnaround to tie the
game up.”
Ha nna h Wood f i n-
ished with three saves for
Stoughton, while Megan
Jordan picked up three for
the Blackhawks.
We r mu t h s a i d t h e
match was played evenly,
and the girls have been
improving with time of
possession in every game,
but the girls need to con-
tinue to improve in that
area to turn some of the
close losses into wins.
“We are making a con-
sorted effort to control
possession, and I think
they are getting better and
better at it,” he said.
St ought on t ravel s t o
Monona Grove at 7 p.m.
Thursday and hosts Lake
Mills at 7 p.m. Friday.
Stoughton finishes the
week at 7 p.m., Tuesday,
May 6, against Madison
Edgewood at home.
Stoughton,
Belleville (PPD)
Tuesday’s game at Bel-
l evi l l e was post poned.
No makeup dat e was
announced by the Courier
Hub’s Tuesday deadline.
Vikings doubled up at Oconomowoc
The St ought on Hi gh
School baseball team fell 8-4
at Oconomowoc last Friday.
The No. 8-ranked Vikings
fell behind by seven runs
early, including a five-run
third inning, and couldn’t
recover.
Stoughton did score three
times in the fourth to cut the
deficit to four, but Ocono-
mowoc added an insur-
ance run in the sixth. The
Vikings’ last run came in the
seventh. The Coons struck
first with two runs in the
first.
Senior PJ Rosowski was
2-for-3 to lead the Vikings’
offense. He also had two
RBIs.
Al ex Zachar i as t ook
t he l os s . He al l owed
seven earned runs on 10 hits
in three innings. He struck
out one and walked two.
Sam Ripp pitched the other
three innings and allowed
an unearned run on four hits.
He walked three and struck
out one.
Oconomowoc’ s J os h
Hottinger pitched all sev-
en innings for the win. He
allowed one earned run on
four hits. He struck out six
and walked one.
Stoughton continues the
season at 5 p.m. Thursday
against Madison Edgewood
at home, and it travels to
Madison West at 5 p.m. Fri-
day.
The Vikings also travel
to DeForest at 10 a.m. Sat-
urday and to Riverside Park
at 4:30 p.m. Monday to take
on Janesville Craig. Stough-
ton finishes the week against
Mount Horeb at 5 p.m. Tues-
day at home.
Stoughton, Monroe
(PPD)
The Vikings’ game at
Monroe last Thursday was
post poned due t o rai n.
No makeup date has been
announced yet.
Stoughton, Fort
Atkinson (PPD)
St ought on’ s game at
Fort At ki nson Tuesday
was postponed due to rain.
There wasn’t a makeup date
announced at the time of the
Courier Hub’s deadline.
Girls soccer Baseball
May 1, 2014 Courier Hub ConnectStoughton.com
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7th grade girls win state tournament
The Stoughton seventh grade girls basketball team won the Division 2 state tournament title held April
12-13 in Wausau with a record of 6-0 in the tournament.
The team’s 2013-2014 season record was 46-5. Highlights of the season leading up to the state title
includes: MATC Tri-County American Red Division champs; MATC Tri-County tournament champions;
Waukesha North tournament champions (D1 Tournament); Highlander Basketball Club (Mequon, WI)
tournament champions (D1 tournament).
Softball splits two games last week
JEREMY JONES
Sports editor
Stoughton softball Thursday got in two
games last week before more spring rains
forced the cancelation of another two games.
Monroe 4, Stoughton 3
Holly Brickson went 2-for-3 at the plate
Thursday in Monroe and Madi Sehmer dou-
bled in a 4-3 loss.
Sarah Seaton allowed one earned run on
seven hits. She walked two and struck out six
in the loss.
Monroe’s Natalie Dillon only gave up four
hits, but surrendered three earned runs on six
walks. The Cheesemakers, ranked second on
the Wisconsin Fastpitch Softball Coaches
Association Division 2 state poll, improved
to 11-1 overall, 4-0 in conference with the
win. The Vikings fell to 2-4 overall (1-3 con-
ference) with the loss.
Stoughton 9, Lancaster 8
Sarah Seaton struck out 11 but had to battle
to the end to earn a 9-8 non-conference game
Friday at Lancaster.
Stoughton trailed 3-0 out of the gate, but
battled back to knot the score with three wins
over the final two innings.
Despite her double-digit strike out total,
Seaton allowed 11 hits and was tagged for
seven runs, though only three were earned.
Payton Gross (2-for-4), Samantha Tepp
(2-for-4) and Bethany Veum (2-for-3) also
added multiple hits. Seaton (2-for-3) and
Sehmer both doubled.
Stoughton, Fort Atkinson (PPD)
Persistent rain forced the Vikings to post-
pone Monday’s April 7 make-up game in
Fort Atkinson. The game will be made up
May 2.
Stoughton, Fort Atkinson (PPD)
Changing venues didn’t change the weath-
er Tuesday as the Vikings’ home game with
Fort Atkinson was also postponed.
No make-up date had been announced as
the Courier Hub went to press.
Softball
The green flag set to wave at
MIS season opener is May 4
The sixth annual ARCA Midwest Tour
Joe Shear Classic returns to Madison
International Speedway on Sunday, May
4. This will be the first race of the sea-
son at Madison before the track returns to
Friday night racing on May 23.
The event honors one of the great-
est short track racers in the country,
the late Joe Shear of Clinton, who won
four track championships at Madison
(1973,1974,1980, 1982) and took home
66 feature wins.
“This is a very special event at Madi-
son,” said MIS owner Terry Kunes. “We
are excited about the 2014 racing season
here and this is the perfect event to open
our year by honoring a true legend of the
short tracks, Shear.”
The ARCA Midwest Tour will bring the
best drivers in the region to Wisconsin’s
Fastest Half-Mile. The Joe Shear Classic
will be a 100-lap event that will be split
into two segments: 64 laps followed by a
short break and then a 36-lap dash. The
American Ethanol Super Trucks will also
be part of the racing program.
Travis Sauter was victorious in last
year’s race and carries a nine race win
streak at Madison into the 2014 season.
Other winners of the “Classic” include
Nat han Hasel eu (2009), St eve Carl -
son (2010), Ross Kenseth (2011), and
Andrew Morrissey (2012).
Action begins on Saturday, May 3 with
an open practice session and free grand-
stand admission for the fans.
On Sunday action begins with practice
at 11:30 a.m., qualifying at 1:15 p.m. fol-
lowed by opening ceremonies at 2:15 and
racing to follow. Adult admission is $15
with seniors (60 plus) and students (12-
17) at $13 and free for kids eleven and
under.
Madison International Speedway
that.
“We have a strong inter-
est in girls basketball now,
and we are hoping to take
that to a new direction.”
Dow sai d he al r eady
started the hiring process
and expects the new open-
ing to be posted for two
weeks.
Ther e wi l l t hen be a
scr eeni ng pr ocess and
i nt ervi ews i n mi d-May
with the goal of hiring a
new coach by the end of
the school year.
The plan is to have a
coach in place so the play-
ers can have an under-
standing of the direction
the new coach will bring,
Dow said.
Girls BB: Coaching search begins
Continued from page 9
Boys tennis
Vikings have mixed results
JEREMY JONES
Sports editor
Rain limited the Stoughton boys tennis
team to only the Madison East Invitational
last week.
The Vikings kicked off the tournament ear-
ly Friday afternoon against Verona at Hruska
Park where only the No. 3 doubles team of
Breckin Houser and Ike Landers picked up
a victory in a 6-1 loss. Houser and Landers
played to a 6-4, 6-1 victory over the Wildcats.
Verona went on to knock off Madison East
4-3 in the championship match.
Stoughton meanwhile, traveled to Madi-
son La Follete later that afternoon for a dual
against the Lancers, which they won 4-3.
The Vikings received another win from
Houser and Landers at 3 doubles 6-2, 6-2 and
Austin Scheel and Asher McMullin added a
6-3, 6-3 win at 1 doubles.
Nathan Lawlor and Gabe Rowley helped
Stoughton close out the dual with a 6-1, 2-6,
10-8 and 7-5, 2-6, 10-3 victory at 2 and 3 sin-
gles, respectively.
Saturday saw the Vikings take four match-
es to three sets, losing three in a 6-1 loss
against the host Purgolders.
Once again Houser and Landers earned the
team’s lone win.
Down two players because of the Wiscon-
sin State Solo ensemble competition at UW-
Whitewater, the Vikings switched up their
lineup in a rematch against Madison La Fol-
lette.
Rowley stepped up to No.2 singles for one
win, while the other came at three singles.
Stoughton, Monroe (PPD)
The Vikings conference dual against
Monroe last Thursday was postponed due
to weather. A make-up date of 4:30 p.m.
May 5 has been set.
Stoughton, Baraboo (PPD)
Rain and 30+ mph winds forced the post-
ponement of Monday’s Badger Conference
crossover in Baraboo. That dual has been
rescheduled for 4:30 p.m. May 7.
Stoughton, Milton (PPD)
Tuesday’s conference dual at Milton
was postponed. No make-up date had been
announced as the Courier Hub went to press.
Photo by Jeremy Jones
Stoughton No. 3 doubles team of Breckin Houser (left) and Ike Landers celebrate following their
6-4, 6-1 victory over Verona early Friday afternoon. The Vikings lost the dual 6-1.
12
May 1, 2014 Courier Hub ConnectStoughton.com
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Office Hours: Monday-Friday 8:30 a.m. - 4 p.m.
Memorials for those we love and remember.
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Serving Stoughton since 1989.
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Obituaries
Caryl J. Johnson-Karls
Caryl J. Johnson-Karls,
age 56, passed away on
Monday, April 21, 2014, at
Agrace HospiceCare, fol-
lowing a brief illness. She
was born in Stoughton on
Feb. 23, 1958, the daughter
of Chester and Helen John-
son.
Caryl graduat ed from
Stoughton High School.
She worked many years
in the health care indus-
try. Caryl enjoyed camp-
ing, softball, the Green
Bay Packers and spending
time with her family, espe-
cially with her daughter and
grandson. She was fun lov-
ing, lived for the moment
and will be missed by all
who knew her.
Caryl is survived by her
daughter, Jenna (fiancé,
Christian Herrera) Karls;
grandson, Alejandro; her
mother, Helen; two sib-
lings, Rae Ann (Gurney)
Pearsall and Jerry (Alice)
Johnson; niece, Lesli (Jer-
emy) Dietzman; nephew,
John Pearsall; many rela-
tives; and dear friends.
She was preceded i n
death by her father, Ches-
ter, and her grandparents,
Alvin and Elinor Anderson.
Funeral services were
held on Friday, April 25,
2014, at Cress Funeral
Home in Stoughton. A spe-
cial thank you to the staffs
of Care WI and Agrace
HospiceCare Inc.
Cress Funeral Service
206 W. Prospect Street
Stoughton, WI 53589
873-9244
cressfuneralservice.com
Caryl J. Johnson-Karls
Anna Mae Listol
Anna Mae Listol, age 91,
of Stoughton, passed away
on Sunday, April 27, 2014,
at Skaalen Nursing Home.
Anna was born on Sept. 5,
1922, to Catherine and Har-
vey Hanson. She married
Donald Listol on May 2,
1942, and they had one son,
Robert.
Anna was employed at
t he St ought on Garment
Factory. After their closing,
she went to work for the
State of Wisconsin Depart-
ment of Transportation for
25 years, until her retire-
ment. Anna enjoyed read-
ing, baking, and she loved
watching the Green Bay
Packers.
Anna i s sur vi ved by
her son, Bob (Sue) Listol;
grandchildren, Scott (Stac-
ey) Listol, Susan (Tim) Lis-
tol-Crye, Sandra Feuling,
Jamie (Deanna) Ennis and
Joshua (Yvonne) Ennis;
nine great-grandchildren;
and one great-great-grand-
son.
She was preceded i n
death by her husband, Don-
ald, and her brother, Sid.
Funeral services will be
held at Skaalen Home Cha-
pel, 400 Morris St., Stough-
ton, at 11 a.m. on Thursday,
May 1, 2014, with the Rev.
Paula Geister-Jones presid-
ing. Private burial will be
at Upper McFarland Cem-
etery. Visitation will be
at the chapel from 10 a.m.
until the time of the service
on Thursday.
In lieu of flowers, dona-
tions may be made to the
Dane County Humane Soci-
ety. Our family wishes to
thank Skaalen Home for
their kindness and care of
Anna. Online condolences
may be made at gunderson-
fh.com
Gunderson Stoughton
Funeral & Cremation
Care
1358 Highway 51N
873-4590
Anna Mae Listol
Tim Andrews Horticulturist - LLC
608-223-9970
www.tahort.com
Caring for our Green World since 1978
It's all about the details!
Fall Cleanups, Tree and Shrub Pruning, Planting and
Removals, Stump Grinding, Mulching and Complete
Landscape Makeovers.
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Spring Pruning, Cleanup,
Lawn Repair and Complete
Landscape Makeovers
Dog wash fundraiser May 10
The Friends of Viking
Park will hold a dog wash
fundraiser May 10 to sup-
port the purchase of a
fence for the dog exercise
area of the Viking Dog
Park.
The new hal f - mi l e
fence, whi ch wi l l run
alongside the Hwy. N side
of the park, will prevent
the common occurrence
of dogs running across a
small trench of the river
and getting onto Hwy. N,
where cars travel 55 mph
or faster.
Friends member Karla
Gander said the fence will
help dog owners feel safe
about bringing their pets
there.
The timing of this proj-
ect comes in response to
an accident that affected
many of the park’s visi-
tors. In February 2013, a
small terrier named Dick-
ens ran across the ice and
onto the highway, where a
truck hit him and his pel-
vis was broken in three
places.
Dickens was lucky in his
survival and recovery. The
new fence should prevent
accidents like this from
happening in the future.
Support for the fence
project has come from a
number of local businesses
and organizations. Dane
County Parks will provide
a matching grant for funds
raised for the park, up to a
set limit.
The pa r ks de pa r t -
ment has also provided
tools and will supply the
equipment needed to erect
the fence, so only the raw
mat er i al s ar e needed.
Operat i on Fresh St art
has offered to help do
the work of erecting the
fence along with the Parks
employees, and Stoughton
Lumber has offered to sell
the fencing at cost for the
project. Thrivent Financial
has also provided financial
support for the fence proj-
ect.
The event will be held
at Claws 2 Paws, 1305 E.
Main St., on Saturday May
10, from 8 a.m.–4 p.m.
The day will include a dog
wash station, dog-training
tips, face painting and the
Stoughton Police Depart-
ment’s K9 unit.
Pork sliders, chips and
drinks will also be avail-
able to purchase.
Indi vi dual s who are
i nt erest ed i n donat i ng
to the cause can join the
Friends group during the
fundraiser or they can
send a check made out to
Friends of Viking Park,
Karla Gander, treasurer,
If you go
What: Fundraiser to
erect fence at Viking Dog
Park
Where: Claws 2 Paws,
1305 E. Main St.
When: 8 a.m. - 4 p.m.,
Saturday, May 10
Info: Dennis Borman,
577-3846
May 1, 2014 Courier Hub ConnectStoughton.com
13
Legals
NOTICE OF BOARD OF
REVIEW MEETING
CITY OF STOUGHTON,
DANE COUNTY, WISCONSIN
Public notice is hereby given
that the Board of Review for the City
of Stoughton will meet in the Council
Chambers, Public Safety Building, 321
South Fourth Street, on Monday, May 12,
2014, from 10:00 o’clock a.m. to 12:00
noon, for the purpose of reviewing and
examining the assessment roll of real
and personal property in said City, and
all sworn statements and valuations
of real and personal property therein,
and of correcting all errors in said roll,
whether in description or otherwise, and
to perform such other duties imposed
by law.
Please be advised of the following
requirements.
No person shall be allowed to ap-
pear before the Board of Review, to
testify to the Board by telephone or to
contest the amount of any assessment
of real or personal property if the per-
son has refused a reasonable written
request by certifed mail of the Assessor
to view such property.
After the frst meeting of the Board
of Review and before the Board’s fnal
adjournment, no person who is sched-
uled to appear before the Board of Re-
view may contact, or provide informa-
tion to, a member of the Board about the
person’s objection except at a session
of the Board.
No person may appear before the
Board of Review, testify to the Board by
telephone or contest the amount of any
assessment unless, at least 48 hours
before the frst meeting of the Board
or at least 48 hours before the objec-
tion is heard if the objection is allowed
because the person has been granted a
waiver of the 48-hour notice of an intent
to fle a written objection by appearing
before the Board during the frst two
hours of the meeting and showing good
cause for failure to meet the 48-hour
notice requirement and fles a written
objection, that person provides to the
Clerk of the Board of Review notice as to
whether the person will ask for removal
of any Board members and, if so, which
member will be removed and the per-
son’s reasonable estimate of the length
of time that the hearing will take.
When appearing before the Board,
the person shall specify, in writing, the
person’s estimate of the value of the
land and of the improvements that are
the subject of the person’s objection
and specify the information that the per-
son used to arrive at that estimate.
No person may appear before the
Board of Review, testify to the Board by
telephone or object to a valuation; if that
valuation was made by the Assessor or
the Objector using the income method;
unless the person supplies to the As-
sessor all of the information about in-
come and expenses, as specifed in the
manual under Section 73.03(2a), that the
Assessor requests. The municipality or
county shall provide by ordinance for
the confdentiality of information about
income and expenses that is provided to
the Assessor under this paragraph and
shall provide exemptions for persons
using the information in the discharge
of duties imposed by law or of the duties
of their offce or by order of a court. The
information that is provided under this
paragraph, unless a court determines
that it is inaccurate, is not subject to the
right of inspection and copying under
Section 19.35(1).
The Board shall hear upon oath,
by telephone, all ill or disabled persons
who present to the Board a letter from
a physician, surgeon or osteopath that
confrms their illness or disability. No
other persons may testify by telephone.
CITY OF STOUGHTON
Maria Hougan, City Clerk
Publish: April 17, 24 and May 1, 2014
WNAXLP
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PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE
The City of Stoughton Planning
Commission will hold a Public Hearing
on Monday, May 12, 2014 at 6:00 o’clock
p.m., or as soon after as the matter may
be heard, in the Council Chambers, Pub-
lic Safety Building, 321 South Fourth
Street, Second Floor, Stoughton, Wis-
consin, 53589, to consider a proposed
Conditional Use Permit Application by
James Brooks, for an Indoor Commer-
cial Entertainment use (ftness facility)
at 1060 W. Main Street, Unit 8, Stough-
ton, Wisconsin. The property at 1060
W. Main Street, Unit 8 is owned by 1050
Associates LLC, and is more fully de-
scribed as follows:
Parcel Number: 281/0511-071-0214-
4,
REPLAT OF BLOCK 2 EMERSON
PARK LOTS 4 & 5 BLOCK 2 & ERICK-
SON PARK BLOCK 1 LOTS 1 & 2 EXC S
33 FT SD LOT 2 & ALSO INCL PRT VAC
ELM ST ADJ SD PRCL IN M274/565
For questions regarding this notice
please contact Michael Stacey, Zoning
Administrator at 608-646-0421
Michael P Stacey
Zoning Administrator
Published April 24 and May 1, 2014
WNAXLP
* * *
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
The City of Stoughton Common
Council will hold a Public Hearing on
Tuesday May 13, 2014 at 7:00 o’clock
p.m., or as soon after as the matter may
be heard, at the Public Safety Build-
ing, Second Floor, 321 S. Fourth Street,
Stoughton, Wisconsin, 53589, to consid-
er an amendment to the City of Stough-
ton Municipal Code of Ordinances, Dane
County, Wisconsin. The proposed ordi-
nance amendments are to sections 66-1,
66-204, 66-501, 66-502 and to Appendix
1, Chapter 66, Land Division Ordinance
For questions regarding this notice
please contact Rodney Scheel, Director
of Planning & Development at 608-873-
6619 or rjscheel@ci.stoughton.wi.us
Rodney Scheel
Director of Planning & Development
Published April 24 and May 1, 2014
WNAXLP
* * *
NOTICE OF
PUBLIC HEARING
The Common Council of the City
of Stoughton, Dane County, Wisconsin,
will hold a Public Hearing on Tuesday,
May 13 at 7:00 o’clock p.m., or as soon
hereafter as the matter may be heard,
in the Council Chambers, Public Safety
Building, 2nd Floor, 321 South Fourth
Street, Stoughton, Wisconsin, to con-
sider sidewalk, driveway and curb and
gutter assessments for 2014 Street And
Utility Construction on Church Street,
Forton Street, Sundt Lane, Oakwood
Court, Smedal Drive, Palmer Drive, Lin-
coln Avenue, Chapin Lane, East Main
Street, North Page Street, and Ridge
Street, within the City of Stoughton and
levying of special assessments to pay
for same.
Please Note:
If you have any questions regard-
ing this notice and/or special assess-
ments, please contact Director of Plan-
ning & Development Rodney Scheel at
873-6619
Maria Hougan, City Clerk
Published May 1, 2014
WNAXLP
* * *
CITY OF STOUGHTON
OFFICIAL MEETING MINUTES
OF THE COMMON COUNCIL
DATE/TIME: TUESDAY,
MARCH 25, 2014 @ 7:00 P.M.
LOCATION: COUNCIL
CHAMBERS/PUBLIC
SAFETY BUILDING
Members: David Kneebone, Sonny
Swangstu, Tim Swadley, Michael Engel-
berger, Ron Christianson, Paul Law-
rence, Greg Jenson, Eric Hohol, Tom
Majewski, Tom Selsor, Tricia Suess
Mayor Donna Olson presided at a
Regular Meeting of the Common Council
of the City of Stoughton, Dane County,
Wisconsin, held in the Council Cham-
bers, Public Safety Building, on March
25, 2014, convening at 7:00 P.M.
CALL TO ORDER
Mayor Olson called the meeting to
order at 7:00 P.M.
Roll Call, Communications, and
Presentations:
Clerk Hougan called the roll and
noted 9 Alderpersons present: Suess,
Kneebone, Swangstu, Swadley, Chris-
tianson, Lawrence, Jenson, Hohol, and
Selsor.
Absent & Excused-Alderperson
Engelberger, Majewski
Communications: Mayor Olson
read a proclamation for March for Meals
Month regarding senior hunger in Amer-
ica, Mayor Olson thanked the Senior
Center for all they do for our community.
Mayor Olson read a proclamation for
Melvin “Red” Benschop’s retirement;
Melvin served 58.1 years of dedicated
service to the City of Stoughton Fire De-
partment. Mayor Olson dedicated March
27, 2014 Melvin “Red” Benschop day.
Mayor Olson stated Mark Friend was on
the news expressing his gratitude to all
those who participated in saving his life
from his accident on January 5, 2013.
Kettle Park West update-Finance
Director Sullivan stated staff work
has centered around the RFP on the
economic impact study. Staff was di-
rected to submit requests for proposals
(RFP’s) to about 12 companies, they did
not received any back, due to the tight
timeline, they sent proposals back and
have received one proposal back today,
and are expecting two more this week.
The proposals will be provided to the
fnance committee for review, and the
fnance committee will make a recom-
mendation. Questions from alderperson
were answered. A request was made to
review the proposals in the Committee
of the Whole.
Public Comment Period- Lisa
Reeves, 708 E Main Street, registered
to speak in support of the proposed
moratorium related to Kettle Park West;
Roger Springman, 812 Kriedeman Drive,
registered to speak in support of the
moratorium and the TIF policy; Sharon
Mason-Boersma, 243 E. McKinley, reg-
istered to speak in opposition of Kettle
Park West, and in support of the morato-
rium and a review of the TIF policy, Phil
Caravello 225 E Main Street, in support
of moratorium until economic and fscal
impact studies have been done, Michael
Engelberger submitted a letter that was
read supporting the moratorium on the
Kettle Park West project.
Consent Agenda: Moved by Law-
rence, second by Swadley, to approve
the council minutes of March 11, 2014.
Motion carried unanimously by accla-
mation.
O-8-2014: Authorizing and directing
the proper city offcials to amend sec-
tion 50-5 prohibit harassment of police
and fre animals. Moved by Swadley,
second by Lawrence to approve. Motion
carried unanimously by acclamation.
NEW BUSINESS
R-22-2014: Approving a Certifed
Survey Map for Norse View Holdings
LLC to reconfgure Lots 126, 127, 128
and part of 129, Seventh Addition to
Norse View Heights, Stoughton, with the
intent to create an additional buildable
single family lot. (Planning commis-
sion approved 6-0 with Mayor
Olson voting). Moved by Lawrence, Sec-
ond by Jenson to approve. Motion car-
ried unanimously by acclamation.
R-23-2014: Approving a Certifed
Survey Map for Norse View Holdings
LLC to reconfgure lots 130,131,132 and
part of 129, Seventh Addition to Norse
View Heights, Stoughton, with the intent
to create an additional buildable single
family lot. (Planning commission ap-
proved 6-0 with Mayor Olson voting).
Moved by Christianson, second by Jen-
son, to approve. Motion carried unani-
mously by acclamation.
R-24-2014: Approving a Certifed
Survey Map for Dwayne Kittleson to
combine lots 1 and 2, CSM #12666, 1707
and 1709 N. Van Buren Street, Stough-
ton, with the intent to reverse a previ-
ously approved zero-lot line. (Planning
commission approved 6-0 with Mayor
Olson voting) Moved by Christianson,
second by Jenson to approve. Motion
carried unanimously by acclamation.
R-29-2014: Authorizing and direct-
ing the proper City offcial(s) to ap-
prove the write off of accounts deemed
uncollectible as of December 31, 2013.
(Utilities approved 7-0 with Mayor Ol-
son voting) Moved by Hohol, second by
Lawrence, to approve. Motion carries by
acclamation with Kneebone voting noe.
Discussion and possible action on
a proposed moratorium to be placed on
any further approvals related to the Ket-
tle Park West development project until
after the completion of the fscal and
economic impact analysis that was pre-
viously requested by a majority vote of
the Stoughton Common Council. Moved
by Kneebone, second by Suess, that
the Common Council not approve the
creation of a Tax Incremental Finance
District relating to the Kettle Park West
Development, and further that the Com-
mon Council request the Plan Commis-
sion to not approve any Specifc Imple-
mentation Plan for the proposed Kettle
Park West Development, until after the
Common Council has determined that it
has received an appropriate economic
impact analysis of the proposed Kettle
Park West Development. Motion carried
unanimously by acclamation.
Discussion and possible referral
to the fnance committee relative to the
development of a City of Stoughton TIF
policy for undeveloped districts similar
to the TIF policy the City of Stoughton
has for redevelopment areas. Moved by
Kneebone, second by Lawrence, that
the Common Council refer the question
of TIF policies to the Finance Committee
regarding undeveloped districts in the
City of Stoughton for further consider-
ation. Motion carries unanimously by
acclamation.
ADJOURNMENT
Moved by Lawrence, second by
Hohol to adjourn at 8:00 P.M. Motion
carries.
Respectfully submitted,
Maria P. Hougan, City Clerk
Published: May 1, 2014
WNAXLP
* * *
CITY OF STOUGHTON
OFFICIAL MEETING MINUTES
OF THE COMMON COUNCIL
DATE/TIME: TUESDAY,
APRIL 8, 2014 @ 7:00 P.M.
LOCATION: COUNCIL
CHAMBERS/PUBLIC
SAFETY BUILDING
Members: David Kneebone, Sonny
Swangstu, Tim Swadley, Michael Engel-
berger, Ron Christianson, Paul Law-
rence, Greg Jenson, Eric Hohol, Tom
Majewski, Tom Selsor, Tricia Suess
Mayor Donna Olson presided at a
Regular Meeting of the Common Council
of the City of Stoughton, Dane County,
Wisconsin, held in the Council Cham-
bers, Public Safety Building, on April 8,
2014, convening at 7:00 P.M.
CALL TO ORDER
Mayor Olson called the meeting to
order at 7:00 P.M.
Roll Call, Communications, and
Presentations:
Clerk Hougan called the roll and
noted 11 Alderpersons present: Suess,
Kneebone, Swangstu, Swadley, Chris-
tianson, Lawrence, Jenson, Hohol, Sel-
sor, Engelberger, and Majewski.
Communications: Clerk Hougan re-
ported out on the election results of the
April Spring Election. Mayor Olson read
a certifcate of appreciation from the De-
partment of Safety and Professional Ser-
vices to the Stoughton Fire Department.
Kettle Park West update- Finance
Director Sullivan presented a detailed
power point on TIF Applications, and the
TIF process.
Public Comment Period- Roger
Springman, 812 Kriedeman Dr., regis-
tered to speak regarding the TIF Policy
and Economic Impact Study.
NEW BUSINESS
Mayor Olson requested agenda
items 8 and 11 to be moved to the be-
ginning of new business. There were no
objections from the council.
R-30-2014: Approving and directing
the proper city offcial(s) to approve a
Class “B” Beer license to the Stough-
ton Merchant’s Baseball for the period
of April 2014 to October 2014. Moved by
Swadley, second by Hohol, to approve.
Motion carries unanimously by accla-
mation.
R-34-2014: Authorizing and direct-
ing the proper city offcial(s) to approve
the Stoughton Utilities 2013 Audit Re-
port and Management Letter. Jodi Dob-
son with Baker Tilly presented the audit
report and management letter. Moved
by Hohol, second by Lawrence, to ap-
prove. Motion carries unanimously by
acclamation.
Request from Council President
Hohol to convene into the Committee of
the Whole for the purpose of making a
recommendation regarding selection of
the company to perform the Economic
and Fiscal Impact Analysis relating to
the proposed Kettle Park West develop-
ment, then reopen for the regular Com-
mon Council meeting.
Moved by Swadley, second by Ma-
jewski, to convene into a Committee of
the Whole. Motion carried unanimously
by acclamation. Planning Director
Scheel presented the process and time-
frame for the Request for Proposals.
Further discussion followed.
Moved by Jenson, second by Chris-
tianson, to recommend to council ap-
proval of the Maxfeld proposal. Motion
carries unanimously by acclamation.
Moved by Lawrence, second by
Suess, to amend the motion to direct
staff to request the upfront payment
of $50, 000, and that staff confrm the
study to include the whole phase one of
the development and not the just the big
box store. Motion carries unanimously
by acclamation.
Moved by Swadley, second by
Kneebone to table this until the develop-
ment plats are approved. Swadley with-
drew the motion. Kneebone seconded
withdrawal. The motion was withdrawn.
Moved by Lawrence, second by
Jenson, to adjourn the Committee of the
Whole at 8:40 p.m. and move into the
regular course of business for the Coun-
cil meeting. Motion carries unanimously
by acclamation.
The Council took a ten minute
break.
Approving the award of the con-
tract to the company selected to perform
the Economic and Fiscal Impact Analy-
sis relating to the proposed Kettle Park
West development.
Moved by Hohol, second by Jen-
son to direst staff to proceed with the
Maxfeld proposal contingent upon the
developer provide the city with upfront
funding of $50,000, and the study to in-
clude the whole development not just
the big box store. Motion carries unani-
mously by acclamation.
Discussion and possible action re-
garding flling the aldermanic vacancy in
Aldermanic District 4. (2 year term).
Moved by Suess, second by Jen-
son, to fll the vacant position for one
year and follow past procedures in
place, until a special election can be
held in April of 2015. Motion carries
unanimously by acclamation.
Moved by Lawrence, second by Ho-
hol, to amend the motion to include the
interviews and appointment of Alderper-
son for the frst meeting in May. Friendly
amendment made by Suess to move to
the second meeting in May. Open seat
will be on the ballot for the Spring Elec-
tion in April 2015, as a special election
to fll the remainder of that term for one
year. Motion carried by acclamation with
Selsor voting noe.
R-35-2014: Approving and direct-
ing the proper city offcial(s) to approve
the recommendation from the EMS/Fire
ad hoc committee of leaving the Fire
Department and Emergency Medical
Services two separate departments, and
to pursue flling the Emergency Medical
Services Director vacancy. Moved by
Swadley, second by Hohol, to approve.
Motion carries unanimously by accla-
mation.
R-32-2014: Authorizing and direct-
ing the proper city offcial(s) to imple-
ment changes to The Park Reservation
Policy/Procedure Manual, that includes
the addition of the Stoughton Ro-
tary Park and Norse Park well as other
changes to words and layout including
approved allowance of alcohol con-
sumption within certain approved areas.
Moved by Suess, second by Engelberg-
er, to approve with the amendment to
section c #2 it should read April through
October. Motion carried unanimously by
acclamation.
R-33-2014: Authorizing and direct-
ing the proper City offcial(s) to ac-
cept the Stoughton Utilities voluntary
Electric and Water Tax Stabilization
Dividends and the required Electric and
Water Payments in Lieu of Taxes. Moved
by Hohol, second by Swangstu, to ap-
prove. Motion carried unanimously by
acclamation.
ADJOURNMENT
Moved by Lawrence, second by
Jenson, to adjourn at 9:20 P.M. Motion
carries unanimously.
Respectfully submitted,
Maria P. Hougan, City Clerk
Published: May 1, 2014
WNAXLP
* * *
TOWN OF DUNKIRK
ADVERTISEMENT FOR
2014 ROAD BIDS
The Town of Dunkirk is taking re-
surfacing bids for the following roads:
Tayerton Circle, Brookside Circle, and
Town parking lot. The Town is taking
seal coat bids for the following roads:
Hammond Road, Hogie Road and Taylor
Lane.
Specifc bid information may be ob-
tained from Mark Gretebeck at (608) 873-
9177, or at the Town Hall, 654 County
Road N, Stoughton, WI 53589.
All bids shall be sealed, marked
“Highway Quote,” and submitted to the
Town Clerk at the town hall up to and in-
cluding 8:30 a.m. on May 15, 2014. Bids
will be opened at 9:30 a.m. on Wednes-
day, May 14, 2014, at the town hall. Bids
will be awarded at the Town Board meet-
ing on May 19, 2014. The contractor
shall be required to pay not less than
the prevailing wage rate as required by
the Wisconsin prevailing wage loss. The
Town of Dunkirk reserves the right to
reject any and all bids or to accept that
bid deemed to be most advantageous to
the Town.
Melanie Huchthausen, Clerk
Posted April 28, 2014
Published: May 1, 2014
WNAXLP
* * *
SECTION 00100
ADVERTISEMENT TO BID
CHURCH STREET
AND RIDGE STREET
RECONSTRUCTION
CONTRACT 2-2014
2014 STREET
CONSTRUCTION
CONTRACT 3-2014
STOUGHTON UTILITIES
CITY OF STOUGHTON,
WISCONSIN
Stoughton Utilities and the City of
Stoughton will receive sealed Bids for
the Church Street and Ridge Street Re-
construction and 2014 Street Construc-
tion projects until 11 A.M., local time,
May 20, 2014, at the offce of Stough-
ton Utilities, 600 South Fourth Street,
Stoughton, WI 53589 at which time the
Bids will be publicly opened and read
aloud.
The Work under Contract 2-2014
includes approximately 1,000 linear feet
of water main; 800 linear feet of sanitary
sewer; 350 linear feet of storm sewer;
and appurtenances. The work also in-
cludes 1,400 linear feet of curb and
gutter replacement; 5,000 square feet
of concrete sidewalk and driveway and
apron; 2,600 tons of base course; 800
tons of asphaltic concrete pavement,
turf restoration, and related miscella-
neous work.
The Work under Contract 3-2014
includes approximately 23,000 square
yards of asphalt pavement pulveriza-
tion and grading, 6,000 tons of asphaltic
concrete pavement, 2,800 linear feet of
concrete curb and gutter, 11,000 square
feet of concrete sidewalk, and related
miscellaneous work.
Bids are to be addressed to
Stoughton Utilities, 600 South Fourth
Street, Stoughton, WI 53589 and shall be
marked ?Sealed Bid-Church Street and
Ridge Street Reconstruction-Contract
2-2014? and/or ?Sealed Bid-2014 Street
Reconstruction-Contract 3-2014.?
Complete digital Project Bidding
Documents are available at www.strand.
com or at www.questcdn.com. Down-
load the digital Bidding Documents for
$30 by inputting Quest project num-
ber 3276894 on the website?s Project
Search page. Please contact QuestCDN.
com at (952) 233-1632 or info@
questcdn.com for assistance with free
membership registration, downloading,
and working with this digital project in-
formation.
Bidding Documents may be re-
viewed and paper copies may be ob-
tained from the Issuing Offce which
is Strand Associates, Inc.?, 910 West
Wingra Drive, Madison, WI 53715. A non-
refundable fee of $100 will be required
(shipping and handling fees included).
Overnight mailing of Bidding Docu-
ments will not be provided.
All Bidders submitting a sealed
Bid shall obtain the Bidding Documents
from QuestCDN.com or from Strand As-
sociates, Inc.?
Bidders who submit a Bid must be
a Plan Holder of record at the Issuing Of-
fce. Bids from Bidders who are not on
the Plan Holders List may be returned as
not being responsive.
Plan Holders are requested to pro-
vide an e-mail address if they wish to
receive addenda and other information
electronically. Plan Holders are request-
ed to designate whether they are a prime
contractor, subcontractor, or supplier if
they want this information posted on the
project Plan Holders List.
The Bid must be accompanied by
Bid security made payable to OWNER in
an amount of 10% of the Bidder?s maxi-
mum Bid price.
Bidders shall comply with all provi-
sions of Section 66.0903 of the Wiscon-
sin Statutes with respect to wage scales.
Stoughton Utilities and the City of
Stoughton reserves the right to reject
any or all Bids, to waive any technical-
ity, and to accept any Bid which it deems
advantageous. All Bids shall remain
subject to acceptance for 85 days after
the time set for receiving Bids.
Contract award shall be made
based on the lowest responsive and re-
sponsible Bidder.
Prospective Bidders are required to
complete and submit a prequalifcation
questionnaire with supporting docu-
ments to OWNER (see Instructions to
Bidders). Prequalifcation forms will be
provided with Bidding Document sets.
Completed forms are to be submitted
no later than 11 A.M., local time, on May
15, 2014.
The Smedal Drive and Palmer Street
portions of Contract 3-2014 are funded
in part by the Local Road Improvement
Program of the Wisconsin Department
of Transportation.
The Strand Associates, Inc.? proj-
ect manager is Mark A. Fisher, P.E., and
can be contacted at Strand Associates,
Inc.?, 910 West Wingra Drive, Madison,
WI 53715, (608) 251-4843 regarding the
project.
Published by the authority of Stoughton
Utilities
Sean Grady, Utilities Operations
Superintendent
Dated at Stoughton, Wisconsin
Published: May 1 and 8, 2014
WNAXLP
* * *
RUTLAND
PLANNING COMMISSION
MAY 5, 2014 – 6:30 P.M.
Agenda:
1. Call meeting to order.
2. Swearing in of reappointed Plan-
ning Commission members whose
terms have expired and possibly a new
Planning Commission member.
3. Roll Call.
4. Approval of April meeting min-
utes.
5. Preliminary and Final CSM for Pe-
tition 10648 by Pete Dunn. Town approv-
al of building site and driveway location.
6. Petition 10674 by Daniel Fleming,
agent for Mueller Implement regarding
modifcation of the Deed Restrictions for
property located at 4633 Hwy 138 (Sec-
tion 7) to allow landscaping business.
7. Preliminary Inquiry by Ashleigh
Carlson and Teresa Peterson for a
12-child day care facility at 4458 Rome
Corners Road.
8. Preliminary inquiry by Shawn
Hillestad to rezone and create homesite
for sale.
9. Petition 10672/CUP 2270 by
Stoughton Farms Inc., located at 3768
Old Stage Rd. (Sec. 34) to rezone 15
acres from A-1 Ex. to A-2(8) creating a
parcel in order to construct a FM radio
tower. Review of materials received to
date.
10. Discussion/update/necessary
action on items from previous meetings:
11. Adjournment.
Dawn George, Clerk
Published: May 1, 2014
WNAXLP
* * *
RUTLAND
TOWN BOARD MEETING
MAY 6, 2014
AGENDA:
1. Appearance by Dane Co. Sheriff
Dept. representative.
2. Constable Reports.
3. Appearance by Rachel Brickner,
Oregon Senior Center.
4. Public Comment for items not on
the agenda:
5. Planning Commission report.
6. Action as necessary on 2014
road work projects.
7. Consent Agenda:
• Minutes April meeting.
• Treasurer’s Report.
• Vouchers and Checks.
• Discussion and necessary action
on annexation tax payments.
8. Correspondence.
9. Receive alcohol license renewal
applications for action at June meeting.
10. Update on Brooklyn Fire/EMS.
Discussion and necessary action on in-
corporation (Articles of Incorporation).
11. Discussion on meeting with
DOT regarding the north end of Hwy 14
as necessary.
12. Update on Environment Cor-
ridor.
13. Discussion on correspondence
from DCTA regarding possible Town
Zoning Withdrawal and reform of Dane
County zoning.
14. Discussion on new Town Hall
matters including:
• amendment to Angus Young con-
tract as necessary
• discussion regarding size of
building committee
• general discussion regarding new
town hall building.
15. Discussion and necessary ac-
tion regarding requesting bids for Rut-
land Comprehensive Plan revisions.
16. Adjournment.
Dawn George, Clerk
Published: May 1, 2014
WNAXLP
* * *
NOTICE
TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN:
I hereby certify that:
BRITTANY BARCENA, AGENT, dba
NELLO’S PIZZA, in the City of Stough-
ton, Wisconsin, has applied to the
Common Council of the City of Stough-
ton, Wisconsin, for a Class “B” Beer &
“Class C” Wine license for the period
ending June 30, 2014, at the tavern or
place of business located at:
135 W. Main Street
Maria Hougan
City Clerk
Published: May 1, 2014
WNAXLP
* * *
143 NOTICES
WCAN (Wisconsin Community Ad Net-
work) and/or the member publications
review ads to the best of their abil-
ity. Unfortunately, many unscrupulous
people are ready to take your money!
PLEASE BE CAREFUL ANSWERING
ANY AD THAT SOUNDS TOO GOOD
TO BE TRUE! For more information, or to
file a complaint regarding an ad, please
contact The Department of Trade, Agri-
culture & Consumer Protection 1-800-
422-7128 (wcan)
163 TRAINING SCHOOLS
DENTAL ASSISTANT Be one in just 10
Saturdays! WeekendDentalAssistant.
com Fan us on Facebook! Next class
begins 9/6/2014. Call 920-730-1112
Appleton (Reg. WI EAB) (wcan)
340 AUTOS
1999 FORD Contour Sport
47,000. Green. Good condition, one
owner. 608-873-9038
DONATE YOUR Car, Truck, Boat to Heri-
tage for the Blind. Free 3-Day Vacation.
Tax Deductible. Free Towing. All paper-
work taken care of! 800-856-5491 (wcan)
342 BOATS & ACCESSORIES
BOAT WORLD Over 700 New & Used
Pontoons, Fishing Boats, Deck Boats,
Ski-boats, Bass & Walleye Boats, Cud-
dys, Cruisers up to 35 feet & Outboards
@ the Guaranteed Best Price! Crown-
line/Axis/Malibu/Triton/Alumacraft/Mor-
rocraftMisty Harbor & Crest Pontoons.
American Marine & Motorsports Super
Center, Shawano. Where Dreams come
True. 866-955-2628 www.americanma-
rina.com (wcan)
MERCURY 20HP Outboard motor.
Used very little. $600. 608-332-0836
SHOREMASTER DOCK & LIFT
Headquarters. New & Used. We do it
all.Delivery/Assembly/Install/Removal
American Marine & Motorsports,
Schawano = Save
866-955-2628 (wcan)
355 RECREATIONAL VEHICLES
2001 17’ High-Low Trailer. Excellent
Condition. Lightly Used. $6800/OBO.
608-873-1601
CLASSIFIED AD DEADLINE IS Noon Fri-
day for the Courier Hub unless changed
because of holiday work schedules.
ATVS SCOOTERS & Go-Karts. Youth
ATV’s & Scooters (80mpg) @ $49/mo.
Sport & 4x4 Atv’s @ $69/mo. Ameri-
can Marine & Motorsports, Schawano
=Save= 866-955-2628 www.american-
marina.com (wcan)
360 TRAILERS
TRAILERS @ LIQUIDATION Pricing.
Boat, ATV, Sled or Pontoons. 2 or 4
Place/Open or Enclosed. American
Marine, Shawano 866-955-2628 www.
americanmarina.com (wcan)
402 HELP WANTED, GENERAL
FARM SERVICE Agency in Madison is
looking for short term temporary help.
Farming experience and office skills are
preferred. $12.07-$19.70/hour. Call
608-224-3767 for an application packet.
Applications due by 4:30 pm, May 7,
2014. USDA is an equal opportunity
provider and employer.
CLASSIFIED AD DEADLINE IS Noon
Friday for The Great Dane and Noon
Monday for the Courier Hub unless
changed because of holiday work sched-
ules. Call now to place your ad, 845-
9559, 873-6671 or 835-6677.
FOUR WINDS Manor, Inc., Verona,
is now hiring dedicated caregivers.
If you share our committment to a
positive attitude, respect for residents,
and are a team player who enjoys
working with the elderly please
consider joining us. We have various
shifts and positions available. A part
time housekeeper from 8am-2pm
in our assisted living facility. A full
time RN for the NOC shift. Full time
PM and NOC shift CNA's for our 60
bed skilled facility. A full time NOC
Resident Assistant for our CBRF and
part time PM shift. These positions
include every other weekend and
holidays with shift differential for
PM, NOC and weekends. Excellent
benefits with full time hours including
health, dental, PTO, flex spending
and 401K. Applications available at
www.fourwindsmanor.com or
303 S Jefferson St.
FULL TIME Cook. Immediate opening at
Koffee Kup Restaurant in Stoughton. Pay
based on experience. Apply in person at:
355 E. Main
CLASSIFIED AD DEADLINE IS NOON
Monday FOR THE Stoughton Courier Hub
FULL TIME manufacturing
position. Responsible, organized
& dependable. Apply At: Midwest
Rubber, 250 Industrial Circle,
Stoughton, WI 53589
GROWING CONCRETE company look-
ing for EXPERIENCED Flat work finisher,
foundation form setter, concrete foreman
and operator with CDL. MUST have
valid drivers license. Competitive wages,
insurance benefits. 608-289-3434
MEDICAL-PHLEB-MA-RN-LPN-MT-
MEDIC NEED recent Venipuncture. Do
Mobile Insurance Exams/Draws. Set you
own appt! Good $. www.appslive.com,
appswi@bizwi.rr.com (wcan)
PT ADMIN Assistant 20 hrs. pr/wk.
Tuesday-Friday 8:30-1:30. MS Office
experience. Bookkeeping. Full job
description at fpcoregonwi.org.
E-mail resume to: oregonfpc@gmail.com
SUMMER HELP 18 Years old+. Vehicle
needed. 40 HRS/Week. Some week-
end and holidays required. Moderate to
heavy lifting. Dependability a must. $11-
12.50 pr/hr. Apply: Nantucket Apts. 3141
Stratton Way, Madison. 608-848-3070
TINA'S HOME CLEANING
Hiring personnel for residential
cleaning position. Days only. Become
a part of our growing Team!
Call 608-835-0339
tinashomecleaning@gmail.com
TNT FIREWORKS IS looking for tent
operators. Make $1500-$3K in 8-10
days. No upfront money. Small credit
inquiry required. Call Matthew at
715-797-6885
423 WORK WANTED
BASIC FARM WORK. 53 yr old, expe-
rienced with animals and equipment.
Also relief milking. Interested call Jerry:
608-228-0124
449 DRIVER, SHIPPING
& WAREHOUSING
FLATBED DRIVERS. New Pay Increase.
Great Miles/ Pay & Home time, New
2014 trucks w/APU’s & Refrigerator. Full
Benefits + Flatbed Equipment Supplied.
CDL-A, 2yrs exp. 855-219-5996
DANE COUNTY’S MARKETPLACE.
The Courier Hub Classifieds. Call 845-
9559, 873-6671 or 835-6677.
14
May 1, 2014 Courier Hub ConnectStoughton.com
OTR DRIVERS WANTED
Above Average Mileage Pay including
Performance and Safety BONUSES!
Health/Dental/Vision/HSA/Matching
401K/Vacation pay and Holiday Pay.
Avg 2500-3500 miles/week 100% No
Touch 12 mo. CDL/A Exp Preferred
888-545-9351 ext 13 Jackson, WI www.
doublejtransprot.com (wcan)
453 VOLUNTEER WANTED
VSA WISCONSIN seeks volunteers to
assist with Madison Gallery Night, Visual
Expressions Exhibition and Reception
on May 2-7. Help us hang and label
art, greet visitors and artists, answer
questions about the art work on dis-
play, registration, refreshments, take
down art, repackage art and patch walls.
Join Lakeshore Preserve staff to pull
invasive garlic mustard plants on Picnic
Point on May 3. Garlic mustard poses
a serious threats to the biodiversity and
overall quality of the preserve. Train-
ing, bags, tools and gloves provided.
Canceled in case of rain. Alzheimers &
Dementia Alliance of WI is looking for
someone with the equipment and know
how to convert VHS from events and our
lending library to DVD or external hard
drive format. Converting our pictures into
digital format would be great as well. Call
the Volunteer Center at 608-246-43580
or visit www.volunteeryourtime.org for
more information or to learn about other
opportunities.
508 CHILD CARE & NURSERIES
SMALL INHOME Daycare- Stoughton
Has an opening for one school age child.
Call Maria at 877-1196
548 HOME IMPROVEMENT
A&B ENTERPRISES
Light Construction/Remodeling
No job too small
608-835-7791
CLASSIFIEDS, 845-9559, 873-6671 or
835-6677. It pays to read the fine print.
ALL THINGS BASEMENTY! Basement
Systems Inc. Call us for all your base-
ment needs! Waterproofing? Finishing?
Structural Repairs? Humidity and Mold
Control? Free Estimates! Call 888-929-
8307 (wcan)
ASPHALT SEAL COATING Crack
filling, striping No job too small. Call
O & H at 608-845-3348 or
608-832-4818
DOUG’S HANDYMAN SERVICE
GUTTER CLEANING
“Honey Do List”
No job too small
608-845-8110
HALLINAN-PAINTING
WALLPAPERING
**Great-Spring-Rates**
35 + Years Professional
Interior/Exterior
Free-Estimates
References/Insured
Arthur Hallinan
608-455-3377
NIELSEN'S
Home Improvements
Repairs, LLC
Kitchens/Bathrooms
Wood & Tile Flooring
Decks/Clean Eaves
*Free Estimates* Insured*
*Senior Discounts*
Home 608-873-8716
Cell 608-576-7126
e-mail zipnputts@sbcglobal.net

TOMAS PAINTING
Professional, Interior,
Exterior, Repairs.
Free Estimates. Insured.
608-873-6160
CLASSIFIED AD DEADLINE IS Noon
Monda for the Stoughton Courier Hub
unless changed because of holiday work
schedules. Call now to place your ad,
845-9559, 873-6671 or 835-6677.
CLASSIFIED AD DEADLINE IS Noon
Friday for The Great Dane and Noon
Monday for The Courier Hub unless
changed because of holiday work sched-
ules. Call now to place your ad, 845-
9559, 873-6671 or 835-6677.
554 LANDSCAPING, LAWN,
TREE & GARDEN WORK
AFFORDABLE QUALITY Services LLC:
Lawn Mowing & Trim, Reseeding, Aera-
tion, Mulch, Shrub Trimming, Sidewalk
Edging Call Matt Nardi for estimate:
608.609.3600 or snowplow@tds.net.
Dependable, Experienced and Fully
Insured. Service areas: Middleton, Mt.
Horeb, Oregon, Verona, West Madison
ARTS LAWNCARE- Mowing,
trimming, roto tilling, Garden
maintenance available.608-235-4389
JAYS LAWN MAINTENANCE
Spring Cleanup, Garden Roto tilling
Lawn mowing, Brick and Flagstone
walkways and patios, Hedge Trimming
608-728-2191
LAWN MOWER Blade Sharpening in
Stoughton. $5. per blade. Call 608-
235-4389
LAWN MOWING Residential and com-
mercial. 608-873-7038
ROTOTILLING, SKIDLOADER, Small
Dumptruck for Brooklyn, Oregon, Evans-
ville and surrounding areas. 608-513-
8572, 608-206-1548
SHREDDED TOPSOIL
Shredded Garden Mix
Shredded Bark
Decorative Stone
Pick-up or Delivered
Limerock Delivery
Ag Lime Spreading
O'BRIEN TRUCKING
5995 Cty D, Oregon, WI
608-835-7255
www.obrientrucking.com
SNOWMARE ENTERPRISES
Property Maintenance
Lawn Mowing
Bush Trimming
Powerwash Houses
Spring/Summer Clean-Up
Gutter Cleaning
608-219-1214

560 PROFESSIONAL SERVICES
APPLIANCE REPAIR
We fix it no matter where
you bought it from!
800-624-0719 (wcan)
THEY SAY people don’t read those little
ads, but YOU read this one, didn’t you?
Call now to place your ad, 845-9559,
873-6671 or 835-6677.
MY COMPUTER WORKS - Computer
Problems? Viruses, Spyware, Email,
Printer Issues, Bad Internet Connec-
tions - FIX IT NOW! Professional, US
based technicians. $25 off service. Call
for immediate help. 888-885-7944 (wcan)
ONE CALL DOES IT ALL! Fast and
Reliable Handyman Services. Call Ser-
viceLive and get referred to a pro today.
Call 800-604-2193 (wcan)
576 SPECIAL SERVICES
BANKRUPTCY- STOUGHTON and sur-
rounding area. Merry Law Offices. 608-
205-0621. No charge for initial consulta-
tion. “We are a debt relief agency. We
help people file for bankruptcy relief
under the bankruptcy code.”
580 TAXES & BOOKKEEPING
BOOKKEEPING SERVICE
For your small business.
Joy 608-712-6286
jhammer9780@tds.net
586 TV, VCR &
ELECTRONICS REPAIR
BUNDLE & SAVE! DirecTV, Internet &
Phone from $69.99/mo. Free 3-months
of HBO, Starz, Showtime & Cinemax.
Free Genie 4-room Upgrade. Lock in 2
year savings. Call 800-918-1046 (wcan)
DIRECTV 2 Year Savings Event. Over
140 channels only $29.99 a month. Only
Directv gives you 2 years of savings and
a FREE Genie upgrade! Call 800-320-
2429 (wcan)
DISH TV RETAILER. Starting at $19.99/
mo for 12 mos. High Speed Internet
starting at $14.95/month (where
available) Save! Ask about same day
installation! Call now -
800-374-3940 (WCAN)
REDUCE YOUR Cable Bill! Get whole-
home Satellite system installed at NO
COST and programming starting at
$19.99/mo. FREE HD/DVR Upgrade to
new callers, so call now. 888-544-0273
(wcan)
601 HOUSEHOLD
NEW MATTRESS SETS from $89.
All sizes in stock! 9 styles. www.
PlymouthFurnitureWI.com
2133 Eastern Ave. Plymouth, WI Open 7
days a week (wcan)
604 APPLIANCES
FOR SALE 30” GE Stove
Self cleaning. $300. 608-424-0141
606 ARTICLES FOR SALE
PROM DRESS SALE! Hundreds of
dresses. Save $50 to 50% OFF. Edith’s
Fond du Lac & Princess Prom, Fox Rover
Mall, Appleton. www.ediths.com (wcan)
648 FOOD & DRINK
ENJOY 100%GUARANTEED, delivered
to the door Omaha Steaks! SAVE 74%
plus 4 FREE burgers - The Family Value
Combo - ONLY $39.99. ORDER today.
800-831-1898 Use Code 49381GVT or
www.OmahaSteaks.com/sp25 (wcan)
SHARI’S BERRIES Order
mouthwatering gifts for any occasion!
SAVE 20% on qualifying orders over
$29! Fresh dipped berries starting at
$19.99. Visit www.berries.com/happy
or Call
800-975-3296 (wcan)
650 FURNITURE
1960’S MATCHING 3-piece Maple bed-
room set. Very good condition. 608-
253-4073
ANTIQUE DESK: Special features
include: Burl Wood drawer fronts with
Ebonized wood drop pulls, pull out
desk top, carved wood embellish-
ments & cylinder roll top. Measures:
41.5Wx25”Dx42”H. $1000. 608-835-
9421
CHINA HUTCH: Excellent condition
58”Wx40”Dx80”H Constructed w/select
hardwood Oak finish. Lighted, glass
shelves w/mirror, 2 pieces. $1500. 608-
835-9421
652 GARAGE SALES
EDGERTON- 613 Doty St 5/2-5/4 Friday,
Saturday & Sunday 9-4. Estate Sale. A
little bit of everything! Antiques, vintage,
collectibles & everyday, Maple Bedroom
set, kitchen sets, commodes, wash
stand, Edgerton Ratzlaff pot, Framed
prints by Charles Peterson & Howie Stiff,
Norwegian items, jewelry, albums, 45’s,
tools & much more.
FITCHBURG-LACY HEIGHTS Neigh-
borhood Garage Sale 8am-2pm, Friday-
Saturday, May 2-3. Many families - 1/2
mile south off PD on Osmundson Rd.
Maps available at each house. Baby &
kids’ clothes, toys, cribs, stroller. Doll
crib, stroller. Legos, Wii gaming, skis,
bikes. Adult clothes, furniture, household,
Lawn-mower. Much more!
OREGON 135 Village View Ct. May 2-3,
8:00-5:00. Boys clothes, shoes, 18mo-
4T, toys, child’s workshop with tools,
collectible dolls, doll furniture, sled, TV,
pictures, dishes, 3 piece wicker set,
juicer, Dr. Suess nursery items, lamps,
strollers, decorations, check craigslist
for more.
OREGON 2412-2414 White Oak Tr.
Oregon Heights. Leaving state. Too
much to list. Sat-Sun, May 3-4, 8am-
5pm. No checks.
OREGON 310 Landover Dr, May 2-3,
9am-2pm. Furniture, refrigerator,
clothing, books, Christmas decorations,
etc.
OREGON 585 Scott St. Multi-family. May
1, 3pm-8pm. May 2, 8am-5pm. small
appliances, dryer, gas stove, microwave,
Christmas dishes and ornaments, light
fixtures, baby items, adult clothes.
OREGON 667 Stonebriar Lane 5/2
7:30-4, 5/3 7:30-1: Multi-family. Antiques,
linens, rugs, household items, includ-
ing decorations, Baby crib, 12 piece
china set, great condition women’s cloth-
ing, sizes 8-10, Quilting items, including
scrap bags, and buttons, golf balls, bas-
kets, flower pots.
STOUGHTON- 577 HWY 51, 3 miles
east of Stoughton just beyond Tower Rd.
Friday 5/2, 8am-5pm. Saturday 5/3 8am-
1pm. Lots of stuff! Furniture, household,
decorative items, antiques, longaberger.
Something for almost everyone. No Chil-
dren items
STOUGHTON- 110O N Page St 5/1 4pm-
8pm, 5/2 8am-6pm, 5/3 8am-noon(1/2
price). Multi-family. Square Stern Canoe,
Yamaha Scooter, Antique Scale, Furni-
ture, womens clothing. Too much to List!
THEY SAY people don’t read those little
ads, but YOU read this one, didn’t you?
Call now to place your ad, 845-9559,
873-6671 or 835-6677.
STOUGHTON- 1539 Williams Dr 5/1
12-7pm, 5/2 8am-5pm. 5/3 8-? BIG Clean
Sale! Namebrand clothes, girls, junior,
women -2x. Boys and mens. Holiday,
household, and tables, exercise bike,
misc antiques
STOUGHTON 1859 Sheryl Ln. May 1-4,
7am-6pm. HUGE SALE! American girl,
Playmobil, Lefton Lighthouse, golf, Ducks
Unlimited, antique depression milk glass
and crocks, holiday decorations. Part of
neighborhood garage sales.
STOUGHTON- 1920 County Road W.
One mile South Utica. or 3/mi N of
Coachmans Golf Course. 5/2-5/3 8am.
100’s primitive collectables, unusual tools
& more 608-873-5803
STOUGHTON 3171 Sunnyside St. Satur-
day, 5/3, 9am-5pm. Bikes, Moped, lawn
mower, pumps, paint sprayer, hydraulic
Jacks, impact wrenches, golf equipment,
dehumidifier, small appliances, air com-
pressor and much more.
STOUGHTON- 3186 CTK A: 4 Family
garage sale in shed,. 138 south, right on
Ctk A. 5/1 3pm-7pm, 5/2 8am-6pm 5/3
8am-noon. Too much to list
STOUGHTON- 324 N Harrison St. 5/3
9-2. Spring Fever Gift & Plant Fair, over
30 vendors with gift items, baskets of
annuals for sale, proceeds benefit St
Ann’s youth mission group.
STOUGHTON- 3605 Lake View 5/1-
5/3 Thurs 3pm-6pm, Fri 7:30-2pm, Sat
7:30am-noon. Multi-family, quality items
priced to sell-Coach pursers, large/small
nautical collectibles (binnacle, lobster
traps, porthole, antique canoe shelving
unit) toys, microwave, air conditioner,
oak coffee table & end tables & small
pine jelly cabinet, area rugs, Rowe pot-
tery lamps, framed-artwork, Norwegian
sweater, household items, lots of clothing
and more!
STOUGHTON 611 S Academy. Friday,
May 2, 8-3. Saturday,. May 3, 8-noon.
Household and kids.
STOUGHTON- 840 Devonshire Road.
5/2-5/3 8am-2pm both days. Many
household items, mens and womens’
clothes, more!
664 LAWN & GARDEN
3’-12’ EVERGREEN and Shade Trees.
Pick Up or Delivery! Planting available.
Detlor Tree Farms
715-335-4444 (wcan)
666 MEDICAL & HEALTH SUPPLIES
MEDICAL GUARDIAN Top-rated medi-
cal alarm and 24/7 monitoring. For a
limited time, get free equipment, no acti-
vation fees, no commitment, a 2nd water-
proof alert button for free and more. Only
$29.95 per month. 800-281-6138
SAFE STEP WALK-IN TUB Alert for
Seniors. Bathrooms falls can be fatal.
Approved by Arthritis Foundation. Thera-
peutic Jets. Less than 4 inch step-in.
Wide door. Anti-slip floors. American
made. Installation included. Call 888-
960-4522 for $750. off (wcan)
668 MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS
AMP: LINE 6 Spider IV 75 watt guitar
amp. Tons of built in effects, tuner, and
recording options. Like new, rarely used,
less than 2 years old. Asking $250 OBO.
call 608-575-5984
DANE COUNTY’S MARKETPLACE.
The Courier Hub Classifieds. Call 845-
9559, 873-6671 or 835-6677.
CITY OF STOUGHTON
DIRECTOR OF EMERGENCY MEDICAL SERVICES
The City of Stoughton has an opening for a full time Director of Emergency
Medical Services.
This position directs the EMS program including operations, quality control,
budget development and long-term capital expenditure. Administers
processing of ambulance billings; supervises daily operations of the
EMS; represents city and participating townships at state, county and
governmental levels; directs and monitors EMS squads; develops &
maintains standards for service level of care mandated by state & county
regulations; develops and implements regulations and policies. Requires
EMT-Basic IV-Tech certification with five years EMT experience. Supervisory
and budget development experience preferred or any combination of
education and experience. The salary for this position is $61,000/annual.
Employment applications and position descriptions are available online at
www.ci.stoughton.wi.us under Employment Opportunities. Please return a
cover letter, application and resume to the Office of the City of Stoughton,
Human Resources Dept., 381 East Main Street, Stoughton, WI 53589, by no
later than May 22, 2014.
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Peterson’s Service
Since 1967
• Repairs & Tune-Ups • Brakes
• Oil Changes • Engines
• Tires • Struts
• Transmissions • Shocks
• Starters • Radiators
• A.C. • Exhaust Systems
Call for an appointment today!
873-5131
435 E. Main St., Stoughton
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Part-Time Administrative Assistant
Stoughton Area Resource Team, Inc. (START)
The Stoughton Area Resource Team (START), a United Way of Dane County
non-profit agency, provides a safety net for families in crisis. It links Stough-
ton area families with community resources and provides support in housing,
health, employment and financial assistance. The position averages 2 hours per
week with schedule determined in collaboration with the START Program Direc-
tor. Pay is $10.00 per hour.
Responsibilities: Deposits checks, records transactions and reconciles the
bank account, inputs financial information into EXCEL data base, acknowledges
gifts and donations, coordinates reservations for the annual fundraising event,
assists in maintaining client records, maintains confidentiality.
Qualifications: Good interpersonal skills, willingness to be flexible with duties
and hours to meet varying program needs, computer skills including Word and
EXCEL, good organizational skills, ability to enjoy detailed work, and ability to
creatively problem solve.
Request application from Katy Polich Kluge, START Program Director,
248 W. Main St., Stoughton, WI 53589, STARTofstoughton@gmail.com or (608)
577.5650. Application and cover letter due no later than May 2, 2014.
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Increase Your sales opportunities…
reach over 1.2 million households!
Advertise in our
Wisconsin Advertising Network System.
For information call 845-9559 or 873-6671.
ADOPTION
ADOPTION We promise your baby a lifetime of LOVE,
laughs and security forever. Expenses pd. Gloria &
Walter. 1-800-523-7192. Email: gloriawalteradopt@
gmail.com (CNOW)
HELP WANTED- TRUCK DRIVER
Knight Refrigerated CDL-A Truck Drivers Needed. Get
Paid Daily or Weekly. Consistent Miles. Pay Incentive &
Benefts! Become a Knight of the Road. EOE. 855-876-
6079. (CNOW)
MARTEN TRANSPORT Regional Runs Available
CHOOSE the TOTAL PACKAGE: AUTOMATIC
DETENTION PAY Regular, Frequent HOME TIME, TOP
PAY BENEFITS; Mthly BONUSES & more! CDL-A, 6
mos. Exp. Req’d. EEOE/AAP 866-322-4039 www.
drive4marten.com (CNOW)
MISCELLANEOUS
This classifed spot for sale! Advertise your product or
recruit an applicant in over 179 Wisconsin newspapers!
Only $300/week. Call this paper or 800-227-7636 www.
cnaads.com (CNOW)
We Need A Z-Truck Driver
Full Time • Daylight Hours • Healthy Wages
Paid Medical & Disability Insurance
Paid Personal Days & Holidays
Well Maintained Trucks • No Sundays
Smoke, Drug and Alcohol Free
Do you have:
Good driving and civil records to secure a Class B CDL with Tanker and Hazmat?
Good physical health to secure a DOT Federal Medical card to do the job safely?
Good social skills to continue our reputation of friendly and safe delivery?
Extra Credit: Mechanical aptitude to visualize and assist in small repair solutions?
Ten, to further your consideration of becoming a part of our 59 year tradition
of fueling construction, homes, farms and businesses, call 608-845-6989, ask for
Barth and make an appointment to complete a job application.
Job applications will be completed at Zurbuchen Oil, Inc, 309 Bruce Street, Verona,
WI 53593. Resumes may be FAXED to 608-845-6953 or emailed to zoil@tds.net.
Zurbuchen Oil, Inc
309 Bruce Street
Verona WI 53593
UN348887
May 1, 2014 Courier Hub ConnectStoughton.com
15
GUITAR: FENDER American made Stan-
dard Stratocaster guitar. Tobacco burst
finish, mint condition. Includes tremelo
bar, straplocks, and custom fitted Fender
hard-shell case. Asking $950 OBO. Call
608-575-5984
672 PETS
SASSY CAT Free to good home! 8 yr old
inside, shorthair tabby with white fur collar
and paws. 608-669-2243
676 PLANTS & FLOWERS
PROFLOWERS SEND Bouquets for Any
occasion. Birthday, Anniversary or Just
Because! Take 20% off your order over
$29 or more. Flowers from $19.99 plus
s/h. Go to www.Proflowers.com/ActNow
or call 800-315-9042 (wcan)
688 SPORTING GOODS
& RECREATIONAL
WE BUY Boats/RV/Pontoons/ATV’s &
Motorcycles! “Cash Paid” now. American
Marine & Motorsports Super Center, Sha-
wano 866-955-2628 www.americanma-
rina.com (wcan)
692 ELECTRONICS
NINTENDO 64 VIDEO GAME
System. Comes with 11 games and
storage box! 2 controllers. 669-2243
696 WANTED TO BUY
RECENT VETERAN looking for antique
firearms (military, percussion, flintlock,
lever or bolt action) Also, old military
items, Civil War to present (helmets,
knives, uniforms, medals, photos,
anything!)
Call Phil 920-248-6495
TOP PRICES Any Scrap Metal
Cars/Batteries/Farm Equipment
Free appliance pick up
Property clean out. Honest
Fully insured. U call/We haul.
608-444-5496
WE BUY Junk Cars and Trucks.
We sell used parts.
Monday thru Friday 8am-5:30pm.
Newville Auto Salvage, 279 Hwy 59
Edgerton, 608-884-3114.
WILL BUY Standing Timber/Wooded 40
acres or more. Northern WI or Upper MI.
Highest prices paid. Close in 30 days.
Send to: PO Box 544, Rhinelander, WI
54501 (wcan)
705 RENTALS
2 BEDROOM Townhouse apartment w/
full basement on Racetrack Rd-Stoughton
$775/mo includes utilities. No Pets. Secu-
rity deposit and references are required.
Available Now for an approved applicant.
Call 608-241-6609
BROOKLYN DUPLEX 2 Bedroom, no-
smoking, A/C, appliances, newer flooring,
large yard, quiet neighborhood, $695/
month plus utilities. 608-558-7017 .
GREENWOOD APARTMENTS Apart-
ments for Seniors 55+, currently has 1
& 2 Bedroom Units available starting at
$695 per month, includes heat, water, and
sewer. 608-835-6717 Located at 139 Wolf
St., Oregon, WI 53575
OREGON 1-BEDROOM Apartment.
2-Car garage. $650/month. No pets. Jane
608-271-7071
OREGON: 2 bdrm duplex, 1 car, spa-
cious, sunny, deck, small pet. SMOKE-
FREE. $1095+. Avail. 6/1 or 7/1. 608-
835-9269
CLASSIFIED AD DEADLINE IS NOON
Monday FOR THE Stoughton Courier Hub
OREGON 2-Bedroom in quiet well kept
building. Convenient location. Includes
all appliances, A/C, blinds, private park-
ing, laundry and storage. $200 Security
deposit. Cats OK. $665/month. 608-219-
6677
RURAL STOUGHTON- Mother N’ Law
Apt. Suitable for 1 person Appliances-
wash-dryer. All Utilities Included. 608-
873-5983
STOUGHTON 211 E Main, 490sqft
efficiency, appliances/utilities included.
A/C, parking, decks. $550/mo. Available
5/1.
608-271-0101. www.hoserealty.com
STOUGHTON- 517 E Jefferson 2 bed-
room, Upper. $720 Utilities included Call
608-455-7100.
STOUGHTON/KENILWORTH- QUIET
2-bedroom, balcony, water. Private
Owner. No Pets. $750/mo. Available Mid
June-July/1 608-212-0829
720 APARTMENTS
OREGON-2 BDRM, 1 bath. Available for
spring/summer. Great central location.
On-site or in-unit laundry, patio, dish-
washer and A/C. $720-$730/month. Call
255-7100 or www.stevebrownapts.com/
oregon
ROSEWOOD APARTMENTS for Seniors
55+, has 1 & 2 bedroom units avail-
able starting at $695 per month. Includes
heat, water and sewer. Professionally
managed. 608-877-9388 Located at 300
Silverado Drive, Stoughton, WI 53589
740 HOUSES FOR RENT
STOUGHTON-3BDRM, 1.5 Bath, large
kitchen, spacious dining room, living
room. 3 season porch, all appliances
included, 1 car detached garage. Very
nice quiet neighborhood. $1195 w/$500
security deposit. Call 608-286-5282
750 STORAGE SPACES FOR RENT

ALL SEASONS SELF STORAGE
10X10 10X15 10X20 10X30
Security Lights-24/7 access
BRAND NEW
OREGON/BROOKLYN
Credit Cards Accepted
CALL (608)444-2900


C.N.R. STORAGE
Located behind
Stoughton Garden Center
Convenient Dry Secure
Lighted with access 24/7
Bank Cards Accepted
Off North Hwy 51 on
Oak Opening Dr. behind
Stoughton Garden Center
Call: 608-509-8904


DEER POINT STORAGE
Convenient location behind
Stoughton Lumber.
Clean-Dry Units
24 HOUR LIGHTED ACCESS
5x10 thru 12x25
608-335-3337

FRENCHTOWN
SELF-STORAGE
Only 6 miles South of
Verona on Hwy PB.
Variety of sizes available now.
10x10=$50/month
10x15=$55/month
10x20=$70/month
10x25=$80/month
12x30=$105/month
Call 608-424-6530 or
1-888-878-4244

NORTH PARK STORAGE
10x10 through 10x40, plus
14x40 with 14' door for
RV & Boats.
Come & go as you please.
608-873-5088


RASCHEIN PROPERTY
STORAGE
6x10 thru 10x25
Market Street/Burr Oak Street
in Oregon
Call 608-206-2347


STORAGE MOTORHOMES
RV's, Autos, Boats
Climate Controlled Space
608-575-5173

UNION ROAD STORAGE
10x10 - 10x15
10x20 - 12x30
24 / 7 Access
Security Lights & Cameras
Credit Cards Accepted
608-835-0082
1128 Union Road
Oregon, WI
Located on the corner of
Union Road & Lincoln Road

801 OFFICE SPACE FOR RENT
STOUGHTON 307 S Forrest Retail or
Office Space. 400 sq ft. $299/month utili-
ties included. 608-271-0101
STOUGHTON 316 S Gjertson St. Office/
Retail space. 1200 sq ft. $850/month,
utilities included. Will build to suit. Private
customer parking. 608-843-9125
VERONA- OFFICE/WAREHOUSE
1000 Sq Ft.$500 +Utilities.
608-575-2211 or
608-845-2052
THEY SAY people don’t read those little
ads, but YOU read this one, didn’t you?
Call now to place your ad, 845-9559, 873-
6671 or 835-6677.
840 CONDOS &
TOWNHOUSES FOR SALE
6924 TOTTENHAM Rd Madison Beautiful
2 bdrm, 1.5 bath condo w/2 car garage,
fireplace, convenient to West Towne &
Epic, $139,900 OPEN Sunday 1-4 (or
by appt)
608-273-2515
965 HAY, STRAW & PASTURE
GRASSY HORSE Hay. Small squares
$4.50/ea. Alfalfa mix. Big squares.
Delivery available.
608-669-7879
970 HORSES
PONIES W/SADDLES three six years
old and one older. Partially broke. Also
Davis 20 inch corn roller/cracker $300.
815-742-1914
WALMERS TACK SHOP
16379 W. Milbrandt Road
Evansville, WI
608-882-5725
975 LIVESTOCK
REGISTERED BLACK ANGUS.
Yearling bulls. Semen tested, docile,
great EPD’s. Also wrapped hay bales.
2nd/3rd crop. 608-655-3370
980 MACHINERY & TOOLS
NH648 SILAGE Special, new tires, excel-
lent condition, $9500. Meyer tandem
manure spreader very good condition
$3500. 815-871-5183
990 FARM: SERVICE
& MERCHANDISE
RENT SKIDLOADERS
MINI-EXCAVATORS
TELE-HANDLER
and these attachments. Concrete breaker,
posthole auger, landscape rake, concrete
bucket, pallet forks, trencher, rock hound,
broom, teleboom, stump grinder.
By the day, week, or month.
Carter & Gruenewald Co.
4417 Hwy 92
Brooklyn, WI, 608-455-2411
995 FARM: WANTED TO BUY

BUYING STANDING WALNUT
Prices are High - Great time to Sell!
608-513-8678

905 AUCTION SALE DATES
FARM EQUIPMENT AUCTION. May 9,
11am at 6471 S. Chase Rd, Sobieski,
WI Visit www.nolansales.com or call for
more info. Nolan Sales LLC, Marion, WI
800-472-0290. Reg. Auctioneers #165 &
# 142. (wcan)
CLASSIFIED AD DEADLINE IS Noon
Friday for The Great Dane and Noon Mon-
day for the Courier Hub unless changed
because of holiday work schedules. Call
now to place your ad, 845-9559, 873-6671
or 835-6677.
SWINE AI COMPANY
Stoughton, WI
Seeks self-motivated, reliable,
full-time employee.
Welding/Maintenance skills are a plus.
Competitive wage & benefits.
Call (608) 877-2500
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Concrete Finishers
and Laborers
Experienced w/valid DL.
CDL preferred.
Competitive wage and benefits.
Call Jeff: 608-884-9725.
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Sienna Meadows
Memory Care
989 Park Street Oregon, WI
608.835.0000
Attn: Chris Kiesz, RN

Sienna Crest & Sienna Meadows-
Oregon has immediate job opportunities
to join their compassionate
Care Specialist Team.

We offer competitive wages designed
to attract and retain quality staff.

Go to www.siennacrest.com
To Print An Application
TODAY!
Return your completed application to:
Various
Shifts Available!
E.O.E


Attention
All Caregivers!
Sienna Crest
Assisted Living
981 Park St Oregon, WI
608.835.7781
Attn: Lois Gilbert, LPN
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Award/Trophy Builder
Full-time start immediately. Seeking
individual with experience in computer
engraving and trophy assembly.
Call for appointment
835-5791 or 276-6050
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** DRIVERS **
FULL TIME DRIVERS NEEDED FOR REGIONAL WORK
$1000 SIGN ON BONUS
$1000 RETENTION BONUS
$750 GUARANTEE WEEKLY
Tractor-trailer drivers needed for the Walgreen’s Private
Fleet Operation based in Windsor, WI. Drivers make hand
deliveries to Walgreen’s stores within a regional area (WI,
IL, IA, MN, ND, SD). Workweek is Tues ~ Sat. All drivers
must be willing & able to unload freight.
*Earn $21.90/hour (OT after 8 hours) or $0.4650/mile
* Full Beneft Pkg includes Life, Dental, Disability & Health
Insurance with Prescription Card
*401k Pension Program with Company Contribution
*Paid Holidays & Vacation
*Home every day except for occasional layover
Drivers must be over 24 years old, have a min 18 months
T/T exp or 6 months T/T exp with a certifcate from an from
an accredited driving school & meet all DOT requirements
Send resume to:
b.kriel@callcpc.com
or call CPC Logistics at 1-800-914-3755
CDL DRIVERS
WANTED
Health Insurance / Vacation / 401K
Call (608) 275-7627
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Equal Opportunity Employer
www.qpsemployment.com
GENERAL LABOR
ASSEMBLY
WAREHOUSE
PRODUCTION
QPS WANTS
TO FIND A GREAT JOB!
Madison
608-819-4000
Monroe
608-325-4690
www.qpsemployment.com
APPLY ONLINE TODAY AT:
GENERAL LABOR
ASSEMBLY - WAREHOUSE
PRODUCTION
Baraboo - Mauston
608-448-4411
608-487-9260
Richland Center - Sparta
HOLTGER BROS., INC.
UTILITY CONTRACTOR
Since 1946

www.Holtger.com | Call 920-664-6300
EOE by AA
Holtger Bros., Inc has immediate career opportunities
in the telephone industry for the following positions:
Foremen | Aerial Technicians | CDL Laborers
Cable Plow/Bore Rig Operators
Training Offered. Travel Required for All Positions.
Get
ConneCted
Find updates and
links right away.
Search for us on
Facebook as
“Stoughton Courier Hub”
and then LIKE us.
16 - The Courier Hub - May 1, 2014
www.kopkesgreenhouse.com
Wisconsin’s Premier Grower of Quality Plants & Hanging Floral Baskets!
Choose from hundreds of varieties of perennials & annuals, from thousands of hanging baskets.
1828 Sandhill Rd. • Oregon, WI 53575 • 608-835-7569
Now open in Stoughton! Visit our sales house located in the Main Street Plaza parking lot.
Koupons & sale prices honored at both locations Gift Certificates available at both locations
April Showers Bring May Flowers!
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CTY. M
Directions from Stoughton:
Take 138 toward Oregon. Go past Eugster’s
Farm Market, one mile and turn right on
Sunrise Rd. Go one more mile then turn left
on Town Line Rd. Continue on to Sand Hill Rd.
(approximately one mile) and turn right.
Directions from Fitchburg:
Take Fish Hatchery Road south to Netherwood
Road. Turn left and go through Oregon past
Walgreen’s to a left on Sand Hill Road.
Directions from Verona:
Take Cty. M to Fish Hatchery Rd. Turn
right and go to Netherwood Road. Turn left
at Netherwood Rd. through Oregon past
Walgreen’s to a left on Sand Hill Rd.
#
Support l ocal agri cul ture! Shop outsi de the box store.
Recycl e your pots & contai ners at our f arm l ocati on.
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Visit the Stoughton Area Farmers Market Friday mornings
in front of Dollar General.
KOPKE’S KOUPON
HANGING BASKETS
$2.00 OFF
Limit 2 per koupon. Limit 1 koupon per kustomer per day.
Valid April 30- May 5, 2014.
KOPKE’S KOUPON
PROFESSIONAL SOIL MIXES
$2.00 OFF
Regular Priced at $7.99 and up. Choose from
Scott’s Metro Mix, Black Gold or Miracle Gro.
Limit 2 per Koupon. Limit 1 koupon per kustomer per day.
Valid April 30- May 5, 2014.
KOPKE’S KOUPON
SAVE UP TO $3.00
50¢ Off
PERENNIALS
Starting at $1.99 • Limit 6 per koupon.
Valid April 30- May 5, 2014.