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Unit Plan: 2

Moving West: The Trail of Dreams



Lesson Plan for Tuesday
Grade: 4th
Social Studies Strand: History
Submitted By: Janis Gomme-Campbell

EDEL 453: Teaching Elementary School Social Science
Nevada State College Spring 2014
Instructor: Karen Powell







Lesson Plan for Tuesday Strand: History submitted by: Janis Gomme-Campbell

Nevada State College EDEL 453 - Spring 2014 Karen Powell- Instructor page 2
B. Summary of the Lesson Plan:
Identify what hardships the pioneers were faced with as they traveled west. SW learn about the Oregon Trail and it's
importance to those traveling west. Students will form groups to create a covered wagon.
C. Basic Information:
Grade Level: 4th grade
Time to Complete this Lesson: 50 min
Groupings: individual, group
D. Materials:
website: Trail of Dreams: http://youtu.be/AHDhDqOfk_o. (8:09 min)
Text: Houghton Mifflin, "Moving West", Core Lesson 2, pages 160-161
Pioneer Facts Sheet.
Popsicle sticks
Skill sticks
Wood glue
Brown paper bags
cardboard
lined paper
pencil
E. Objectives:
o NV State Social Studies Standards
H2.4.2 Explain the experiences of pioneers moving out west.
o Student-Friendly Standards
H2.4.2 I can explain the experiences of pioneers moving out west.
F. Vocabulary
Oregon Trail- Path that the pioneers took to go west.
cholera- A disease that plagued the pioneers.
obstacles- A thing in the way; hindrance to progress.
G. Procedure:
1. TW show video: Trail of Dreams"
2. TW read from text: Houghton Mifflin, "Moving West", Core Lesson 2, pages 160-161.
3. TW ask group to write answers to key questions on a piece of lined paper:
How did the Oregon Trail come to be?
Where was it located?
What were the different modes of travel used on the Trail?
What supplies were needed for a trip on the Oregon Trail?
What obstacles did they encounter along the way?
How did the Native Americans of the area react to the amount of settlers coming into their regions?
How did technology in the field of transportation end the importance of the Oregon Trail?
Lesson Plan for Tuesday Strand: History submitted by: Janis Gomme-Campbell

Nevada State College EDEL 453 - Spring 2014 Karen Powell- Instructor page 3
4 TW form groups of 4 and pass out materials for covered wagon activity.
5. TW model steps while students create wagon. Wagons will be displayed in school library.
H. Assessment:
What will you use to measure student understanding?
Participation in group project and observed interest in video and informational sheet.
Explain how you will know students understand the concepts from the lesson.
I. Closure:
TW ask prediction question: "What do you think the pioneers did when they reached their destinations? (build a log
cabin, build fences for the livestock, plant gardens, (answers will vary)































PIONEER FACTS
Lesson Plan for Tuesday Strand: History submitted by: Janis Gomme-Campbell

Nevada State College EDEL 453 - Spring 2014 Karen Powell- Instructor page 4
The Oregon Trail was a very important pathway to the West.
It was the only practical way to the West.
First emigrants on the Oregon Trail in 1836 traveled in covered wagons.
The Great Migration started in 1843 and lasted 25 years with more than half a million people using the Oregon Trail.
In 1869 the transcontinental railroad was completed supplying an improved means of travel through new technology.

There were several reasons for the travel to the West:
-Free land was available.
-Freedom from slavery attracted many people.
-Good land for farming meant more and better crops.
-Good businesses could be made at forts.
-People wanted to control and populate new parts of the country (Manifest Destiny).
-Men and women had hopes and dreams for a growing nation.
-Heartache and hardship made people look for a new start.
-Some families were looking for a place to call home.
-Movement and change was desired by some travelers.
-Emigrants searched for opportunity.
-People were hurrying to obtain gold that had been discovered.
Preparation for the trip was hard work.
-Selling all belongings and property from home was hard on the people.
-Packing for a 6-month trip was complicated and difficult.
-Acquiring the appropriate wagon and supplies was necessary.

Daily hardships were encountered along the way.
-Rattlesnake bite
-Fording river
-Undrinkable water
-Starvation
-Death
-Birth of a baby
-Disease
-Native Americans
-Mountains to cross
-Cholera
-Proper hygiene
-Equipment maintenance
-Food acclamation
-Buffalo stampede
-Personal hardship
-Weather
-Lack of proper shoes, clothing
-Fire building
Many travelers kept diaries during their trips on the Oregon Trail that
are available today in archives, libraries, online.
Mapping the route of the Oregon Trail lead to better understanding
of distances, times and important geographic locations.









COVERED WAGON CRAFT ACTIVITY
Lesson Plan for Tuesday Strand: History submitted by: Janis Gomme-Campbell

Nevada State College EDEL 453 - Spring 2014 Karen Powell- Instructor page 5

Step 1
Using your Skill Sticks create the bed of
your wagon. We built ours three sticks
high all the way around
Step 2
Using regular Popsicle sticks, create a
frame by gluing four of them together
at the corners.
Step 3
After the corners dry, glue more sticks
across the middle to form a solid plank.
Then turn it over and apply glue to the
bottom two Popsicle Sticks.
Lesson Plan for Tuesday Strand: History submitted by: Janis Gomme-Campbell

Nevada State College EDEL 453 - Spring 2014 Karen Powell- Instructor page 6


Step 4
Set your Wagon bed onto the glue and let
dry. If you're using a glue gun this step is
much quicker, the wood glue will take a
while to dry and you should set it
somewhere where it won't be moved.
Step 5
(This is an optional step, we did to
keep our canvas up)

Using 4 Popsicle sticks, glue them
around the sides of the wagon like
posts.
Lesson Plan for Tuesday Strand: History submitted by: Janis Gomme-Campbell

Nevada State College EDEL 453 - Spring 2014 Karen Powell- Instructor page 7
Step 6
Cut a long rectangle shape from your
paper bag. We used the side of the bag
and that width worked pretty well. Curve
up the edges as shown in the picture

Step 7
Glue your paper bag to your wagon. We
used wood glue, so we had to put on these
little binder clips to hold it in place while it
dried. If you have a glue gun, it would
really speed up the process here.
Lesson Plan for Tuesday Strand: History submitted by: Janis Gomme-Campbell

Nevada State College EDEL 453 - Spring 2014 Karen Powell- Instructor page 8
Step 8
Using a small coffee cup, trace 4 circles onto
your cardboard. Cut them out and poke a
small hole in the center of each of them.
Step 9
Insert a Popsicle Stick into each of the
wheels. You can use a glue gun around the
sides if the hold is to big and they get loose
Step 10
Glue the Popsicle sticks together to make
the axle. You'll have two sets of wheels like
this.
Lesson Plan for Tuesday Strand: History submitted by: Janis Gomme-Campbell

Nevada State College EDEL 453 - Spring 2014 Karen Powell- Instructor page 9
Step 11
Glue the axles to the bottom of your wagon.
Make sure that your front and back wheels are
sitting evenly, and make any necessary
adjustments.

All Done!
After your wagon is complete, it's time
to fill it up with some pioneer goodies!
Make little scrap quilts and boxes, pots
and pans, or even a clay family to put
in the wagon.




Lesson Plan for Tuesday Strand: History submitted by: Janis Gomme-Campbell

Nevada State College EDEL 453 - Spring 2014 Karen Powell- Instructor page
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Unit Plan 2: Reflection Page

1. Where did you get the ideas and materials for this unit plan? Include
website names, URLs, book titles and authors.
Video: Trail of Dreams = YouTube
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AHDhDqOfk_o
Website for covered wagon activity:
http://www.thecraftyclassroom.com/CraftPioneerWagon.html
Pioneer Facts sheet:
http://www.kidinfo.com/american_history/pioneers.html
I got a cornucopia of information off this site!
Text: Houghton Mifflin,


2. What were the easiest and most challenging parts of writing this unit
plan?
I think the easiest, or most fun was including the hands-on covered
wagon as an activity for the kids to do. They are so prideful when they
make something together. It's a great wagon, and all you need is pre-fab
pieces and glue.
A challenging part may have been finding good, hard, solid facts to
present about the movement west.


3. What suggestions do you have for yourself for the next time you write unit
plans?
Don't try to re-invent the wheel. Everything has been done prior to my
doing it, so borrow from other people's plans that are tried-and-true, but
make it my own by tailoring it to my own needs.