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Stage 2 English Athena Taylor

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English Studies
Unit Plan: Snow Falling on Cedars

Year: Stage 2
Class Description
For the purposes of this unit I am working on the assumption of a Stage 2 English
Studies class at Wilderness School, an independent, single gender secondary school
based in an inner Adelaide suburb, where I will be doing my second practicuum. It has
a significant number of students from a high socio-economic background, a minimal
non-attendance rate, and an emphasis on academic achievement. However it also has a
high percentage (22%) of students with a language background other than English,
who may need further scaffolding and support to achieve their learning goals. ICT and
technological resources should be available for use in the classroom, with all students
having access to Ipads or equivalent. I anticipate most of my students to be aiming for
higher education of some description, with a number having aspirations for a merit in
English Studies.

Text
Snow Falling on Cedars, by David Guterson
An English-language novel by American novelist David Guterson, published in 1994.
The story is set on a fictional island in the northern Puget Sound region of Washington
state, and revolves around a murder case, in which Kabuo Miyamoto, a Japanese
American, is accused of killing Carl Heine, a respected fisherman in the close-knit
community. Its major themes are love, justice, racism and conscience. Set in 1954,
eight years after World War II, it also covers issues surrounding war and its impact on
family, individuals and the wider community.
Stage 2 English Athena Taylor

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Unit Task
Text Response: Essay, maximum 1000 words (see attached sheet)
Unit Length
Three weeks
2 x 45 min lessons, 1 x 90 min lesson per week
See attached sheets for further detail.
Unit Rationale
This unit focuses on textual analysis, and the ability of students to discuss and
critique the ideas, values and beliefs embedded in a single text. I have chosen
the book Snow Falling on Cedars as I believe it would have resonance with my
hypothetical school class, an all girls school with above average participation
levels. I anticipate the elements of romance and love, as well as the focus on
relationships, to appeal to that age and gender group (generally), and hopefully
their interest in the subject would encourage deeper involvement in the study.
In addition, given the number of students with a background other than
English, there is a chance some of my students may have a Japanese
background, in which case I hope the text to be of topical relevance to them.
Differentiation
In terms of differentiation possibilities, I believe the multi-layered nature of
Snow Falling on Cedars lends itself to staggered achievement levels. For those
students who need additional scaffolding and assistance, the more obvious
technique and symbolism in the text allows them to build upon basic levels of
literary analysis. At the same time students with a greater level of ability can
reach the upper marks through more complex interpretations and deeper
analysis of subtler textual suggestions. Snow Falling on Cedars has also been
adapted into a well-made movie, as a fall-back option for those students who
may not read the entire book and a way to introduce visual elements into an
otherwise text-heavy curriculum.

Stage 2 English Athena Taylor

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Curriculum Knowledge
I believe there are a number of issues that can be unpacked through this text
which will help students develop their levels of communication as outlined in
the SACE guidelines. Most importantly, the unit centres around an essay
response which should assist students with their skills of analysis, textual
interpretation and formal written expression. The unit will focus on the
essentials of essay writing, including succinct analysis, textual support and
inferences, topic sentences and organising paragraphs into conceptual points
of discussion, as well as unpacking a narrative and its effects on the reader.
Students will work with the source text on a detailed, highly analytical level,
with the aim of creating a high level essay that explores the ideas, values and
beliefs of the text in accordance with SACE knowledge levels.
By the end of this unit I anticipate my students to have a grasp of several key
competencies. These are outlined below but include precise writing styles and
structures, an appreciation of the techniques with which an author may convey
complex meaning, and a firm grasp of the use of evidence to support
conclusions and interpretations in response to a text.
Timeframe
I would assign this unit somewhere in the middle of the year, after initial
critical analysis and text productions that would help to ascertain the literacy
levels and capabilities of the class. Hopefully I will already have some idea as to
which students may need additional support and which may benefit from
extension activities and further challenging. I imagine most of the class to
already have basic compentency in the skill of essay writing, with opportunities
for further enhancement and fine-tuning to reach those top level SACE marks.
Further Knowledge
In terms of a hidden curriculum, I would hope that through the study of this
text issues of race, community and acceptance were raised in class discussion,
and my students may be led towards a greater appreciation of cultural
difference and the powers of acceptance and exclusion on individuals.

Stage 2 English Athena Taylor

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Focus Questions
Community: What does it mean to be part of a community? How is the
San Piedro community defined? Who is included and excluded from this
definition?
Setting: How does setting impact upon the story in Snow Falling on
Cedars? What role does snow play? How does the author define and
divide the island through sense of place?
Love: What are the different forms of love explored in the text? What
impact does love, and unrequited love, have on the characters and their
actions? How is love shown through the language of the story?
Isolation: In what forms does it occur what are the different ways a
person can be isolated (from themselves, their family, the community)?
How is isolation conveyed through the text, both physically and
symbolically?
War: What effect does it have on the novels characters? Both those
who served and those who stayed at home?
Racism: In what ways do the books Japanese characters respond to the
hostility of their white neighbours? How does bigotry manifest itself?








Stage 2 English Athena Taylor

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LEARNING AND ASSESSMENT PLAN
Stage 2 English Studies
School WILDERNESS SCHOOL (HYPOTHETICAL) Contact Teacher ATHENA TAYLOR
SACE
School Code

Year

Enrolment Code

Program
Variant Code
(AW)
Stage Subject Code
No. of Credits
(10 or 20)
12 2 E N D 20
COHORT/CONTEXT DESCRIPTION

For the purposes of this unit I am working on the assumption of a Stage 2 English Studies class at Wilderness School,
an independent, single gender secondary school based in an inner Adelaide suburb, where I will be doing my second
practicuum. It has a significant number of students from a high socio-economic background, a minimal non-
attendance rate, and an emphasis on academic achievement. However it also has a high percentage (22%) of
students with a language background other than English, who may need further scaffolding and support to achieve
their learning goals. ICT and technological resources should be available for use in the classroom, with all students
having access to Ipads or equivalent. I anticipate most of my students to be aiming for higher education of some
description, with a number having aspirations for a merit in English Studies.
PROGRAM DESIGN

This unit will involve visual, auditory and written stimuli, with the aim of engaging students across a broad spectrum
of learning capabilities. It is my intention to emphasise the analytical nature of the task and encourage student
participation in the learning process, particularly in an examination of the literary techniques and their intended
effects on the audience. There will be multiple opportunities for feedback, review and scaffolding, in the hope of
supporting those who may have difficulty with the task and promoting those who have the capability of extension.
The unit is delivered over 4 weeks with 3 individual lessons per week. It will include a mix of teacher instruction,
open class discussion, group work and independent student study. As this is Stage 2 English Studies there will also
be a substantial amount of homework and guided learning tasks assigned to the students, particularly in the areas
of extension work and deeper analysis for those aiming for merits in the subject.
While this unit is relatively prescriptive, as is the way with Stage 2 English Studies, there is a degree of flexibility in
what the students may choose to consider when studying this text. The focus they take and the themes they choose
to unpack will be made in consultation with me and with a careful eye to each students strengths in literary
exposition.
Analytical expansion will be available for those students capable of seeking the higher echelons of marks in SACE.
The text chosen allows for both the more basic scaffolding analysis as well as a much more indepth and
sophisticated exploration of the novels themes, ideas and values. I anticipate most of my students to be high
achievers with good work ethic, and think this text has the layering and subtlety to reward dedicated and focused
study. Homework extension will be important for those wishing to seek a higher mark in this subject, as well as for
those who may need additional support and monitoring.

CAPABILITIES, LITERACY AND NUMERACY OPPORTUNITIES
Capabilities
This unit should develop students confidence and competence in using the English languace, and understanding how
texts are constructed for particular purposes and audiences.
It will assist students in developing knowledge and understanding of the ways in which language enables students to participate
in and critique social, cultural and economic aspects of local, national and global society.
Literacy and Numeracy skills
Students will have a grasp of several key competencies: knowledge and understanding of stylistic features and
language techniques of the author, and of the ideas, values and beliefs in texts.

Students will work on their accuracy, clarity and fluency of expression in the area of essay writing and literary
interpretation. They will also have a greater understanding of the use of language in appropriate forms and registers
for the relevant audience and purpose.
Stage 2 English Athena Taylor

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Stage 2 English Studies
Shared Study 1
Essay

You must answer ONE question from this section.

1000 words maximum
Due Date: 5
th
May, 2014

QUESTIONS ON SINGLE TEXTS (Questions 1 to 6)

1. In what ways does the author of a prescribed text explore the idea that it is seemingly
civilised peope who abuse power?

2. Show how the author of a prescribed text uses one or more of the following as a
device to reinforce ideas:
Irony
Foreshadowing
Changes in time
Changes in place
Recurring symbol(s)
The way the text ends

3. How does the author of a prescribed text present the idea that being at odds with
societys values involves risk but complying with those values can also be harmful?

4. What techniques does the author of a prescribed text use to position the reader to
admire certain human characteristics but condemn others?

5. Violent yet vulnerable.
How does the author of a prescribed text make the reader aware that violence does not
always signify strength?

6. In what ways does the author of a prescribed text use the juxtaposition of opposing
forces in order to present ideas?

Activity 1
Stage 2 English Athena Taylor

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Assessment Design Criteria
Knowledge and Understanding
The specific features are as follows:
KU1 Knowledge and understanding of authors use of stylistic feature and
language techniques to communicate ideas and influence the readers
response
KU2 Knowledge and understanding of ideas, values and beliefs in texts.
KU3 Knowledge and understanding of the textual conventions of different
text types.
Analysis
The specific features are as follows:
An1 Analysis of the interplay between what authors present in texts and the
experiences, ideas, values and beliefs of the readers.
An2 Analysis of the similarities and differences in texts, in comparative
exercises.
An3 Analysis of the ways in which language technqiues are used to
influence opinions and decisions in texts.
Application
The specific features are as follows:
Ap1 Use of language skills and techniques to create coherent texts that
address the meaning and intention of the task.
Ap2 Recognition of connections between texts, and an integrated approach
to comparing and contrasting texts.
Ap3 Use of evidence from texts to develop and support a response.
Ap4 Use of textual, structural, and conventional features of selected text
types and forms of presentation to convey meaning.
Communication
The specific features are as follows:
C1 Accuracy, clarity, and fluency of expression.
C2 Appropriate form and register for audience and purpose.



Stage 2 English Athena Taylor

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Performance Standards for Stage 2 English Studies

Knowledge and
Understanding
Analysis Application Communication
A
Knowledge and
understanding of a wide
range of ways in which
authors use stylistic features
and language techniques to
communicate complex and
familiar ideas, and to
influence the readers
response.
Detailed knowledge and
understanding of the ideas,
values, and beliefs in familiar
and unfamiliar texts.
Knowledge and
understanding of the ways in
which creators and readers of
familiar and unfamiliar texts
use a range of textual
conventions to make
meaning.
Analysis of complex
connections between
personal experiences,
ideas, values, and beliefs,
and those explored in
familiar and unfamiliar
texts.
In comparative exercises,
a perceptive analysis of
connections between
texts, based on analysis
and synthesis of
similarities and/or
differences.
Perceptive analysis of a
range of ways in which
authors use language
techniques to influence
opinions and decisions in
familiar and unfamiliar
texts.
Use of a wide range of
language skills and techniques
to create sophisticated and
coherent texts that address the
meaning and intention of the
task.
In comparative exercises, a
perceptive recognition of
connections between texts,
through responses that
integrate discussion of texts and
move easily between them.
Detailed and appropriate use of
evidence from texts to support
responses, with textual
references incorporated fluently
in discussion.
Skills in using the textual,
structural, and conventional
features of text types for a
range of familiar and unfamiliar
contexts, audiences, and
purposes.
Fluent and precise writing
and speaking, using
appropriate style and
structure for a range of
mainly unfamiliar
audiences and contexts.
Appropriate use of form
and register to convey
mostly complex meaning
in a range of unfamiliar
contexts.
B
Knowledge and
understanding of the ways in
which authors use stylistic
features and language
techniques to communicate
complex and familiar ideas,
and to influence the readers
response.
Knowledge and
understanding of some ideas,
values, and beliefs in familiar,
and some unfamiliar, texts.
Knowledge and
understanding of the ways in
which creators and readers of
mainly familiar texts use
some textual conventions to
make meaning.
Analysis of some complex
connections between
personal experiences,
ideas, values, and beliefs,
and those explored in
familiar, and some
unfamiliar, texts.
In comparative exercises,
a clear analysis of
connections between
texts, based on analysis
of similarities and/or
differences.
Analysis of a range of
ways in which authors
use language techniques
to influence opinions and
decisions in familiar, and
some unfamiliar, texts.
Use of a range of language
skills and techniques to create
clear and coherent texts that
address the meaning and
intention of the task.
In comparative exercises,
recognition of connections
between texts, through
responses that compare and
contrast texts in an integrated
way.
Appropriate use of evidence
from texts to support responses,
with textual references
incorporated in discussion.
Skills in using some of the
textual, structural, and
conventional features of text
types for a range of mainly
familiar, and some unfamiliar,
contexts, audiences, and
purposes.
Mostly fluent and precise
writing and speaking,
using appropriate style
and structure for a range
of mostly familiar
audiences and contexts.
Appropriate use of form
and register to convey
complex and simple
meaning in a range of
familiar and unfamiliar
contexts.

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Knowledge and
Understanding
Analysis Application Communication
C
Knowledge and
understanding of a narrow
range of ways in which
authors use stylistic features
and language techniques to
communicate mainly familiar
ideas, and to influence the
readers response.
Knowledge and
understanding of some ideas,
values, and beliefs in mainly
familiar texts.
Knowledge and
understanding of some of the
ways in which creators and
readers of a range of familiar
texts use textual conventions
to make simple or factual
meaning.
Analysis of simple
connections between
personal experiences,
ideas, values, and beliefs,
and those explored in
familiar texts.
In comparative exercises,
analysis of connections
between texts, based on
some understanding of
similarities and/or
differences.
Descriptive analysis of a
number of ways in which
authors use language
techniques to influence
opinions and decisions in
familiar texts.
Use of language skills and
techniques to create texts that
address the meaning and intention
of the task.
In comparative exercises,
recognition of some connections
between texts, through responses
that compare and contrast texts,
usually in a sequential rather than
an integrated way.
Competent use of evidence from
texts to support responses, with
some use of textual references in
discussion.
Skills in using some of the textual,
structural, and conventional
features of some text types for
familiar contexts, audiences, and
purposes.
Generally fluent and
functional writing and
speaking, using
appropriate style and
structure for familiar
audiences and
contexts.
Appropriate use of
form and register to
convey simple
meaning in a narrow
range of familiar and
unfamiliar contexts.
D
Knowledge and restricted
understanding of some
simple stylistic features and
language techniques used by
authors to communicate
mainly familiar ideas, and to
influence the readers
response.
Knowledge and
understanding of some
familiar ideas, values, and
beliefs in familiar texts.
Knowledge and
understanding of a restricted
number of ways in which
creators and readers of a
narrow range of familiar texts
use some textual conventions
to make simple or factual
meaning.
Reference to simple
connections between
uncomplicated personal
experiences, ideas,
values, and beliefs, and
those explored in familiar
texts.
In comparative exercises,
answers that make partial
comparisons and
contrasts.
Reference to some ways
in which authors use a
range of language
techniques to influence
opinions and decisions in
familiar texts.
Use of some language skills and
techniques to create texts that
partly address the meaning and
intention of the task.
In comparative exercises, some
awareness of connections between
texts, through partial responses that
mainly deal with texts separately.
Some use of evidence from texts to
support a response, with use of a
narrow range of textual references.
Skills in using some of the textual,
structural, or conventional features
of a text type for a familiar context,
audience, or purpose.
Achievement of a
level of fluency in
writing and speaking,
in a mainly
appropriate style.
Occasionally
appropriate use of
form and/or register
to convey simple
meaning in familiar
contexts.
E
Knowledge and
understanding of a restricted
range of simple stylistic
features and language
techniques used by authors
to communicate familiar
ideas, and to influence the
readers response.
Identification of an idea, a
value, or a belief in familiar
texts.
Knowledge and
understanding of the ways in
which a creator or reader of a
highly familiar text uses
textual conventions to make
factual meaning.
Recognition of a simple
connection between a
straightforward personal,
experience, idea, value, or
belief, and that explored in
a highly familiar text.
In comparative exercises,
answers that make a
simple comparison or
contrast.
Reference to the way in
which an author uses
language techniques to
influence opinions and
decisions in a highly
familiar text.
Attempted use of a restricted range
of language skills and/or techniques
to create a text or texts that attempt
to address the meaning or intention
of the task.
In comparative exercises,
identification of limited connections
between texts, through fragmented
responses that deal with texts
separately.
Restricted use of evidence from
texts to support a simple response,
with limited textual reference.
Skills in using the textual, structural,
or conventional features of a text
type for a highly familiar context,
audience, or purpose.
Emerging
development of
fluency in an
occasionally
appropriate style.
Occasionally
appropriate use of
form and register to
convey literal
meaning in highly
familiar contexts.



Stage 2 English Athena Taylor

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LESSON BY LESSON PLAN
Week Lesson Time Content Teaching
Method
Homework Learning
Resources
Week
One
Lesson
One
45 min Introduction to Snow Falling on Cedars
-eg historical background of the
novel, author information, location,
etc.

Set up outline of what will be covered
over the course of the unit, including
summative assessment tasks

Discussion of key summary of plot and
characters, brief brainstorm of what
issues and themes might be covered in
the book

Presuming there is time at the end of
the lesson: watch trailer of the movie:
start thinking about themes, ideas,
things that are relevant for a literary
essay
Teacher
Instruction



Teacher
instruction


Class discussion




Interactive
I will assume
at this point
that the
students
have all
finished
reading the
novel;
however
realistically
there will
still be
students
reading this
book for
homework.

Character
sheets
Handout
with key
information
(see
attached)




Whiteboard




Youtube, tv


Lesson
Two
(see
full
lesson
plan
for
greater
detail)
90 min Class brainstorm of characters in the
novel: their key info, their motivations,
their actions in the story, etc.

Discussion of the use of setting and
place in the text. Reading of exerpts
from the book to exemplify this point.
Depending on class size, either each
student to read an exerpt and explore
impact on reader, or else pairs to
divide the task.

Final half an hour: incorporating
quotes into essays. How to support
your point, transitioning, etc.

Class discussion



Group
discussion,
student
individual work




Teacher
instruction
Students to
be given
individual
focus
questions to
work on
overnight in
preparation
for the next
lesson (see
attached)
Character
info sheet


Text exerpts








Lesson
Three
(see
full
lesson
plan
for
greater
detail)
Discuss as a class: what issues does the
text raise/explore? Justify using
analytical responses/examples. Write
on board and have all students take
notes (continuation from homework)

Breakdown issues into individual
elements, eg. racism, love, war, etc
correspond quotes/evidence from
book to issues


Class discussion





Group
discussion,
student
independent
work

Choose an
essay
question and
type up a
rough
outline of
your essay,
including key
points












Stage 2 English Athena Taylor

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Handout essay questions (see
assignment sheet) students to begin
very rough outline of their essay
response
Student
independent
work
List of essay
questions
Week
Two
Lesson
Four
45 min A discussion of the way motifs are used
in the text: begin with brainstorming of
relevant examples on the board

Once initial motifs have been
generated, have students apply them
to the selected essay questions (eg an
analysis the effect of the motifs). This
can be done in small groups as
assigned and then shared with the
class

With time remaining, begin to work on
fleshing out detail of individual essays,
quote mining, etc.
Class discussion



Group work







Student
independent
work
Continue
working on
revised essay
Handout to
be given at
end of class
with list of
motifs used
in SFOC
(essay cheat
sheet)
Lesson
Five
90 min Focus on techniques: narrative,
language, pacing, perspective

Read and discuss exerpts from the
book from different chapters which
highlight particular uses of these
literary devices

In class: each student to write a timed
(c 30min) paragraph on a different
technique in the text and how the
author uses it to reinforce the
previously discussed issues/ideas of
the text

With remaining time: students to
discuss how their first draft is coming
along/issues they have anything they
would like to work on in the final
lesson before first draft is due



Class discussion




Student
independent
work





Continue
working on
first draft of
essay (due at
end of next
lesson)




Relevant
exerpts of
text
Lesson
Six
45 min Go over any issues that were raised by
students at the end of previous lesson
as area for concern

Have brief revision session on writing a
good essay: key points such as topic
sentences, incorporating quotes,
introductions and conclusions, proper
use of language etc

Students to work on draft essays, with
intention to hand up at end of class
Class discussion



Teacher
instruction




Student
individual work
Hand up first
draft




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Week
Three
Lesson
Seven
45 min Hand back edited first drafts and go
through any issues that appeared
common

Brief discussion of who the text might
appeal to, and what influence this may
have on the authors techniques/style

Recap of the different elements of
literary analysis we have been
studying: eg the differences between
motifs/symbols, issues and themes,
and literary techniques. Perhaps have
students work in groups to separate
examples into their proper categories,
then reconvene and share with class

Teacher
instruction


Class discussion



Group work




Go through
my edits on
draft and
begin
refining/ame
nding essay









Lesson
Eight
(see
full
lesson
plan
for
greater
detail)
90 min The editing process:

Work as a class on how to make
sentences tighter (go through 2/1
rule), on the differences between
formal/informal language, of the
importance of a clear but refined
vocabulary, and in incorporating
quotes/evidence into essays

Have examples of good editing
practices to show students. Explain the
three different layers of editing:
spelling/grammar, overall sentence
construction and flow, and the broader
issues/points being made in the essay.

Remaining time: work on essays,
making sure to include simple,
compound and complex sentences,
formal essay language and correct
quotation and referencing
conventions. Quiet work time while I
assist students individually.


Class discussion







Teacher
instruction


Group work


Student
independent
work
Final chance
to refine and
edit essay.
Due at end
of week










Exerpts of
writing to
demonstrate
the three
different
layers of
editing
Lesson
Nine
45 min Final chance of editing, discussion with
teacher on issues: hand up at end of
week

Conclude unit, summary of skills learnt,
why its important, what aims and
objectives we have achived as a group

Begin preliminary introduction to new
unit
Student
independent
work

Class discussion



Teacher
instruction
First draft
due at end
of week




Printed
summary for
student
reflection


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Lesson Plan: Week 1, Lesson 2
Part 1 20 min
Character Information
As this is the second lesson of the unit, I will presume a certain amount of introductary
information has been conveyed already. However, I imagine students will still need a certain
degree of transitioning, and a useful way of accomplishing this whilst at the same time
making sure the time is being used productively is on character summaries.
The previous days homework would have been to assign individual characters to each
student and ask them to research into their key info, motivations, actions in the story, ultimate
outcome, etc. Now we will convene as a class and share what we have learnt. I will write the
answers given on the board by the students and they can take notes of the answers. I would
then, when I had the time, type up the responses and print them out to give to the students as a
kind of character cheat-sheet. I believe this is a good way to give students ownership of the
learning process, when they feel as if they have been involved in the creation of knowledge. It
also compensates for those students who may have difficulty in copying exacting and
information-heavy notes from a whiteboard.
Part 2 20 - 30 min
Content Study: Setting
I will now initiate a discussion on the use of setting and place in the text. This forms a major
part of the novels form and direction, and is a straightforward way of getting the students
involved in relatively simple textual analysis. I would start by a brief class discussion of what
settings occur in the text: the island, the sea, the cedar forests and strawberry farms, etc. I will
have pre-prepared exerpts that give examples of each of these settings in the text, and will
assign students to read them one by one. This is a way of introducing some auditory
stimulation into the course, which may also help the students to appreciate the structure and
formation of the language as well as the textual content of the novel. After each exerpt has
been read, we can hopefully add to the brainstorming on the whiteboard, and begin to
establish links between the physical description of place and the themes/issues being explored
in the text.

Stage 2 English Athena Taylor

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Part 3 5 min
Break
As this is a double lesson and very content-heavy I feel it would be pertinent at this point to
give the students a break. Otherwise after an hour of hard work and text analysis the brain
begins to shut off, the students get rowdy, and the teaching is ineffective. Plus I could
probably use a break at this point too!
Part 4 25 - 30 min
Teacher Instruction: Quotes
After now having studied a content element of the course, I would begin a different element
of instruction: the art of essay writing, or more particularly, the ability to incorporate textual
evidence in support of your conclusions. I anticipate this part of the lesson to be led by
teacher instruction, with opportunities for student independent work.
Hopefully in our previous discussions on place and setting, we will have identified several
key quotes and texts which highlight its importance to the text. I would use these as examples
of the way to incorporate quotes: firstly by assigning a quote to each student and asking them
to incorporate it into an essay sentence. Hopefully I would have some kind of Ipad projector
equipment, so that when the students then read their sentences back to me I could type them
up and they would appear on a screen for all the students to copy down (after discussion of
whether the sentence is crafted correctly, of course, and any corrections that could be made).
I would then demonstrate examples on the board or via handouts that highlighted both well
done and poorly done quote incorporation. Following this, I would hope to build upon this
instruction by identifying the simple essay structure of PEA: Point, Evidence, Analysis. We
would go through an example of this as a class together, and I would make sure that the
students understood that this was of primary importance to their upcoming assignment of an
essay regarding Snow Falling on Cedars.



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Part 4 5 - 10 min
ICT Integration
With the remaining five to ten minutes, I would like to show the students an exerpt or exerpts
of the movie that focused on the setting of Snow Falling on Cedars; for example, the beach
scenes, strawberry farm scene or cedar forest scenes, in order to emphasise the visual impact
of setting to a movie and hopefully by doing so reinforce the use and power of setting in the
written text as well. In addition this is a lighter way to end what has hopefully been a very
productive but strenuous lesson, and give the students a brief reprieve from writing.
Part 5 -
Homework
In order to expand upon the lessons work on setting and place, I would assign each student in
my class a focus question in regards to some element in the text, and ask them to prepare a
short written answer for the next class. See attached sheet.
Part 6 5 min
Personal Review
I will write notes for myself as review of the lesson, considering what worked well and what
didnt, what discussions were embraced by the students and which needed more coaxing from
me. I will also consider which issues and elements of the discussion students seemed most
enthused about, and whether there is a way to focus on these in the subsequent lessons. In
particular I will consider whether the ICT integration was a productive use of time, and
whether students responded to the change in pace and style with positivity or not. I will also
examine the written examples given by the students of textual quotation, and consider
whether further work needs to be done in this regard.



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Lesson Plan: Week 1, Lesson 3
Part 1 10 min
Discussion
I initiate a discussion of issues raised in the text by asking the students to share the answers to
the focus question they were assigned for homework. By writing the answers on the board
and asking students to compile the answers, hopefully we will generate a broad spectrum of
issues/themes from the text. This is a good way of ensuring the students have done their
homework, as well as covering a broad spectrum of issues in hopefully an interactive fashion.
It also teaches good brainstorming practices for initial essay planning.
Part 2 25-30 min
In-Depth Study
Once we have outlined the issues/themes raised in the text, I will assign a particular theme or
issue to either individual students or pairs depending on:
a) the mix of the class and whether a majority have learning styles that benefit from
group-work
b) the level of diligence in the students and whether I believe they will work most
effectively individually or collaboratively, and
c) the number of students and the timeframe of the lesson.
I will ask students, either individually or in pairs, to go through the book and identify key
scenes/quotes/general examples related to the theme or issue they have been assigned. I
would ask them to work quietly in compiling their work, for say fifteen minutes, and
hopefully by the end of that time they have managed at least half a dozen examples. I would
ask students to type these up and email to me and then I would compile them and send it out
to all the students. This ensures everyone is engaged and contributing to the learning process.
Hopefully during this time, which should be relatively quiet and studious, I will have an
opportunity to walk around the classroom and help individual students with their exploration
of the text, guiding them in the right direction and pointing out useful quotes.
I will also make sure to link the work we are doing back to their summative task, the essay, so
that students know the work they are generating will be of use later.
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Part 3 5 - 10 min
Summative Introduction
At the end of the class, I will hand out the assessment sheet (attached above) highlighting the
summative task, which is an essay of 1000 words on any of the questions given. As this is the
final lesson of the week, students will have the following days to choose a question and
contemplate their essay. They can use the five to ten minutes at the end of this class to begin
their plan, discussing any issues they have with me and/or their peers. Hopefully from the
days work they will have more of an idea of what issues and themes they feel most confident
tackling in their essay.
Part 5 1 hr
Homework
Homework will be to choose one of the essay questions and type up a rough outline of their
essay, including key paragraphs, topic sentences and basic evidence. Students can flesh this
out as much as they want, but a minimum standard will be to have individual paragraphs
planned and a very rough summary of the points to be covered. They will send these through
to me at the end of the weekend, which will give me a chance to make sure everyone is up to
speed, as well as directing my attention to particular areas of focus we may not have covered
in sufficient detail.
Part 6 5 min
Personal Review
I will write notes for myself as review of the lesson, considering what worked well and what
didnt, what discussions were embraced by the students and which needed more coaxing. I
will consider which issues and themes in the text students seemed most interested in, and
whether there is a way to focus on these in subsequent lessons.
When I review the essay plans I will probably be able to have a better idea of who is engaging
well with the text, and who is going to need further encouragement to reach their benchmark.
Obviously the text will not enthuse everybody but I hope there is a variety of issues and
techniques available for all the students to get their teeth into.

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Lesson Plan: Week 3, Lesson 8
Part 1 10-15 min
Discussion
We are coming towards the end of the unit now, and students will have had their first drafts
marked and returned the previous day. Now the focus will be on refining those essays to be
the best they can be, with an emphasis on the editing process.
To begin, I will explain the three different layers of editing: ie, spelling/grammar, the so-
called superficial layer, and the importance of proof-reading; secondly, the construction and
flow of individual sentences and the paragraph as a whole; and finally, the issues and larger
points being made, and whether the arguments are well supported, the evidence smoothly
integrated, and the conclusion neat and well rounded.
To begin, we will have a class discussion on sentence and paragraph construction.
Part 2 20 min
Focus: Sentence Editing
Following on from this general introduction, I will narrow the focus into the second layer of
editing, which is sentence construction and flow of the paragraph. I will write examples on
the board of essay sentences which can be improved. These will be non-specific but for
example: sentences which are too long-winded, sentences with comma splices, sentences with
colloquial or informal language (please see attached sheet for examples).
I will then discuss with the class the 2/1 rule for essay writing: ie, never say in two sentences
what can be said in one. We will practise as a class condensing longwinded double sentences
into one concise one, until I feel confident that the students can apply this rule to their own
work.
Part 3 10 - 15 min
Demonstrative Editing
Having now set a hopefully productive grounding on the editing process both general and
specific, I will not hand out examples of paragraphs that are badly in need of editing, of all
three kinds discussed above. Each student will get a different paragraph, and I will ask them
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to go through the piece, keeping in mind what we have discussed, and edit it to a more
respectable standard. A good idea, particularly for those kids who learn visually, would be to
colour-code the different corrections they make according to which layer of editing they fit
under.
Part 4 30 min
Student Independent Work
With the time remaining in the lesson, I would have the students work on their essays,
applying the lessons in editing we have just learned to their own work. This way they can
work while the lesson is fresh, and I can monitor their progress and be available for their
questions if need be. I would put particular emphasis on making sure their essays have
sentence variety, formal essay language and correct quotation insertion. The level of
advancement and the depth of editing and refinement will of course vary according to the
individual students ability, but hopefully with the time and structure available all students
will be able to reach a high standard.
Part 5 -
Homework
As we are nearing the end of the unit the only homework assigned at this point will be to
finish editing and hand up the completed versions of their essays, which will be due at the end
of the week. I will of course be available to the students for further feedback and assistance
but I would hope that their work will be coming to a smooth completion at this point.
Part 6 5 min
Personal Review
By this stage I should have a fair grasp of how the students have responded to the text and the
essay assignment. I would take into account the responses I have received over the course of
the unit in my future planning, as well as identify any learning issues that should be
improved/built upon for the end of year exam.


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WORKSHEET: HOMEWORK: LESSON ONE
Snow Falling on Cedars
by David Guterson
Characters






Plot






Settings






Issues/Themes







Techniques










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WORKSHEET: HOMEWORK: LESSON TWO
1. What effect does the author create by witholding information and
introducing it in the form of flashbacks? How is the novels past related
to its fictional present?

2. The trial functions both as this novels narrative frame and as its
governing metaphor for larger questions about the nature of truth, guilt
and responsibility. How does the author interweave these two
functions? Which characters are aware that what is at stake is more than
one mans guilt?

3. When the trial begins, San Piedro is in the midst of a snowstorm, which
continues throughout its course. What role does snow play both
literally and metaphorically in the book? How does nature shape this
novel?

4. Guterson divides his island setting into four zones: the town of Amity
Harbor; the sea; the strawberry fields; and the cedar forest. What
actions take place in these different zones? Which characters are
associated with them? How does the author establish a different mood
for each setting?

5. In his first description of Carl Heine, Guterson imparts a fair amount of
what is seemingly background information. How do these facts becoe
crucial later on? Where else does the author impart often critical
information in a casual manner? What does this method suggest abouve
the novels sense of meaningful?

6. Where in Snow Falling on Cedars are people depersonalised detached
from their identities either deliberately or inadvertantly? What role
does depersonalisation play within the novels larger scheme?


7. What material evidence does the prosecution produce in arguing
Kabuos guilt? Why might they have been so quick to attribute Carls
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death to foul play? How does the notion of a murder trial fit into the
books thematic structure?

8. How is Ishamels sense of estrangement mirrored in Hatsue? To what
extent do Kabuo and Carl suffer from similar feelings? How does this
condition of transcendental homelessness serve both to unite and
isolate the novels characters?

9. What role does the San Piedro Review play in the life and times of its
community? How has Ishmaels stewardship of the paper differed from
his fathers? What actions of his may be said to parallel the older mans?

10. How does Guterson contrast Hatsues feelings for the two men in her
life, Ishmael and Kabuo? What does the disparity between Hatsues
memories and Ishmaels suggest about the nature of love? Where else in
this novel do different characters perceive the same events in radically
different ways and with what consequences?

11. What is the effect of parallelism in the novel and where does the author
employ this method?

12. What is the significance of the novels last sentence: Accident ruled
every corner of the universe except the chambers of the human heart?


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WORKSHEET: HOMEWORK: LESSON THREE
Points Evidence Analysis
Paragraph One
Paragraph Two
Paragraph Three