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Stage 1 History Athena Taylor

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History Stage 1
Unit Plan: The Great Depression

Class Description
For the purposes of this unit I am working on the assumption of a Stage 1, year 11
Modern History class in a rural highschool of majority lower socio-economic status.
My first practicuum is at Port Lincoln Highschool, which has 42% in the bottom
quarter according to myschool.edu.au. It also has 16% Indigenous students, but a very
small (under 1%) percentage of students with english as a second language. As
History is an elective, I imagine the majority of my class to be interested and engaged
to a certain degree, with a number aspiring to continue the subject into Stage 2. ICT
and technological resources may present some difficulties regarding equalisation and
availability for all students; however, in-class use of digital media should not present
any difficulties.

Focus Questions
Causes: What were the causes of the Great Depression?
Impact: What were the short and long term impacts of the Great
Depression?
Experiences: What were the human experiences of the Great
Depression? What insight do these events give you into human nature
and the ways in which individual and societies function?

Stage 1 History Athena Taylor

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Unit Rationale
Region: Europe, USA
Key themes: political, cultural and social consequences of economic collapse
I have chosen the Great Depression as it is one of my favourite historical periods, both
in terms of its incredible impact on twentieth century events and culture as well as the
depth and richness of the historical period itself. Indepth study of the Great Depression
involves careful analysis of the political, social, cultural and economic upheavals of
the late 1920s and early 1930s, which helps to fine tune the critical reasoning and
arguing skills of the students. It requires a consideration of the holistic impact of
events, on entire nations and industries, as well as the devastating effects which the
Depression had on individuals, families, and small communities. It also has
international scope, spanning the United States and Europe and influencing a variety
of global outcomes. As such it provides a wonderful launching pad for students in
their historical inquiry into the events of the twentieth century, from the rise of
Fascism and National Socialism in Europe, to the commencment of World War Two,
and the subsequent post-war boom across the United States and the world.

Timeframe
I would assign this unit somewhere in the middle of the year, after preliminary source
analyses and text productions that would help to ascertain the literacy levels and
capabilities of the class. Hopefully I will already have some idea as to which students
may need additional scaffolding and which may benefit from extension activities and
further challenging. I imagine most of the class to have very basic compentency in the
skill of essay writing, but anticipate an abhove average degree of teacher instruction
and demonstration to be necessary for those higher level SACE standards.


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Capabilities
This unit focuses on the five capabilities identified by SACE: communication,
citizenship, personal development, work and learning. Students will learn to
read critically, write in clear prose, succinctly develop their arguments, and
make relevant and informed contributions to class discussions. Source analysis
and unpacking of historical resources will form a core component of this unit,
along with which students will also gain technological skill and the ability to
critically assess aspects of digital media that relate to historical narratives,
discussions, and sources.
In terms of skills of historical inquiry, by the completion of this unit students
should have a functioning ability to pose historical hypotheses and ask focusing
questions to guide their inquiry; select from historical materials on the basis of
relevance; research, evaluate, interpret, analyse and use historical materials
efficiently and critically; think imaginatively about the past; think critically
about the uses and limitations of sources; make comparisons and contrasts to
increase their understanding of the past; and recognise differences of
interpretation among historians.
I believe this unit develops a number of key areas of skill and curriculum
knowledge. Students will develop higher level historical expression and refine
their argumentative skills, with consideration of a number of different
perspectives and source materials. Activities such as source analysis and essay
writing help students to build upon their ability to read critically, write in clear
prose, succinctly develop argument and make relevant and informed
contributions to class discussion. The unit will particulary focus on the skill of
source analysis, including an understanding of contextual historical
information, the manipulation of language and image to suit a preconceived
agenda, and the uses and limitations of perspective in shaping our historical
understanding.




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Differentiation
In terms of differentiation possibilities, I believe the multi-layered nature of the Great
Depression lends itself to staggered achievement levels. For those students who need
additional scaffolding and assistance, the more obvious effects and consequences of
economic down-turn allows them to build upon basic levels of historical analysis. At
the same time students with a greater level of ability can reach the upper marks
through more complex interpretations and deeper analysis of subtler historical
connections. The Great Depression has also been featured in movies, photography,
and popular culture phenomenon, as visual stimulus to go alongside the textual
informatino relating to this era.
In the assessment, while the formative test is prescriptive (to allow me to clearly
identify areas of strength and weakness in the students), the summative assignment of
an oral presentation with accompanying powerpoint lends itself to those students who
prefer spoken communication and physical presentation of knowledge, rather than
plain written form. Hopefully this is a way to make the task more engaging and allow
for a greater variety of responses from the students without sacrificing any depth of
learning.

Further Knowledge
In terms of a hidden curriculum, I would hope that through the study of this period
issues of poverty and community were raised in class discussion,and my students may
be lead towards a greater appreciation of the severe impact of economic decline and
the power it can have on individuals and society.




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Stage 1 History
Assessment Type 1
Formative Test
Purpose
This assessment will occur half-way through the unit, as a means of testing the students
knowledge and ensuring that key dates, figures and facts are being remembered sufficiently.
It should hopefully highlight any areas of weakness that need to be worked on, as well as
providing a good basis for further learning.
Description of Task
The test will consist of a series of multiple choice, short answer and one source analysis
question. It will be timed but formative, with marks serving only as a guide for future
performance. All questions will relate to the Great Depression.
Form/lengths/conditions
30 mins.
Test to include ten multiple choice, four short answers and one source analysis.

Please see attached for example test.
Audience: The teachers and others of your choosing.
Due Date: 8
th
May, 2014

Activity 1
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Stage 1 History
Assessment Type 2
Summative Oral Presentation
Purpose
This assessment provides for a number of key competencies in the study of history to be
met, whilst simultaneously providing a more stimulating learning environment for the
students than may have been accomplished by an essay question.
Description of Task
The task will require a short (five to ten minute) oral presentation by the students on an
aspect of the Great Depression. Students have a degree of determination over which
elements of the course interests them most, and in consultation with me they can decide on
the direction of their presentation. The accompanying powerpoint should provide the bulk of
th substantive written material, and allow for grading on the depth of knowledge shown and
level of analysis, whilst also working on the students oral skills and ability to present in front
of a class.

Please see attached sheet for further detail.

Timeframe
This assessment will occur at the end of the unit, as a summative task counting towards their
final grade. Hopefully a variety of choices from the students regarding topics will allow for a
comprehensive summary of the key issues, ideas and understandings to come out of
studying the Great Depression.
Form/lengths/conditions
5 - 10 mins.

If there are students with legitimate concerns regarding performance of their oral in front of
the entire class, there may be other arrangements made (eg. they could perform their
presentation at lunch time or immediately after school).
Audience: The classroom, or teacher by arrangement.
Due Date: 8
th
May, 2014



Activity 2
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LEARNING AND ASSESSMENT PLAN
Stage 1 History
School PORT LINCOLN HIGH SCHOOL (HYPOTHETICAL) Contact Teacher ATHENA TAYLOR
Other schools using this plan

SACE
School Code

Year

Enrolment Code

Program
Variant Code
(AW)
Stage Subject Code
No. of Credits
(10 or 20)
11 1 E G H 20

COHORT/CONTEXT DESCRIPTION

For the purposes of this unit I am working on the assumption of a Stage 1, year 11 History class in a rural
highschool of majority lower socio-economic status. My first practicuum is at Port Lincoln Highschool, which has
42% in the bottom quarter. It also has 16% Indigenous students, but a very small (under 1%) percentage of students
with english as a second language. I imagine the majority of my class to be aiming to take History as a subject in
Stage 2.

PROGRAM DESIGN

The unit will involve visual, auditory and written stimuli, with the aim of engaging students across a
broad spectrum of learning capabilities. It is my intention to emphasise the social relevance of the task
and encourage student participation in the learning process, particularly in an examination of the issues
being explored and how they might affect their own lives. There will be multiple opportunities for
feedback, review and scaffolding, with the hope of supporting those who may have difficulty with the
task.
The unit is delivered over 4 weeks with 3 individual lessons per week. It will include teacher instruction,
open class discussion, group work and independent student study. It will involve a moderate degree of
homework but continuous class participation, with the aim of creating a guided and structured path to
the summative task.
The unit will involve a moderate degree of negotiation, as students will have the chance to focus their
own study on a particular area of the Great Depression, such as economy or family life. To help
structure this, I will provide constant guidance, direction and clarification, with the thematic focus of
dealing with issues that are relevant to the wider topic. Homework monitoring will be important in this
unit to ensure students are keeping on task and completing the task as required.

CAPABILITIES, LITERACY AND NUMERACY OPPORTUNITIES
Capabilities
Students will achieve a level of fluency, precision, style and structure appropriate to the argument they are
making; they will learn to use evidence appropriately to support their historical hypothesis.

Students will have a greater understanding of the way in which society was shaped by the effects of the Great
Depression, as well as the development of historical concepts surrounding this event. Hopefully this will develop
into increased appreciation of the role of the economy in history.
Literacy and Numeracy skills
Students will have a grasp of several key competencies: the essentials of essay writing, fluency and clarity of
expression, engaging language, evidence and support, and correct historical referencing.

Students will study and discuss a variety of primary sources, including their limitations and strengths in shaping
a historians understanding of the Great Depression.
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Assessment Design Criteria
Knowledge and Understanding
The specific features are as follows:
KU1 Explanation of how particular societies in selected periods and places
have been shaped by both internal and external forces.
KU2 Identification and explanation of historical concepts.
Inquiry and Analysis
The specific features are as follows:
IA1 Analysis of hypotheses and/or focusing questions to guide historical
inquiry.
IA2 Analysis and evaluation of sources.
Reflection
The specific features are as follows:
R1 Understanding and appreciation of the role of particular individuals and
groups in .history
Communication
The specific features are as follows:
C1 Communication of informed and relevant arguments.
C2 Use of subject-specific language and conventions.






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Performance Standards for Stage 1 History

Knowledge and
Understanding
Inquiry and Analysis Reflection Communication
A
Comprehensive and relevant
explanation of how particular
societies in selected periods
and places have been
shaped by both internal and
external forces.
Insightful and well-informed
identification and explanation
of historical concepts.
Perceptive application of
hypotheses and/or focusing
questions to guide
historical inquiry.
Comprehensive and astute
analysis and evaluation of
sources.
Well-informed and
insightful understanding
and appreciation of the
role of particular
individuals and groups in
history.
Well-structured and coherent
communication of well-
informed and relevant
arguments.
Consistent, clear, and
appropriate use of subject-
specific language and
conventions.
B
Well-considered and relevant
explanation of how particular
societies in selected periods
and places have been
shaped by both internal and
external forces.
Well-informed identification
and explanation of historical
concepts.
Well-considered application
of hypotheses and/or
focusing questions to guide
historical inquiry.
Well-considered analysis
and evaluation of sources.
Well-informed
understanding and
appreciation of the role of
particular individuals and
groups in history, with
some insight.
Structured and mostly
coherent communication of
informed and relevant
arguments.
Clear and appropriate use of
subject-specific language and
conventions.
C
Considered and relevant
explanation of how particular
societies in selected periods
and places have been
shaped by both internal and
external forces.
Informed identification and
explanation of historical
concepts.
Competent application of
hypotheses and/or focusing
questions to guide
historical inquiry.
Considered analysis and
evaluation of sources.
Informed understanding
and appreciation of the
role of particular
individuals and groups in
history.
Generally coherent
communication of informed
and relevant arguments.
Mostly appropriate use of
subject-specific language and
conventions.
D
Recognition and basic
understanding of some
aspects of how particular
societies have been shaped
by both internal and external
forces.
Basic awareness and some
description of historical
concepts.
Partial application of a
hypothesis and/or focusing
question to guide historical
inquiry.
Superficial analysis of
sources, tending towards
description.
Some awareness and
recognition of the role of
particular individuals and
groups in history.
Basic communication of
aspects of an argument.
Some appropriate use of
subject-specific language and
conventions, with
inaccuracies.
E
Limited awareness of how
particular societies have been
shaped by internal and
external forces.
Some descriptions of
historical information.
Attempted application of a
focusing question to guide
historical inquiry.
Description of one or more
sources.
Emerging awareness of
the role of one or more
individuals or groups in
history.
Attempted communication of
one or more aspects of an
argument.
Limited use of any appropriate
subject-specific language and
conventions.

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LESSON BY LESSON PLAN
Week Lesson Time Content Teaching
Method
Homework Learning
Resources
Week
One
Lesson
One
(see
full
lesson
plan
for
greater
detail)
50 min Introduction to topic: initiate class
discussion on Great Depression
brainstorm on whiteboard

Summary of what the unit plan will
cover, assessment detaisl, due dates,
etc.

Provide interesting photographs of the
timeframe to increase understanding

In groups: brainstorm all the aspects of
modern life which we consider vital:
water, food, shelter, employment, etc.
-share with class, and tie in to how
these things were lost in the GD

Watch trailer for the movie Grapes of
Wrath: start thinking about themes,
ideas, issues that occurred in the GD
Class discussion



Interactive


Group
discussion




Teacher
instruction


Interactive
Write a
summary of
events prior
to and just
after the
Wall Street
Crash of
1929








Primary
source
photographs
(see
attached)




Youtube, tv

Lesson
Two
90 min Area of inquiry: causes of the GD

Work through homework as a class
together, creating timeline summary of
events of 1929 on board for students
to copy down

After summary, now work through on
a case by case basis the various causes
of the GD (overproduction, poverty,
trade, overselling)
isolate each + determine
whether long or short term causes,
flesh out detail in small groups, share

Inidividually, students to work through
worksheet (see attached) to
summarise the downward spiral of the
American economy

Break: Brother, Can you Spare Dime

2nd half: sources analysis as a class: go
through individual sources from 1929
which depict the Wall St Crash (see
attached) and work through together



Class work




Group work







Individual
student work



Interactive

Teacher
instruction,
class discussion
Find a
primary
source
relating to
the Wall
Street Crash
of 1929 and
write a
paragraph
analysing its
uses and
limitations to
historians















Worksheets
(see
attached
sheet)

Youtube

Primary
sources
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Lesson
Three
50 min Area of inquiry: immediate
consequences of the GD

Summary of key info regarding
immediate impact of GD (stock market
share prices, suicides, joblessness, etc)

Discussion of the key strategies put
into place by governments to deal with
the crash, and assessment of their
effectiveness



Teacher
instruction


Teacher
instruction,
class discussion
Answer
questions
(see
attached
sheet)
Worksheet
for
homework
use
Week
Two
Lesson
Four
(see
full
lesson
plan
for
greater
detail)
50 min Continuing: key strategies of Hoover to
try and save US economy from crash

Assessment of effectiveness: group
discussion on different strategies,
share opinions with class on whether
effective, justify with evidence

Each student to be assigned a
particular key indicator re GD: eg.
business failures, wheat prices, car
sales, etc. then find out figures, explain
how helped/hindered recovery from
Wall St crash, and share with class
Teacher
instruction

Group
discussion



Student
independent
work

Assign a
particular
role to a
student, eg.
worker,
union,
businessmen
, capitalists,
etc: prepare
reasons why
that
particular
group was
responsible
for GD
Key info
summaries
Lesson
Five
90 min Presentation by each student of their
homework, eg. why the different
groups were responsible/not
responsible for the GD

Teacher to write key facts and info re:
each group on board, go through as a
class after presentations and
summarise

Break: pre and post 1929 comparison

Discuss whether the 20s were jazz age
or depression blues: each student to
make a point either for or against

Election of Franklin Roosevelt: key
facts of the 1932 election, summary of
platforms, results, etc, the First New
Deal
Class discussion




Teacher
instruction

Student
independent
work

Class Discussion



Teacher
instruction
Prepare for
formative
test











Charts
Lesson
Six
50 min Formative Test


Student
Independent
work




Assessment
(see
attached
sheet)

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Week
Three
Lesson
Seven
(see
full
lesson
plan
for
greater
detail)
50 min Hand back formative tests, go through
areas of improvement/confusion

Continuing on from lesson five: brief
summary of FDRs election platform

Outline of the Second New Deal:
descriptions of each agency and its
functions (powerpoint)

Discuss questions re: New Deal as
groups, share responses with class,
write answers

Choose element of GD for
oral/powerpoint presentation
Teacher
instruction

Teacher
instruction




Group work



Student
independent
work
Students to
draw a chart
of the
alphabet
agencies
and their
role in the
New Deal
plan (see
attached)



Powerpoint



Question
sheet
Lesson
Eight
90 min Expansion of economic consequences
of GD

Exerpts of primary sources which
explore economic consequences,
discussion on uses/limitations

2
nd
half: expansion of social
consequences of GD

Exerpts ofprimary sources which
explore social consequences,
discussion of uses/limitations

Discussion with teacher re: topic for
powerpoint/oral presentation
Teacher
instruction

Class discussion



Teacher
instruction

Class discussion



Interactive
Work on
summative
assessment
Worksheets
and
information
summaries
Lesson
Nine
50 min Expansion of cultural impact of the GD,
following on from previous lesson

Exploration of sources which explore
cultural impact, uses/limitations, etc.

In groups: given an individual character
in 1929 farmer, businessman, factory
worker, student and report to class
as assessment of how the GD would
have impacted upon them, long and
short term consequences
Teacher
instruction

Class discussion


Group work
Work on
summative
assessment:
rough
outline of
argument to
be
submitted
for drafting
at end of
week
Information
summaries
Week
Four
Lesson
Ten
(see
full
lesson
plan
for
50 min Hand back rough drafts of
powerpoint/oral presentations with
comments/notes

Basically a lesson dedicated to
students working on their summative
assessment teacher guidance, source
Class discussion



Student
independent
work
Final chance
to work on
summative
assessment


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greater
detail)
hunting, and fine tuning the next
lessons procedure


Lessson
Eleven
90 min Summative Orals and Powerpoint
presentations
Student
independent
work
- Powerpoint
and
projector
screens
Lesson
Twelve
50 min Conclude unit, summary of everything
we have learnt, why its important,
what aims and objectives we have
achieved as a group

Begin preliminary introduction to new
unit, tie in with Great Depression and
its flow on consequences, explain the
fluid nature of historical study and
analysis
Teacher
instruction,
class discussion


Teacher
instruction
- Printed
summary for
student
reflection




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Lesson Plan: Week 1, Lesson 1
Part 1 10 - 15 min
Preliminary Groundwork
As this is the first lesson on the topic, I will start by introducing the Great Depression to the
students. This will begin with a discussion of what we already know about the Depression,
through popular culture, and after that, what general words come to mind when we think
about it. I would hope this would encourage students to begin to think about the overall
themes and issues we will be covering in this unit of work.
Once we have a broad understanding of the topics to be covered, I will provide a summary of
the unit of work we will cover, including formative and summative assessment details, due
dates, lesson structure, etc. I will have students copy these notes for themselves.
Part 2 10 - 15 min
Starter
In order to further increase the interest in the subject, and give some visual stimulation to the
topic, I would now go through a series of interesting photographs from the time of the
Depression. This would cover a broad range of the issues, such as the dust bowl, joblessness,
poverty, business collapse, and protest riots. Hopefully this will increase the students
curiosity about the subject, as well as giving some context and human reality to the things
we will be discussing. For a brief example of some of the photos, please see attached sheet.
Part 3 10 - 15 min
Group Work
This is an interactive group activity meant to help ease students into an idea of the topic we
are covering, and hopefully following on from the class discussion and photograph display. In
groups or pairs, depending on class size and the level of enthusiasm of the class, I would ask
the stuents to brainstorm the elements of life which they consider essential: ie. food, water,
clothing, shelter. There will probably be more interesting responses too, like facebook or
internet, which will allow me to remind students that these things didnt exist in the
timeframe we are discussing. Once we have a decent list of lifes essentials, we can work
through each one and discuss how they came under threat from the Great Depression, and the
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ways in which families had to struggle to fulfill their most basic of needs. Hopefully this will
give a humanist aspect to the course as well as helping students build a little compassion and
empathy for the circumstances we will be exploring.
Part 4 5 min
Interactive
If there is time, I would show a trailer of key clip from the movie Grapes of Wrath, which
focuses on the Great Depression and in particule the migration of Okies from the dustbowl
to California. It is a nice way to end the lesson, as well as stimulate interest for the subject
and, hopefully, provide greater context and motivation for in-depth learning. Also if there
wasnt time for this at the end of this particular lesson I would simply shelve it for another
day.
Part 5 30 min
Homework
Homework will be to type up a brief summary of events priod to and immediately after the
Wall Street Crash of 1929. I imagine this will all be laid out in the textbook or exerpts I
provide, but it still helps to build your own summary of key info and dates. This will build
towards the next lessons topic.
Part 6 5 min
Personal Review
I will write notes for myself as review of the lesson, considering what worked well and what
didnt, what discussions were embraced by the students and which needed more coaxing. I
will also consider which elements of the Great Depression my students seemed most enthused
with, and whether there is a way to focus more on these in subsequent lessons. Also I will
take on board feedback regarding the trailer and photographs provided by the students, and
consider whether this caught their interest.

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Lesson Plan: Week 2, Lesson 4
Part 1 5 - 10 min
Summary of Previous Lesson
We are well into the topic now, so I dont imagine much of a starter to be required. However,
a brief refresher of what was covered in the previous lesson certainly wouldnt go astray,
particularly as we may have run out of time and not been able to cover Hoovers strategies for
dealing with the GD in sufficient detail. This will provide an opportunity to emphasise any
particular facts/issues that may have been missed the previous week.
Part 2 15-20 min
Group Discussion
We will now move from outlining Hoovers steps to assessing the effectiveness of them. In
order to streamline this discussion, I will break the class up into groups/pairs, and assign each
group a particular strategy employed by Hoover, and ask them to consider how well it worked
in alleviating the effects and consequences of the Depression. I would ask them to find
evidence, either from their textbook or supporting materials, to back up their opinion. I would
give the students ten minutes to do this, and then a further ten minutes to reconvene as a class
and share with each other our opinions. I would make a reference of the arguments and
analysis on the board, and have students copy them down, so as to create a good overview of
the effectiveness of Hoovers strategies. I thnik this is the best way of getting through a large
block of information in an interesting, engaging, and hopefully efficient manner.
Part 3 15-20 min
Student Independent Work
Continuing on from a discussion on the effectiveness of the strategies employed to limit the
effects of the Depression, I would try and narrow the area of inquiry even further into
particular segments of society. In doing so, I would assign each student a key indicator of
the Great Depression, eg. business failures, wheat prices, car sales etc. I would ask them to
research the facts and figures of that particular indicator, from the late 1920s boom time into
the 1930s depression, then write a brief summary of how that key indicator changed over time
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and whether Hoovers strategies helped or hindered its recovery. Then share this information
with the class and take notes of everyones answers for future sharing.
Part 4 30 min
Homework
Homework will be to investigate a particular individual from the time of the 1930s, and how
their role contributed to the Great Depression. Examples are worker, union, businessman,
capitalist, etc. Write a up a summary of their role in the Depression, and also how the Wall St
Crash and subsequent economic failure impacted on their life. Justify with evidence and
examples (homework should be around one para, emailed to me). I will then compile all the
answers and share with students as useful summary.
Part 5 30 min
Personal Review
When I review the homework I will probably be able to have a better idea of who is engaging
well with the task, and who is going to need further encouragement. The good thing about a
topic such as the Great Depression is there enough diversity of issues/topics to interest most
students in one way or another.

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Lesson Plan: Week 3, Lesson 7
Part 1 5 - 10 min
Test Review
This lesson takes place immediately following on from the formative test, the last lesson the
previous wekk, so I anticipate spending a few minutes at the beginning of the class going
through the answers, as well as assessing areas of improvement or confusion that may have
arised. Students will have their marks now and be able to see how their general knowledge of
the topic is coming along. They will also have an idea of how their source analysis skills are
coming along, and depending on the results I may dedicate some time at the start of this
lesson to working through an ideal source analysis response as a class.
Part 2 5 - 10 min
Summary
As we have had an interruption for the test, I would now take the chance to briefly summarise
what we were studying in lesson 5, which was the election of Franklid Roosevelt and his key
election platforms. I will again emphasise the comparison between the different directions
FDR and Hoover wanted to take th American economy, as well as reminding students of the
key aspects of th First New Deal.
Part 3 15-20 min
Teacher Instruction
Having summarised the previous lesson, I will now move onto an outline of the Second New
Deal, FDRs strategy for dragging America out of Depression. This will be rather content
heavy, so I believe the best method of conveying it would be in the form of a powerpoint,
with relevant images, graphs and statistics to break up the written information. Hopefully this
will also give students an idea of the form their own powerpoint presentation will take.
Key elements of study here include an overview of the alphabet agencies and their role in
reforming elements of American society, an analysis of how they complemented or at times
overrode aspects of the First New Deal, and the overall effect of the deal on aspects of the
American economy.
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Part 4 5 min
Summative Asseessment
Now that the formative assessment is taken care of, it will be time for students to turn their
attention towards the summative powerpoint presentation and oral they will be required to
complete at the end of the unit. I will outline the requirements of the assessment, and the form
and manner in which it will take place. Hopefully by now students will have a fairly thorough
idea of the issues they could explore in their powerpoint, and can begin narrowing their focus
and attention. This will be a time for students to think about this, draw a rudimentary plan,
and discuss any issues/questions with me.
Part 5 30 min
Homework
Homework will be to draw up a chart of the alphabet agencies created by FDR as part of the
New Deal. These include, for instance, the Tennesee Valley Authorty (TVA), the Works
Progress Administration (WPA), the Social Security Act, etc. Students will identify the
acronym, identify whether the agency was involved in relief, recovery or reform of the
American economy/society, and give an explanation of its role and impact. Hopefully the
chart will serve as a good summary of the New Deal and help as a cheat sheet for future
reference. If students have been paying attention and taking notes in class a lot of this work
will already have been completed for them, so it will also be a good demonstration of who is
engaged with the topic and who isnt.





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Lesson Plan: Week 4, Lesson 10
Part 1 5 - 10 min
Draft Review
At the end of the previous week students were required to submit a rough outline of what
their powerpoint presentation and oral will consist of, including basic arguments, key facts
and indicators, and the conclusion they will be working towards. This could have been either
in rough powerpoint form or a simple word document. I will have reviewed these over the
weekend and will hand them back to students at the beginning of the lesson. There may be
time for brief comments on the work, such as any areas of confusion that occur across the
board. Otherwise I will work one on one with the students at a later date to help refine their
argument/presentation.
Part 2 15 - 20 min
Review of Topic
As this is the lesson immediately before the summative orals and powerpoint presentations, I
expect most of the content of this course to have been already covered. This is a lesson to
cover any issues/elements of analysis that may have been skipped over or rushed in the
previous weeks, or topics that the students want more detail in. I would ask the students to
come prepared to this lesson with any information/topics they want covered in more detail, as
well as any questions they have about the summative assessment. Basically this will be an
opportunity to ensure all loose ends are tidied up, all the details are covered, and everybody
arrives at the next lesson prepared and ready for their assessment.
Part 3 20 min
Summative Assessment Work
Depending on how many questions the students have, how many areas of detail still needed to
be covered that were previously rushed over, and how well the class applies themselves to the
task, I anticipate there will a degree of time left over at the end of this lesson for students to
work on polishing up their powerpoint and oral presentation. This will be a time of quiet
student study as well as a chance for me to work with students one on one and help them get
the best out of their work.
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Part 4 -
Homework
As the summative oral and powerpoint is due the next day, the homework will be to finalise
their presentation and work on getting everything together for their assessment. There will be
no other set homework.
Part 5 5 min
Personal Review
By this stage I should have a fair grasp of how the students have responded to the unit and the
oral assignment. I would take into account the responses I have received over the course of
the unit in my future planning, as well as identify any learning issues that should be
improved/built upon for the end of year exam. Whether students enjoyed the interactive
nature of the course, which issues and themes engaged them the most, and whether they
responded well to the test structure and the presentation, will all be of use to me in future unit
plannings both for the rest of the year and beyond. Hopefully at the end of the week there will
be opportunity to get direct feedback from the students, including which skills of historical
analysis they would like to focus on in future units.




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Formative Test
The Great Depression
1. An economic depression occurs when ______________
A. wages and prices rise and unemployment falls.
B. wages and prices fall and unemployment rises.
C. wages, prices, and unemployment all rise together.
D. wages, prices, and unemployment all fall together.

2. Why did Congress grant President Roosevelt special powers at the start of
his first term?
A. because the Great Depression was a serious national crisis
B. because Roosevelt was elected in a landslide
C. because Congress and Roosevelt represented opposing political parties
D. because he was related to former president Theodore Roosevelt
3. First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt was especially active on the issue of
A. foreign aff airs.
B. civil rights.
C. the domestic economy.
D. womens rights.
4. The Grapes of Wrath describes the experiences of _________________
A. farmers migrating westward in search of work.
B. African Americans moving north to find jobs.
C. people relying on breadlines in major cities.
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D. New Deal workers building bridges and highways.
5. Which industry continued to pay high salaries and earn profits during the
Great Depression?

A. the agricultural industry
B. the banking industry
C. the livestock industry
D. the motion-picture industry

6. Dorothea Lange is a notable American in the field of _________________
A. politics.
B. photojournalism.
C. big business.
D. transportation.
7. Conservatives who opposed FDRs New Deal policies claimed that he
A. was destroying big business and free enterprise.
B. was not providing enough new jobs.
C. had failed to combat the rise of unemployment.
D. did not pass enough civil rights legislation.
8. Hoover took all these steps to combat the Great Depression except
A. funding public works projects.
B. establishing the Federal Farm Board.
C. reorganizing the banking system.
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D. buying up surplus farm crops.
9. The New Deal had all of these major goals and objectives except
A. to bring immediate relief to the unemployed by providing money, jobs,
or both.
B. to help the economy recover.
C. to provide universal employment throughout the United States.
D. to restructure the banking and business systems to prevent a future
economic crash.

10. The term Hooverville _________________
A. is a nickname for the White House during Hoovers administration.
B. refers to a community of homemade shacks housing the unemployed.
C. is a derogatory reference to Congress in the Hoover administration.
D. refers to the stock market on the day of the 1929 crash.

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Short Answer Questions
1. What were some of the causes of the Great Depression?





2. How did Hoovers policies worsen the effects?








3. Why did the New Deal lose steam in 1938 and 1939?





4. In your opinion, was Roosevelts New Deal a success or a failure?


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Source Analysis
American farmers pour unwanted milk into the road, 1932.
1. What is the purpose of the source?
2. What audience is the source trying to reach?
3. What is the tone of the source?
4. What are its uses and limitations as historical evidence?
5. What further information could be helpful in understanding the issue raised
by the source?


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Stage 1 Modern History
Investigative Study
Powerpoint Presentation and Oral

You must choose ONE of the following topics for your presentation.

5 10 minutes.

Up to 20 powerpoint slides.

Due Date: 9
th
May, 2014

TOPICS ON THE GREAT DEPRESSION

1. Philosophy on how to deal with the Depression. How did Hoover and FRD vary in
their management of the American economy?

2. Economic effects of the Great Depression. How did the stock market crash of 1929
impact on the overall economy of the United States?

3. What were the political consequences of the Great Depression?

4. Social impacts of the Great Depression? How did the economic collapse change the
face of American society?

5. The Twenties Jazz Age or Depression Blues?

6. A topic of your choice (discuss with teacher).


SAT No. 1
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LESSON ONE: PRIMARY SOURCE EXAMPLES

A mother of seven
children, by
Dorthea Lange, c.
1936
















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A man standing in a dust storm in Oklahoma, 1934
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Farm foreclosure sale, c. 1933

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A covered wagon in a migratory carrot pullers camp, c. 1939
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Homeless family, tenant farmers in 1936.
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Group of men standing outside an employment agency in America, c. 1935
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Men standing in a bread line in New York City in 1932.
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Civilian Conservation Corps enrollees clearing land for soil conservation, c. 1934

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