We've Been Waiting

We've Been Waiting

How long has it been since I've come To this town that was once my home? Have six years really passed away? It feels just like it were a day. The lightning illuminated This settlement so sedated1. I wonder if it's me that's changed, Or this town from which I'm estranged2. I presume we are both guilty, Surely that's why it's so ghostly. The Sawyer's roof has fallen in. Most homes don't seem to be lived in. No steam is rising from the mill That several city blocks does fill. Broken glass marks where windows were. I thought I saw a darting blur. But no one seems to move about, And all the power has gone out. But that's nothing more than this storm. It's time to find that ever warm Greeting I know I will receive From mom and dad, for I believe That they'll be shocked by my surprise Visit. My how time quickly flies. Have the pears ripened in the grove? What feast's mom cooking on the stove? Will dad be sitting in his chair? Is there less color in their hair? Have their glasses grown much thicker?

5

10

15

20

25

1 sedated: calm, tranquil 2 estranged: separated

30

35

40

45

50

55

60

Do they still playfully bicker3? Has mom done more embroidery? Does dad still play the lottery? A million questions, maybe more, Followed me till I reached their door. The lights were out, and no one came To the door. I called them by name As I entered. This door'd never Been locked in my whole life. Howe'er, No one responded to my calls. I wandered through the dusty halls, Groping and fumbling in the dark. No one was home; the air was stark And musty. Where would they have gone? I wandered to the telephone Where I'd called them the week before. As I reached it, I heard a door Bang shut, though it could have been a Shutter. I asked, "Who's there?" Dismay Was my only reply. I picked Up the receiver. Something clicked In the hall, and I turned my head, Realizing that the line was dead. The storm must have knocked out the lines. There was the sound of a fork's tines Screeching down a metal surface. I rushed to see what was the fuss. But there was nothing I could see, Since the light was obscurity. I sought the kerosene lantern, And as the wick began to burn I was grateful to have the light, Since darkness can produce a fright

3 bicker: argue back and forth about trivial things

65

70

75

80

85

Of harmless shadows and nonsense, Despite your age or competence4. Great solace5 comes from believing In naught6 because you see nothing. My valor7 came by lantern fire And convinced my mind to inquire8 Into the noises heard of late, Though my heart would fain liquidate Its assets while it's still ahead. I scoffed at my ungainly9 dread, And walked about my old dwelling To spite Phobos10 for its swelling. Though the light played tricks with my eyes, I unmasked the dark's each disguise. There was nothing lurking about. I decided to wait them out. They'd return perhaps tomorrow. Tired, I went upstairs to borrow The room which I had occupied When as a lad I did reside Here. A lightning bolt told me the Room was empty, the bed neatly Made, like an oyster dredged from the Sea to rip apart messily. I set the light on the dresser Old as Edward the Confessor11.
competence: abilities and intelligence solace: comfort naught: nothing valor: courage inquire: look into, investigate ungainly: inappropriate, silly Phobos: fear (the ancient Greek god of fear) Edward the Confessor: the next to last Anglo­Saxon king of England. He died in  1066.

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

90

95

100

105

110

115

Lying down in lilac perfume, Nature called me from the bathroom. Intent that I would not betray Its confidence, I made my way Down the corridor to its door. The darkness hid the changed decor That mom had mentioned months ago. A sudden gust of wind did blow, Turning the flame into a glow That died, making the pitch pall12 grow. Did it suffer from some malaise13? Then, chillbumps on my flesh did raise, And my hair stood on its end As terror began to descend On me. I didn't understand, Till I saw a dark figure stand Directly in front of my face. My feet seemed bolted fast in place. I knew that this must be a ghost. To my soul it gave quick riposte14, "My son, we've waited long for you." "Dad?" I thought, 'Is this really you?' The door slammed behind me and locked; My escape route had now been blocked. He lifted me from off my feet; Forcefully he began to beat Me 'gainst the walls. The mirror broke. Ethereal15 fingers did choke Me. I'm sure that my neck was bruised, I blacked out as the pain suffused16

12 13 14 15 16

pitch pall: dark shroud malaise: disease, uneasiness riposte: quick reply ethereal: ghostly suffused: spread through

120

125

130

135

140

145
17 18 19 20

Through my body. When I came to, All that I could smell was mildew. Rising carefully to my feet, I wondered what ghost would then greet Me. Why had dad been so violent? It must be a malevolent17 Spirit and not him, because he Always acted pacifically18. What had happened to my parents? They'd never been so aberrant19. Had this home and whole town been cursed? I couldn't help but fear the worst. Has he really locked me in my Closet? This would be no Versailles Where I'd wait for impending doom20. I made too much noise in the gloom As I burst through the slatted door. The ghost returned with many more. They advanced from the window's side, Calling for my blood and hide.21 As the door closed, I bolted through. Downstairs I could smell mom's beef stew, But I had no appetite now. I would be in it anyhow. Leaping down the stairs franticly, Mom's fine China crashed into me. Papers flew in a tempest's gust, Scorching me when they would combust

malevolent: evil pacifically: peacefully aberrant: strangely­behaved, odd Versailles. . . doom: The royal family of Louis XVI were in Versailles in 1789 as  their regime finally cracked and they were  seized and returned to Paris, signaling the  beginning of the Reign of Terror. 21 hide: skin

150

155

160

165

170

175

On contact. My singed hair reeked. Dim Pain gave way to adrenaline. I could hear the chairs as they slid Intensely. Running like I did When I was a kid, I reached The hall. It seems a banshee screeched, But I held quickly to my soul. Where I'd just stood there was a hole. The wall was riddled with mom's knives. I was a cat with fewer lives. The grandfather clock doubled me Over, but I arose to flee. The front door was getting close, and Then I was pinned by a book stand. "Why are you running from us, son?" He asked, like Attila the Hun22  Gazing on the Roman Empire Or Gaul23 as he set them afire, Confused at why they squirmed about With their hideous screams and shouts. "Aren't you happy to see your dad? We gave you everything you had. Now, there's one thing that you can give To us so that we too may live." I was too horrified to speak , And I heard the wall begin to creak. Where one knife was lodged deep in the Wall, it struggled to become free. Trapped by the shelf and mesmerized By its movements, I realized

22 Attila the Hun: 4th Century AD king of the Huns, who ruled an empire stretching  from Central Asia into Western Europe. He was one of the most feared and reportedly  barbaric men of his day. 23 Gaul: France

180

185

190

195

200

205

That I would never leave this home, Despite the fact that I was grown. The spirits advanced, and the knife Flew at me. I fainted. My life Would have surely come to an end. The pain woke me, since I'd been skinned On my legs, arms, and abdomen. Nothing within my blurry ken24 Could I see besides mom's stew pot. It was boiling, but I could not Discern what was cooking inside. I feared that it would be my hide. There were no ghosts that I could see, So I ran away to be free From the place that had enslaved me With bonds so violent and ghostly. The front door's handle wouldn't turn. It was never locked! Fear did burn Within me, thus I jumped right through The window, glass and all, into The sick birth of a twisted dawn. I had no time to hurt or fawn About, for shapes did appear On the porch of the house once dear To me for childhood's sake. They chased Me slowly until dawn erased Their figures, and I had returned To a world where spirits sojourn25 As spectators without power. The old ghost town seemed to glower26 At me as I hobbled away.

24 ken: field of vision 25 sojour n: live 26 glower: stare at evilly

210

215

220

225

230

235

Though atheist, I felt to pray. The phenomenon that I'd seen Had changed my view of everything. As I approached the bus stop, there Was a faint rustling in the air. I could almost hear my name called, As the words touched me, they did scald My body's many open wounds. My ankle was just then harpooned By a fist clutching from the ground. Their grave sites I seemed to have found. I tried to kick the dead hand off, But I just heard a sandy scoff. Many are rising from the soil, Hoping that they might later boil My flesh that they might feed on me. Like a voracious wolf pack prowls, They circle me. I hear their growls. A slimy fiend steps from the pack Whose recognition makes me back Away in fear. This perfidy27 Must be the greatest tragedy, For my decaying mom stood there. "Son, you shall not go anywhere." "But mom, I thought that you loved me." She replied, "'Memento mori28.' What did old Zachariah say About families in our day?" My heart sank like a boat anchor Since families were to canker By rancor, and love would perish Since parents no longer'd cherish

27 per fidy: treason 28 memento mori: famous Latin phrase for “Remember you shall die.”

240

245

250

255

260

265

270

Their inheritance of the Lord29, Which they would run through with the sword30. Years ago mom was perplexed how This could be. She seemed not so now. "Why do you seek to eat my flesh?" "Because your meat is pure and fresh." I looked at her bewilderedly31, As cold flesh grabs me hungrily. I'm trapped by the inhumanly Who dismember me eagerly. My ghost looks on curiously, For I can no longer feel pain. Am I dreaming? Am I insane? The undead carry my remains Hastily back across the plains Into the city where I grew Back to a special house I knew. I watched as they tossed my flesh in The pot. Someone gnawed on my shin, But I won't need that anymore. Still, some part of me did abhor My cadaver's mutilation. "What has brought this desolation?" I asked aloud, and the answer A spirit gave was that, "Cancer More hideous than ever known Had ravished us like a cyclone. Poison reached the water supply, And everyone began to die. At least, we thought we'd died at first, Until we discovered our thirst

29 inheritance. . . Lord: children. See Psalms 127:3 30 since families were to. . . sword: see Zechariah 13:3 31 bewilderedly: confused

275

280

285

290

295

300

For the living's juices and meat. The first to die came back to eat Their spouses, kids, friends, and neighbors, Making us all join their labors. We hunt around the country side Like the jaws of hell gaping wide. This happened several years ago." I was surprised I did not know. But mom and dad had never told Me this, nor that their hearts were cold. That night they ladled out my soup And devoured it as their goop Dripped like pus from sores in their  bowls. They fought for the dregs like crazed trolls. Then, when they had consumed it all They all went outside and did fall To the ground. Their bodies melted Like summer hail that has pelted Hot southern climes furiously. I studied this curiously. Have my assailants passed away? A sudden breeze seemed to convey Electricity back to the House. My parents stood before me Now in their fleshless, spectral forms. "It's good to be rid of those worms," My mom smiled as she winked at dad. "Where are the bodies you just had?" "They are good to hunt and eat with, But the spirit's truly the pith Of being in the Afterdeath.  Though silent as a statue's breath, This cold, spirit form can channel More power than you can handle.

305

310

315

320

325

330

Our zombie forms are slow and reek , They are Creole32 when you know Greek33. They're not refined and cannot pass Through walls like spirits to harass The weaklings that we mortify To the extent we chondrify34 Their bones, and they are easy kills, Petrified, and covered with chills. We slay them without sympathy. The spirit has telepathy, As well as telekinesis. It is without agenesis35, With the exception so fleeting That bodies do all the eating. They're necessary to savor Human flesh in every flavor. Perhaps these things seem unreal now, But these truths you can't disavow. You'll learn. It's like riding a bike, Albeit that is no thrill like Seeing terror bathe someone's eyes And listening to their wild cries Curdle like old milk in their throats As you eat them like tender shoats36. The living are but bred to die. They know it—look them in the eye, And their panic makes evident That to earth they've only been sent As a premonition of what Will be when living they are not,

32 33 34 35 36

Creole: simplified French language spoken in places such as Haiti Greek: the language of many of the classics of Western Literature. chondr ify: Turn bone into cartilage and such less sturdy tissues agenesis: defects shoats: young hogs

335

340

345

To be hunted as coturnix37. A human is but a phoenix38, What greatness comes from its ashes After our teeth on it gnashes You'll have the chance to discover. May fiendishness be your lover." I didn't know how to reply, So I let the moments slide by. Well, it seems that I'm here to stay. Time together's good, anyway. I wanted to surprise them; they Surprised me instead yesterday.

From The Dementia of Iyan Igma Copyleft 2007/2008 by Iyan Igma Creative Commons Attribution­Noncommercial­No Derivative Works 3.0  United States License

37 coturnix: quail 38 phoenix: a bird that is reborn from its own ashes

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful