Amphibious Gods

Wells, springs, lakes, and oceans have been considered sacred since the earliest days of mankind. Many of these water sources have been associated with gods, goddesses, spirits and demons. Throughout history, many mystical beings have been revered. Today, we look at a few of them. To the ancient Greeks, Amphitrite was a goddess of the sea. Over time, she became merely a consort of Poseidon. To the Romans, she was Salacia, consort of Neptune. Amphitrite, in addition to birthing dolphins and seals, also had a son and daughter father by Poseidon. Cybele Cybele is an ancient Phrygian goddess, at least 5000 years older than the Egyptian and Sumerian goddesses. Worshiped in Rome as the "Magna Mater," or Great Mother, this maternal and queenly GoddessÕ influence can still be seen in the worship of Mary in the Catholic faith. She is a goddess of fertility, of the earth and of animals. She can be found in caverns and mountains and all Earth's wild places. Her son, Attis, died after castrating himself. When his mother resurrected him, she became an important deity to the ancients in matters of life, death, and rebirth. Dagon This Philistine god represented fertility, nature, and reproduction. From the waist up, he is a man, strong and virile; below the waist he is a fish. Dagon was also a god of grain and agriculture, worshiped by many cultures. He was a major god of the Semites, the Amorites, and the Philistines. Traces of his name have been found in the writings of ancient Hebrews, Akkadians, and other cultures. Fu Xi or Fu Hsi The ancient Chinese believe that their civilization was founded by Fuxi, an androgynous God with the head of a man in detail the fish. Traditionally, he was born in 3322 B.C. His gifts to society include the arts of writing, trapping, and fishing. Chinese mythology credits him as the first of the Mystical Sovereigns of ancient China. Fu Xi and his sister were the only survivors of a great flood near the Yellow River. In legend, he and his sister procreated, creating the human race. He became more popular once ancient Chinese society became patriarchal. Fu Xi is credited with developing the I Ching; other gifts to mankind include the secrets of cooking, net fishing, and Iran weapons. Glaucus Glaucus was a Greek god of the sea, though the name has been given to several different figures. According to legend, Glaucus was a fisherman. The magical herb he found brought fish back to life, but turned him into a half man, half fish, forced to live in this sea forever. He was well received by the gods of the sea, who taught him the art of prophecy. Glaucus' love for the beautiful nymph, Scylla, led him to seek the help of a witch, Circe. By refusing to return the witch's love, he condemned Scylla to a terrible fate – she was transformed by Circe into a ravening monster with six heads and 12 feet. It is said that Glaucus helped Menelaus to return home; he also helped the Argonauts. He is credited with rescuing sailors from storms.

Classicist Richard Cassaro's research focuses on ancient mysticism and secret societies. His current project, Written In Stone, reveals never-before-seen visual evidence of a "secret code" hidden in plain view in the architectural facades of the world's most famous Gothic cathedrals. He examines how the code conveys an ancient Pagan message to posterity that was fully intended by the Freemasons who scholars say built these sacred structures. For a powerful preview, visit www.DeeperTruth.com and download his illuminating PDF Report: Breaking The Cathedral Code, Freemasonry's Triptych Secret Revealed. Also, visit his Sacred Science blog at www.RichardCassaro.com

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