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ENGLISH UPPER-LEVEL COURSES

DEPARTMENT
WINTER SESSION 2010 AND SPRING 2010

WINTER SESSION 2010


ENGLISH 307, SECTION 01: WRITING FOR MANAGEMENT, PUBLIC RELATIONS AND THE PROFESSIONS
An Advanced course designed for students interested in administration, business, accounting, law, and other professions, public relations and any
other area where skills will be required. The course will explore appropriate language, tone and format for effective letters, memos, reports,
proposals, job application materials and writing for mass media. Emphasis on purpose and clarity in the context of specific cases. 3 credits (Pribek)
9:00-12:30 TuWThF, CWH 326

ENGLISH 307, SECTION 411: WRITING FOR MANAGEMENT, PUBLIC RELATIONS AND THE PROFESSIONS
An advanced course focusing on written communication for relations with clients, boards, organizations, customers, constituents, or the
public. Students practice writing as an effective process of gathering and conveying information, answering questions, and solving problems. The
course will explore appropriate language, tone, and format for effective letters, memos, news releases, reports, proposals, abstracts, and summaries.
There is emphasis on purpose, audience, and clarity. Students must be able to work independently to meet deadlines in this online course. 3 credits
ONLINE COURSE (Jett) Note: There is an additional $75 per credit fee assessed for this on-line course.

ENGLISH 449, SECTION 01: FORMS OF POETRY


This course will provide an exploration of traditional and innovative poetic forms in the work of many canonical and contemporary American poets.
The thematic focus will be "lives in transition," a collection of readings centered on pivotal stages in the lives of all human beings. This course will
operate on a seminar format; daily discussions of poetic texts, as well as practice in writing poetry in various forms, will provide the core of the
coursework. Our time will be spent examining the rich, prolific body of work written by noteworthy voices in American poetry. 3 credits (Davidson)

SPRING 2010
ENGLISH 301, SECTIONS 01 & 02: FOUNDATIONS FOR LITERARY STUDIES
An introduction to foundational knowledge and skills for the advanced study of literature. The course fosters understanding of the importance of
historical, cultural, and intellectual contexts for literary study as well as appreciation for the diversity of literary expression. Students can expect to
develop the facility for critical work with literature by expanding their understanding of literary genres and basic literary terminology, and by
improving their abilities to engage in literary research, conduct close textual analysis, and write critically about literature. 4 credits (Jessee, Gray)
2:15-3:40 TuTh, CWH 210 & LAB 3:55-4:50 Tu, CWH 210; 2:15-3:40 MW, CWH 303 & LAB 3:50-4:45 M, CWH 303

ENGLISH 302, SECTION 01: INTERMED TOPICS-LITERATURE: “Yanks vs. Brits: Anglo-American Dramatic
Literature”
In this course, we will read and discuss selected pairs of works by American and British playwrights. Our goal is to examine the similarities and
differences between life in the U.S. and the U.K., as shown in prominent plays and musicals produced on both sides of the Atlantic Ocean. Topics for
comparison will include language, style, themes, humor, music, and other relevant elements. Paired American and British works will include
Sweeney Todd vs. Evita, Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? vs. The Taming of the Shrew, A Raisin in the Sun vs. Pygmalion, and The Odd Couple vs.
Waiting for Godot. 3 credits (Konas) 2:15-3:40 MW, CWH 117

E NGLISH 302, SECTION 02: INTERMED TOPICS-LITERATURE: “Literature of Resistance”


English 302 exposes students to the Black Radical Tradition as it emerges in a multi-faceted, cross-cultural literature of resistance (or of insurgency),
a literature that is unmoored from the epistemic foundations and ideological assumptions of the West (but embraces a shared epistemology with other
insurgent African groups), a literature that endures and persists in detailing the experience of those who resist the imperialism and totalization of the
racial discourse of the West. Topics would include but not be limited to issues raised by such writers as V. Y. Mudimbe, J. M. Blaut, C. L. R. James,
W. E. B. DuBois, Frantz Fanon, Richard Wright and E. Said. 3 credits (Young) 9:55-10:50 MWF, CWH 326

ENGLISH 303, SECTIONS 01 & 02: COLLEGE WRITING II


An advanced course which looks at the rhetorical strategies that strengthen college-level writing assignments from essay exams and arguments to
research papers. Soon after mid-term, a forward-looking component gives the student an opportunity to develop a strong resume and to explore the
writing about to be encountered in his/her chosen career-field. 3 credits (Graham) 12:40-2:05 TuTh, CWH 332; 2:15-3:40 TuTh, CWH 332

ENGLISH 304, SECTION 01: WRITING IN THE HUMANITIES


What is the role of the humanities in a digital culture that moves at the speed of Twitter? Are "post-print" forms of writing indicative of a consumer
culture of "total entertainment all the time" that suspends reflection "about the differences among wisdom, knowledge, and information"
(Edmundson, Why Read?). Are we moving towards what Jacques Derrida calls a "new economy" of disruption, dislocation, disjunction, and
dissemination that moves reading and writing "beyond the closure of the book" (Paper Machine)? Or, are the complex modes of reading and writing
the humanities provides an integral means by which to "explain the abstract structures of daily life…and produce an understanding of the social
totality (Ebert, The Task of Cultural Critique)? Taking up these and other questions, this section of English 304 will engage a diverse range of texts—
from "classic" literature to "popular" fiction, from online writings to film and advertising, and from "high" theory to "popular" commentary—as well
as examine issues of form, rhetoric, reasoning and audience, in order to assist students in becoming active writers and readers in a digital age. 3
credits (Wilkie) 12:40-2:05 TuTh, CWH 303

ENGLISH 305, SECTION 01: CREATIVE WRITING


A course emphasizing the writing of poetry and short fiction taught by a professor who is a published fiction writer and poet. Students will develop
skills in each of these genres, participate in workshops in which student work is critiqued, and analyze the works of professional writers. The class
may also meet with visiting writers. The course is intended as the basic course in the creative writing English minor. Primarily for English majors
and minors. It is also for students interested in writing short fiction and/or poems. Prerequisite: three credits in 200-level English courses. 3
credits (Cashion) 2:15-3:40 TuTh, CWH 305

ENGLISH 306, SECTION 01: WRITING FOR TEACHERS


Designed for students in education, future teachers of writing, this course will make you a better writer and teach you how to teach writing. In this
course you will learn strategies for writing about issues in education; you will review grammar and mechanics and syntaxall by learning new writing
maneuvers. You will develop practical skills and strategies for teaching writing in a way that will prepare you for your future as a teacher. 3 credits
(Crank) 1:10-2:05 MWF, CWH 117

ENGLISH 307, SECTION 01: WRITING FOR MANAGEMENT, PUBLIC RELATIONS AND THE PROFESSIONS
An advanced course focusing on written communication for relations with clients, boards, organizations, customers, constituents, or the public.
Students practice writing as an effective process of gathering and conveying information, answering questions, and solving problems. The course
will explore appropriate language, tone, and format for effective letters, memos, news releases, reports, proposals, abstracts, and summaries. There is
emphasis on purpose, audience, and clarity. 3 credits (Voiku) 11:00-12:25 TuTh, CWH 135

ENGLISH 307, SECTION 411: WRITING FOR MANAGEMENT, PUBLIC RELATIONS AND THE PROFESSIONS
An advanced course focusing on written communication for relations with clients, boards, organizations, customers, constituents, or the public.
Students practice writing as an effective process of gathering and conveying information, answering questions, and solving problems. The course
will explore appropriate language, tone, and format for effective letters, memos, news releases, reports, proposals, abstracts, and summaries. There is
emphasis on purpose, audience, and clarity. Students must be able to work independently to meet deadlines in this online course. 3 credit ONLINE
COURSE (Jett) Note: There is an additional $75 per credit fee assessed for this on-line course.

ENGLISH 308, SECTION 01: TECHNICAL WRITING


The aim of technical writing is to report factual information objectively and clearly. This course is designed to prepare students from all disciplines to
organize information and communicate it effectively to a targeted audience. The course emphasizes design principles needed to create appropriate
layouts, which may include such formats as computer slide presentations, Web sites, and videos, as well as text documents. 3 credits (Konas) 9:25-
10:50 TuTh, CWH 315

ENGLISH 313, SECTION 01: PROSE STYLE AND EDITING


A practical course in developing a flexible and effective capacity for writing prose. Students will master techniques and strategies of emphasis,
coherence, clarity, conciseness, balance, and rhythm. Use of tropes and figures (particularly metaphorical language and imagery) and tone will be
explored in the context of rhetorical appropriateness and strategy. The course will provide students with the fundamentals of prose technique--the
basis for an art, which they can continue to refine and develop for the rest of their lives. 3 credits (Thoune) 9:55-10:50 MWF, CWH 125

ENGLISH 320, SECTION 01: LITERARY JOURNAL PRODUCTION/PUBLICATION


A workshop course in literary magazine production and publication. The class assembles and publishes Steam Ticket, a literary journal of quality
writing. An open call for manuscripts is advertised in a national writing journal, and from hundreds of submissions, students collaborate to select
poetry, fiction, creative nonfiction, and artwork they believe to have redeeming literary merit. Students assume roles as editors and readers, and
the process is overseen (but not controlled) by a professor who has experience in creative writing and publishing. Emphasis will be placed on
inter-disciplinary and multicultural content and participation. Prerequisite: 300-level writing course or consent of instructor. 3
credits. Repeatable for credit — maximum 6. (Cashion) 3:55-5:20 TuTh, CWH 207
ENGLISH 327, SECTION 01: PUBLICATION PRODUCTION
The emergence of "digital" publishing—from blogging to podcasting, Twitter to the Kindle, and from YouTube to a global network of satellite
communications—has become synonymous with a fundamentally new way of thinking about the production and consumption of information. Instead
of a "broadcast" model of communications, in which information is presumed to be centralized and "one-way," new media and digital publishing is
said to represent a revolutionary model of "openness" in which, as Mark Poster writes, "cultural acts, symbolizations in all forms [are] in the hands of
all participants" (What's the Matter with the Internet?). And yet, recent studies show that digital publishing might not be immune from the same
forces which have led to the crisis in print. A recent study found that while 5,000-7,000 companies accounted for fifty percent of all web traffic in
2007, today that number has been reduced to just 150 companies. What do these competing accounts of digital culture mean for publishing today?
Through an investigation which will move from design theory and the study of the history of the page to the practical applications of blogging,
hypertext, Photoshop, and web design, students will examine the possibilities and limits of digital publishing. By the end of the semester, students
will have established new online publications. 3 credits (Wilkie) 2:15-3:40 TuTh CWH 207

ENGLISH 330, SECTION 01 & 02: ENGLISH LANGUAGE


Examines the historical development of the English language by focusing on the semantic, phonetic, and syntactic components of speech. 3 credits
(Voiku) 12:40-2:05 TuTh, CWH 135

ENGLISH 332, SECTIONS 01: MODERN ENGLISH GRAMMARS


A linguistic introduction to the structure of the English language using descriptive methods to explain, examine, and challenge the prescriptive rules
of Standard English. 3 credits (Canon) 8:50-9:45 MWF, CWH 117

ENGLISH 333, SECTION 01: INTRODUCTION TO RHETORIC AND WRITING STUDIES


How does rhetorical invention (what we write about) relate to organization/style (how we write about it)? Rhetoricians and composition scholars
differ in their answers to this question, and this introductory course to the field of Rhetoric and Composition examines three different views regarding
this relationship, which entail three different processes of writing, three different approaches to improving writing. Course responsibilities include
reading, daily in-class writings, three take-home exams, and one final project. 3 credits (Lan) 2:15-3:40 MW, CWH 332 <WRITING EMPHASIS
COURSE>

ENGLISH 334, SECTION 01: LANGUAGE STUDIES FOR SECONDARY TEACHERS


Course participants will read, write, and converse about major issues in the teaching and learning of language. We will study language in its cultural,
political, theoretical and historical dimensions, continually drawing out implications for classroom practice. Although our emphasis will be on
understanding how the nature of language and its relationship to society direct our choices in writing and reading instruction, we will examine
multiple literacies. Students will play an active role in facilitating discussions. 3 credits (Finders) 5:30-8:15 M, CWH 305

ENGLISH 337, SECTION 01: RHETORICS OF STYLE


The course is a systematic effort to help students understand and use rhetorical strategies for making stylistic choices to improve their writing style.
The course also provides students with an opportunity to reflect upon the tropical nature of language-use in rhetorical contexts. 3 credits (Lan) 11:00-
11:55 MWF, CWH 332 <WRITING EMPHASIS COURSE>

ENGLISH 341, SECTION 01: ADOLESCENT LITERATURE


Contemporary Young Adult literature reflects the changing world of today's teen reader. This course will critically evaluate and discuss recent books
that are both popular with, and appropriate for contemporary Young Adult readers. 3 credits (Gappa) 3:55-5:20 TuTh, CWH 303

ENGLISH 355, SECTION 01: CRITICAL THEORY


This course focuses on generating a reflective understanding of the processes of reading, writing and interpretation of literature. Reading materials
are drawn from various fields in humanities and culture studies. An informed understanding of concepts and methodologies – developed by various
European, non-European and American theorists – facilitates a more systematic and insightful study of literature. 3 credits (Kopp) 2:15-3:40 MW,
CWH 326 <WRITING EMPHASIS COURSE>

ENGLISH 363, SECTION 01: SHAKESPEARE I


Close reading and analysis of representative examples of Shakespeare’s early works, focusing on their historical and cultural contexts, and
considering some contemporary adaptations. 3 credits (Eschenbaum) 12:40-2:05 TuTh, CWH 210

ENGLISH 364, SECTION 01: SHAKESPEARE II


Nine plays, including Henry IV, Part Two, King Lear, and eight others, chosen from Twelfth Night, Measure for Measure, The Tempest, Henry V,
Othello, Macbeth, Antony and Cleopatra, Coriolanus, Much Ado About Nothing, Troilus and Cressida, and Cymbeline. 3 credits (Hogan) 5:30-8:15
W, CWH 210 <WRITING EMPHASIS>

ENGLISH 368, SECTION 01: BRITISH LITERATURE AFTER 1900


This course’s main focal points are on major British writers and literary developments during the Twentieth Century. We will review texts that bring
up concerns of British identity, the British Empire and its role in the world, and cultural changes during the decline of the British Empire. We may
respond to this literature through various concerns of race, class, gender, nationalism, and imperialism (in the least). We will focus specifically on
novels by Joseph Conrad (Heart of Darkness), Virginia Woolf (Mrs. Dalloway), Aldous Huxley (Brave New World), Graham Greene (The Ministry
of Fear), Ian Fleming (Dr. No), and Zadie Smith (White Teeth). We will also read critical essays, short stories, and poetry by many other highly-
accomplished authors. 3 credits (Hart) 11-12:25 TuTh, CWH 303
ENGLISH 370, SECTION 01: EARLY AMERICAN LITERATURE
This course covers a stretch of two centuries (probably the biggest slice of American-English Literature after the 200-level surveys); to take
advantage of the recently-available "thrift" editions of classic works, I'm choosing Great Books, or Great Authors, rather than any attempt at covering
the total historical spectrum: Charles Brockden Brown, Daniel Defoe, Olaudah Equiano, Susanna Rowson, Anne Bradsteet, Ben Franklin, and Tom
Paine. Moreover, as this is the foreground to modern-language literary forms, for class discussion and papers we will try to stay focused on genres:
poetry, Westerns, Gothic Thrillers, Humor/Satire, Personal Narrative, and Romance. In many cases, these are authors creating forms or, perhaps,
realizing what readers will patronize when literature becomes truly "mass market" and popular by the 19th century. 3 credits (Pribek) 12:40-2:05
TuTh, CWH 326

ENGLISH 372, SECTION 01: AMERICAN LITERATURE AFTER 1900


This course provides an introduction to some of the major 20th century writers and literary movements in the United States, in historical and cultural
contexts. Historical currents and cultural movements will be primary emphases in text selection in order to familiarize students with literary
developments such as Modernism and Post-modernism. Readings will be selected from major genres, including poetry, fiction, and drama. Selected
authors will include (but not be limited to) Kate Chopin, Eugene O'Neill, Nathanael West, William Faulkner, Toni Morrison, John Edgar Wideman,
and Marilynne Robinson. 3 credits (Gray) 9:25-10:50 TuTh, CWH 303

ENGLISH 385, SECTION 01: WOMEN AUTHORS


The course will provide introductions to major feminist approaches to analyzing literature in English by women. Primary authors may include poets,
playwrights, story-writers and novelists such as Sappho, Margaret Cavendish, Aphra Behn, Charlotte Brontë, George Eliot, Christina Rosetti, Emily
Dickinson, Sophie Treadwell, Nella Larsen, Djuna Barnes, Gertrude Stein, H.D., Marianne Moore, Adrienne Rich, Ann Sexton, Sylvia Plath, Audre
Lorde, Rita Dove, Toni Morrison, Maxine Hong Kingston, Angela Carter, Leslie Marmon Silko, Jean Rhys, and Arundhati Roy. Course
Assignments include exams, essays, and group discussion work in class. 3 credits (Crutchfield) 3:55-5:20 TuTh, CWH 326 <WRITING EMPHASIS
COURSE>

ENGLISH 413, SECTIONS 01 & 02: WRITING PORTFOLIO


A workshop course in which students assemble portfolios of their work, demonstrating their abilities as writers. English majors with an emphasis in
rhetoric and writing and professional writing minors will be in the same section; however, writing minors, unless they elect the 3-credit option, will
meet the class only one a week and will have a 1-credit work load. Prerequisite: senior standing (be in his or her final or penultimate semester in
completing the major or minor). 1 or 3 credits (Kopp) 1:10-2:05 MWF (3 cr.), CWH 207; 1:10-2:05 W (1 cr.), CWH 207

ENGLISH 432, SECTION 01: INTRODUCTION TO LINGUISTICS


An introduction to the basic components of human language. Topics covered will include: phonetics and phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics,
historical linguistics, language acquisition, and language in social contexts. 3 credits (Canon) 2:15-3:40 MW, CWH 207

ENGLISH 464, SECTION 01: MILTON


This course covers the development and growth of Milton from his university years to the culmination of his career as England’s greatest narrative
poet. Works read will include the minor poems, the political and theological treatises, as well as the major poems: Paradise Lost, Paradise Regained,
Samson Agonistes, and Comus. Included in the course is a lovely springtime, guided, field trip to John Milton’s grave at no extra cost to enrolled
students. 3 credits (Gappa) 2:15-3:40 TuTh, CWH 303

ENGLISH 467, SECTION 01: VICTORIAN POETS


Students become familiar with the major voices of the Victorian Age and hear how they grappled with the issues of the day in one of the most
intellectually challenging eras in English history. Robert and Elizabeth Barrett Browning, Tennyson, Arnold, Dante and Christina Rossetti and other
Pre-Raphaelites, Swinburne, Alice Meynell, Hopkins, Wilde, and others. Prerequisite: three credits in 200-level English courses. 3 credits
(Graham ) 9:25-10:50 TuTh, CWH 124 <WRITING EMPHASIS COURSE>

ENGLISH 484, SECTION 01: CAPSTONE: LITERARY STUDIES


This is a required course for senior English majors—literature emphasis. The first section of the course introduces this semester's focus on a
particular set of contemporary issues in literature studies: Discourse, Power, and the Ethics of Reading. The first four to five weeks of the semester
focus primarily on reading assignments, discussion, lecture, and informal journal-writing. Class members will then develop individual research
projects which combine their prior or concurrent interests from another 400-level literature course along with the capstone's theme on the relations of
discourse and power, and the ethical implications and significances of those relations. For example, a class member may choose the work of a
particular author, or a group of works by different authors, with which she or he has already worked in another professor's course. Works may
include drama, poetry, fiction, essay, and hybrid texts. The class member will then explore various aspects of these texts which can be connected to
this course's focus. Research, as well as creative thinking, are required in this development phase. Students will present work-in-progress to other
members of the class and meet with me individually. The third and final phase of the course entails oral presentations by class members as they
finalize their written projects. Faculty and students in the English Department will be invited to attend these presentations. Peer revisions and class
discussions of each project will make up the last few days of the course. MAY BE REQUIRED TO PURCHASE TEXTS OVER $20.00. 2 credits
(Jessee) 3:55-5:20 MW, CWH 210 <WRITING EMPHASIS COURSE>

ENGLISH 497, SECTION 01: SEMINAR IN RHETORIC AND WRITING STUDIES


Introduces students to histories, theories, and practices that will enable them to make effective choices as teachers of writing. Areas of study include
a brief history of writing instruction in American schools, including an overview of influential theories; the development and implementation of
writing assignments; and theories and best practices for responding to student writing. Students engage these issues both as writers and as future
teachers. This specific preparation to teach writing builds on students’ disciplinary knowledge and more general courses in education theory and
practice. 3 credits (Crank) 11:00-12:25, CWH <WRITING EMPHASIS COURSE>
ENGLISH 532, SECTION 01: INTRODUCTION TO LINGUISTICS
An introduction to the basic components of human language. Topics covered will include: phonetics and phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics,
historical linguistics, language acquisition, and language in social contexts.
3 credits (Canon) 2:15-3:40 MW, CWH 103

Log on to the UW-La Crosse website for the most accurate and up to date scheduling information at
https://timetable.uwlax.edu. Please refer to your UW La Crosse Catalog for course prerequisites, credits,
program requirements, etc.