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ARMING THE CONSTITUENTS IN THE WAR ON HOMELESSNESS:

AN ALTERNATE HOUSING STRATEGY


FOR NEW YORK CITY
A CATALOGUE OF TACTICS, TOOLS, AND WEAPONRY
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CONTENTS
Arming the Constituents:
Introduction
Catalogue A: At Risk
New Typology:
Drop-in City
Micro Projects:
Products and Services
Catalogue B: Currently Homeless
Case Study:
Queens Community District 12
Proposal:
225 Housing Units for Jamaica
Center
Appendix
ArchAttacks!
Game Design and Data Collection
01
02
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06
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On any given day, about 36,000 people are homeless in
New York City.
However, less than 10 percent of the homeless population
actually resides in the public spaces of the city typi-
cally associated with sites of homelessness: the street,
the subway, abandoned lots.
1
The majority of New Yorks
homeless, living in the citys shelter system, consists
almost entirely of families, all of whom are invisible
to the public eye. This data does not include the thou-
sands of New Yorkers who are at risk of becoming home-
less within the year. These factors make it very diffi-
cult to delineate the boundaries of homelessness in the
city. How can architecture address such an invisible
and undefined institution?
Standard governmental responses to homelessness consist
of funding emergency shelters and temporary relief ini-
tiatives in the hope of easing the short-term discomfort
Arming the Constituents
in the War on Homelessness:
An Alternate Housing Strategy
for New York City
of homelessness. Strategies based around temporary so-
lutions formed the core of New York Citys plan for
homelessness for decades. A surge in the population
seeking emergency shelter following 9/11 provoked the
Bloomberg administration to reformulate the citys home-
less services system in 2002, focusing instead on perma-
nent solutions for those currently homeless and preven-
tative measures for those at risk of becoming homeless.
The new strategy aims at decreasing lengths of stays in
expensive homeless shelters and creating cost-effective
and long-term improved living conditions for the home-
less through the construction of large-scale supportive
housing developments (12,000 new units are planned for
the next five years). The mayors final goal is nothing
short of ending homelessness in New York City once and
for all.
Architectural responses to homelessness have also tended
to focus on temporary solutions, often consisting of
transportable shelter solutions for individuals living
on the street. But unlike governmental strategies, ar-
chitectural responses are often leveraged at the scale
of the individual, enhancing the existing tactics of the
currently homeless. While small-scale responses can
have great power for the individuals involved, they fail
to address the large-scale needs of the majority of the
homeless population: the thousands of men, women, and
families at risk of homelessness or currently navigating
the citys shelter system.
This project seeks to redefine the constituency of home-
lessness and to propose architectural actions that both
address and reach beyond temporary solutions for the
individual living on the street. Of those who experi-
ence homelessness in a given year, at any given time
only 40 percent are currently homeless, while the re-
maining 60 percent are still at risk. This divide sug-
gests the need for both permanent and preventative re-
sponses that take into account the needs of those living
in emergency shelters and supportive housing, as well as
those transitioning from the homes of friends or family,
prisons, hospitals, and foster care. We aim to act
within the architectural tradition of tactical responses
while addressing the simple fact that the majority of
homeless New Yorkers are seeking permanent, not tempo-
rary, housing solutions. The most extreme form of home-
lessness in New York City is a systemic issue, and must
be dealt with in systemic terms. At the same time we are
interested in how average New Yorkers make their homes
in the public spaces of the city every day. Strategic
architectural responses to homelessness could serve a
wider audience than those most extremely affected.
Our strategy begins with an analysis of the current con-
ditions of at-risk and homeless populations, tracing the
two paths through the existing homeless services system.
We then identify and design for conditions occurring
across homeless or at-risk populations, including the
average city dweller experiencing some degree of home-
lessness in everyday life. Identifying shared needs and
interdependencies among seemingly disparate groups sug-
gests the possibility of developing more effective tac-
tics as well as creating a new, de-stigmatized image of
homelessness in the modern city.
Within this catalogue of tactics, tools, and weaponry,
we propose services (housed in the new typology of a
drop-in city for existing drop-in centers), products
(used by various constituency groups and displayed and
sold in a flagship store with roving outlets), and hous-
ing units (addressed in a case study and supportive
housing proposal for Jamaica Center in Queens Community
District 12). By experimenting with and combining vari-
ous distribution models, we aim to cover a more exten-
sive territory that is the reality of homelessness in
New York.
Asking a series of guiding questions, we frame the proj-
ect within the current and continuing cultural context
of social wars, considering Mayor Bloombergs plan as
a new battle in the war on homelessness:
Who are the constituents of this war, on all sides?
How can they be armed to achieve their mission(s)?
What might their weapons look like?
What might their tactics be?
How can this strategy be deployed in the territory of
New York City?
Terri Chiao
Deborah Grossberg
June 2007
Notes
1 Data compiled from Vera Insti-
tute of Justice study and Depart-
ment of Homeless Services website
documents suggests that less than
4,000 individuals live on the
street in New York, while
approximately 36,000 people expe-
rience homelessness on
any given day.
2 Currently, one million dollars
can house 27 families per year
in the existing shelter system
or 112 families in their own
homes with rental assistance.
3 Determined through an analysis
of data compiled from the Vera
Institute of Justice study and
the Department of Homeless Ser-
vices website
Sources
VERA Institute of Justice, Under-
standing Family Homelessness in
NYC (September 2005)
NYC Department of Homeless Ser-
vices
www.nyc.gov/dhs
Uniting for Solutions Beyond
Shelter: The Action Plan for
New York City (2004)
Coalition for the Homeless,
Undercounting the Homeless
(May 2004)
Coalition for the Homeless,
State of the Homeless 2006
(January 2006)
Thanks to Laura Kurgan and the
Spatial Information Design Lab
for supporting this research
through the fall 2006 housing
studio at Columbia University
Graduate School of Architecture,
Planning, and Preservation.
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CATALOGUE A: AT RISK
= +
Emergency shelters are the standard response to homeless-
ness in New York City. Drop-in centers and intake locations
(places where homeless people can go to request information
and emergency housing) are notoriously terrible spaces to
be in, let alone live in for days on end, as many homeless
families are made to do while waiting for a more permanent
housing placement. About a third of the homeless populta-
tion in New York is children, whose accounts clearly state
that the experience of staying in these spaces is deeply
traumatic. By condensing and expanding these intake and
drop-in centers into drop-in cities with enriched program-
ming, homeless services organizations can make use of time
spent waiting and destigmatize entry into the homeless ser-
vices system.
NEW TYPOLOGY:
DROP-IN CITY
DROP-IN CITY:
CATALOGUE FACADE
I6
JAMAICA ARMORY:
WOMENS INTAKE CENTER
FRIENDLY
BARRIER
CHECK-IN
PLATFORM
PRODUCTS AND SERVICES
City dwellers make their home in the street, subway, cafe,
bars, parks, and other public spaces to compensate for the
lack of space and/or the poor quality of their individual
living spaces. The extreme version of this collectivized
living in the street is the sleeping on the street that is
the image of the stereotypical homeless person. This nega-
tive image is an extension of the very positive qualities
that dense city living requires -- the interaction and demo-
cratic mixing that happens on city streets. The obvious
negative side of street sleeping, and all of the other forms
of public space habitation that city dwellers experience,
is the physical discomfort caused by attempting to make
ones home in a place designed for other activities. Domes-
ticating the streetscape creates comfortable public living
spaces for all city dwellers, especially the homeless.
GOVERNMENT PROGRAMS
EXTENDED INSTITUTIONS
DISPLAY INITIATIVES
RENEGADE INSTITUTIONS
I003 second life
I002 urban renewal materials
redistribution center
D002 model house
D001 flagship store
X001 health portal
X003 transit fleet
secret agency G001
identity reclamation service I001 I.D.
X002 funland daycare
X004 check-in platform
AT HOME ON THE STREET
PUBLIC CAMPAIGNS
AT HOME IN THE HOME
S002 clean-cut kit
S004 soft seat
P001 wallpaper awareness
H003 bunker bed
H001 capsule shelter
H004 expandable playhouse
H005 the sock
S005 clip-on hammock
S003 magic cloak
S006 drop box lobby
H002 pop-out tent
P002 friendly barrier
S001 dust-ruffle disguise
hacker-run agency providing documents to
allow newly homeless people easier access
to support services
RECOMMENDED FOR:
NEWLY HOMELESS PEOPLE LACKING DOCUMENTATION
ILLEGAL IMMIGRANTS
HOMELESS ADVOCACY GROUPS
I001 IDENTITY RECLAMATION SERVICE
RECOMMENDED FOR:
STREET HOMELESS PEOPLE
ARTISTS
NYC MATERIALS FOR THE ARTS
IOO2 MATERIALS REDISTRIBUTION CENTER
APPLICATION FOR SUPPORTIVE HOUSING
I.D.
SUPPORT SERVICES
SUPPORTIVE HOUSING: APARTMENT
RENTAL ASSISTANCE
JOB CONSULTATION
a
p
p
r
o
v
e
d
construction sites
electronics
film studios
corporations
restaurants
offices
theaters
supermarkets
retail stores
individuals
MA MAAA MA MA M TTE TE TE TE TERI RI RRI RIAL AL AAL ALSSSS
recycling center providing materials for the
currently homeless in constructing their own
shelters or for artists in need of supplies
I.D.
RECOMMENDED FOR:
AT-RISK JOB SEEKERS
EX-CONVICTS
GENERAL POPULATION
I003 SECOND LIFE
L
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electronics refurbishment
tech service renewing and upgrading
donated used computers and cell
phones for distribution to at-risk
and homeless populations
ex-con job training
technical instruction sessions for
the formerly incarcerated
internet cafe
job placement and social networking
website access
X001 HEALTH PORTAL
RECOMMENDED FOR:
OUTPATIENTS
AT-RISK HOSPITAL/DETOX CENTER RESIDENTS
STUDY LOFT /
LOOK-OUT POINT
KID-SAFE PLASTIC
CLIMBING STRUCTURE
TV / COMPUTER MONITORS
FOR MOVIES AND GAMES
MULTI-PURPOSE SOFT PADS

BRANCH STRUCTURE IS EASILY
DISASSEMBLED AND REASSEMBLED
FOR FLEXIBILITY IN
PARTITIONING PLAY SPACE
OR FITTING TO A SMALLER ROOM
REFURBISHED LAPTOP
WITH VIDEO CHAT CONNECTION
TO PSYCHIATRISTS/DOCTORS
a b
a b
DAY-BY-DAY
PILL DISPENSER
CLIPS ONTO BATHROOM
VANITY
RECOMMENDED FOR:
DEPT. OF HOMELESS SERVICES DROP-IN CENTERS
DAYCARE PROVIDERS
PEDIATRICS OFFICES
XOO2 FUNLAND DAYCARE
cheap, modular system of climbing structures,
ball pits, video arcades, and study hall
quiet zones to destigmatize drop-in centers
for children and provide adults with some
downtime
in-home medical station for video
conferencing with psychiatrists and doctors,
measuring vital signs, and dispensing
medication
roving shuttle
NYC taxis and buses providing free fares from
drop-in cities to housing locations for
homeless families entering DHS to make entry
more comfortable
outreach outlets
NYC buses and subway cars retrofitted with
domesticated streetscapes providing mobile
services for homeless people
X003 TRANSIT FLEET
RECOMMENDED FOR:
DROP-IN CITY CLIENTS
STREET AND SUBWAY HOMELESS RESIDENTS
RECOMMENDED FOR:
DROP-IN CITY CLIENTS
XOO4 CHECK-IN PLATFORM
elevator retrofitted to contain DHS
registration desk and free cell phone
distribution, providing quick and convenient
check-in experience
FREE
FOR DHS
CLIENTS
FREE
CELL PHONE
FOR QUALIFIED
CLIENTS
MOBILE
DOMESTICATED
STREETSCAPE
UNIT
DROP-IN CITY
CHECK-IN
WELCOME!
big-box retail center stocking domesticated
streetscape products, retrofitted shopping
carts, and other useful tools for navigating
homelessness (discounts available for
DHS clients); embedded model house
D001 FLAGSHIP STORE
RECOMMENDED FOR:
HOMELESS AND AT-RISK PEOPLE
GENERAL POPULATION
RECOMMENDED FOR:
DEPT. OF HOMELESS SERVICES
PARENTS WITH CHILDREN IN FOSTER CARE
GENERAL PUBLIC
DOO2 MODEL HOUSE
attic office
upstairs administrative space for building
and program management
life skills kitchen
cooking and cleaning classes for homeless
people and parents with children in foster care
basement laundromat
public laundry machines to provide useful
services during DHS application waiting period
BASEMENT
LAUNDROMAT
ATTIC
OFFICE
FLAGSHIP
STORE
MODEL
HOUSE
DOMESTICATED
STREETSCAPE
PRODUCTS
LIFE-SKILLS
KITCHEN
D
H
S

C
L
I
E
N
T
S
:
S
H
O
P

H
E
R
E
surveillance space
data lab for undercover govt employees who
befriend and live with street homeless people
in order to stealthily convince them to find
shelter through DHS; agency collects data on
the difficult-to-track street homeless
population
clean-cut bathroom
public changing areas and toilets, including
clean-cut disguise kits and covert entrance
to the agency
RECOMMENDED FOR:
DEPT. OF HOMELESS SERVICES
G001 SECRET AGENCY
RECOMMENDED FOR:
HOMELESS SUBWAY RESIDENTS
SUBWAY RIDERS
secret agent
homeless man
But the new element is potentially controversial. The Department of Homeless Services, under its new commissioner, Robert Hess, has identified 73 makeshift
encampments, including 30 in Manhattan, to which roughly 350 homeless men and women -- of a total homeless population of about 3,800, according to the city's la
count -- return nightly.
Most of the encampments are little more than collections of cardboard boxes, or tarpaulins hung over a beam, officials said.
Now, working with community and faith-based organizations, the city plans to work more aggressively to persuade people to leave those areas and enter housing,
treatment programs or shelters.
The vigorous focus on the street population is an unusual approach that Mr. Hess brings from his time supervising services to adults in Philadelphia, where he built
reputation for reducing the number of people living on the streets.
The strategy, which officials say has been tried in only a few cities, reflects a growing consensus that a small number of long-term, chronically homeless people ac
for a large share of the medical care and other services required by the homeless population over all.
Officials stopped short of saying that they would force people off the streets, but they do plan to clear the makeshift dwellings and make them inaccessible for othe
return.
"We're going to let them know that their days on the streets must come to an end," Mr. Bloomberg said in an address to the annual conference of the National Alli
to End Homelessness. "And we'll secure and clean up the places where they've been bedding down, to make sure that they won't be occupied again."
Over the past four years, officials said, the administration has worked to shift its focus from improving and expanding shelters toward more permanent solutions.
effort has included the use of supportive housing -- or housing that affords a range of on-site social services -- and a program called HomeBase, which offers flex
subsidies or other support for people at risk of homelessness.
Mr. Hess would not give the precise locations of the sleeping areas -- most of them out of sight of the public -- that the city plans to target, out of respect for the p
who stay in them, he said.
But officials said that some of the sites are already familiar to the department's teams of outreach workers and that they will coordinate with the Police and Sanit
Departments and with transit officials to identify other sites, both outdoors and in vacant buildings.
One site, near Riverside Drive in Upper Manhattan, is known to homeless workers as the Bat Cave. Lately, it has been home to at least four people, including G
Anderson, 44, who sleeps on a discarded bed propped on milk crates. Monday afternoon, sitting on a red velveteen bedspread, she said she would gladly accept
mayor's offer of more permanent housing.
She said it was "time to be out" of the cave.
"I will drop it like it's hot," she said. "This is not no life adventure for me. We're just passing through."
City outreach workers stopped by a few days earlier, she said, and had the people in the encampment fill out paperwork needed to get apartments.
Her boyfriend, who would give his name only as Country, was more skeptical of the offer.
"This is America," he said as he loaded 12 garbage bags full of cans and bottles onto a large rolling cart. "This is living off the land. That's how we built this th
The largest group of street homeless identified by city workers, 195, is in Manhattan, officials said, spread over 30 locations. In the Bronx there are 54 people
12 sites; in Brooklyn, workers identified 45 people in 10 areas; in Queens they found 40 people at 10 sites; and in Staten Island, they identified 24 people gath
11 spots.
The city estimates that it will take six months to a year to clear the often-squalid locations, which will then be secured with fencing or other methods, said M
who appeared with the mayor at a news conference after Mr. Bloomberg's speech. Both men emphasized that they would not forcibly remove people, pointin
there are legal barriers to doing so.
"The objective is not in any way to force people from one area to another," Mr. Hess said. "It is to take a social service intervention strategy approach to help
make a decision to move from these very unhealthy encampments."
THE NEW YORK TIMES







Jul 18, 2006
Homeless in City Face New Effort To Clear Streets
Publisher: The New York Times
By: Diane Cardwell (Leslie Kaufman and Matthew Sweeney contributed reporting for this article)
Working with community and faith-based organizations, the city
plans to work more aggressively to persuade people to leave [homeless
encampments] and enter housing, treatment programs, or shelters.
The objective is not in any way to force people from one area to another,
Mr. Hess (Director of NYC Dept. of Homeless Services) said. It is to take a
social service intervention strategy approach to help people make a decision to
move from these very unhealthy encampments.
camouflage gear for sleeping under subway
benches without being noticed
set of disguise tools housed in a false book
designed to deflect police attention when
making ones home in public; includes
inflatable maternity body suit for women and
clip-on collar, tie, and shirt cuffs for men
RECOMMENDED FOR:
HOMELESS SUBWAY RESIDENTS
S001 DUST-RUFFLE DISGUISE
RECOMMENDED FOR:
STREET HOMELESS PEOPLE
SOO2 CLEAN-CUT KIT
comfortable, warm, convertible garment
equipped with health-monitoring devices and
utility pockets for protection from weather,
police, and sharp objects
CLOAK
removable inner layer
Polartec fleece lining
waterproof outer layer
reversible for in/visibility
CONVERTIBLE
GARMENT
STUFF SACK /
PILLOW CASE
BLANKET
SLEEPING BAG
REVERSIBLE
OUTER LAYER
FOR INCREASED IN/VISIBILITY
elastic draw-cords
close sleeping bag
expandable
midsection
unzips for
added leg room
while sleeping
draw-cord
waterproof document
holder w/ secret pocket
hydration sleeve
and flask holder
handwarmer holder
utensil organizer
(shown here: dining
utensils and pen)
utensil organizer
(shown here: flashlight,
screwdriver, thermometer
all-purpose pocket
(shown here: Peak-Flow
health monitoring device)
money holder
cigarette and
lighter pockets
cell phone pocket
one-week pill
organizer
soft
waterproof
casing
waterproof
bill
Velcro collar
provides
increased
protection
fleece-lined
hood with
adjustable
draw strings
thick, waterproof
outer layer designed
to withstand harsh
urban elements while
providing comfort
and warmth
camo grey / safety orange
classic grey / safety orange
RECOMMENDED FOR:
LIVING ON THE STREET
CAMPING OUTDOORS
S003 MAGIC CLOAK
modular foldable cushions for commuters or
the homeless to sit or sleep more comfortably
on hard subway car bucket seats and to make
emergency overnights at drop-in centers
more comfortable
suspension system for sleeping in subway cars
LIGHTWEIGHT
AND PACKABLE!
RECOMMENDED FOR:
HOMELESS SUBWAY RESIDENTS
DROP-IN CENTERS
COMMUTERS
S004 SOFT SEAT
RECOMMENDED FOR:
HOMELESS SUBWAY RESIDENTS
SUBWAY RIDERS
SOO5 CLIP-ON HAMMOCK
storage/locker system shared with
travelers to eliminate danger of theft
during overnight stays; doubles as mailbox
and address for homeless individuals
RECOMMENDED FOR:
STREET HOMELESS INDIVIDUALS
DROP-IN CITY CLIENTS
BUSINESS TRAVELERS
TOURISTS
S006 DROP BOX
retrofit unit for multi-family buildings
serves as a boutique hotel room; income
generated goes towards tenant eviction relief
until needed as guest room for 1 of 4
adjacent families at-risk of overcrowding
RECOMMENDED FOR:
BUSINESS TRAVELLERS
HOMELESS/AT-RISK GUESTS
HOO1 CAPSULE SHELTER
S
L
O
T
S

I
N
T
O

A
N

E
X
I
S
T
I
N
G
B
U
I
L
D
I
N
G
!
Proceeds from
capsule hotel
can be distributed
through eviction
relief and rental
assistance pro-
grams to tenants
BUSINESS
HOTEL
ENTRANCE
BUSINESS
HOTEL
EXIT
RE-
POSITION
STAIRS TO
ACCESS
BATHROOM
RE-
POSITION
STAIRS
TO EXIT
BATHROOM
ENTRANCE
APT.2
ENTRANCE
APT.3
ENTRANCE
APT.1
ENTRANCE
RE-
POSITION
STAIRS
TO SWITCH
UNIT OWNERSHIP
APT.4
ENTRANCE
EVEN FL.
TYP.
ODD FL.
TYP.
3
HOTEL
ENTRANCE
1 2 4
APT.
ENTRANCE
APT.
ENTRANCE
APT.
ENTRANCE
APT.
ENTRANCE
BATHROOM
UNIT
SLEEPING
UNIT
ENTRANCE UNIT (HOTEL) +
STORAGE CLOSET (AT-RISK)
INSTRUCTIONS FOR USE
fold up table
tent pops open connect to top anchor
and inflate mattress
occupy!
pop out of window secure platform unfold flaps
popping open
deployed unit
quickly deployable window box guestroom
for children and friends and family of
those at-risk
F
O
R
I
M
M
E
D
I
A
T
E H
A
B
I
T
A
T
I
O
N
!
1
5 6 7
2 3 4
RECOMMENDED FOR:
FAMILES WITH CHILDREN
HOMELESS GUESTS
HOO2 POP-OUT TENT
enclosure for bunk bed ensuring privacy in
shared bedrooms for families of at-risk
people
packable furniture for overcrowded apartments
varying expansions accomodate different
activities: reading cubby, office/study,
sleeping quarters, and playroom
RECOMMENDED FOR:
FAMILES WITH CHILDREN
HOMELESS/AT-RISK GUESTS
shoes
documents
nightstand
toiletries
clothes
h
o
m
e
l
e
s
s
g
u
e
s
t
friend/family
STAIRS STORAGE
HOO3 BUNKER BED
RECOMMENDED FOR:
FAMILES WITH CHILDREN
HOMELESS/AT-RISK GUESTS
HOO4 EXPANDABLE PLAYHOUSE
WORK!
PLAY!
SLEEP!
READ!
soft structure which pulls inside out,
partitioning or expanding crowded apartments
RECOMMENDED FOR:
FAMILES WITH CHILDREN
HOMELESS GUESTS
HOO5 THE SOCK
inside/
/out
full coverage subway car ads displaying
the scale of homelessness in New York City
soft, huggable cozy cover for chain-link
fences; built-in information screens provide
phone numbers and locations of drop-in
centers, shelters, and treatment programs
to avoid alienating displaced homeless people
and to provide comfortable resting spots for
passersby
NEED HELP?
DIAL 311 NEED HELP?
DIAL 311
DHS INFO PORTAL
NEED HELP?
DIAL 311
RECOMMENDED FOR:
DEPT. OF HOMELESS SERVICES
P001 WALLPAPER AWARENESS
RECOMMENDED FOR:
DEPT. OF HOMELESS SERVICES
POO2 FRIENDLY BARRIER
ON AN AVERAGE DAY,
36,000 PEOPLE ARE HOMELESS
IN NEW YORK CITY
CATALOGUE B: CURRENTLY HOMELESS
= +
CASE STUDY:
QUEENS COMMUNITY DISTRICT 12
What about housing the currently homeless? Building afford-
able, permanent homes for those New Yorkers waiting for
housing in shelters or on the street is essential to ending
the systemic cycle of homelessness in the city. What kind
of model makes sense for this type of housing? These ques-
tions are most effectively answered on a case-by-case
basis, at the local level. This case study considers the
question of housing for homeless families in Queens from
three perspectives: mapping (site location), game design
(breakdown and re-construction of a system microcosm), and
architecture (schematic design project). This research
points to a model of mixed use, mixed income housing incor-
porating a responsibility imperative, both for and from the
homeless population.
SHARED GRAYWATER
TREATMENT UNITS
IRRIGATE FLOWER BEDS
PRIVATE PARKING SPOTS
FOR EACH UNIT
FILTERED EXHAUST
FUNNELED THROUGH
GRATES PROVIDES
WARM ZONES OUTDOORS
I.D.
DOMESTICATED
STREETSCAPE
# homeless families per 1000 households
per census tract (1999-2003)
source:
VERA Institute of Justice
Understanding Family Homelessness in NYC (9/2005)
I.D.
I.D.
I.D.
316
412
305
203
201
209
205
204
110
303
75 50 25 5 0
I2
D1
D2
D3
D4
D5
D6
D7
D8
D9
D10
D11
I5
I6
I1
I3
I4
S1
S2
S3
DROP-IN CENTERS
MANHATTAN
Grand Central Neighborhood
120 East 32nd Street
NY, NY 10017
John Heuss House
42 Beaver Street
NY, NY 10004
Olivieri Center for Women
257 West 30th Street
NY, NY 10001
The Open Door
402 West 41st Street
NY, NY 10036
Neighborhood Center for Homeless People
237 East 77th Street
NY, NY 10028
Peters Place
123 West 23rd Street
NY, NY 10011
Project Rescue
315 Bowery
NY, NY 10003
BRONX
The Living Room
890 Garrison Avenue
Bronx, NY 10011
BROOKLYN
Bond Street Drop-In Center
39-41 Bond Street
Brooklyn, NY 11201
The Gathering Place
2402 Atlantic Avenue
Brooklyn, NY 11233
STATEN ISLAND
Project Hospitality Drop-In Center
25 Central Avenue
Staten Island, NY 10036
D1
D2
D3
D4
D5
D6
D7
D8
D9
D10
D11
INTAKE LOCATIONS
FAMILIES WITH CHILDREN
Prevention Assistance and
Temporary Housing (PATH) Office
346 Powers Avenue
Bronx, NY 10454
FAMILIES WITHOUT CHILDREN
Adult Family Intake Center(AFIC)
29th Street and 1st Avenue
Manhattan, NY 10016
MEN
30th Street Intake
400-430 East 30th Street
NY, NY 10016
WOMEN
Brooklyn Womens Shelter
116 Williams Avenue
Brooklyn, NY 11217
Franklin Shelter
1122 Franklin Avenue
Bronx, NY 10456
Jamaica Armory
93-05 168th Street
Jamaica, NY 11434
BUILDING SITES
I2
I3
I4
I5
I6
I1
EXISTING
PROPOSED
TRAVEL PATTERN:
HOMELESS FAMILY
INTAKES FROM QN12
S1
AIRTRAIN STATION
Jamaica & Sutphin Blvd
Jamaica, NY 11435
S2
YORK COLLEGE
9420 Guy R Brewer Blvd
Jamaica, NY 11451
S3
QNS VILLAGE COMMITTEE
Outpatient Clinic/
Detox Center
16204 South Rd
Jamaica, NY 11434
I.D.
primary site
secondary site
parks + public land
deployed weapon
drop-in city
S1
S2
S3
I6
I.D.
potential distribution of deployed weapons over 1 year:
last addresses of homeless families before entering
NYC Department of Homeless Services shelter
source: VERA study, extrapolated from 4 years of data
site identification:
1. Airtrain (guesthouse)
2. QNS Village Committee clinic (housecall)
3. York College (homestay)
I6
I6
INTAKE LOCATIONS
WOMEN
Jamaica Armory
93-05 168th Street
Jamaica, NY 11434
2
3
1
S1
S1
AIRTRAIN STATION
Jamaica & Sutphin Blvd
Jamaica, NY 11435
S2
S2
YORK COLLEGE
9420 Guy R Brewer Blvd
Jamaica, NY 11451
S3
QNS VILLAGE COMMITTEE
Outpatient Clinic/
Detox Center
16204 South Rd
Jamaica, NY 11434
BUILDING SITES
I.D.
S3
PROPOSAL:
HOUSING FOR JAMAICA CENTER
from houses to housing:
locating underutilized space in existing
(and successful) house types onsite in
Jamaica Center, Queens, yields a denser, more
efficient model for housing
drawing from models of family interdependency
(guest houses, caretaker relationships, and
college homestays) provides a basis for units
with built-in responsibility contracts that
benefit dependants and offer the possibility
of additional income for homeowners
40 COLLEGE STUDENTS
10 FOSTER CARE GRADS
20 BUSINESS TRAVELLERS
30 GENERAL SINGLES
15 INPATIENT/OUTPATIENT
10 MENTAL HEALTH/DETOX
MODEL HOMESTAY GUEST HOUSE HOUSE CALL
TYPOLOGY SHARED BEDROOM + BATH BEDROOM + BATH + MINIBAR BEDROOM + BATH + FULL KITCHEN
FAMILY-PROVIDED SERVICES MEALS CLEANING CHECK-IN / EMERGENCY CONTACT
STAY INCREMENT 1 SEMESTER 1 DAY 1 YEAR
YORK COLLEGE AIRTRAIN QNS VILLAGE COMMITTEE SITE
175 300 150
125 250 125
50 50 25
MARKET-RATE CONSTITUENCY (1-2)
1-2
SUPPORTED CONSTITUENCY (1-2)
FAMILIES
HOMELESS CONSTITUENCY
SINGLES/COUPLES
3-6
4-8
DETACHMENT
STOOP
PARKING SPOT
STREET
SIDEWALK
BEDROOM
ROOF
BASEMENT
LIVING ROOM
FRONT YARD
BACK YARD
BACK YARD
DETACMENT
STREET
SIDEWALK
BEDROOM
BASEMENT/ATTIC
BASEMENT/ATTIC
ROOF
INVERT HOUSE
LIVING ROOM
CONDENSE FOOTPRINT:
EXPAND STREET INTO
AND ONTO HOUSE
PARKING SPOT
FRONT YARD
STOOP
BACK YARD
FRONT YARD
DETACHMENT
BEDROOM
ROOF
LIVING ROOM
SIDEWALK
STOOP
STREET
DOUBLE
RESIDENTIAL
DENSITY:
STACK
HOUSES
REPROGRAM
ATTIC FOR
SUPPORTIVE
HOUSING +
PROVIDE ACCESS
TO NEW UNITS:
INVERT
HOUSES
MAINTAIN
LOW HEIGHT:
SHIFT + TILE
HOUSES
MAINTAIN
DETACHMENT:
OFFSET
HOUSES
MAINTAIN
UNIFIED
STREETSCAPE:
ELEVATE
STREET
extending and elevating the street
allows for increased density and provides
parking beneath perforated streetscape
LEVEL 1
+0
CHECK-IN PLATFORM
MATERIALS
REDISTRIBUTION CENTER
EXISTING
GAS STATION
EXISTING
HOUSES
PREDICTED
DEVELOPMENT
FUNLAND DAYCARE
CHECK-IN PLATFORM
FRIENDLY BARRIER
CLEAN-CUT
PUBLIC BATHS
EMPTY
LOT
TRANSIT FLEET
DROP OFF
LEVEL 2
+24
CHECK-IN PLATFORM
CLIP-ON HAMMOCK FOREST
CHECK-IN PLATFORM
WALLPAPER AWARENESS
CAMPAIGN
SOFT-SEATING AUDITORIUM
DROP-BOX LOCKERS
by inverting top row of houses,
access points for multiple units
converge at streetscape, increasing
density of use around communal stoop
areas. stoops extend into houses,
serving as internal circulation and
flexible dividers between units within
houses when necessary
FRIENDLY
BARRIERS
WALLPAPER
AWARENESS
CAMPAIGN
WALLPAPER
AWARENESS
CAMPAIGN
FRIENDLY
BARRIER
FRONT YARD
(PUBLIC)
BACK YARD
(PRIVATE)
BUNKER BED
(ADULTS)
THE SOCK
CLIP-ON
HAMMOCK
CLEAN-
CUT KIT
EXPANDABLE
PLAYHOUSE
(CHILDREN)
DUST-RUFFLE
DISGUISE
WALLPAPER
AWARENESS
CAMPAIGN
DUST-RUFFLE
DISGUISE
DROP-BOX
LOCKERS
WALLPAPER
AWARENESS
CAMPAIGN
CAPSULE
SHELTER
CLEAN-
CUT KIT
DUST-RUFFLE
DISGUISE
DROP-BOX
LOCKERS
THE SOCK
THE SOCK
CLEAN-
CUT KIT
DUST-RUFFLE
DISGUISE
FOLD-DOWN
LADDER
TO ATTIC/
BASEMENT
DROP-BOX
LOCKERS
STOOP BEDROOM
UTIL-
ITIES LIVING ROOM
ROOF
UPSTAIRS
DOWNSTAIRS
ATTIC/BASEMENT
DOMESTICATED
STREETSCAPE
LEVEL 3
DOMESTICATED
STREETSCAPE
LEVEL 1

site model shows configuration of housing, with variety


of unit sizing and stoop frontage and connection of
domesticated streetscape to current street.
architectural stencils for domestic spaces represent
program zones in streetscape inspired by catalogue items
such as the soft seating auditorium and the clip-on
hammock forest
APPENDIX:
ArchAttacks!
Data Collection and Game Design
set of 101 cards defining identities for
game players: currently homeless individuals,
those at risk of homelessness, average New
Yorkers, power players, institutions, and
territories
information collected: name, quotation,
mission, strategies, tactics, resources,
power level, location
100
250
108
9
150
1
AMASS TROOPS
DRAW A CARD FROM THE CHARACTER STACK TO
DEVELOP YOUR ARMY
FORM AN ALLIANCE
WITH ANY CHARACTER WHO OPERATES IN YOUR
TERRITORIES IN ORDER TO POOL RESOURCES AND ACT
COLLECTIVELY
APPLY FOR FUNDING
CHARACTERS SUBMIT APPLICATIONS OF INTENT TO
REDEEM VOUCHERS FROM DHS
INSTITUTIONS SUBMIT APPLICATIONS FOR $10,000
VOUCHER BONUS FOR EVERY 5 HOMELESS OR AT-RISK
CHARACTERS IN ITS ALLIANCE NETWORK
BUILD WEAPONS ARSENAL
WITH YOUR CHARACTERS DHS HOUSING
ALLOWANCES OR YOUR INSTITUTIONS BUDGET
MASS-PRODUCE WEAPONS
BUY UP TO 5 WEAPONS WHICH YOU ALREADY OWN FOR
.75 THE PRICE OF THE ORIGINAL
DEPLOY A WEAPON
IN YOUR OR YOUR ALLIES TERRITORIES
CRISIS ZONE
EVERY 5TH TURN, EACH PLAYER ROLLS THE DICE,
EXPERIENCING A CRISIS AND CORRESPONDING
TERRITORY SHIFT FOR ONE AT-RISK CHARACTER
DEAL 7 CARDS
TO EACH PLAYER
1 TERRITORY
1 INSTITUTION
5 CHARACTERS
DISTRIBUTE OCCUPANCY TOKENS
AMONG CHARACTERS, COLOR-CODED BY PLAYER,
ACCORDING TO DEALT CARDS
1 DOUBLE BED FOR EVERY COUPLE
1 SINGLE BED FOR EVERY ADULT OR CHILD
LAND GRAB
STAKE OUT CHARACTERS TERRITORIES WITH TOKENS
ALLOCATE VOUCHERS
DHS TREASURER GIVES EACH HOMELESS OR AT-RISK
CHARACTER A VOUCHER WORTH $13,000
**

AVAILABLE FUNDING
***
$1,000,000 FOR FAMILIES
$800,000 FOR SINGLE ADULTS
VARIABLE INSTITUTIONAL BUDGETS
4-6 FIELD OFFICERS
1 DOUBLES AS NYC DEPT. OF HOMELESS
SERVICES (DHS) TREASURER
100 CARDS
*
37 AT-RISK SINGLE ADULTS + FAMILIES
25 HOMELESS SINGLE ADULTS + FAMILIES
14 AVERAGE NEW YORKERS
2 POWER PLAYERS
13 INSTITUTIONS
9 TERRITORIES
250 WEAPONRY PLAYING PIECES (25 TYPES x 10 EACH)
108 OCCUPANCY TOKENS (102 SINGLE + 6 DOUBLE BEDS)
9 TERRITORY BOARDS
150 FUNDING VOUCHERS WORTH $13,000 EACH
1 PAIR DICE
POWER PLAY
There are 2
power player
cards mixed
into the
character
deck: Mayor
Bloomberg and
Governor
Pataki. Use
these cards to
ally and pool
resources with
other
institutions
under city and
state control.
THINK TANK
Invent your
own weapon!
Call a vote on
the terms and
price - a
majority of
players must
agree to put
it into play.
Sell your new
weapon as an
extra source
of income.
GROUND UP
Fed up with
institutional
red tape?
Pool your
resources and
start a
grass-roots
institution
for $100,000.
Get it
unanimously
approved and
use it to gain
the upper
hand.
ARMY
OCCUPY QN12
BY DEPLOYING 20 WEAPONS, WITH AT LEAST 1
WEAPON DEPLOYED FOR EACH CHARACTER
IN YOUR HAND * division of cards based on conditions of homelessness in NYC
** average amount spent on supportive housing per tenant per year
*** figures based on % of DHS FY07 budget for 100 QN12 constituents
1 eviction SHELTER/CHURCH/DROPIN/ST./SUBWAY
2 overcrowding
3 domestic violence
4 family discord
5 unlivable conditions
6 lose job
7 lose housing subsidy
8 illegal lockout
9 substance abuse STREET/SUBWAY/HOSPITAL
10 physical health problems HOSPITAL
11 mental health problems
12 incarceration JAIL/PRISON
Name
Quotation.
CONSTITUENCY TYPE
ENEMIES
ALLIES
WEAPONRY
MISSION TACTICS RESOURCES LOCATION THREAT
pamphlet providing game rules outlines the
field in which players act within the game,
exposing possible locations for intervention
3 foldup playing piece types based on
the typical housing available onsite in
Jamaica, Queens:
12, 16, and 20 wide 2 story detached
houses with attics and/or basements,
peaked roofs, etc.
a
c d
c d
b
a b
a
c d
cd
b
ab
a
c d
c d
b
a b

Related Interests