S u l l i v a n ’ s I s l a n d • I s l e o f P a l m s • G o a t I s l a n d • D e w e e s I s l a n d

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May 9, 2014 Volume 10 Issue 1 FREE
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LOOK AT
SPOLETO
PG 13
INSIDE THE ISLAND EYE NEWS
BOY, IT'S
CHILI
PG 19
EAGLE
SCARE
PG 20
New store continues on page 11 History continues on page 10
W
atering troughs at
Dunleavy’s. Movies and
socials at Ft. Moultrie.
Fishing, crabbing and oystering
for daily meals. Riding on mule-
driven streetcars between IOP
and Mt. Pleasant. Catching a ferry
to attend high school. Civilian
life has changed dramatically on
Sullivan’s Island in the past 75
years, and as the Island can’t
help but move forward, a group
is gaining momentum to help it
reclaim some of its past.
Twenty-fve years ago,
Hurricane Hugo devastated
Sullivan’s Island, both physically
and emotionally. Clean-up was
slow and painful as residents
sifted through the rubble of their
lives, but three years later,
things were better. Homes had
been renovated or rebuilt. A
new two-story wing opened at
Sullivan’s Island Elementary
School, and nearby, the Edgar
Allan Poe Library was set to
reopen in November of 1992 after
extensive repairs. With peace
came the luxury for Islanders of
being able to look back.
Enter Mayme Aiken “Make”
Macmurphy, a dynamic
organizer with a strong desire to
celebrate the stories and gifts of
the Island reborn. She gathered
an enthusiastic group committed
to her vision, and the Gadsden
Cultural Center was incorporated
as a non-proft organization in
1992 with the stated mission
“to establish and maintain a
Bringing
the history
back
R E S I D E N T S WOR K T O
R E V I V E T H E GA D S D E N
C U LT U R A L C E N T E R
BY DELORES SCHWEITZER
FOR ISLAND EYE NEWS
“H
allelujah!” Tanja
Sullivan DePass said,
echoing the sentiment
of many islanders that, at long
last, the Isle of Palms has a fully
functional grocery store. “It’s
beautiful inside,” she said. “With
everything you could ask for, and
the prices seem to be the same as
inland locations.”
It has been a long time coming,
but fnally residents and visitors
to the Isle of Palms can do their
grocery shopping just steps from
the beach. Harris Teeter’s brand
new 25,000 square foot store in
Palm Boulevard’s Island Center,
opened with a snip of Mayor
Cronin’s scissors on Wednesday,
April 30.
While many Islanders still
mourn the loss of the classic
‘Hallelujah!’ it’s here
I S L A N D E R S WE L C O ME H A R R I S T E E T E R A F T E R
1 6 - MO N T H G R O C E R Y S T O R E D R O U G H T
B Y J E N N I F E R T U O H Y
ISLAND EYE NEWS EDITOR
Mayor Dick Cronin cuts the ribbon to offcially
open Isle of Palms’ new grocery store.
PHOTOS BY STEVE ROSAMILIA
2 May 9, 2014
WWW.ISLANDEYENEWS.COM
CIVIC
O
n March 23, 2014, the
Commission on Accreditation
for Law Enforcement Agencies
awarded the Isle of Palms’ Police
Department the Gold Standard Award
for Accreditation for the ffth time.
A framed certifcate was unveiled at
April’s City Council meeting.
“This award is a presentation to the
entire Police Department and to the City
of Isle Of Palms,” Police Chief Thomas
Buckhannon said at the unveiling.
“I’d like to thank the City Council for
allowing us to go through this process.
This is another way to show that we are
meeting the highest standards of a law
enforcement agency.”
The award means the department
remains part of an elite group of 628
agencies in the United States that have
achieved CALEA Accreditation, and
one of 31 agencies in South Carolina.
Chief Buckhannon and Captain
Kimberly Usry participated in
conference and hearing. The event
followed the completion of the On-
Site Assessment that was conducted
December 2013 and examined the
department for its commitment to
law enforcement excellence. The
department continues to work on
keeping its status and will spend the
next three years working towards its
sixth accreditation award.
PHOTO COURTESY CITY OF ISLE OF PALMS
Captain Kimberly S. Usry, Captain Dawn Caldwell, Public Safety Chair Marty Bettelli and Police Chief Thomas
Buckhannon unveil the Isle of Palms’ CALEA Accreditation at April’s City Council meeting.
IOP Police Department wins gold, again
STAFF REPORT
ISLAND EYE NEWS
May 9, 2014
3
Lynn Pierotti
publisher
lynn@luckydognews.com
Jennifer Tuohy
managing editor
jennifer@luckydognews.com
Swan Richards
graphic designer
swan@luckydognews.com
Lori McGee 614.0901
advertising executives
Christian LeBlanc
social media
christian@luckydognews.com
Steve Rosamilia
photographer

Contributors:
Delores Schweitzer
Carol Antman
Mariana Hall
Dimi Matouchev
Judy Fairchild
Paul Roof
Carol King
Bob Hooper
Geoff Bennett
Ruth Thornburg
Maggie Diebolt Mohr

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of South Carolina, LLC
P.O. Box 837
Sullivan’s Island, SC 29482
843-886-NEWS
Submit your letters to the editor to:
info@luckydognews.com
Future deadline: May 14 for
our May 23 issue
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OF SC, LLC
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and the Island Connection
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of Lucky Dog Publishing of SC LLC, is a free,
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Isle of Palms
886.6428
www.iop.net
Wednesday, May 14
Municipal Court
9 a.m.
1207 Palm Boulevard
Planning Commission
4:30 p.m.
1207 Palm Boulevard
Thursday, May 15
Livability Court
5 p.m.
1207 Palm Boulevard
Tuesday, May 20
Ways and Means Committee
5:45 p.m.
1207 Palm Boulevard
Wednesday, May 21
Municipal Court
9 a.m.
1207 Palm Boulevard
SI-IOP DISASTER EXPO
5 p.m.
Joint IOP-SI annual event to help
residents of the Islands and East
Cooper prepare for hurricane
season. Hosted this year by IOP.
Public Safety Building,
30 J.C. Long Boulevard
Sullivan's Island
883.3198
www.sullivansisland-sc.com
Monday, May 12
Council Workshop
6 p.m.
2050 Middle Street
Tuesday, May 13
Municipal Court*
5:30 p.m.
2050 Middle Street
Wednesday, May 14
Coffee with the Chief!
Stop by for a chat about SI with
Police Chief Howard at Cafe Medley.
8:30 a.m.
2213 Middle Street.

Planning Commission
6 p.m.
2050 Middle Street
Tuesday, May 13
Regular Council Meeting
6 p.m.
2050 Middle Street
Wednesday, May 21
Coffee with the Chief!
See Wednesday, May 14.
DRB Meeting
6 p.m.
2050 Middle Street
CIVIC
* Bench Trials will be at a temporary Town Hall facility located behind the Fire Station, next to the Stith Park
(2050 Middle Street). Contact SI Clerk of Court directly at 883-5734 (Maria LoRusso) for payments or questions.
Civic Calendar
 
Recycle - WEDNESDAY- MAY 14 - Recycle
T
he Isle of Palms City Council
unanimously approved the
frst reading of the city’s
2014/2015 budget at its regular
City Council meeting on April 29.
“We approached the budget from
a totally different perspective,”
Linda Tucker, City Administrator,
said at the meeting. “We were
looking at revenues frst rather
than expenditures. Basically, we
presented the budget showing
what we needed to balance it, and
provided council with a whole
menu of options. We worked
through all of those options and
ended with the document that
we have tonight for frst reading.
It was a challenging but very
positive experience.”
Although the frst reading
passed, members of council
expressed their concerns about
the fnancial stability of the City.
“It was great to see the council
work so well together and
pull together during this last
week,” Councilmember Ryan
Buckhannon said during the
meeting. “But we’re getting to a
point where we are going to have
to fnd new sources for revenue.
We’re getting to the point where
we have quite a few unanswered
expenses.”
“Right,” agreed Mayor Cronin.
“The boat is about to take on water
and we can’t let that happen.”
The budget will now go back
to each committee to go through
one more time before it is
presented again to Council at the
May meeting. There will also be a
public hearing.
“We are at the point where
we are out of running money,”
Councilmember Michael Loftus
said. “We can’t continue spending
money where we are spending
money. We are depleting our
funds. We’ve got to fnd ways to
cut our expenses. Or the well is
going to run dry.”
Councilmember Sandy
Ferencz agreed, saying that the
City needs to fnd a way to make
the island’s day visitors more
responsible fscally.
One way of doing this would
be to charge visitors for parking
on the island. That matter is
currently being discussed by the
Public Works Committee.
The City spent a lot of the
time during the budgeting
process combing for new sources
of revenues. Areas that were
considered included:
• Raising the SCE&G franchise
fee to 5 percent from 3
percent
• Revising the Comcast
franchise fee
• Reducing the part-time Fire
Department budget
• Raising the hourly rate of
parking at kiosks on Front
Beach was dismissed but the
consideration of operating
them year round is still on
the table
With property tax revenues
down year-to-year, new sources
of revenues are more pressing if
a raise in taxes is to be avoided.
“Including the March 2014
payment just received and
comparing to the same total for
March 2013, the revenues are
approximately $9,000 less for
year-to-date 2014,” Linda Tucker
said in an email. “
We will continue to monitor the
revenues closely. The City did not
have a millage increase for FY14,
so we do not expect a signifcant
increase in property tax revenue
from 2013 to 2014.”
IOP looking for more cash
A S C O U N C I L C O N S I D E R S N E X T Y E A R ’ S B U D G E T P O T E N T I A L
S O U R C E S O F R E V E N U E A R E B E I N G C L O S E L Y S C R U T I N I Z E D
BY JENNIFER TUOHY
ISLAND EYE NEWS EDITOR
“I
have an extremely unfavorable view
of closing the streets on St. Patrick’s
Day,” said Sullivan’s Island resident
Skip Condon at the April 22 Town Council
meeting. “I have 5 restaurants, so it’s not like
I don’t understand what they are doing. I’m
not proposing we regulate everything they do
in their bar. But it’s a public street, I don’t see
the need for closing the street and disrupting
everyone on this island.”
Condon’s comments echo numerous
concerns citizens have expressed to Council
regarding the behavior of revelers during the
business district St. Patrick’s Day celebrations
on March 15. This year, Council decided
to close some streets to traffc for the frst
time, due to safety concerns that arose after
previous year’s events saw people spilling in to
the streets, creating traffc hazards. However,
the closures allowed revelers to congregate
on Middle Street, signifcantly changing the
nature of the event
Condon, who owns the Irish-themed
restaurant Tommy Condons in downtown
Charleston, told council that many years ago
they closed a street for a celebration.
“Then everybody started doing it,” he said.
“And then the city said no–this is too much.
That’s what’s happening here.”
“We have taken what happened on St.
Patrick’s Day very seriously,” Mayor Perkis
said. “Most of us agree that the behavior was
unacceptable this year.”
The issue was discussed in great detail at
the April Public Safety Committee meeting,
where a number of business owners were
present in the audience. At the meeting Police
Chief Howard said the road closures created
the unintended consequence of opening a
much larger party area. Meaning the crowd
grew too. This resulted in the crowd “becoming
more disrespectful.” Items were thrown at
an offcer, another offcer assaulted and one
offcer was almost bitten (by a human), said
Howard. There were four arrests and three
people taken off the Island by ambulance
because they were so drunk they could not
state their names.
Chief Howard recommended that the overall
size of the event be scaled back for next year,
and suggested that this might be achieved
through some sort of control mechanism
such as ticketing. Fire Chief Stith said there
was a defnite need for a suffcient quantity of
portable toilets, and that partygoers bringing
alcoholic cans to the event needs to be
addressed.
Bill Dunleavy, owner of Dunleavy’s
Tavern, agreed that establishing control
over alcohol brought to the event, possibly
through checkpoints was important. He also
suggested liquor shots should not be sold at
any venue as it increased the speed at which
people became drunk.
Rusty Bennett, co-owner of Poe’s Tavern
said they had six security personnel on site
and had no problems. He suggested other
establishments employ security staff as
well. He also said having a police
presence walking the streets
would be helpful.
Councilmember Chauncey
Clark foated the idea that the
successful Town sponsored family
St. Patrick’s Day celebration,
which took place in the morning
at Stith Park, be in some way combined with
the evening event to create a more controlled,
family-friendly event. He suggested adding
tables and seating, including food sales
outside, maybe even adding enhancements
like a parade and bagpipes to turn the event
toward a family-centric celebration instead of
a drinking party.
The committee asked the businesses to
communicate with each other and provide the
Town with an event plan, and Town staff would
do the same. The committee will discuss the
event again to develop a comprehensive event
plan before the end of the summer.
Citizens who wish to contribute comments
and ideas to this discussion should contact
Clark at crclark4si@gmail.com or attend the
next Public Safety meeting. Minutes from the
April meeting can be read online here tinyurl.
com/mcrm7eq.
4 May 9, 2014
WWW.ISLANDEYENEWS.COM
"THERE WERE FOUR ARRESTS AND THREE PEOPLE TAKEN
OFF THE ISLAND BY AMBULANCE BECAUSE THEY WERE
SO DRUNK THEY COULD NOT STATE THEIR NAMES."
Did St. Patrick’s Day celebrations go too far?
A F T E R 4 A R R E S T S A N D A N A S S A U L T, T O WN C O N S I D E R S F U T U R E O F E V E N T
BY JENNIFER TUOHY
ISLAND EYE NEWS EDITOR
CIVIC
W
ith summer bearing
down on the island
fast, Isle of Palms’ City
Council is prepping the beach
for the onslaught, starting with
the installation of seven new
surveillance cameras on Front
Beach.
The cameras replace four aging
models installed in 2004, which
stopped working last February.
Ostensibly to help monitor traffc
patterns as visitors come on the
island, the cameras will also be
used for a variety of public safety
related issues. They should be
functional by June.
“The use of the cameras is a
way to monitor traffc and crowd
activity, and such monitoring is
something with which the City
has experience,” Linda Tucker,
city administrator for Isle of
Palms said in an email. “The
cameras have been useful for
service to the public, behavior
modifcation, traffc management,
deployment of resources, re-
review to determine vandalism
culprits etc.”
There are also cameras at the
Recreation Department and City
Hall.
At its April meeting, Council
approved an amount of just
over $25,000 to replace the four
non-functioning ones at Front
Beach, add one pointed at the
beach access near the public
restroom, add one pointed at the
alleyway leading to the public
restroom, and add one camera
that will monitor the traffc at
the intersection of 14th and Palm
Boulevard.
“The City is expanding the
area which will be visible via the
camera system with a total of
seven cameras,” Tucker said.
The Police Department are
also preparing for the increased
workload, and have requested a
Charleston County paramedic
level ambulance be stationed on
the island on Saturdays, Sundays
and holidays throughout the
summer, as was the case last
year.
The department has recently
responded to a number of reported
violations of city noise ordinances,
including a particularly large one
at a rental property on March 27.
Chief Buckhannon said offcers
charged 28 individuals as minors
in possession of alcohol, and the
owner of the rental property with
transfer of alcohol to minors.
Surveillance beefed up on
Front Beach as summer looms
BY JENNIFER TUOHY
ISLAND EYE NEWS EDITOR
WWW.ISLANDEYENEWS.COM
8 May 9, 2014
A
fter four years of discussion and
deliberation the Town of Sullivan’s
Island Police Department will soon be
equipped with Tasers.
“We’re giving the police an option between
an argument and a gun,” said councilmember
Patrick O’Neil at the April Town Council
Meeting.
The new Tasers are equipped with a camera,
which is activated when pulled, allowing video
of the entire process to be reviewed.
“I see this as a safety feature for the public
and our offcers,” said councilmember Susan
Middaugh.
Fire Chief Stith is also getting some new
equipment. Council approved moving forward
on purchasing a new fre truck for the
department. And Stith announced that they
have received a $310,000 grant for a new fre
and rescue boat.
“We got it through FEMA,” he said. “Our
portion will be 20 percent. The boat allows for
my people to be a lot safer—we’re getting a lot
more calls out to the jetty areas, especially
during the winter time. We’ve been looking for
an all-weather boat for years. It will have the
same pump capacity as our trucks, so we’ll
get some ISO credit for that.”
The boat will also have an enclosed cabin
area that will be used for securing patients.
CONSTRUCTION HOURS CONFIRMED
It is now illegal for construction to occur
on New Year’s Day, Memorial Day, July 4th,
Labor Day, Thanksgiving Day and Christmas
Day. Council unanimously approved an
ordinance to amend code of the ordinance
that bans construction on Sullivan’s Island
before 8 a.m. or after 6 p.m. Monday through
Friday, and before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m.
on Saturday, and all day on Sundays. The
previous ordinance had just specifed “and
holidays,” which made it diffcult for the police
to enforce. By naming holidays they will now
be able to issue tickets.
Exceptions include performing emergency
repairs, or homeowners and their immediate
family members performing maintenance or
work on their own property. Another exception
is work by or for the beneft of governmental
agencies in the interests of public safety or
public interest.
TOWN SELLS PROPERTY
The Town has sold the lot it owned
across the street from the old Town Hall for
$605,000, fairly close to the asking price. The
proceeds from the sale will go towards the
cost of various new construction projects on
the island, including the building of the new
Town Hall.
DATES FOR THE DIARY
• The next Council workshop is 6 p.m.
May 12. Among other things, council
will be reviewing a tree maintenance
plan for Stith Park. The public is
encouraged to attend and give input.
• A Hurricane Preparation Expo is being
held on the Isle of Palms on May 21.
• Town Naturalist Consultants will be
holding two educational workshops
in the protected lands to help people
identify invasive species and eradiation
techniques. They will provide instruction
and engage in some hands on removal
of invasive plants on Tuesday, May 13
and Tuesday, May 21 from 4-6 p.m. at
the Station 16 beach path entrance.
SI police department to be equipped with Tasers
T O WN C O U N C I L ME E T I N G , A P R I L 2 2 , 2 0 1 4
BY JENNIFER TUOHY
ISLAND EYE NEWS EDITOR
CIVIC
““I SEE THIS AS A SAFETY FEATURE FOR
THE PUBLIC AND OUR OFFICERS."
~ Susan Middaugh
May 9, 2014 9
WWW.ISLANDEYENEWS.COM
03/02/14 – A complainant
reported that he and his son had
gotten into an argument and the
son had left the residence. The
son was unable to be located
and the father declined pressing
any charges.
03/15/14 – While on patrol an
offcer observed two subjects
working at 11 p.m., the subjects
were stopped and could not
produce proper identifcation
or a business license. After a
lengthy attempt to get someone
to pick the subjects up, the
subject were arrested and
transported to the county jail.
03/15/14 – While trying to
reopen the roadway after the St.
Patrick Day festivities a female
subject was told numerous times
to stay out of the street, as the
offcer was making a pass in the
patrol vehicle the female stepped
into the street in front of the
vehicle and was dancing. The
female, who was intoxicated, was
arrested and transported to the
county jail.
03/15/14 – While on patrol
an offcer located a subject
lying face down on the side of
the road, upon checking on
the subject it was determined
that the subject was highly
intoxicated. EMS was contacted
and checked the subject out
and determined he needed to
treatment at the hospital and
therefore transported him.
03/15/14 – An offcer was
assisting a cab driver in
removing an unwanted person
from the rear seat of the cab,
after several attempts to
remove the subject, the subject
exited the cab. The offcer
was then attempted to get the
intoxicated subject another cab
and the subject kept cursing
and grabbing at the offcer.
The subject was arrested and
while preparing the subject for
transport the subject tried to
break away from the offcers and
in doing so struck and tried to
bite an offcer. The subject was
transported to the county jail.
03/15/14 – A complainant
reported that someone had
stolen her phone while she was
in Home Team BBQ, it was later
learned that someone had given
the phone to another offcer
while he was directing traffc and
the phone was in the possession
of the offcer when it was
reported missing.
03/16/14 – Offcers were
dispatched to a residence in
reference to a verbal dispute
between two suspects. On
arrival and after speaking to the
suspects, it was learned that
the two suspects had been in
a verbal argument about one
suspect having guns in the
residence. No physical contact
or threats had been made and
therefore no crimes had been
committed. One suspect left the
residence and offcers clear the
scene.
03/17/14 – A vehicle was
observed parked on a beach
path, while checking the vehicle
the owner of the vehicle came
from the beach and while talking
to the owner it was learned that
the owner and the passenger
had been drinking and should
not drive. The vehicle was towed
and a cab was called to take the
occupant to their hotel.
03/18/14 – A complainant
reported that someone broke the
handle off her sliding glass door.
03/22/14 – A vehicle was
stopped because the driver
threw litter out the window of
the vehicle, while conducting
the stop it was learned that
the vehicle was uninsured. The
driver was cited and released
and the vehicle was towed.
03/25/14 – A complainant
reported that the U.S.
registration tag that was
assigned to a government boat
trailer was missing from the
trailer, the tag was entered in
NCIC.
03/26/14 – Offcers responded
to a report of a domestic
disturbance, on arrival the
offcers learned that the mother
and father of a child had been
in a verbal altercation and that
there had been no physical
contact. The two agreed to
separate for the night and the
father left the residence.
03/30/14 – A vehicle was
stopped for speeding, while
conducting the stop it was learned
that the driver had been drinking,
the driver was arrested and
transported to the county jail.
SULLIVAN’S ISLAND POLICE REPORT, MARCH 2014
WWW.ISLANDEYENEWS.COM
10 May 9, 2014
museum of the civilian life of
Sullivan’s Island, to establish
and maintain an art gallery, and
to provide studio space for use by
local artists.” It took up residence
at 2017 I’on Avenue and soon
was off and running.
Jeri England, a founding
member of the Gadsden Cultural
Center Board of Directors,
remembers Macmurphy’s energy
fondly.
“She was strong-willed,
hard-working and organized,
and she absolutely adored
this island,” England said.
Through Macmurphy’s
inspiration, networking, and
direction, residents enjoyed
island history guest speakers,
Mayfest celebrations, artist
demonstrations, Shakespeare
in the Park, Piccolo Spoleto
concerts, and Frogmore Stew
fundraisers. She identifed 28
long-time residents as “critical
resources” and videotaped them
as they shared their memories.
Local historian Suzannah
Smith Miles took this footage,
wrote a script and produced a
celebrated documentary called
“This Island Remembered: An
Oral History” which the Cultural
Center sold as a fundraiser in
1997.
But Macmurphy wasn’t done.
She worked with Islanders to
gather historic photos and roped
another local historian, Roy
Williams III, into a tremendous
amount of research and writing,
resulting in the book Sullivan’s
Island as part of the “Images in
America” series in 2004, which
includes 128 pages of history,
homes, postcards, and family
Island fun. The book is remains
a staple on the bookshelves of
many island homes.
Make Macmurphy died in
January of 2007, leaving large
shoes to fll. A commemorative
plaque declaring the “Make
Macmurphy
Cultural
Center at
Battery
Gadsden”
was placed at
the entrance,
but sadly,
without a
vigorous leader and organizer,
activities fell off.
A group of islanders met
recently to discuss the viability
of reviving the Gadsden Cultural
Center and develop action plans.
Hal Coste, who grew up on the
island and was a guest speaker
in the Cultural Center’s heyday,
summed up a new mission.
“Our goal is ignite interest in
Sullivan’s Island history through
programs much like those
Make Macmurphy instituted,”
Coste said. He cited the current
challenges: restoring 501c3
status, reinstating an active
Board, soliciting public opinion,
and asking the town to renew
the Cultural Center’s lease at the
terms initiated in 1992.
There is also a pressing need
to gather scattered scrapbooks,
VHS oral history recordings,
and artifacts to digitize them
for preservation and research
purposes, and to record current
long-time residents whose stories
are being lost with passing years.
The Battery Gadsden group
recognizes that each generation,
from those born in 1914 to
those attending Sullivan’s Island
Elementary in 2014, has stories
to tell of friendships formed,
hardships overcome, adventures
attempted, and most of all, how
special their lives are, by virtue of
living on Sullivan’s Island.
The Cultural Center was
last open to the public for the
Topping Off Ceremony at the
new Sullivan’s Island Elementary
School in February, revealing a
space that obviously needs some
work, but also has a great deal
of potential. With the new school
opening in August and the Poe
Library and Community Garden
thriving, it could be that the time
for the Gadsden Cultural Center
has come again.
Interested Islanders can
“Like” the “Battery Gadsden
Cultural Center” on Facebook,
email batterygadsden@outlook.
com, or contact Jeri England
at 843.883.3389 to share
statements of support and receive
updates. The Battery Gadsden
advisory committee is looking
for locals with expertise in
archive/museum management,
communications, landscaping,
and event organization who might
have skills to share. They are
also starting a database of “local
cultural resources” – long-time
residents with perspective on the
Island’s past, as well as individuals
with talents in fne arts, poetry,
and music who could share
their talents at future events.
The Gadsden Cultural Center on I’on Avenue needs work to return it to its former glory
as a showcase for the island’s histoyr, but has a great deal of potential.
History continues from cover
"OUR GOAL IS IGNITE INTEREST IN SULLIVAN’S
ISLAND HISTORY THROUGH PROGRAMS MUCH LIKE
THOSE MAKE MACMURPHY INSTITUTED."
~ Hal Coste
More Post Please
Dear Editor,
I just wanted to take a moment
to comment on our local postal
service.
Last week a car was parked in
front of our mailbox as a man did
some work in the yard. Our mail
was delivered on Monday with
a note on an envelope stating,
"Mailbox blocked—April 26." It
took longer to write this note
than to put the mail in the box.
For all I know, the mail
carrier may have wanted to do
just that, but management or
union rules prohibited him from
doing so. My point: this is not
how great companies strive to
improve customer satisfaction.
Starbucks, Amazon, Chipotle
always try to please the
customer. But then, they don't
have a monopoly.
Hey Post Offce, if you want
people to care about you and
the good work you do, you need
to show you care about the
customer, the person paying
your salary.
Ralph B. Piening
Isle of Palms
All letters submitted to the Island Eye News must bear a full
name, address and phone number for verifcation. Only the author’s
name and city will be printed. Submissions are accepted via email
to jennifer@luckydognews.com or mail to PO. Box 837, Sullivan’s
Island, SC 29482.
Letters may be edited for length and readability. The Island Eye
News reserves the right to reject letters that are libelous, unseemly,
not individually addressed to the Island Eye News or that have been
previously published elsewhere. The Island Eye News will not publish
letters endorsing political candidates.
LETTER TO THE EDITOR
P
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May 9, 2014 11
WWW.ISLANDEYENEWS.COM
New store continues from cover
mom and pop grocery store that
once stood there, a year and
a half without a place to buy
groceries is enough to erase
even the fondest memories of the
Red & White. When The Beach
Co. declined to renew owner
Wayne Moseley’s lease, forcing
the 54-year-old grocery store to
close its doors on Dec. 21, 2012,
the island threw a farewell party.
On Wednesday, many came out
to join the welcome party for its
replacement—albeit about good
12 months later than expected.
The Beach Co. had intended to
replace the Red & White almost
immediately with a high-end
Newton Farms store, owned by
Piggly Wiggly. But the Pig’s demise
in the middle of 2013, ended that
plan. Thankfully, Harris Teeter
stepped in to save the project.
“When the Harris Teeter/Piggly
Wiggly PSA was fnalized, the
shell of building was up,” said
Danna Jones, Harris Teeter’s
spokesperson. “Our team did
change the entire interior of the
store, as it was upgraded to meet
Harris Teeter brand and layout
standards.”
Whatever your feelings
regarding the history of the
island’s grocery store, the future
certainly looks rosy. The new
store has a surprisingly warm,
welcoming feeling, partly due to
its relatively small size and partly
due to the glow of eco-friendly
LED lights, which are installed
throughout.
The large produce section offers
goods from local farms, including
strawberries from Boone Hall
and produce from Johns Island
farms such as Ambrose Farms,
Lime House Produce and Joseph
Fields Farms. The day before the
opening, the seafood department
was buzzing with excitement
about getting its hands on the
frst load of local shrimp coming
in from Cherry Point Seafood in
Rock Hill.
“We’re excited to be here,”
Jones said. “And the fact that the
community is excited is great.
We want to join communities
that want to welcome us. We
hope you’re familiar with Harris
Teeter but for anyone that has
never been to one we want to wow
them.”
The community certainly
seems excited; before the opening,
staff members said people were
constantly coming up to the doors
and peeking in, just wanting to
say hi.
At the grand opening there
were plenty of smiles and a good
turn out.
“The community members are
happy to have their brand new
Harris Teeter,” Jones said. “And
we are thrilled to be serving the
Isle of Palms community. Harris
Teeter strives to provide an
excellent shopping experience on
every visit, and we believe this
starts in the store with excellent
customer service, high-quality
perishables, along with great
variety and selection."
As most savvy shoppers
will know, grocery stores tend
to tailor their selection to the
neighborhoods they serve. In this
case the produce department
boasts an array of up-scale
choices, including globe grapes
from Peru. It also hasn’t escaped
management’s notice that their
new store is about 500 yards
from the ocean.
“Shoppers can fnd everything
needed for a day at the beach—
sunscreen, towels, beach chairs,
coolers, umbrellas,” Jones said. “I
even saw Jelly Fish sting remedy
on our shelves—hopefully none of
our shoppers will ‘need’ that this
summer, but in the event they do,
their Island Center Harris Teeter
has it.”
This could be good news for the
Fire Department, which responds
to a fair number of jelly-sting
related calls during the summer.
The store’s management,
headed by Store Director Chris
Beeker of Summerville, is very
receptive to suggestions and
encourages customers to let them
know what they would like to see
stocked in their neighborhood
store.
“The community dictates what
we offer,” Jones said. “We want to
hear what you want.”
Harris Teeter is also actively
looking to get involved in the
island community through
sponsoring local events and
activities and helping community
efforts in general. In addition, of
the 98 associates in the store,
over half were new hires—a boon
for any small community.
WHAT’S IN STORE
Harris Teeter will be open from 6 a.m. to midnight, 7 days a week.
The store features a full-service Butchers Market with Rancher
Beef, HT Reserve Angus Beef and HT Naturals Natural Beef, full-
service Fishermans Market, shrimp party trays, Farmers Market
produce, full-service foral and custom foral arrangements,
fresh fruit bar, produce party trays, full-service fresh foods
Market Deli/Bakery, sushi, self-serve olives, fresh made salads,
international cheeses, ice cream cakes and custom cakes, sub
shop, artisan breads, made-to-order sandwiches, Boar’s Head
meats & cheeses, rotisserie items, organic, natural and specialty
foods, bulk candy, Western Union, double coupons, Club 60
senior discount, carryout Service and 4 self-serve checkout.
WWW.ISLANDEYENEWS.COM
12 May 9, 2014
Dog days of summer
STAFF REPORT
ISLAND EYE NEWS
T
he summer hours for
dogs on the beach have
gone into effect.
Isle of Palms
Dogs may be off leash
between 5 a.m. and 9 a.m.,
at all other times they must
be leashes while on the
beach.
Sullivan’s Island
Dogs may be off leash from
5 a.m. to 10 a.m. No dogs are
allowed on the beach from
10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Leashed
dogs are allowed on the
beach from 6 p.m. to 5
a.m. All dogs must have a
relevant permit. These can be
obtained at Sullivan’s Island
Town Hall 843.883.3198.
Kristen Lesesne picks up some essentials at the community
yard sale held at the Isle of Palms Recreation Center.
Carol and Tom Buckhannon, Isle of Palms' Chief of Police and Clyde
Dangerfeld attend the annual yard sale.
Sun, sea and sale
R
esidents turned out in force to sell their gently used goods
to bargain hunters at the Isle of Palms annual yard sale on
Saturday, April 26. the event was bathed in sunshine, a
nice change from the stormy weather that forced the event to be
rescheduled from its original date.
PHOTOS BY STEVE ROSAMILIA
WWW.ISLANDEYENEWS.COM
May 9, 2014 13
T
ranscendent moments: a hushed
audience before the curtain goes up,
time-traveling on music from centuries
ago, immersing yourself in a character until
you forget he’s an actor; art that brings tears,
memories, laughter or insight.
Beyond entertainment, we’re all hoping our
Spoleto tickets bring enlightenment and joy.
That’s a tall order. Over 150 performances
with such claims as “a spellbinding
thriller,” “breathtaking feats”, “revolutionary
instrument techniques” and infuences
ranging from Brazilian choro music to South
African ancestors, not to mention ticket
prices up to $100 can be intimidating. To
cut through the confusion, I’ve polled arts
mavens for their suggestions.
As the purveyor of fne instruments all over
the city, Charles Fox of Fox Music recommends
the opening ceremonies. Free, lively and
short, this is a perfect splash of culture to
begin the 17 days of artistic experiences.
“I dearly enjoy the feel and connection of
the opening ceremony at city hall,” he says.
And there’s always an artistic surprise. One
year it was a composition played on car
horns, once an elephant. I hear this year
involves opera. Catch it on Friday, May 23 at
noon outside City Hall, the corner of Meeting
and Broad Streets.
Judy Vane, long-time arts supporter and
former Spoleto board member is looking
forward to the Leoš Janáček opera “Kat’a
Kabanova.” The themes of freedom and
guilt set to shimmering 20th century music
promise a provocative evening.
“We had a whole weekend dedicated
to Janáček a few years ago so I learned to
appreciate him,” she said. Which you can
also do by attending the free artist’s talk with
the opera’s director Garry Hynes on May 24.
Judy’s also a big fan of the Gate Theatre.
“They’ve become friends of mine, since
they’ve performed in the festival several
times,” she said. “My Cousin Rachel,” a play
by Daphne du Maurier is a new production by
the company this year.
Another fan of the Gate Theatre is Dana
DeMartino, a local actress who trained at
conservatories in music, dance and theatre.
“One thing that keeps me returning to
festivals like Spoleto is their commitment
to present new works or old works that are
brought to life within a new concept,” she
said. “I love the company at the Gate Theatre
and fnd whatever they're doing exciting to
watch. They have often taken a very dated
piece of theater and turned it into a gem.”
Ellen Dressler Moryl, the retired director of
Charleston’s Offce of Cultural Affairs says,
“The older I get the more I need excellent choir
music to sustain my soul.” She recommends
the Westminster Choir and especially Handel’s
“Te Deum.” She also describes John Adams
as “a groundbreaking composer in every
way” and is looking forward to his opera “El
Nino” with its mixture of Mexican poetry, the
nativity story and female voices.
Music lovers recommended the Chamber
Music series. As local futist Susan Kraybill
said, “I always like the Dock Street Chamber
series, but then, who doesn't?”
Charles Wadsworth’s able protégé Geoff
Nuttall curates these twice-daily programs
that always include familiar gems beside
unfamiliar works. Composers may premier
new pieces while listening from the audience.
It’s an intimate, often humorous and
casual way to hear the country’s best small
ensembles play their hearts out. Many of the
musicians are rising stars following the path
of such luminaries as Jean-Yves Thibaudet
who performed here before he became an
international sensation.
Dance lovers have much to anticipate this
year. Eliza Ingle, a local dancer, choreographer
and College of Charleston dance professor
suggests that you not miss Hubbard Street
Dance.
“A beautiful and powerful company
showing the best choreography of today,” she
said. But she has a hot tip for us.
“I'm told the sleeper is the solo work from
Gregory Maqoma from South Africa doing a
full evening dance/storytelling evening.” A
reviewer said of this show “a runaway triumph
in terms of artistic excellence, aesthetic
sorcery and responses.” It does what Spoleto
does best: showcase an exotic culture through
a compelling mixture
of artforms. Dottie
Ashley, journalist
and dance expert also
recommends them.
as well as Dorrance
Dance which she
says is on the cutting
edge of the tap dance
revival she’s noticing
on Broadway.
It’s very unusual
for a local group to
play Spoleto venues,
but the fnale this
year features Shovels
and Rope who have
catapulted from
Lowcountry stages to
fame. They’ve been
touring extensively
since winning the
Americana Music
Honors and Award’s
Emerging Artist of the Year in 2013.
“I've been in and out of town for months,”
says Cary Ann Hearst who performs with her
husband Michael Trent in the duo. A large
crowd is sure to welcome back their mixture
of honky-tonk, country, folk and rock as it
flls Middleton Place on June 8 for the all-day
party of picnics, beer and freworks amidst
the beautiful gardens.
Ellen Moryl admonishes that it’s easy to
become a “jaded voluptuary” and take for
granted this world-class festival with its
stellar experiences. So choose carefully but
choose. You will undoubtedly fnd yourself
transported, enlightened and entertained.
Spoleto runs from May 23 to June 8 in
venues throughout Charleston. For more
information and tickets visit www.spoletousa.
org. For more photos or to make comments or
suggestions visit www.peaksandpotholes.
blogspot.com.
Follow the arts mavens to Spoleto
L O C A L E X P E R T S O F F E R T H E I R P I C K S O F T H E F E S T I VA L
BY CAROL ANTMAN
FOR ISLAND EYE NEWS
Shovels and Ropes, a local group, will be featured at the Spoleto fnale on June 8 at Middleton Place.
May 30 Is l and Eye Cal endar
May 9
FRIDAY, MAY 9
Gypsy
Crabpot Players Theater
Company’s season fnale, Gypsy
opens May 2 and runs through
Mothers’ Day, May 11. This Tony
Award winning musical is directed
by Angelia Grech and features
a full orchestra. May 2, 3 and
9th will have 7pm performances.
Matinee performances will take
place at 2pm on May 4, 10 and
culminate on Mother’s Day, May
11. Tickets are available online
at www.crabpotplayers.com. The
Crabpot Players Performing Arts
Center is located at 1137 Johnnie
Dodds Blvd.
SATURDAY, MAY 10
Fear No Easel Painting
Workshop: A Members-only
Program
9:30 - 11:30 a.m. Free your
inner artist and receive painting
guidance from the experts at Fear
No Easel. A fnished product would
make a great Mother’s Day gift,
or better yet, bring Mom along
and paint together. Supplies
will be provided, and tickets are
$25. Recommended for ages
8-16. Reservations are required.
To reserve your spot or for more
information, call 843.579.8518.
SUNDAY, MAY 11
Mother’s Day A La Carte Brunch
Celebrate Mom at the Sea Island
Grill for an a la carte brunch from
11 a.m.-2 p.m. and Mom gets a
special surprise! Reservations
are required at 843.886.2307. To
cancel, please call 48 hours in
advance to avoid being charged in
full.

Sunday Brunch at The Sand Bar
Spoil mom the whole weekend!
Join us for brunch at The Sand
Bar on Sunday for southern
inspired brunch dishes such as
Charleston Crab Cake Benedict,
Shrimp and Grits or a Shrimp Po
Boy. Call 843.886.2296.
WEDNESDAY, MAY 13
East Cooper Habitat for
Humanity hosts Tees for Keys at
Daniel Island Club
Registration begins at 11 a.m.
Lunch follows at 12 p.m., with a
shotgun start at 1 p.m. “Golf Tees
to House Keys” will beneft East
Cooper Habitat for Humanity and
is an 18-hole shamble format.
The entry fee is $225 per player
or $850 per team. Entry forms
may be downloaded at www.
eastcooperhabitat.org, and
questions should be directed to
Christine Pinson at 843.881.2600
or by email at christine@
eastcooperhabitat.org.
THURSDAY, MAY 14
Dance Under the Stars: Lions,
Tigers, and Bears—Oh, My!
5:30-7:30 p.m., Mount Pleasant
Pier. People with special needs
and their families and friends are
invited to an unforgettable night on
the pier. This is a circus-themed
event with plenty of dancing and
music that is sure to amaze.
Tickets are limited. Advance
purchase is recommended. A
registered and paid chaperone
is required for participants
ages 15 and under. $5/$4 CCR
Discount/$5 on-site (if available).
For more information visit www.
CharlestonCountyParks.com.
New Public Charter School in
Downtown Charleston
A public information meetings will
be held by the planning committee
to discuss the August 2015
opening of a new public charter
middle/high school that will offer
a focus on music instruction on
the Charleston Peninsula. The
meetings will be held: Wednesday,
May 14 from 5:30-7:30 p.m. at
Marshall Walker Real Estate,
582 Rutledge Ave., Charleston,
SC, and Tuesday, May 20, 2014
from 5:30-7:30 p.m. at the Main
Branch of the Charleston County
Public Library, 68 Calhoun Street,
Charleston, SC. Allegro Charter
School of Music will serve students
in grades 6-12 (opening with
grades 6-9 in 2015) in downtown
Charleston. For more information,
visit MusicallyInspiredMinds.org.
FRIDAY, MAY 16
Yoga: Yogathon
May 16-18. 5:45 -6:45 p.m., Meets
at the Isle of Palms County Park,
for ages 16 and up. Renew a sense
of adventure and recharge energy
with these community-minded,
Mother Nature-inspired yoga
programs. Celebrate the moon
and the sun during a month-long
yoga series. From the beach to the
meadows of the county parks, yoga
takes on a whole new dimension
with earthly views. Participants will
truly reach their arms to the skies,
take in the sights and sounds
of nature, and ignite childlike
wonder and awe. Fee: $10/$8 CCR
Discount. For more information
visit charlestoncountyparks.com.
Basic Sailing: Basic Sailing
Level 1
May 16-18, Friday 5:30 -8 p.m.,
Sunday 9:30 a.m.-1 p.m., CCPRC
Headquarters. This event is for
ages 16 and up. Fee: $132/$120
CCR Discount. Learn the basics of
sailing from US Sailing Certifed
Instructors, and feel comfortable
on the water. Learn basic sailing
nomenclature, along with rigging
and de-rigging skills, safety, and
the basics of tacking, jibing, and
docking. Pre-registration required.
For more information visit www.
charlestoncountyparks.com.
SATURDAY, MAY 17
VFW POST 3137 Fish Fry
6-9 p.m., $8 a plate.
Book Club
Edgar Allan Poe/Sullivan’s Island
Library holds its next book club
meeting to discuss Fever by
Mary Beth Keane at 10:30 a.m.
Saturday, May 17
Turtle Crafts
10:30 a.m. Celebrate International
World Turtle Day by making a
turtle puppets at Edgar Allan Poe/
Sullivan’s Island Branch.
Toddler Time:
A Members-only Event
8 – 9 a.m. Join, before we open
to the public, for a fun morning
just for toddlers and their parents.
1-3 year olds will be introduced
to magnifcent creatures with
up-close animal encounters
and explore the Aquarium by
themselves before the crowds
arrive. Adults enjoy complimentary
coffee and muffns, and snacks
for the kids will also be served.
Tickets are $10 per member child
(two adults get in free with each
participating child). Reservations
are required. To make a
reservation, call 843.579.8518.
Alligator Adventure
10 a.m.-12 p.m., Meets at
Wannamaker County Park, Ages 9
and up, Fee $9/$7 CCR Discount.
Search for alligators and separate
fact and fction on this journey
to learn why these large reptiles
carry the special title of “keystone
species.” A registered chaperone
is required for participants ages
15 and under. Pre-registration
required.
Shaggin’ on the Cooper
7-11 p.m., Mount Pleasant
Pier. Spend an evening dancing
on the scenic Mount Pleasant
Pier to live music by the Local
Motion Party Band. Enjoy
scenic views of the Charleston
Harbor while dancing to live
classic oldies and beach music.
Beverages, food, and snacks will
be available for purchase. Tickets
are limited; advance purchase
is recommended. A photo ID is
required to gain entry into the
event. No refunds issued or rain
dates scheduled for this event,
but receipts will be good for any
other CCPRC 2014 Shaggin' on
the Cooper. A registered and
paid chaperone is required for
participants ages 15 and under.
Fee: $10/$8 CCR Discount/$10
on-site (if available).
“Sullivan’s Island and Isle of
Palms, an Illustrated History”
Book Signing and Talk
12:30 p.m., Edgar Allan Poe
Library. This elegant and
absorbing coffee-table book kicks
up some fne historical sand with
an exploration of Charleston’s
oldest resort islands, Sullivan’s
Island and Isle of Palms. Long
applauded as a writer who makes
history a joy to read, this book
is a crowning achievement for
Suzannah Smith Miles, who is
widely known for her previous
writing on the islands and the East
Cooper.

SUNDAY, MAY 18
Sunrise Presbyterian Church
Beach Service
9 a.m., followed by a presentation
by the South Carolina Aquarium
Rovers Program. Following the
beach service, at 10, all ages
are invited to the Fellowship
Hall, where guests from the SC
Aquarium’s Rovers Program will
present information about different
plant and animal life and show
us some of the exciting things
that we can fnd on the beach this
summer.
Intermediate Climbing: Climbing
205: Top Rope Rescues
10 a.m.-4 p.m., Meets at James
Island County Park, Ages 16 and
up, Fee $44/$36 CCR Discount.
Learn valuable rock climbing
rescue skills. Rescue theories,
belay escapes, and counter
balance ascents will be covered.
Participants should have a
current CCPRC Belay Card. Pre-
registration required.
TUESDAY, MAY 20
Tech Tuesdays: Online
Genealogy Research
12 p.m. Start discovering your
family roots with CCPL’s genealogy
and historical research tools, at
Edgar Allan Poe/Sullivan’s Island
Branch.
WEDNESDAY, MAY 21
2014 Disaster Preparedness Expo
5-7 p.m., Isle of Palms Public
Safety Building, 30 JC Long
Boulevard. Annual joint Sullivan's
Island-Isle of Palms event to
help residents of the Island
and East Cooper prepare for
hurricane season and other
emergencies. Free, family-friendly
event.
THURSDAY, MAY 22
Pups, Yups, and Food Trucks
5-8 p.m., Mount Pleasant Palmetto
Islands County Park. It’s a party in
the park with for owners and dogs.
There will be live music performed
by Dave Landeo, beverages, and
the Cast Iron food truck. All dogs
must remain on leash. No outside
alcohol or coolers permitted. This
is a free event with regular park
gate admission.
Charleston Waterkeeper's Fifth
Annual Water Ball
At the SC Aquarium, 7 to 11 p.m.
Buy tickets online https://www.
eventbrite.com/e/water-ball-2014-
tickets-11061373867.
FRIDAY, MAY 23
Spoleto & Piccolo Spoleto
Festivals Kick Off
See story on page 13.
Crafternoon: Turtle Crafts
4 p.m. Celebrate International
World Turtle Day by making a
turtle puppets, at Edgar Allan Poe/
Sullivan’s Island Branch.
MONDAY, MAY 24
Play: Fabric Finger Painting
10:30 a.m. We’ll bring the fabric
and paint, and you bring the
fngers at Edgar Allan Poe/
Sullivan’s Island Branch.
SOS “fun-raiser”
Mount Pleasant Memorial
Waterfront Park (at the foot of the
Ravenel Bridge) 6 p.m. This marks
the event’s 10th anniversary, and
it will feature two bands, food,
friends and a healthy dose of
hope for breast cancer survivors
and patients. All proceeds raised
stay in South Carolina – helping
individuals managing the
crushing expenses associated
with breast cancer diagnosis
and treatment. Tickets are $35
in advance and $50 the day of,
and can be purchased at etix.
com or by calling 800.514.ETIX
(3849). One hundred percent of
the net proceeds from the event
will directly beneft breast cancer
patients in South Carolina.
MONDAY, MAY 26
Charleston County Waterparks
Open Daily
Starting May 26 Splash Zone
Waterpark at James Island County
Park, Splash Island at Mount
Pleasant Palmetto Islands County
Park, and Whirlin’ Waters at
Wannamaker County Park are now
open every day through August
15. Visit www.splashparks.com for
hours, fees and other details.
FRIDAY, MAY 30
Jewelry Sale
The Volunteers at East Cooper
Medical Center are sponsoring
a Masquerade $5 Jewelry Sale.
7 a.m. to 7 p.m. in the lobby of
East Cooper Medical Center, 2000
Hospital Drive, Mt. Pleasant. Items
include necklaces, bracelets,
earrings and more. Everyone is
Welcome! Everything is $5. All
proceeds beneft the Volunteer
Services Organization Scholarship
Fund to help individuals pursuing
a career in the medical felds.
16 May 9, 2014
island eats
Ben & Jerry’s
Enjoy an array of ice cream
favors, from Chocolate Therapy
to Peach Cobbler on Isle of Palms’
Ocean Boulevard
$
886-6314
www.benandjerrys.com
1009 Ocean Boulevard,
Isle of Palms, SC 29451
Café Medley
Start your day or end it with
a well rounded café, serving
breakfast, lunch, and a glass of
wine in the evening.
$$
793-4055
www.cafemedley.com
2213 Middle Street
Sullivan’s Island, SC 29482
High Thyme Cuisine
A small island bistro with a wide
range of dishes from seafood,
tapas on Tuesdays, and a brunch
on Sunday mornings.
$$$
883-3536
www.highthymecuisine.com
2213 Middle Street
Sullivan’s Island, SC 29482
Home Team BBQ
Not limited to barbeque, this
casual eatery also serves salads,
wraps, tacos, and quesadillas, as
well as Sunday brunch.
$$
883-3131
www.hometeambbq.com
2209 Middle Street
Sullivan’s Island, SC 29482
Long Island Cafe
Come in for lunch, dinner, or
Sunday brunch and enjoy all your
favorite seafood plus so much
more at this island favorite.
$$
886-8809
www.longislandcafesc.com
1515-A Palm Boulevard
Isle of Palms, SC 29451
Morgan Creek Grill
Relax with a front row seat on
the Intracoastal waterway while
enjoying fresh seafood and
southern hospitality.
$$$
886-8980
www.morgancreekgrill.com
80 41st Avenue
Isle of Palms, SC 29451
Poe’s Tavern
Famous for their gourmet burgers
and chicken sandwiches, this Poe-
inspired eatery also features great
deals on fresh fsh tacos.
$$
883-0083
www.poestavern.com
2210 Middle Street
Sullivan’s Island, SC
SALT at Station 22
Enjoy a fun atmosphere with fresh
seafood and southern favorites,
and a fresh, local raw bar.
$$$
883-3355
www.saltstation22.com
2205 Middle Street
Sullivan’s Island, SC 29482
SaltWorks Dockside Deli
Located inside the Isle of Palms
Marina Market, come enjoy
fresh breakfast, smoothies, &
sandwiches. Open from 7AM-3PM
daily.
$
www.saltworkscc.com
50 41st Avenue
Isle of Palms, SC 29451
Sullivan’s
Grab a casual dinner of fried
founder or crab cakes in a cozy
atmosphere, as well as lunch on
the weekends.
$$
883-3222
2019 Middle Street
Sullivan’s Island, SC 29482
Taco Mamacita
Enjoy made-from-scratch “Tex
Mex” soups, salads, tacos, and
enchiladas, and quench your
thirst with one of several specialty
margaritas.
$$
789-4107
www.tacomamacita.com
2213-B Middle Street
Sullivan’s Island, SC 29482
A
Coast Guard helicopter crew located a missing
kayaker Friday morning after his wife reported him
missing during a kayak trip in Charleston Harbor,
prompting a multi-agency all-night search Thursday night.
Tim Pratt, 53, was found on Morris Island in Charleston
Harbor at 7:50 a.m.
Pratt was found in good condition and reported his paddle broke
so he was unable to return to shore. The Coast Guard helicopter
crew landed on Morris Island, brought Pratt aboard and few
him to Charleston Executive Airport in Johns Island, S.C., where
EMTs and his family were waiting. EMTs evaluated him on site
and released him.
Sullivan's Island Fire Department contacted watchstanders in
the Coast Guard Sector Charleston command center to request
assistance in the search for Pratt about 9:30 p.m. Thursday.
Coast Guard air and boat crews searched continuously through
the night. Also responding were the South Carolina Department of
Natural Resources, Charleston County Sheriff’s Offce, Sullivan’s
Island Fire Department, Mount Pleasant Police Department, and
North Charleston Fire Department.
SI Fire Department help
locate missing kayaker
BY STAFF REPORT
ISLAND EYE NEWS
A
ccording to data released
by Charleston Trident
Association of Realtors,
inventory of homes for sales in
Charleston increased signifcantly
in March.
Isle of Palms had 35 new
listings. The average sales price
for a single-family home was
$883,427, there were 15 closed
sales—an increase of 7.1 percent
from the previous March.
The good news for sellers is the
average days on market fell from
189 days to 124.
On Sullivan’s Island, there were
5 new listings with an average
sales price of $1,717,000—an
increase of 7.9 percent from the
same period last year.
There are 37 homes currently
for sale on Sullivan’s Island.
Inventory is down 14 percent
from March 2013.
Sand Dollar Real Estate
Group currently holds the most
expensive listing on the Isle of
Palms at $5,400.000.
“There has been a lot of interest
in this home,” Chuck Mimms,
broker in charge, said. “Investors
and second home buyers from
around the world are adding
Real Estate to their portfolio and
Charleston is still seen as a good
value.”
To date for the month of April, 20
homes have closed on the islands
with 45 currently under contract.
The Spring selling season
and the increasing inventory
should keep home prices from
infating on an unrealistic basis.
State of the Islands
March real estate news
STAFF REPORT
ISLAND EYE NEWS
Catch Gypsy this weekend
C R A B P O T P L AY E R S C E L E B R AT E S MO T H E R ’ S
D AY WI T H T H E U L T I MAT E S TA G E MO T H E R
BY MARIANA HALL
FOR ISLAND EYE NEWS
C
rabpot Players Theater
Company’s season fnale,
Gypsy opened May 2
and runs through Mothers’
Day, May 11. This Tony Award
winning musical is directed by
Angelia Grech and features a full
orchestra.
Gypsy is loosely based on the
1957 memoirs of Gypsy Rose
Lee, the famous striptease artist,
and focuses on her mother,
Rose, whose name has become
synonymous with "the ultimate
show business mother." It follows
the dreams and efforts of Rose to
raise two daughters to perform
onstage and casts an affectionate
eye on the hardships of show
business life in the 1920’s when
vaudeville was dying and
burlesque was born.
The show includes memorable
classics by Jules Styne and
Stephen Sondheim such as
“Let Me Entertain You,” “Some
People,” “Everything’s Coming Up
Roses,” and “Together
Wherever We Go.”
New York Time
theater
critic
Clive Barnes wrote that “‘Gypsy’
is one of the best musicals…”
and also described the character
of Mama Rose as “one of the few
truly complex characters in the
American musical.”
May 9 will have a 7 p.m.
performance, with a matinee
performance at 2 p.m. on
Mother’s Day, May 11. Tickets
are available online at www.
crabpotplayers.com.
The Crabpot Players Performing
Arts Center is located at 1137
Johnnie Dodds Blvd. Founded in
1993, the mission of The Crabpot
Players Theater Company is
to encourage and promote live
theatre through the medium of
acting and to provide educational
opportunities for emerging
performing artists of all ages
throughout the Charleston area.
17 May 9, 2014
Breach I nl et Ti de Char t
Date High Tide Low Tide
Hurricanes, storms etc., are NOT included in the
predictions. Tidal current direction changes and tide time
predictions can be very different. Tide predictions are
PREDICTIONS; they can be wrong so use common sense.
Source: www.saltwatertides.com
May 9
May 10
May 11
May 12
May 13
May 14
May 15
May 16
May 17
May 18
May 19
May 20
May 21
May 22
4:01am/4:50pm
4:53am/5:39pm
5:43am/6:25pm
6:31am/7:10pm
7:17am/7:54pm
8:03am/8:39pm
8:50am/9:24pm
9:38am/10:12pm
10:28am/11:03pm
11:22am/11:57pm
12:20pm
12:55am/1:22pm
1:55am/2:26pm
2:56am/3:29pm
10:13am/10:48pm
11:01am/11:41pm
11:48am
12:31am/12:33pm
1:19am/1:18pm
2:06am/2:04pm
2:53am/2:50pm
3:41am/3:38pm
4:30am/4:29pm
5:20am/5:22pm
6:13am/6:21pm
7:09am/7:23pm
8:06am/8:29pm
9:04am/9:36pm
FINANCIAL FOCUS
A
few days ago, we observed
May Day, a celebration of
spring. And, after a long and
hard winter in many parts of the
country, most of us are ready for
sunshine, warmer temperatures
and the hopefulness that spring
always symbolizes. But as winter
gives way to spring, we are also
reminded that our lives have
“seasons,” too—and it pays to
be prepared for all of them. So,
as you move into the “retirement
season,” you’ll need to prepare
for several possible challenges,
including the following:
Outliving your resources
The idea of outliving one’s
fnancial resources is certainly
not one we want to face. In
fact, in a poll of people ages 44
to 75 sponsored by Allianz Life
Insurance, 61 percent said they
fear depleting their assets more
than they fear dying. The best
way you can overcome anxiety
about running out of money is
to invest and plan. Contribute as
much as you can afford to your
IRA and 401(k) or other employer-
sponsored retirement plan—and
when your salary goes up over
time, increase your contributions.
As for the “plan” part, try to
envision the type of lifestyle you
want during retirement, and
then estimate how much this
lifestyle will cost. Once you reach
retirement, you will also need to
do some planning—specifcally,
you will need to calculate how
much money you can afford to
withdraw from your investments
each year.
Becoming disabled
One-third of all people
between the ages of 30 and 64
will become disabled at some
point, according to the Health
Insurance Association of America.
If you became disabled, even
temporarily, the loss of income
could prove devastating to your
fnancial security, and that of your
family’s. To avoid this worrisome
scenario, you may want to
consider disability insurance.
If your employer offers this
coverage as an employee beneft,
take it — but don’t assume it will
be suffcient. Many times, an
employer-sponsored disability
policy will only cover a short-
term disability and may have a
long waiting period for benefts
to kick in. Consequently you
may need to purchase your
own disability insurance policy
to supplement your employer’s
coverage.
Requiring long-term care
Unfortunately, many people
eventually require some type
of long-term care, whether that
involves a stay in a nursing
home or the assistance of a
home health care aid. This type of
care is expensive, and Medicare
only covers part of it. Just how
costly is long-term care? The
national average for home health
aide services is nearly $45,000
per year, and a private room
in a nursing home is nearly
$84,000 per year, according to
a recent survey by Genworth,
a fnancial security company.
To meet long-term care costs,
you could self-insure, but that
might be prohibitively expensive.
But failing to do anything about
meeting long-term care costs
could result in the need for
your grown children or other
family members to get involved
in some fashion—and that is
something you no doubt wish
to avoid. Fortunately, you can
fnd solutions. To learn about
appropriate protection vehicles,
consult with your fnancial
advisor.
With some thoughtful
planning, constant vigilance and
timely action, you can meet all
these challenges—and enjoy all
the seasons of life in which you
fnd yourself.
This article was written by
Edward Jones for use by your
local Edward Jones Financial
Advisor.
Edward Jones operates as an
insurance producer in California,
New Mexico, and Massachusetts
through the following subsidiaries,
respectively: Edward Jones
Insurance Agency of California,
L.L.C., Edward Jones Insurance
Agency of New Mexico, L.L.C.,
and Edward Jones Insurance
Agency of Massachusetts, L.L.C.
California Insurance License
OC24309.

Be prepared for changing
seasons of your life
BY DIMI MATOUCHEV
FOR ISLAND EYE NEWS
WWW.ISLANDEYENEWS.COM
18 May 9, 2014
COMPUTER CORNER
I
f you have not heard, Microsoft,
in the guise of Windows
Internet Explorer, had to
admit recently that its premiere
Internet browser IE 11 has a bit
of a problem; like a truck could
drive through the security and
hack your computer, yikes. Then
it was Adobe Flash Player 13 in
combination with IE 11 that was
the problem. By the time this
column hits the doorstep the fx is
supposed to be out and all will be
well, except the browser still does
not perform the way it should.
Now is the time to look at some
alternatives to IE 11, such as
Firefox, Chrome, Safari, Puffn
and, from way back when, Opera.
Below I will give you some good
and not so good about each.
One thing to remember about
browsers is that they all do one
thing: access the Internet.
Firefox has a lot going for it
and I would recommend trying
it instead of IE. You can use IE
to go to www.frefox.com and
download the program. It is a
very easy to use installer and will
even transfer all your favorites
(called bookmarks in Firefox) and
settings over from IE. If you spend
just a bit of time with Firefox, as
well with other browsers, you can
add all sorts of plug-ins or add-
ons that will stop annoying ads,
tracking cookies, etc.
One of my favorite add-ons is
an extension called AdBlocker
Plus that prevents pop-up ads
and embedded ads in websites.
About the only real minus to
Firefox is that is seems every other
week they want to install another
update, which can change some
settings. I usually wait through a
couple of updates before allowing
them.
Next up would be Chrome,
which has some wonderful
benefts with one drawback in my
opinion. They follow you wherever
you go. I know in today’s world
it’s almost impossible to be
anonymous online, but I don’t
like the thought of agreeing to be
followed. To download Chrome go
to www.google.com/chrome.
All new browsers will want to
make themselves the "default"
browser, and that's fne if you are
moving to them, just remember
that means any link in an email
or on your desktop will now open
in Chrome (or whatever browser
you have). One nice beneft of
Chrome is how well it plays with
Gmail since it’s all the same
company.
Safari is the only browser that
was made for Apple frst, but can
now be used by Windows-based
computers. Some enjoy seeing the
same layout when away from their
beloved Apple products, such as
iPhones and iPads. It seems that
many have a Windows based
desktop or laptop for work and
use the Apple products for and
play and work. Having the same
browser on
both makes
jumping
from the iPad
to the laptop
simple, with
the only real
drawback
being that Safari was not intended
for Windows in the beginning and
can get a bit wobbly (crash) using
it on your laptop. You can get
Safari by just typing "Safari for
Windows" in Google.
Speaking of using Google, do
not click on the top results that
have a yellow "AD" next to them,
instead scroll down and click on
a link that does not have ad next
to it.
Puffn is more for Apple
products in that it allows you to
view Flash Player enabled videos
on your Mac, iPhone and iPad
products. It is available thru
the iTunes store and has a free
versions and a paid version. I
would go with the paid version;
it just seems to work better.
With it you can view videos that
would not normally work on
Apple products because they will
not install Flash Player or do not
support it correctly. Puffn runs
a cloud-based Flash Player and
allows the videos to be seen.
Lastly, I just wanted you to
know that Opera is still around,
as are hundreds of other web
browsers. Remember that a
browser, be it IE 11 or Firefox
or another choice, is just that, a
way to access and “browse” the
Internet. All have the same basic
function with lots of additions to
make you want to use them.
As always if you have questions
or need help you can call Rent A
Bob at 843.822.7794 or email at
rentabob@live.com.
There are other browsers
BY BOB HOOPER
FOR ISLAND EYE NEWS
"NOW IS THE TIME TO LOOK AT SOME ALTERNATIVES TO
IE 11, SUCH AS FIREFOX, CHROME, SAFARI, PUFFIN."
~ Bob Hooper
WWW.ISLANDEYENEWS.COM
19 May 9, 2014
I
t was a chili night on Thursday,
April 24, 2014, at the Isle
of Palms Exchange Club as
members gathered for the Second
Annual Chili Cook-off.
Twelve teams of Chili Cooks
from both the Isle Palms and
Mt. Pleasant Exchange Clubs
brought crock pots flled with
their favorite chili recipes such as
Smokin’ Chili, Chilly in Italy, and
Pork ‘n’ ‘Turf, along with familiar
condiments including chopped
onions, sour cream, and extra
peppers. Assorted corn breads
and awesome desserts of pecan
bars and cherry cobbler topped-
off the dinner.
While 80 club members
including Tracey Edwards of the
National Exchange Club and
other special guests, sampled
each of the delicious and distinctly
different chilies, two carefully
selected judges—Robert Walker
from My Father's Mustache, and
Scott Malouche from The Palms—
had the diffcult job of selecting
just three winners from the
twelve teams of cooks. The judges
both agreed that all of the Chili
recipes were exceptional. Isle of
Palms resident, Mike Branch, in
caveman costume, grabbed frst
place with his Wild Thang chili, a
meaty venison and bison recipe.
The slightly spicy Chililicious
with a taste of India, by Maureen
Matthews and Terry Kinder
of Mt. Pleasant, took second
place; while Isle of Palms club
members, Monica Mueller and
Bob Roth, slid into third place
with their down home formula of
Beef It Up chili. Judging by the
smiles and laughter that evening,
it is safe to say that each and
everyone present, whether a cook
or attendee, was a winner at the
Second Annual Chili Cook-off.
The Isle of Palms Exchange
Club is a service organization
whose members raise funds
for scholarships and other
youth programs as well as for
organizations dedicated to the
prevention of child abuse. For
additional information about
Exchange Club events visit www.
facebook.com/IOPExchangeClub
or www.iopexchange.org.
Chili Cook-off at the
IOP Exchange Club
BY RUTH THORNBURG
FOR ISLAND EYE NEWS
Members line up to have their chili judged.
Left to Right: Terry Kinder and Marion Matthews, 2nd place; Robert Walker, Event
Judge; Mike Branch, 1st place; Scott Malouche, Event Judge; Bob Roth, 3rd place;
Tracey Edwards, National Exchange Club; Monica Mueller, 3rd Place; and Barby
Harrington, event co-coordinator
Barby Harington, Event Coordinator
20 May 9, 2014
WWW.ISLANDEYENEWS.COM
“BY SUNDAY NIGHT, THE FEMALE WAS ABLE
TO CLAW AND CHEW HER WAY THROUGH
THE DEBRIS AND FREE HERSELF. "
~ Judy Fairschild
B
oth Dewees Island eaglets
appear to be growing and
healthy. You can fnd videos
of their growth on the Dewees
Island Blog. They are practicing
short fights by fapping up above
the nest and landing again. This
week, however, there appeared
to be a problem with one of the
adults getting entangled in sea
debris. Based on the relative size,
watchers determined that it was
the female parent.
On Sunday morning Captain
Tripp Hanna of the Dewees
Island Ferry was alarmed to see
a struggling adult eagle in the
water. The eagle managed to swim
to shore, and was resting on the
point in Dewees Inlet, attended
by its mate. Captain Hanna called
the Birds of Prey Center, and the
two island residents with docks
near the place where the eagles
were resting.
The Kennedy’s and Mosers
and Fairchilds all responded,
gathering together a crate for
transport, a camera, and gloves.
After consultations with DNR
and the Birds of Prey Center, the
island rescuers tried to approach
the pair, but they wouldn’t let
anyone get close enough to try
to help. Every time rescuers
approached the shore, they
would fy off a short distance. The
larger bird appeared to be caught
in some sort of fshing line, and
although she had trouble fying
to start with, she seemed to be
able to gain some altitude.
On the advice of DNR and Birds
of Prey experts, the rescuers
decided to watch from a distance,
and were gratifed to see that
she moved off to a snag right in
the middle of the island across
from Dewees, where she would
be relatively safe, there would be
little boat traffc, and predators
are few. Bobby Kennedy
surmised that the
eagle had grabbed a
“fsh that got away,”
possibly one that was
still dangling some
fshing gear. Since
eagles have pretty
sharp talons and
beaks, it’s likely she’ll be able
to free herself. Upon examining
photos later, with the help of a
digital zoom, it appeared that she
was somehow entangled in a dead
bird, who was also connected
to either fshing line or balloon
strings.
Ginny Moser sent out an
email to island residents with a
description of the problem, and
one resident responded that that
he had seen the eagle entangled
in what he thought was seaweed
on the beach Saturday, which
put the timeline of entanglement
at over 30 hours, at least.
Many residents called in eagle
sightings. Both adults were seen
on their regular perches around
the island. In addition, the eagles
were seen feeding the chicks on
Saturday. By Sunday night, the
female was able to claw and chew
her way through the debris and
free herself.
Residents all over the islands
were relieved to see both adult
eagles, unencumbered, feeding
with the dolphins and Pelicans
near Dewees Inlet this week.
As sea turtle season
approaches, it’s a good reminder
that it’s worth keeping close tabs
on extra fshing leads and lines
(you can recycle them) and that
balloons and plastic bags are
dangerous to all sorts of creatures
when they accidentally end up in
the ocean.
PHOTOS BY JUDY FAIRCHILD
Dewees Eagle survives to fy another day
ENTANGL EMENT OF I SL AND BI RD RAI SES AWARENESS OF KEEPI NG T RACK OF F I SHI NG L I NES
BY JUDY FAIRCHILD
FOR ISLAND EYE NEWS
The female eagle was somehow entangled in a dead bird, that was connected to a
fshing line or balloon strings.
E
dgar Allan Poe/Sullivan’s
Island Library holds its
next book club meeting
to discuss Fever by Mary Beth
Keane at 10:30 a.m. Saturday,
May 17. Refreshments will be
provided, and the public is
welcome to attend.
“Fever” is a bold and intriguing
novel about the woman known as
“Typhoid Mary,” the frst person
in America identifed as a healthy
carrier of Typhoid Fever.
On the eve of the twentieth
century, Mary Mallon emigrated
from Ireland at age 15 to make
her way in New York City. Brave
and headstrong, with dreams of
being a cook, she fought to climb
up from the lowest rung of the
domestic service ladder.
Canny and enterprising,
Mallon worked her way to the
kitchen and found she had the
true talent of a chef. She seemed
to have achieved the life she’d
desired, until one determined
medical engineer noticed that
she left a trail of disease wherever
she cooked and identifed her
as an asymptomatic carrier
of Typhoid Fever. With this
seemingly preposterous theory,
he made Mallon a hunted woman.
In the imagination of Mary
Beth Keane, Mary Mallon
becomes a fercely compelling,
dramatic, vexing, sympathetic,
uncompromising and
unforgettable heroine.
Stop by the library to check out
the book prior to the discussion.
The Edgar Allan Poe/Sullivan’s
Island Library, located at 1921
I’On Avenue, Sullivan’s Island,
is a branch of Charleston
County Public Library. For more
information, call 843.883.3914.
Library book discussion
features Fever
BY MAGGIE DIEBOLT MOHR
FOR ISLAND EYE NEWS
WWW.ISLANDEYENEWS.COM
22 May 9, 2014
N
either cold, nor dreary clouds, nor drizzling
rain could keep Sunday early birds from
the annual Easter Morning Breakfast
hosted by the Isle of Palms Exchange Club on
April 20, 2014.
In just one hour, Exchange Club members
treated more than 150 residents and guests
from the Isle of Palms, Sullivan’s Island and Mt.
Pleasant to a delicious hot breakfast of pancakes,
sausage, scrambled eggs, grits, coffee, orange
juice, and milk.
The event was made possible by the collaborative
efforts of Exchange Club members and the event
coordinator, John Bushong. Members started
Saturday afternoon by arranging tables and
chairs and setting up the equipment for the next
day.
At 4:30 a.m. Sunday morning, the pancake
crew arrived, followed by crews of sausage,
grits, and egg cooks, and serving staff who had
everything ready and waiting by 6:50 a.m., when
the guests began arriving.
Club members say it is fun to work together
early in the morning to serve the community on
such a joyous and happy morning. And as for
the guests, they just love the tradition of Easter
morning with good food, family and friends.
The Isle of Palms Exchange Club is a service
organization, whose members raise money
through numerous community projects to
provide scholarships to deserving students and
to support organizations whose work is aimed at
the prevention of child abuse.
Club Members Alan Bowen, Bob Roth and Dimi Matouchev serve a hot breakfast to Easter early birds.
IOP Exchange Club hosts annual Easter Breakfast
BY RUTH THORNBURG
FOR ISLAND EYE NEWS
WWW.ISLANDEYENEWS.COM
23 May 9, 2014
ON THE WATER
"IT’S THAT TIME OF YEAR FOR TOPWATER TROUT
ACTION AT FIRST LIGHT"
~ Geoff Bennett
“W
ind again?” was
a familiar refrain
over the past few
weeks. Even blustery weather
couldn’t hold back warmer water
temperatures and the arrival
of bait. Seasonal species like
spanish mackerel, shark and
bluefsh were right behind. In
spite of the breezy days, anglers
have a lot to look forward to over
the coming months.
As water clarity slowly
improves, redfsh are eating
artifcial plastic lures, especially
those that mimic the glass
minnows so abundant in our
waters. Zman’s 3 3/4" streakz
in smokey shad is an excellent
choice. I pair this lure with a
1/8oz jighead. When possible I
try to bump this lure along the
bottom then pick it up sharply
once or twice with a fick of my
wrist. Often, the fsh will crush it
as it pops up.
It’s that time of year for
topwater trout action at frst
light. Heddon’s Super Spook Jr.
in their silver mullet color works
great, but my
favorite is the
chartreuse
and black.
Vary retrieve
speeds as you
work these
lures back to
the boat. Here’s a lure that you
should reel tight to the fsh before
raising your rod tip. Good luck
with that as a violent boil erupts
around your lure.
Spanish mackerel and
bluefsh are beginning to show
up especially in the harbor. If
you fnd schools of fsh slashing
across the surface, throw
refective casting jigs and reel
them quickly through the school.
Alternatively, if you know fsh are
present but not up top, try trolling
Clark Spoons at different depths
and different speeds. Remember
to check your leader often as it
only takes catching a few of these
teethy fsh to cut through it.
With the warmer water
temperatures, sharks have
returned to our waters. You'll
start to see the fns of bonnethead
sharks slicing through the water
as they seek out prey. Chunks of
blue crab or live shrimp both work
well on these predators. Fishing
for sharks can be a great way to
get younger anglers involved as
sharks are usually hungry and
put up great fghts.
See you on the water
Capt. Geoff Bennett operates
Charleston Charter Fishing
providing fy fshing and light
tackle charters. Clients choose from
a full menu of fy rods, artifcial
and live bait fshing options with
charters tailored to their desires.
USCG licensed and insured,
Capt. Bennett is committed to
providing a safe and enjoyable
charter to anglers of all skill levels
and ages. For more information,
call 843.324.3332, visit www.
charlestoncharterfshing.
com or email captain@
charlestoncharterfshing.com.
Fish are biting, and the water is clearing
BY GEOFF BENNETT
FOR ISLAND EYE NEWS
WWW.ISLANDEYENEWS.COM
25 May 9, 2014
PHOTO BY STEVEN ROSAMILIA
Charlotte Webster makes an airplane with recycled materials at the Poe Library on
Sullivan’s Island in honor of Earth Day on April 22.
TAKE HOME A LUCKY DOG
Lucky Dog Club
LDC
Ty is a handsome Staffe mix who is up for adoption at
Charleston Animal Society. Good on a leash and very playful,
Ty will make a wonderful addition to anyone's home.
Visit the shelter at 2455
Remount Road in North
Charleston, seven days a
week. Charleston Animal
Society's was just voted
Charleston's Best Nonproft
and is South Carolina's most
honored charity.
Ty
27 May 9, 2014
F
or the last four years
the Holy City Beard &
Moustache Society has
hosted the Southeastern Beard
& Moustache Championships.
The Championships run over
Memorial Day weekend, with
the main event on Saturday,
May 24 at the Music Farm, a
welcome party Friday at the
Recovery Room and a Sunday
brunch set for Holy City Brewery.
Last year there were
over 195 contestants, 700
spectators and over $6,000
raised for Lowcountry Women
with Wings. Contestants came
from as far as Texas, New York,
California and Michigan.
Women with Wings helps
women rise above ovarian
cancer. Every year 22,000
women are diagnosed with
ovarian cancer, and within 5
years, 15,000 of them will die.
There is no reliable screening
test for early detection of
ovarian cancer. The Lowcountry
Women with Wings program
was established by Terry
Scharstein, an ovarian cancer
patient, in partnership with the
Center for Women. Lowcountry
Women with Wings provides
education and support services
to women diagnosed with
ovarian cancer, their caregivers
and families. The Center for
Women offers programs on
legal, fnancial and family
issues as well as individual
counseling and support groups.
Categories at this year’s
competition include sideburns,
goatee, Donegal/Amish,
moustache (styled & natural),
full beard styled moustache,
college beard, full beard
freestyle, partial beard freestyle,
ladies artifcial (creative &
realistic), gray beard, full beard
natural (> 12 inches and < 12
inches). There will also be two
Best in Show Awards.
Find out more about the event on
Facebook: www.facebook.com/
events/547140208699079/
Get your
moustaches ready
C H A R L E S T O N H O S T S S O U T H E A S T E R N
B E A R D A N D MO U S TA C H E C H A MP I O N S H I P
BY PAUL ROOF
FOR ISLAND EYE NEWS
T
he First United Methodist
Church, Isle of Palms
invites families to a summer
event called Wilderness Escape.
Children will step back in time,
caravanning with Moses and the
Israelites as they escape Egypt.
Activities include participating
in an Israelite Camp, singing
catchy songs, playing teamwork-
building games, digging into
Bible-times snacks and visiting
Moses. Everyone will learn to look
for evidence of God all around
them. Each day concludes at
Celebration—a time of upbeat
worship that gets everyone
involved.
Wilderness Escape will run
from 9 a.m. to noon each day for
children Kindergarten through 5th
grade. Drop off and pick up will
be in the sanctuary. You can sign-
up online, go to iopmethodist.com
and click on Vacation Bible School.
First United Methodist Church is
located at 12 21st Avenue, IOP.
Call 843.886.6610 for additional
information.
Children and
adults are asked to
bring gently used
children’s books
throughout the
week. These books
will be donated
to Book Worm
Angels, to replenish
classroom libraries
already started and
to bring more schools
into their program.
First United offers
Wilderness Escape
this summer
BY CAROL KING
FOR ISLAND EYE NEWS