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Fort Worth Country Day • October 2013 • Volume 50 • Issue 1

OUT WITH THE OLD, IN WITH THE NEW
Administration plans for new athletic facility
I
n today’s rap-
idly changing world,
private schools
are forced to change
with the times or be
left behind. Fort Worth
Country Day’s new
Capital Campaign will
be benefcial in keeping
the school relevant and
updated by allowing
for renovation and con-
struction to take place
throughout campus, as
well as bolstering the
school’s endowment for
fnancial aid and faculty
salaries.
In order to ensure that
the students have access
to the best facilities pos-
sible, FWCD is planning
to construct a new feld
house, although no date
for construction has
been set. But according
to Head of School Evan
D. Peterson, the facility’s
location has already
been confrmed.
“The feld house will
be where the tennis
courts are currently, and
the tennis courts will
move across the street
to where the apartment
buildings used to be,”
Peterson said.
This move would
likely involve the school fling
with the city of Fort Worth
to close Bryan Henderson
Road to public access, making it a private drive.
More parking for athletic events would also likely
be added in this space.
The new athletic facility will contain a new
basketball arena with permanent seats as op-
posed to the pull-out bleachers currently in use.
Additional amentiies will include new locker
rooms, a new weight room, and two competi-
tion courts, one practice court, and training
rooms. According to Assistant Head of School
Steve Stackhouse, the new athletic facility will be
similar to facilities at Brewer High School, with
a team room and coaches’ offces similar to the
ones at Brewer. However, the school is still in the
“quiet phase” of the campaign.
The quiet phase of fundraising is the stage
Connall Mccormack
copy editor
NEWS BRIEFS
in which the school has approved a new project,
but is still gauging support and fnancial options.
As the administration moves forward, the goal
is to raise $21-25 mfllion to fund the new feld
house and focus on the School’s endowment.
While the new athletic building will be the next
construction project the school undertakes, many
more are in the works. According to Peterson,
the school willl look very different in the years
to come. While none of these projects will begin
in the immediate future and are not confrmed,
they are options that have been discussed.
One of the hypothetical options for campus
development is the demolition of the Round
Gym. If the Round Gym was removed, a facade
could be constructed in its place, leaving a grassy
area between the Lou and Nick Martin Cam-
New Falcon Portal Coming
Homecoming Festivities Tonight Financial Aid at $2 Million SPC Championships Nov. 8-9
H
omecoming week is fnally here! Be sure
to make it out to the 50th anniversary
football game at 7:00 p.m. on Friday
night. This game is huge. Not only is it the last
game of the season, but it is also the Battle of
Bryant Irvin, a longstanding rivalry. Come watch
the varsity football team defeat the Trojans and
enjoy food trucks, a jumbotron, and freworks
at the game. See p. 8-9 for more information.
The Homecoming dance is 8:30-10:30 p.m. on
Saturday night in the Upper School Commons.
Go Falcons!
A
lthough Friday night is the last regular
season football game of the year, the
rest of the fall sports teams will still
be competing throughout the next week. On
Nov. 8 and 9, the fall sports teams from all over
Texas and Oklahoma will be heading to Fort
Worth to compete for the frst place title in
SPC. The Upper School students will be out
of school that Friday, Nov. 8 so be sure to come
support your peers as they battle for frst place
in feld hockey, volleyball, football, and cross
country.
F
or the current school year, one in every fve
students is receiving need-based fnancial
aid, with more than $2 million awarded.
FWCD’s fnancial aid guidelines state that each
year our returning students are served frst. After
spring enrollment of new students K-12, the
fnancial aid committee meets a second time to
distribute remaining funds as available to new
students. Understandably, the returning students
make up the larger of the two groups. The fnan-
cial aid budget comes from the FWCD restricted
endowment.
pus Center and the Square Gym. A multi-foor
Lower School could be constructed that would
encompass Lower Schoolers as well as kindergar-
teners. The structure of the building would likely
parallel that of the Middle School renovation, with
lower grades on the lower foor and higher grades
upstairs. The Lower School could be connected
to the Square Gym, which would be used for P.E.
and recreational purposes since the new gyms in
the feld house would be so far away.
In the space vacated by the Lower School and
the Kindergarten, a new theater and perfoming
arts center may be constructed.
“We need a theater that can seat all our stu-
dents, not just 400,” Peterson said.
A new facility would likely have a capacity
of close to 1,000, making it far larger and more
usable than the current 500-seat theater. While
the visual arts facilities received an impressive
makeover when the Sid W. Richardson Visual
Arts Center opened, the performing arts class-
rooms as well as the Upper School remain some
of the most outdated buildings on campus.
Although it has been years since the Upper
School has been updated, there are no current
plans to make any changes.
“We’re waiting to see what happens with the
online classes,” Peterson said.
By waiting to see how technology and educa-
tion as a whole develop, the administration will
be able to renovate the Upper School in a man-
ner that maximizes its effciencey aud suits the
needs of both students and faculty.

S
ometime in the next few weeks, the tech
department will unveil the new Falcon Por-
tal. Although students have not been given
direct information how the portal will change,
teachers have been testing it out recently. The
new site will boast a fresh new look that mirrors
the Facebook home page and an easier naviga-
tion system.
“I didn’t have much experience with the
former Falcon Portal, but I like the updates. It is
much easier to deal with,” US math teacher Ravi
Pillalamari said.
The architect’s rendering of the proposed field house is planned to be constructed where the current tennis courts are. It will provide locker rooms for the
sports teams, among many other amenities, which will in turn give the student-athletes a more oonvenient walk to their respective fields. Photo courtesy of
Steve Stackhouse
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T
he fall of 2013 at Country Day has been one
of frsts. We have celebrated FWCD’s 50th
birthday, we have witnessed the boy’s varsity
cross country team win its frst meet, and we have ac-
cepted six students who previously lived in a foreign coun-
try who have brought their experiences into the Country
Day family. Keeping with the theme, this year FWCD is
offering a new set of classes. But they’re different: they’re
not only online, but they also include students from other
schools across the country.
The online program is associated with Stanford Univer-
sity and Stanford Online High School, and is called the
Malone Schools Online Network, or MSON.
The program is comprised of approximately 88 students
T
aking AP Spanish Language wasn’t enough for
Sawyer Stratton ‘15. He wanted something more,
something more exotic. This year, he is taking Arabic
I, a vastly different language from Spanish, French, or Latin,
the three languages FWCD offers.
“The alphabet is nothing like English,” Stratton said.
The language consists of random-looking shapes with dots.
However, they’re not characters, they’re letters. This is one of
the few similarities between Arabic and the English language.
They are both phonetic.”
Taking a language course online is a little different from
taking something concrete, such as a science or a math class.
The class meets Mondays and Wednesdays from 4:30 to
5:30 p.m., which makes it convenient for those students who
aren’t playing a fall sport. For Stratton, though, taking this
particular class sometimes gets in the way of cross-country
practice. Luckily, his personality allows him to always look at
the bright side.
“With such positive attitude towards learning, I don’t fnd it
annoying in the slightest,” Stratton said.
Even though the class interferes with athletics, the timing
of Arabic I can be be considered convenient in relation to
academic classes.
“Because the class is after school, it doesn’t interfere with
my other classes,” Stratton said. “It just adds more work.”
Since most of the work is done at home, Stratton is able to
focus as much as possible on learning the language at home.
This enables him to speak with the teacher during class,
so the professor can monitor his progress and fne tune his
speaking skills. The class is what Stratton calls an interactive
lecture, in which the teacher presents the material online,
where the students can see his every move, while speaking in
the language.
“Right now, we are still learning the letters, the phonetics,
This story offers five different perspectives on this year’s new virtual-classroom option, each with unique
mson offers students

¸

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Robbie Stackhouse ‘14, a Freedom, Democracy, and Rule of Law student, flips through a physical notes packet
while listening and watching his teacher on the screen at the front of the old Technology Office. Photo by Alex
Doswell
from 8 schools all over the U.S. By now, you may be
wondering how these students connect with each other.
The answer is a virtual discussion seminar setting made
possible by HD equipment from a company called Lifesize.
The physical classroom in which FWCD students take all
of their MSON courses is located in the old Tech Offce;
now, the Tech Offce is located in Seminar AB, which hugs
the round gym.
Director of Technology Steve Uhr serves as the technical
liaison between Fort Worth Country Day and Stanford
University, oversees the connection between the two
schools, and ensures that the system is reliable and func-
tioning.
“I work with the tech liaison at Stanford University and
make sure that the tech at Country Day works for both
the students and the school,” Uhr said. “I make sure that
the equipment turns on correctly, that it connects on time
and correctly, and that there are no problems with the
computers or software.”
With all these high-tech gadgets, students are able to
learn in a different way, in what’s called a fipped class-
room. This teaching style emphasizes the personalized as-
pect of education, and requires students to learn at home
or on their own. The courses utilize two new softwares
that make this possible: SABA and eCollege.
“SABA is more of an interactive software, while eCol-
lege is simpler to use,” Uhr said.
SABA was described to be a software that the students
how to write, and reciting the alphabet,” Stratton said. “He
lectures us the whole time, and we can see what he’s doing.”
One unique thing about the MSON program is that it is
wireless. Professors may be pulled from all over the coun-
try to teach the students of all the schools offering MSON
courses. This means that top-notch teachers are accessible to
FWCD students.
“My class is taught by a professor out of Egypt who also
teaches at Stanford University,” Stratton said.
Since the MSON courses are different from classes offered
on the FWCD campus in a physical classroom, missing class
could prove to be a dilemma for some students; however, not
so for for Stratton.
“I’m too perfect to miss class,” Stratton said.
The difference between an MSON course and one that
has a physical classroom and a physical teacher is the way in
which homework is given and completed.
Work for that night could range anywhere from a packet to
a simple handout. Most of the time, the students of the class
will fll out the worksheet, bring it the next day, and discuss
any questions they had over the material.
Grading is also an obviously critical part of taking a course.
Doing well in a class can be refected in a number of ways:
tests, quizzes, labs. In a language class, however, there is more
variability in what is considered a correct answer.
“I suppose we have completion grades,” Stratton. “Usually,
we will be given a handout and we’ll fll it out that night and
then bring it to class to show the teacher we did the home-
work.”
Regardless of how the class functions, Stratton has shown
genuine enthusiasm about the opportunity that has been
given to him thanks to the MSON program and FWCD.


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Zane Lincoln
editor in chief
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unique opportunities
insight into the five different classes FWCD represents within the Malone Schools Online Network program
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soon as the student created an account.
With the help of the online-classroom environment
and these two softwares, students enable themselves to
complete homework in class as well as allow themselves
to receive the most effective instruction with the teacher
during actual class time. Because the learning is done at
home and the homework done in class, the teacher and
the students are able to discuss any misunderstandings
they have.
The new teaching method has been embraced by all
the participating students at Country Day, and many of
them appreciate a different way of learning. Although this
is nothing new to FWCD, the program also boasts small
class sizes and emphasizes the importance of building a
Uhr said. “The courses require a lot of bandwidth.”
Although scheduling proved to be the hardest goal to ac-
complish in Uhr’s eyes, he believes the hard work FWCD
put into making these classes possible for the student body
paid off. MSON course-takers were given a survey, which
yielded positive results. The feedback Uhr got from the
surveys helped him better understand the many advan-
tages of offering courses like these: they are rigorous, they
require a lot of work, and they allow FWCD students to
engage with other students all over the United States. As
many universities today have online programs, taking an
online class as a high schooler only reinforces the fact that
FWCD is a college preparatory school.

comfortable teacher-student relationship.
It took a lot from FWCD faculty to make these classes
available to the student body. Uhr sits in on every class
each day, there for students whether they need his as-
sistance or not.
“Hopefully, by second semester, they will be completely
self-suffcient,” Uhr said. “I have had to adjust my calen-
dar a little bit this year., but I like to watch the different
courses, see how the different teachers teach.”
Fortunately, there haven’t many problems with the daily
process of taking an MSON course. However, there are
some diffculties that come along with providing such an
opportunity.
“It’s gone smoothly, but there have been a few issues,”
12
/
88
FWCD boasts 12 students taking
five different classes: Democracy,
Freedom, and the Rule of Law; Chi-
nese Five; Arabic One; Advanced
Abstract Math; and Introduction
to Organic Chemistry. A total of
88 students across the country are
involved in the MSON program for
the fall semester.
O
rgano chem. Organic chemistry. Some call it the
hardest class they’ve ever taken in college, but for
Malcolm McDonald ‘14, it’s just another class he’s
taking in high school.
The class focuses on exactly what a regulars or honors
chemistry class at FWCD doesn’t cover in depth. It studies
the chemistry of carbon bonds and how they relate to our ev-
eryday lives, incorporating chemistry’s practical applications
to medicine, various industries, and the environment.
“Right now, we are learning all of the prerequisites for the
course,” McDonald said. “So that includes understanding
how bonds form, hybridization, and orbits. We’ve also gone
over functional groups, which has helped a lot in my Biology
class as well.”
For him, there is a small price to pay for taking an MSON
course.
“I miss a lot of class,” McDonald said. “But, I usually don’t
have a lot of makeup work because I have a free period, and
the class lines up pretty nicely with my schedule. Most of the
classes I miss are taught by teachers with whom I share free
periods with.”
McDonald’s love for chemistry is defnitely evident, as he
took the AP Chemistry course last year as a junior, and is
now taking AP Biology as a senior. Now, he’s taking the next
step into the world of medicine.
“It’s nice because FWCD doesn’t offer Organic Chemis-
try,” McDonald said.
With this year’s new course offerings through MSON, stu-
dents like McDonald are exposed to subjects they would’ve
had to wait until college to study; now, they can take them in
the comfort of their own high school.
A
lso a BC Calculus student, junior Coleman Walker
‘15 is enrolled in Advanced Abstract Math; and the
class covers just that.
“We are currently talking about proving set equality and
countability and introducing fractals,” Walker said.
Although some students may have heard of terms similar
to these, like fraction instead of fractal or solution set instead
of set equality, they most likely have never covered anything
like this. Even Walker states that the course is meant to teach
exactly what a student hasn’t covered in traditional math
classes like geometry or algebra II.
“Considering it’s a class that is based on math concepts
not covered in high school, I was unprepared, but that was
expected,” Walker said.
However, unprepared may be a bit of a misnomer, consid-
ering the feedback Mrs. Wakeland, Assistant Division Head
of the Upper School, is receiving from the coordinators of
the MSON program. Wakeland boasts that FWCD stu-
dents are almost always the frst to log into the system, earn
exceptional grades, and seem to be very comfortable in the
new setting.
Getting accustomed to a new way of learning may prove
diffcult for some, but Walker is thriving.
“I defnitely like the relaxed attitude toward grades,”
Walker said. “Because it’s a new concept and technology and
has a few kinks, the focus of my class tends to lie more heav-
ily on understanding the concepts than the grades.”
By placing more of an emphasis on comprehension rather
than tangible rewards such as a good grade on a test, the
math class creates a comfortable environment for its students,
one in which they can explore mathematics without fear.
Like many other MSON courses, the Advanced Abstract
Math class utilizes the fipped classroom.
“We present homework problems to the class and go
Coleman Walker ‘15 works on his math homework during his Advanced Abstract Math class. Photo by Alex
Doswell ‘16
over the solutions,” Walker said. “After that [the instructor]
teaches everything we need to know to watch the homework
lecture and do the problems.”
The actual class is something that Walker really enjoys;
however, there are some things that could be changed in
order to make his junior year a little easier. As we all very
well know, junior year is defnitely a stressful one, as you
begin your college search, begin taking APs, and hopefully
start acquiring positions of leadership in fne arts or sports.
With all of the added weight, taking an MSON course can
be challenging in terms of scheduling.
“I miss a class every time [the MSON course is in session],”
Walker said. “It can be a little much at times, but I’m able to
make up the work. I’d prefer more even spacing [in between
MSON gatherings].”
Despite minor inconveniences, Walker thoroughly enjoys
the new environment offered by the Malone Schools Online
Network and believes it is a valuable experience. It has
proved to be a very encouraging, goal-oriented, and reward-
ing way of learning.
“I really want to improve my problem solving abilities and
rational thought process, and it’s defnitely helping,” Walker
said.
Expanding on the helpfulness of the program in his math
abilities, Walker invites and encourages other students to go
out on a limb and try something new or continue studying
something they already have a passion for.
“If a student is interested in the subject being taught, I
highly recommend they take the class,” Walker said.
FWCD students have all expressed their satisfaction with
the MSON course offerings, something that is manifested
in their praise from other teachers all over the country, their
grades, and their success in getting used to the innovational
virtual classroom.

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F
or years, students at Fort Worth
Country Day have attended classes
in the same rotating schedule format.
However, the FWCD school day could look
different in the upcoming school year.
“Although nothing has been confrmed, the
expectation is that there will be a different
bell schedule in the fall of next year,” Assis-
tant Head of Upper School Peggy Wakeland
said.
While no schedule has been approved, ru-
mors have been fying for some time. Many
of these discussions are the result of the
ISAS report and a consultant who met with
faculty, students and parents last spring. One
main purpose of these changes is to synchro-
nize the schedules of the Middle and Upper
Schools in order to allow for more interdivi-
sional activities and optimize the school’s use
of both faculty and facilities.
“The goal is to dedicate the faculty that
teach in both the Middle and Upper Schools
to one division or the other,” Wakeland said.
This designation of teachers in the math,
foreign language and fne arts divisions
would open up new scheduling options. The
school could potentially change to a fully
rotating schedule in which A and B periods
rotate as well if cross-divisional teaching was
no longer in play. However, this is not the
only option being considered.
“Another option that’s being looked at is
a 6-day rotation where students still take 6
courses with a free period,” Wakeland said.
Administration is also looking to maintain
the culture of the Upper School that brings
students together on a day-to-day basis for
announcements. With respect to block sched-
uling, extended class times of varying lengths
are also being considered.
“If we were to make the change to ex-
tended class times of 75 or 90 minutes the
school would offer inservices and workshops
to give teachers the opportunity to alter their
presentations for a longer class,” Wakeland
said.
While these changes would be a departure
from the normal routine of FWCD students,
athletic practices will remain unchanged.
According to Wakeland, the issue of sharing
athletic facilities with the whole school takes
altering practice times off the table.
All of these options are considered on a
weekly basis, as Assistant MS Divison Head
Chaka Cummings, MS Division Head John
Stephens, US Division Head Rob Hereford
and Wakeland present ideas and discuss
courses of action. While no frm deadline is
in place, the administration hopes to have a
plan in place by spring break, so faculty can
plan accordingly in the spring and early sum-
mer. No matter what is decided, the odds are
in favor of a slightly different experience
at FWCD for the 2014-2015 school
year.

CHANGE ON THE WAY
Administration Considers New Schedules for 2014-2015
connall mccormack
copy editor
This rotating schedule is one of several options being consid-
ered by the administration. Courtesy of Peggy Wakeland
The schedule banners that hang in the US
commons will have a different look next
school year. Photo by Ross Biggs ‘17
The Falcon Quill Online is the Upper School student website supplement for the Falcon Quill.The staff includes 14 students in the journalism class, which produces fve print issues a year and
maintains the Online Quill. Our former Yearbook DVD staff has merged with journalism, creating a video class which produces original stories for the Online Quill. The Quill newspaper
staff writes stories for online that are topical and current because the newspaper only comes out with fve issues a year. See more at: www.falconquill.org.
VISIT THE FALCON QUILL ONLINE!
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Baby Bliss
Catering
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mimi RyAN
section editor
Country Day welcomes new falcons
William Boon Teegarden
US History teacher Sara
and Blake Teegarden
August 16, 2013 at 1:25am
7 lbs, 3 ounces
19.5 inches
Teegarden will be returning
on November 18
Misha Jane Augusta Farda
Marisol and US History
teacher Brian Farda
August 15, 2013 at 9:05pm
7lbs, 13 ounces
18.5 inches
Gabriella Ilona Vecino
US English teacher Catherine
Collins and Mauricio Vecino
September 25, 2013 at 4:42am
6 lbs, 4 ounces
Collins will be returning on
December 9
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R
oom 213 has an exciting new air to it, and
students will feel it immediately when they walk
in to see Jordan Hampton, US math teacher.
Hampton is an FWCD alum and graduated in 2001.
Hampton never had a class in Mr. Hoover’s room, but has
enjoyed seeing some familiar faces from his high school
days, like Mrs. Robinson, Mr. Arnold, Dr. Aldridge, Mrs.
Hamilton, and Ms. Wakeland. Although Hampton and
Colin Douglas ‘06, US history teacher, both graduated
from FWCD, they never knew each other. Hampton is
married with a two-year-old daughter.
“Taking her to school today [for the frst time] was so
hard.” As a student, Hampton had no intention of return-
ing to FWCD, especially as a high school math teacher,
but while studying architecture and engineering at Texas
Tech University, he decided that sitting behind a cubicle
for the rest of his life would not be as fun as returning to
his alma mater. In high school, Hampton was a go-getter,
living a double life as the football jock and the band geek.
He showed his passion for football when he taught and
coached at Joshua High School for fve years, Brewer High
School for one year, and now at Fort Worth Country Day.
Hampton loves coming back to Country Day to teach and
coach the students. He has always loved watching and
playing sports and is a big fan of the Dallas Cowboys.
B
etween Maryland and Virginia lies the capital of
the United States: Washington, D.C. This is where
Andrew Thomas, US history teacher, met his wife,
as well as where he was hired for his frst job. He met his wife
while interning at Capitol Hill during his fnal semester of
college. His frst job was at the White House, working as an
assistant to the Chief of Staff of the Offce of National Drug
Control.
Since then, Thomas has taught history for ten years, and he
and his family (his wife and three children) have moved to Fort
Worth. Now, he can be found in Upper School room 211.
Besides his obvious interest in history and government,
Thomas also has a strong interest in Superman and baseball.
He proudly displays the well-known superman logo on his
coffee mug, and he has multiple pictures of his “favorite comic
book hero” on his classroom wall. His love for the sport of
baseball, on the other hand, is much more personal to him.
“It keeps me closer to my dad,” Thomas said.
Along with the multiple references to superman and baseball
found around his classroom, there is also a long line of col-
lege pennants hanging down the top of his walls. It is one of
Thomas’ goals to extend that line of pennants across his entire
classroom.
“These college banners represent opportunities in life...
especially outside of Texas,” Thomas said.
I
n one of the back classrooms of the Visual Arts
building is Lauren Cunningham, US art teacher.
For the students’ frst project there is a tower of
cardboard boxes in the middle of the room, surrounded by
easels and desks. At the front of the room is a small living
room like area, with a few chairs and a carpet, topped off
with a coffee table and books. It’s cozy, and she offers tea
to all of her students.
Relocating to Fort Worth from the “Peach State,” Cun-
ningham is Georgia-born, has a B.A. in Studio Art which
covers a wide range of the different visual arts from David-
son College in North Carolina and an M.F.A. in Sculpture
from the University of Georgia in Athens. She worked at
the High Museum in Atlanta, Georgia and the Georgia
Museum of Art on the University of Georgia campus
in Athens. There she worked as a preparator, someone
who prepares the art in the exhibits to be shown. Her art
has also been shown in juried shows, a show where work
is submitted to a panel and work is selected to be shown
in the exhibit, in major cities including New York and
Philadelphia.
Cunningham says there is a misconception of art teach-
ers and artists being messy.
“Let the art be messy and the room be clean,” Cunning-
ham said.
A good rule of thumb for high school students. She is
excited to be teaching at FWCD.
Lauren Cunningham instructs Nicole
Johnson ‘17 on a sketching activity.
Cunningham’s humorous personality
makes being in her class a fun experi-
ences. . Photo by Alex Doswell ‘16
Jordan Hampton ‘01 plays the trumpet during his
senior year at Fort Wourth Country Day. Luckily, he
chose to come back and teach at his alma mater.
Photo courtesy of FWCD
abby steinsieck
reporter
An expressive Andrew Thomas gives a lecture to an economics
class. It’s no surprise that Thomas teaches AP United States History,
AP Government and Politics, and Economics with his background
working in Washington D.C. His enthusiasm for history shows in his
interactive teaching style, as shown above. Photo by Alex Doswell
‘16
William Newton
reporter
Natalie Rosenthal
reporter
FWCD WELCOMES
Six New Teachers Start Their First Year at FWCD During our Fifieth Year
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T
oday the FWCD Upper School’s English depart-
ment has a very special new member, Daniel
Lancaster. Before coming to teach at Country
Day, Lancaster taught as an English teacher at Paschal High
School. He said that there was a difference in “professional-
ism” between the students at Paschal compared to those at
FWCD. Not only did Lancaster teach at Paschal but he also
taught at Western Hills and Tarrant County College.
When asked why he chose to major in English and later
teach he said, “I believe that English is everything, it can con-
nect to everything.”
He continued saying that English had always been his
strong suit and he could never teach math. Lancaster shows
the characteristics of a very dedicated teacher and someone
who loves what they do, being enthusiastic and ready to teach
every day. He has quickly captured the hearts of his students
and fellow co-workers.
Delaney Fleming, a sophomore, described him as “ one
of the best new teachers FWCD has had. He has different
thoughts that make his class entertaining.”
Lancaster is currently attending The University of Texas at
Arlington studying for his Ph.D. in English.
A
fter 23 years of living in Maui, Hawaii,
Sherri Reed, US Biology and AP Environ-
mental Science teacher, has moved back to
her home state of Texas. She taught at a private col-
lege preparatory school named Seabury Hall before
making the decision to move back to the mainland
to teach at FWCD.
For the most part, FWCD and Seabury Hall are
similar except for the fact that the campus is much
more open in Hawaii. How awesome would it be go
to school in Hawaii? At FWCD, most Upper School
students can be found socializing or working on
homework in the Commons, and in Hawaii all of
the students sit outside on the grass surrounded by
the ocean and colorful, tropical plants, both things
that Texas doesn’t have a lot of.
Reed has taught high school students for a total of
28 years.
“I teach because it keeps me young,” Reed said
with a smile. “Being with kids all day is so reward-
ing, and I learn a lot from them.”
Unsurprisingly, she misses the island life, the
beach, snorkeling, and being outside all day. Un-
fortunately, Texas weather isn’t always as pleasant
as Hawaii weather. Reed is also glad to be back in
Texas because she and her husband are much closer
to her parents, siblings, and daughter.
F
rom the moment I found out that Ravi Pillalamarri,
US math teacher, was from Maryland, I knew we had
a connection. Even though we were from different
parts of the state and I was only born there and lived there
for 7 months, I lived there long enough to recognize our birth-
place bond.
Pillalamarri went on a nationwide search for a new job last
year and felt that FWCD would be the best ft for him. He
teaches Accelerated Algebra 2, Calculus AB, and Modeling
Calculus. Pillalamarri says that teaching here is a totally dif-
ferent experience, but likes it a lot and says everybody is very
nice. He claims that it is totally different being able to rely
on the majority of the students to actually complete all their
homework, and also do it well.
“It is not an uphill battle every day discipline and academic
wise,” Pillalamarri said.
Pillalamarri said. With more persistent students, it makes
for a tougher teaching job as well.
“It is important that you keep up with your students because
they are moving at the same pace you are,” Pillalamarri said.
Having the luxury of being able to plan ahead is very nice.
He says that at his old school, even if you tried to plan ahead,
so many people wouldn’t do their work that it was often just a
game of catch up. Pillalamarri’s dry, hilarious sense of humor
make for a great FWCD teacher.
NEW FACES
Daniel Lancaster’s sophomore English class gathers around their beloved teacher
for a picture. Lancaster teaches sophomores and seniors in his English 10 and AP
Language and Composition classes. Photo by Alex Doswell ‘16
BriAnna OrdoÑez & Kate Nolan
reporters
ROss biggs
reporter
Olivia lincoln
reporter
Sherri Reed expands on a topic in her freshman biology class. She
teaches freshman regular biologyand AP Environmental Science. Photo
by Alex Doswell ‘16
Ravi Pillalamarri uses his smartboard to demostrate the lesson to the class. He
teaches Accelerated Algebra II, Modeling and Calculus, and AP AB Calculus.
Pillalamarri, although a serious and effective teacher, is also talented in that he
incorporates huumor into the lessons he teaches. Photo by Alex Doswell ‘16
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Fifieth Anniversary Homecoming
Katie Anderson
ads editor
Fort Worth Country Day celebrates 50 years of Falcon Spirit
2003
1981
1982
Activities for Friday, Oct. 25 at Rosacker Stadium
• Festivities begin at 5:00 p.m.
• Falcon Alley
- Photo Buttons
- Bounce Houses
- Prizes and Giveaways
• Jumbrotron featuring photos videos and photos
from the last 50 years
-North End of the Stadium
• DJ
-Michael Wittman ‘14
• National Anthem
-James Chilcoat ‘12
• Halftime- Homecoming King & Queen revealed
- Athlete Wall of Fame
- Alumni Cheer
• Food Trucks
- Gepetto’s (pizza), Salsa Limón, Good Karma (vegan),
Kona Ice, Sauzy’s (burgers), and The Lunch Box
• Fireworks and Pizza after the
game in the South End Zone
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Best Homecoming Asks of 2013
Best friends Margot Berry ’16 and Mary Catherine Bishop ’16 were asked together by another best friend
duo, James Ferguson ’16 and Aaron Lax ’16, with J Raes cookies.
John Fredian ’16 used his red hair to his advantage when asking Savannah Norman ’16. He presented a
“pot of gold” to her and said he would be the luckiest of them all if she went to Homecoming with him.
Carlyle Rascoe ’15 was asked by boyfriend Campbell Boswell ’14 during announcements by a bunch of
freshman boys holding up signs saying, “Homecoming, Carlyle?”
Robert Arnold ’14 recited a sweet love poem for Samantha Hughes ’14 during announcements.
Graham Pergande ‘15 asked Eliza Wagner ‘14 in a different way than most people. He secretly rode in the
trunk of her car on the way to school one morning, and jumped out of the trunk when she opened it yell-
ing, “Homecoming?”
Braquece Smith ‘14 asked Adele Elkind ’16 by serenading her with the hit song, “Someone Like You” dur-
ing announcements and having Tyler Steele ’14 throw a bouquet of roses down from the balcony for her.
Brodie Hyde ’17 ripped his shirt open Superman style to reveal “Homecoming, Anna?” written on his
chest when he asked Anna Puff ’17.
Ben Sankary ’14 asked childhood best friend Claudia Boyd ’14 by putting a picture of the two as babies on
a poster with the caption, “Let’s create this TBT, CKB will you go to hoco with me?”
Turner MacLean ’15 gave Lauren Wagner ’14 a bottle of Gatorade with a note saying, “I hope it wouldn’t
cramp your style if you went to Homecoming with me! Go win y’all’s counter today!” on the day of Falcon
Field Hockey’s frst counter.
Isaac Klein ’15 asked his girlfriend Ellee Conway ’15 with a sweet proposal with fowers saying, “Nothing
would make me happier than taking my ONE in a MILLION to Homecoming with me!”
Childhood best friends, Ben Sankary ‘14
and Claudia Boyd ‘14, are spending their
last Homecoming together. Photo by Lau-
ren Wagner ‘14
Mary Catherine Bishop ‘16 and Margot Berry
‘16 pose with their respected dates, Aaron Lax
‘16 and James Ferguson ‘16. Photo courtesy of
Mary Catherine Bishop ‘16
Fifieth Anniversary Homecoming
Alex doswell
photo editor
Fort Worth Country Day celebrates 50 years of Falcon Spirit
2003
1978
1987
1982
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All ARound
F
or the Avila sisters, this isn’t their frst
time living in the United States. Through-
out their lives, they’ve had the opportu-
nity to live in places ranging from Mexico City,
Mexico; Doylestown, Pennsylvania; Chicago;
the Philippines; and Fort Worth multiple times.
The reason for their constant moving around
is because of their father’s job. However, when
their father fnished his business in Manila,
Philippines, the Avila family moved back to Fort
Worth for good.
“This is the place that feel the most like
home,” Natalia said.
“There’s a lot of good food in America that
we didn’t have in the Philippines, but I really
miss the food there,” Rebeca said, “It was so
good.”
Both sisters agree that now that they’re older,
they have a lot more freedom to explore new
things to do in America. Rebeca plans on
going to college in the States and majoring in
flm, and Natalia is also planning on staying in
America for college, but is just living in the mo-
ment for right now.
“Right now, I’m just exploring it and seeing
all that this city has to offer now that I have the
ability to do so,” Natalia said.
M
anila, Philippines; Montreal, Canada; Hong Kong, China; and Zhengzhou, China. These are the four cities in which six new FWCD students, (Rebeca Avila ’15, Natalia Avila ’17,
Vincent Marquis-Cartier ’15, Philippe Roberge ’14, Ava Chen ’16, and Carleen Wenner ’15) previously lived before the 2013-2014 school year. These students all moved to Fort
Worth for various reasons: parent’s jobs, an overseas experience, or returning home. Although they all miss their former home, FWCD hopes to make these students feel as if this is
their home by the end of the year.
B
orn in Florida, Carleen Wenner ’15 has
spent the last nine years in Hong Kong,
China with her family for her father’s job.
However, Wenner is not in Florida at the mo-
ment because her family decided to move to Fort
Worth, where her grandparents live. Wenner ’15
is fuent in Mandarin Chinese, loves history, and
plays softball. When asked what she misses the
most about Hong Kong, Wenner had no hesita-
tion in saying her friends. During summer and
winter break, she used to travel from China to
America, but now hopes to do the opposite and
visit her friends in Hong Kong in the near future.
However, Wenner is excited about some of the
perks that America has to offer.
“I love the malls here, but the best part about
moving back here is defnitely being able to
drive,” Wenner said.
She plans to graduate from FWCD, but isn’t
sure what country she wants to attend college in
since she is bilingual. For now, America is happy
to have her back.
Downtown Hong Kong, Carleen Wenner’s home for nine years. Photo courtesy of Carleen
Wenner ‘15
Carleen Wenner ‘15 took this picture of a serene view in
China. Photo courtesy of Carleen Wenner ‘15
Rebeca Avila ‘15 is shown here with a friend from the
Phillippines. Photo courtesy of Natalia Avila ‘15
Natalia Avila ‘17 smiles with a friend n the Philippines. Photo
courtesy of Natalia Avila ‘17
A scenic water view of the Philippines. Photo courtesy of Natalia Avila ‘17
Alex doswell
photo editor
For six FWCD students, Fort Worth is a new city for them. But that’s not all that’s new; living in the USA is as well.
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W RLD THE
“Dentistry, like Falconry,
depends upon skill.
Your smile, like the Falcon’s Quill,
needs tendering.”
Hulen Family
Dentistry
4900 Overton Ridge
817.370.0065
FEATURING
Zoom In-Ofce
Whitening System

JESSICA H. BRIGATI, D.D.S
A
va Chen ’16 is unique from the other
fve students that have previously lived
internationally. Instead of moving to
America with her family, she came by herself as
an exchange student and is currently living with
the Parker family until she graduates in 2016
(Michael, MS Science Teacher; Lisa, Athletic
Offce Administrative Assistant; Erin ’12, Rea-
gan ’16, and Sawyer ’22.) A question many ask
Chen is why move to a different continent where
you know no one without your family.
“I decided it would be cool to have a new
experience to raise self-independence by living
in a new environment,” Chen said.
Initially, Chen looked at boarding schools on
the East Coast to attend, but found them too
competitive. She thinks the day school approach
is more typical of American society than board-
ing. Chen’s favorite parts about FWCD are the
athletic program and the interaction provided
by smaller classrooms. Chen loves living with the
Parker family and thinks the people at FWCD
are extremely nice and welcoming. However, she
does miss her friends and family, with whom she
chats online when she can. Next summer, Chen
plans to go back to Zhengzhou to spend time
with them.
Ava Chen ‘16 meets up with friends, out on the town in
Zhengzhou, China. Photo courtesy of Ava Chen ‘16
Ava Chen ‘16 takes a selfie with girlfriends before
class. Photo courtesy of Ava Chen ‘16
S
tepbrothers Philippe Roberge ’14 and
Vincent Marquis-Cartier ’15 moved
to Fort Worth, Texas over the summer
so their father would be able to have better
access to his job with the Van Cliburn Foun-
dation. The two are from Montreal, Quebec,
a place that is a polar opposite compared
to Fort Worth. Both brothers love to play
ice hockey in the winter, but are currently
excelling on the FWCD football team with
Vincent taking the position of running back
and Philippe at defensive end. Vincent is also
particularly fond of Texas weather, some-
thing that may come as a shock to those who
have lived here all of their lives. Philippe, a
senior, is looking in both Canada and Amer-
ica for colleges next fall, but Vincent thinks
he’ll return home come time for him to go
to college. During winter break, both boys
hope to see their family that stayed behind in
Montreal, but for the time being, they plan
to work on the English language and enjoy
being on the varsity football team.
“It’s really different in Texas than it is in
Montreal, but FWCD has a school spirit
that’s unlike any school in Canada,” Roberge
said.
Vincent Marquis-Cartier ‘15 and Philippe Roberge ‘14
post-win at a home game earlier in the season. Photo
courtesy of Philippe Roberge ‘14
Philippe Roberge ‘14 joins his soccer teammates in Quebec. Photo courtesy of Philippe
Roberge ‘14
Vincent Marquis-Cartier ‘15 misses his mother, who stayed in Que-
bec with his other siblings. Photo courtesy of Philippe Roberge ‘14
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Whiz Quiz
Garrett Podell
online editor
Whiz Quiz sponsor Spencer Smith and William Newton ‘16 enjoy a moment of lighthearted-
ness afer Newton successfully answers a question. Photo by Alex Doswell ’16
Seniors Mathew Leonard, Ryan Hunt, and
Malcolm McDonald share a laugh during one
of Whiz Quiz’s meetings. Photo by Alex Do-
swell ’16
All are Welcome
I
n the past 15 years, the Whiz Quiz team has been passed
around like a “hot potato,” according to current sponsor,
US English teacher Spencer Smith, but he is now happy
to build a new team. The team met with much success while
Science Department Chair Sharon Hamilton was the spon-
sor, so Smith is hoping to recreate some of that success.
When building a team, the ideal way to go about it is to
build it around people who have an area of expertise in
which they excel. For example, a team could have someone
who balances chemical equations in their sleep; someone
who knows everything about America dating back to the
year 1764; someone who eats, lives, and breathes sports; and
someone who performs ballet because four people go up in a
match at a time.
“Anything that could be considered an academic subject is
fair game as well as pop culture,” Smith said.
Schools can have alternates and multiple teams. At a com-
petition, FWCD can take one team of six to seven students,
or two teams of 10-12 total.
“It’s like coaching anything else because you have to put
in your best teams with your most knowledgeable players,”
Smith said.
Substitutions come into play more than people would think
in a Quiz match.
“We lost only one match last year, and the coach subbed
a guy in at the end,” Smith said.
Veteran Quiz team member, William Nober ’14, shed
some light on a common misconception about the Whiz
Quiz team.
“They never ask us about dates. It’s usually like obscure
history, current events, sports, really anything, so anyone
can make the team because every person has a different
area of knowledge,” Nober said.
One time in a Whiz Quiz competition, Kenzie Knox ’15
was part of a team that was asked a question about ballet.
“I was so excited because it was me and a bunch of guys
up there, and I was the only one in ballet,” Knox said.
“It was so fun because I was the only person who had a
remote idea what the answer was, and I happened to get
the question right.”
So, whether you are fascinated with sports, music,
literature, history, or ballet, step right up and give Whiz
Quiz a try.
“They never ask us
about dates. It’s usu-
ally like obscure history,
current events, sports,
really anything, so any-
one can make the team
because every person
has a different area of
knowledge.”
-William Nober ‘14
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817-336-HANG • www.hangmans.com
Travel through
Hangman’s in
complete darkness,
armed with only one
small fashlight
per group!
Flashlight Night
Sun, Oct. 27th!
Tickets Available
Online!
Open Every Fri & Sat,
thru Nov 2
Plus Nightly
Oct 27-31
7:30 pm til 12 am Fri’s & Sat’s
til 10 pm all other nights
2013 North Forest Park Blvd.
On I-30, one mile west of
downtown Fort Worth
Unhappily
Ever After...
The End
This is the 25th anniversary of Hangman’s, and
your last chance to attend this haunted house which
benefts several charities in the Fort Worth area. It
will be closing after this season. It’s bound to be the
scariest yet! Don’t miss out!
See Mrs. Wallace for discounted passes, $10 each.
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In honor of the 50th anniversary, Home-
coming, and Battle of Bryant Irvin, Jr. Torres
‘15 drew a series of comics for the Falcon
Quill. In past years, Torres has contributed
other drawings; however this year, he was
easily inspired by the history of the school, the
long-time rivalry between Fort Worth Country
Day and Trinity Valley School, and the iconic
atmosphere of Homecoming.
Tyler’s Teepee
Collegiate athletes deserve to be paid
Texas A&M Aggies quarterback Johnny Manziel (2)
smiles as he walks to the bench afer throwing an
interception during the first half against Alabama at
Kyle Field in College Station on Sepember 14, 2013.
Alabama would go on to win 49-42. Photo by G.J. Mc-
Carthy/MCT Campus
Tyler Steele
managing editor
E
lectronic Arts Sports and Collegiate Licensing Com-
pany have settled all claims brought against them by
plaintiffs in the joint Sam Keller and Ed O’Bannon
lawsuit over the use of college athletes’ names, images and
likeness on September 26. More than 100,000 athletes will be
eligible for compensation at varying amounts depending on
each class members’ claims, said Rob Carey, an attorney for
Keller, the former Nebraska and Arizona State quarterback.
EA, which announced it won’t produce its 2014 college foot-
ball video game, reached similar settlements in cases brought
by former Rutgers football player Ryan Hart and former
West Virginia football player Shawne Alston.
“This is as profoundly disappointing to the people who
make this game as I expect it will be for the millions who en-
joy playing it,” Cam Weber, the general manager of Ameri-
can football for EA Sports, wrote on the company’s website.
There has been a never-ending debate concerning the
legal rights of collegiate athletes to receive payment for their
services to the college. These athletes rake in millions and
millions of dollars for the universities and don’t see a cent of
it. Many will argue that a free education is more than enough
to compensate for their athletic commitment to the school.
I, on the other hand, think that is blasphemy and extremely
simple minded. While I believe this lawsuit against EA was
unnecessary and quite devastating to millions of people,
including myself, who love the college football video game, it
was a small step towards players getting paid for their work.
The most recent story about player proft is regarding Tex-
as A&M quarterback, Johnny Manziel, and his alleged sale
of autographed footballs at the BCS National Championship
between the University of Alabama and the University of
Notre Dame on January 7, 2013. Manziel is one of the most
immature and polarized fgures in recent college football
history, but why should he not be allowed to proft off of
himself ? It was reported he earned over 7,500 dollars selling
the autographed footballs. It was proven to be a false accusa-
tion, but even if it were true should it matter? It’s absurd that
the players can’t beneft from their athletic success.
The NCAA seems to try their hardest to make the lives
of the athletes diffcult. Players aren’t allowed jobs because
the NCAA fears they’ll make more than others will because
they’re football players, but it’s ok for the university to proft
off of every aspect of the player. The removal of these
ridiculous rules and regulations would be a huge step towards
progression. The least the NCAA could do is allow its more
productive athletes to beneft from a few of the principles
that have helped coaches, athletic directors, media compa-
nies and the NCAA president get rich. One way the NCAA
could accomplish this is that every time an athlete’s jersey is
sold, take a small percent of the cost and place it in a trust.
Schools wouldn’t use the plan to offer improper incentives to
recruits, make a rule that the school can’t sell a player’s jersey
number until the player has spent a non-redshirt year in the
program. No one will buy the jersey of a player who doesn’t
produce. Then, when a star athlete exhausts his eligibility
after a career spent racking up stats and selling jerseys for his
school, pay him the money in the trust. The NCAA needs
to closely re-evaluate their rules and regulations, and allow
player to see some profts from their success.
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GO FALCONS!
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anaging editor
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Over the last couple of years it’s become a habit for underclassmen,
who don’t have off campus for lunch, to have their parents bring them
lunch from various restaurants. Before the school year was started the
lunch group idea was disbanded by administration. It’s unfortunate for
the underclassmen because lunch group really was a fun thing to be a
part of and probably helped keep the load of the entire Upper School
off of the Fischer Dining Pavilion during lunchtime. I’m sure the stu-
dent body would like to see it back in the future.
Here we are in the 2013-2014 year and many of the printers around
the Upper School are still slower than my mile time which I assure you
isn’t impressive. It seems as though the printers are either waiting until
the end of the world to print or have formed minds of their own and are
throwing their cartridges away to mess with us. There are few consistent
printers around the Upper School and it would be appreciated if their
were more effcient printers for everyone who spends much of their day
in the Upper School.
After the Upper School got rid of the old bell system that warned the school
of potential weather danger, the students were introduced to the PA system
that allows M
r. Slayton, head of security, to specifcally identify the hazard or
danger and voice it to everyone around campus. The new system features the
voice of a security guard directing the student body in a direction and tells
them where to go to ensure their safety. It’s kind of scary to have a loud voice
come through the ceiling to tell us what to do in an emergency.
The Falcon Quill Online, directed by Garrett Podell ‘15, Kyle O’Brien ‘14, and Robbie Stack-
house ‘14, was offcailly unveiled earlier this month. It features a great collection of stories and
videos about subjects pertaining to Upper School student life in the FW
CD community. The website
will also have updated sports scores from teams on the JV and Varsity levels after games, student
polls, and more timely news and feature stories. Visit www.falconquill.org weekly for new and up-
dated stories, and follow us on Twitter @
falcon_quill to fnd out when we update the site.
Bob W
ood, the long-term substitute for US History teacher SaraTeegarden while she’s on
maternity leave, has been extremely popular with students during the frst three months of
school. “At the beginning of class every day, he provides us with words of wisdom by either
using the letters of the alphabet or quotes from Regina Brett,” Caroline Cameron ‘16 said. He
is not only a great teacher, but a person of inspiration for his students. W
ood looks out for his
students and makes sure they are always on top of their school work and having a good day as
well. He is one of the most approachable teachers to seek out for help on an assignment and is
always prepared to give great suggestions to help students.
“Almost, M
aine” was not your typical play, as it contained many vignettes of varying degrees
of relationships. The play was brilliantly performed, as all of the actors sold their characters ef-
fectively, especially the old married couple of Amanda Stephens ‘15 amd M
ichael W
ittman ‘14.
The play also walked the fne line of what is okay to show in a school productions as there were
some comical sexual innuendos between Branson Nelson ‘16 and Katherine D’ Souza ‘16. All in
all, the play was a masterful performance that showed that love comes in all different shapes and
sizes.
The Ballstreet Journal is one printer in M
rs.
W
allace’s room that takes its own sweet time
to deliver a page. Photo by Alex Doswell ‘16
Post-performance, the “Almost, M
aine” cast took pictures and signed autographs for
fans. Photo courtesy of Natalie Bracken ‘05
The new PA system in the Upper School Sci-
ence Building is used to announce dangers to the
students and faculty of the school. Photo by Alex
Doswell ‘16