You are on page 1of 51

"lily learned so much in our home- about being a family member, being a dog, being worthy.

I will always be bothered that she never learned how to run or really how to play. But she
learned how to love and be loved and for that, there are no words. She changed our lives
forever.
Lily died on May 13, 2008 at the age of eight- about half the life expectancy for an Italian
Greyhound. Martha, she died as a direct result of the neglect she suffered for seven years in
your care. How many others have suffered the same fate?
This industry has been hidden far too long. The word is out, the days are numbered. People
like you will soon venture out into fields of honest work and leave the care of God's creatures
to those of us who truly love them."
Theresa Strader
Mifl Dog Rescue
May 15,2008
Dear Martha,
It's been fifteen months
since you and I first met.
More than likely, you
remember very little about
me. After all, we met in
your world, on your
property in fact. Since that
day, elements of your world
have become a very big
part of mine. For that,
myself and many like-
minded people are very
thankful to you.
In February 2007, I received an email- "50 Italian Greyhounds in need" and with that, a phone number.
Having had a lifetime affinity for the breed, I called the number to find out what the story was and how I
might be able to help. I'm certain you know where this letter is going now.
Yes, February 17, 2007, after 40+ years, your kennel would be going out of business. Time to retire and
relax after four decades of mistreating dogs. Five hundred and sixty one dogs would head to the auction
blocks that day, 49 were Italian Greyhounds. It was without question that I would help, though I must
admit, I had no idea what I would come to learn through the process. Due to transportation issues, I
realized that if I were to be of any use to these dogs, I would have to drive out to Lamar myself. So, on
the 16th of February, my daughter and I headed to Missouri.
Understand, I've been involved in dog rescue essentially my entire life- fostering and placing homeless
dogs, caring for sick or injured dogs, assisting overpopulated shelters, etc. I have always known about
puppy mills and pet store puppies but have never shared my home with anything other than rescued
animals. For the record, I AM NOT AN ANIMAL RIGHTS ACTIVIST. What I am is a person who believes in
the right to humane treatment for all living things.
Martha, what I witnessed on your property was far from humane. Hundreds of terrified ailing faces,
imprisoned in their wire confines, some staring at me, but most too fearful to look into my eyes, so
unsure of how to interpret human contact. That experience has caused me countless sleepless nights
and to this very day, the sadness and the fear in their eyes haunts my very being.
I am completely aware that you were operating well within USDA standards- what a despicable thought
that is. I am also aware that in your circles, commercial breeding dogs are considered livestock. Dogs are
not livestock, Martha. Thousands of years ago, man domesticated dogs to be our protectors, hunters,
herders, guardians, but most of all, our companions.
I came home with thirteen of your dogs- nine Italian Greyhounds, two Dachshunds and two Papillons.
Not a single dog that I had cared for in over 25 years of rescue work came anywhere close to the
physical and emotional damage that your dogs had suffered. As it related to rescuing dogs, the next
several months would become the education of a lifetime for me.
The entire purpose of this letter though, is about just one of those dogs, the one who would find her
forever home here with my family ..... #251- AKC registered "Reedgate's Swift Motion". Oh, the irony of
her name- Swift Motion- an Italian Greyhound who was never able to run. Caging her for her entire
life stripped her of ever having enough strength in her legs to experience the joy of running. A cruel
reality for a breed built to run.
In our home, we cut the chain from her neck, replaced it with a soft collar and named her Lily. At the age
of seven years and one month Lily had been set free.
Lily was one of several of your dogs that was missing her lower jaw. I wonder how you might explain
why so many of your dogs were suffering from this condition. I wonder if you were ever concerned
about their pain or perhaps about how they were able to eat enough to stay alive. I wonder how many
died in your care from the results of this condition. I wonder if you even noticed. I'm very certain you did
notice one thing beyond the rotting faces though- their ability to produce puppies. That' s what your
business is all about- producing puppies, at any expense.
Lily became an absolute treasure in our home. Despite her many health issues and her extreme fear, in
time, with lots of love and care, she found her courage and when she did, no one was immune to her
love. Men, women and children brought to tears to hear her story and to have the untold pleasure of
meeting her. Lily's life was no longer about what she could do for you but instead, how we could make it
up to her in a warm and loving home.
It was agonizing for our family to watch her suffer through four surgeries to remove mammary tumors,
to attempt to repair her decaying face and to spay her- removing the papery black, pus filled organ
that was once her uterus. How selfish of you never to see her pain, just the dollars.
Directly because of your gross neglect, every meal Lily ate was a struggle. We tried so many foods and so
many different ways to make it easier for her to eat. But in the end, she had to do it her way, the way
she learned at your place, the way she kept herself alive for you- picking kibbles out of her bowl, a few
at a time with her feet, spreading them around the floor, then rubbing the "good" side of her face along
the floor to catch a kibble on her tongue, then extending her neck upwards and swallowing it whole.
Think about that, Martha. How would you like to eat just one meal that way?
Do you remember sitting in my car when the auction was over? The guys were gathering up the dogs
that I had "won". You said to me, "I just love my Italian Greyhounds". Oh, the thoughts that went
through my mind when those words came out of your mouth. You don't love any dogs, Martha. What
you did was spend more than forty years of your God given life using dogs for your personal gain. No
regard to their physical or mental well-being, just cashing in on their ability to reproduce. Think about
the thousands of dogs that passed through your hands- you robbed every single one of them of the
simple joys they so deserve. A good meal, a warm and comfortable place to sleep, medical attention,
and most of all, a human companion to make their lives whole.
Lily learned so much in our home- about being a family member, being a dog, being worthy. I will
always be bothered that she never learned how to run or really how to play. But she learned how to
love and be loved and for that, there are no words. She changed our lives forever.
Lily died on May 13, 2008 at the age of eight- about half the life expectancy for an Italian Greyhound.
Martha, she died as a direct result of the neglect she suffered for seven years in your care. How many
others have suffered the same fate?
This industry has been hidden far too long. The word is out, the days are numbered. People like you will
soon venture out into fields of honest work and leave the care of God's creatures to those of us who
truly love them.
Theresa Strader
Contact Us
Voicemail:
(719) 495-7679
Toll Free:
(888) 495-DOGS
Email :
info@milldogrescue.org
Mailing address:
National Mill Dog Rescue
PO Box 88468
Colorado Springs, CO 80908
Puppy Mill Dog Sales in Delray Beach, Florida
Contents:
Letter: Theresa Strader National Mill Dog Rescue
Article: Palm Beach Post, Mass breeders ship thousands of puppies to Palm Beach County, Treasure
Coast
HSUS List: Delray Beach Puppy Mill Dog Sales from their "Horrible Hundred" commercial breeders
(Included here are the sales documents filled out in the store's own handwriting from Waggs to Riches
and submitted to Palm Beach County Animal Care and Control as well as Veterinary Inspection
certificates verifying delivery of the dogs from these "Horrible Hundred" commercial breeders to Waggs
to Riches)
HSUS Conversion Print out: A way to help pet stores that sell puppies switch to a more humane model
ASPCA Letter: To Mayor Glickstein Re: Retail Puppy sales in Delray Beach
HSUS Letter: To Delray Beach City Council Re: Sale of puppy mill dogs in pet stores
This is an extensive report from December of 2010, in which the Palm Beach Post says Kim
Curler, the owner of Waggs to Riches, knew one of the commercial breeders she used was a
puppy mill and she no longer used them.
Breaking news starts here
Posted: 9:21p.m. Saturday, Dec. 11 , 2010
Mass breeders ship thousands of puppies to
Palm Beach County, Treasure Coast
Stores unaware of citations
Most of the breeders did not respond to repeated requests for comment. A person answering the
phone at the Lourances' kennel said simply, "If you are talking about puppy mills, then you are
not talking to me."
But breeder Donna Brown, whose USDA reports contain minor violations over a three-year
period - rust on a cage side where puppies had peed was one - points out that some negative
comments by USDA simply reflect the day-to-day realities of farm life. "When you live on a
farm, it's ongoing, all the time, with repairing and improving and painting and welding. It's just
constant repair." And at Little Pals of Boynton Beach, owner Donna Erickson says, "She has
sold me wonderful, wonderful puppies." Pet store owners who agreed to speak with The Post all
said they were unaware ofUSDA violations by suppliers. "If they don' t have a license in good
standing, and if problems are not corrected, then that is not something we would want to deal
with," said Alan Garson, co-owner of Palm Beach Puppies and Boutique in Boca Raton and
Palm Beach Puppies of Wellington, where puppies are kept in baby cribs and European doggie-
designer clothing hangs from the walls.
"I will not use them anymore," Top Shelf Puppies owner Debora Vanoort said of the Lourances.
"I didn' t know" about the USDA violations. " And Waggs to Riches owner Kim Curler
emphasized she used Fletcher Creek only one time and no longer buys puppies from the kennel.
A spokesman for Tiny Paws, who refused to identifY himself but stated that he spoke on behalf
of the owners, said ofbreeders with violations: "You live and you learn. There are some bad
ones out there and we try to stay away from them. "
Mass breeders ship thousands of puppies to
Palm Beach County, Treasure Coast
A puppy is dipped in insecticide intended for livestock at Kathy Bauck' s kennel in New York
Mills, Minn., in this video provided by the Companion Animal Protection Society. Bauck was
found guilty of three misdemeanor counts of animal torture and one of animal cruelty in March
2009, around the same time a puppy belonging to her husband was sold to a Palm Beach County
pet store. Bauck said she was set up by the photographer and never mistreated animals. This
image was taken from video that aired on WBBM-TV (Channel2) in Chicago.
Photo taken at Allan R. and Kathy Jo Bauck's Pick of the Litter kennel in New York Mills,
Caged shih-tzu puppies in a garage in suburban Lake Worth. The dogs came from puppy
breeders in Missouri. The owner voluntarily gave custody to Palm Beach County Animal Care
and Control.
Allan R. and Kathy Jo Bauck's Pick of the Litter kennel in New York Mills, Minnesota.
By Pat Beall and Jennifer Sorentrue
Palm Beach Post Staff Writers
What Susan Marik wanted was a healthy, teacup-sized pug puppy with a good pedigree - and
no puppy mill in its history.
What she got from a Boca Raton puppy boutique was 4-pound, 11-week-old Molly, loaded with
germs, in need of oxygen treatments and born in Missouri, the puppy mill capital of the nation.
Molly' s travels are part of a puppy pipeline from the Ozarks to South Florida, one that has
brought thousands of sometimes-sick puppies from mass-breeding operations to local pet stores.
At least 2,500 puppies were delivered to Palm Beach and St. Lucie counties from out-of-state
breeders in an 11-month period examined by The Palm Beach Post.
Roughly one in three of those came from breeders or distributors cited for problems by the U.S.
Department of Agriculture, which oversees wholesale dog breeding. Citations varied from
keeping animals in too-small and rusting cages with exposed nails or wires, to caked feces, to
infestations of roaches and other insects that covered the walls and ceilings of kennels. At one
operation, which delivered 82 puppies to area pet stores, USDA inspectors found multiple sick
animals in need of veterinary care. Two had to be euthanized. In dozens of cases, kennel owners
averted USDA inspection entirely by not being on site when inspectors showed up.
Pet sales nationally are a $2.2 billion business, according to the American Pet Products
Association, fed in part by growing demand for "teacup" -sized dogs. It's not known what
percentage of pet store sales of puppies are dependent on mass-breeding operations. However,
"it's definitely in the millions" of dollars nationwide, said Kathleen Summers, manager of the
Humane Society of the United States' anti-puppy-mill campaign. "If you consider that if (broker
and distributor) Hunte Corp. alone sells 85,000 puppies a year, and if they are making a couple
of hundred dollars per puppy, then you are at $16 million a year and that is just for Hunte."
Wire cages, imperfect rules
Eight area pet retailers received puppies from troubled breeders. Those contacted or visited by
The Post all emphasized that their puppies come from USDA-certified breeding operations. And
some pet stores, such as Petland, use middlemen with few USDA violations.
Brokers, though, may be buying from breeders with documented problems.
Molly, for instance, came from B&T Distributors, a broker with no major USDA citations.
However, B&T got the puppy from Missouri breeder Vicki Nelson. Within weeks ofMolly' s
birth, a USDA report on Nelson' s operation during a pre-license inspection found crowded cages
that did not have enough room for dogs to "sit, stand, and lie in a normal manner and to tum
about freely. " The inspector also noted that outdoor enclosures were rusty and dirt-covered, and
some had sharp edges.
Such inspections are not a perfect science: The USDA employed just 99 inspectors in 2008 to
examine 5,720 licensed breeders and brokers across the nation. Further, some sellers in The
Post's review of sales records were not listed as licensed by the USDA, avoiding any inspection.
And sellers who deal directly with buyers over the Internet are not federally regulated.
Even a clean USDA bill of health may not mean much, a recent federal audit suggested, because
the agency has done such a poor job of policing, fining and supervising puppy breeders. And
revoking a license is rare, sometimes taking years to complete, while a breeder may continue to
do business.
Also, "USDA regulations allow a medium-sized dog to spend her entire life in a cage the size of
your refrigerator with several other dogs, and the breeder is in full compliance," said Marcy
LaHart, an attorney who sued Puppy Palace in Boynton Beach on behalf of a customer who
bought a sick puppy. The case was settled out of court.
"Commercial breeders typically house their dogs in unheated wire cages, and USDA regulations
do not require that the dogs ever be allowed out of those cages to relieve themselves or get
exercise," said LaHart. "Not daily, not weekly, not ever."
Some items commonly cited by USDA inspections of breeders selling to local pet shops might
seem small . But matted hair leads to skin sores. Puppies whose paws become stuck through too-
large holes in the floor can break a leg. And then there are rusted, broken or protruding cage
wues.
"One of the most common things we find in puppy mills where we do rescues are dogs with
missing eyes due to the jagged metal on wire cages," said Tim Rickey, senior director of field
investigations for the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals. "These dogs
frequently have a 2-by-2-foot box to live in. Ifthere is jagged metal, it is guaranteed to injure the
animal at some point. Those are pretty significant infractions."
Serious USDA violations
Certain breeders delivering puppies to Palm Beach County had more serious problems,
according to USDA reports from 2007 to 2010. Among them:
Karen Brunkhorst, Armstrong, Mo.: Repeatedly averted USDA inspection because no
one was home. Litter of puppies walking in soupy wet feces; some with extremely
splayed feet, likely from nutritional deficiency. Two adult mastiffs taller than their cages.
Two adult golden retrievers in same shelter without enough room to sit, stand or move
about freely. Local sales: Palm Beach Puppies in Boca Raton and Tiny Paws in Port St.
Lucie.
Cheryl Moudy, Seneca, Mo.: Sharp wires in cages, feed bowls contaminated with caked
food dust and feces from top cages leaking onto bottom cages. Local sale: Kim Hayes,
who sells puppies from her home.
Brandi Cheney, two sites run by her or her mother; Milan, Mo. : In outdoor shelters, 73
dogs lacked bedding, despite temperatures near zero at night. Local sales: Palm Beach
Puppies in Wellington and Boca Raton, Star Pups in Royal Palm Beach, Sophisticated
Pup in Lake Worth .
Mary Ann Susalski' s Fletcher Creek Kennel, Little Falls, Minn. : 189 dogs in enclosed
buildings with no fans to offset temperatures that rose to 87 degrees or more. Numerous
dogs had seriously overgrown nails, which can lead to lameness. A litter of fi ve puppies,
each measuring about 13 inches in length, kept in a 46-by-30-inch pen. Local sale:
Waggs to Riches in Delray Beach.
Darlene and Robert Lourance, Duncan, Okla.: Dental rot, eye infections, lacerations. Two
dogs euthanized. Flaking rusted cages, feeders with rust or holes, outside wire floors with
a large accumulation of feces. Insects, including cockroaches, in the food, on the walls
and ceiling . Chickens in coops on top of puppies. Jagged broken wires . Local sales: Top
Shelf Puppies in Royal Palm Beach, Tiny Paws, Star Pups and Palm Beach Puppies.
Kathy Bauck, New York Mills, Minn.: Convicted on four misdemeanor counts of animal
cruelty and torture the same month her husband was selling a puppy to Palm Beach
Puppies.
Individuals also may purchase directly from a breeder with troubling USDA records. A West
Palm Beach man and St. Lucie County woman each bought a puppy from Diane Swearingen of
Missouri. Inspectors at the kennel found a beagle with a days-old, inches-long leg wound
exposing the dog' s muscle. The morning after temperatures had dipped to 27, a dead puppy was
found among a litter of week-old terriers living outside.
The puppy pipeline is heavily dependent on brokers who deal directly with breeders and buyers.
But middlemen can have problems of their own. The Hunte Corp. , one of the nation' s largest
puppy distributors, delivered more than 100 dogs locally, mostly to Petland stores. Hunte was
cited in 2008 for too-small cages.
Two lawsuits brought by former out-of-state Petland franchisees alleged Hunte delivered
truckloads of ailing puppies. And last year, a division of Hunte agreed to pay the Environmental
Protection Agency a $56,600 fine for selling insecticide intended for hogs and cattle as a flea and
tick remedy for dogs. The company did not admit wrongdoing in the settlement. The crowding
cited in 2008 was alleviated in a matter of hours, Hunte said.
Stores unaware of citations
Most of the breeders did not respond to repeated requests for comment. A person answering the
phone at the Lourances' kennel said simply, "If you are talking about puppy mills, then you are
not talking to me. "
But breeder Donna Brown, whose USDA reports contain minor violations over a three-year
period - rust on a cage side where puppies had peed was one - points out that some negative
comments by USDA simply reflect the day-to-day realities of farm life. "When you live on a
farm, it' s ongoing, all the time, with repairing and improving and painting and welding. It's just
constant repair." And at Little Pals of Boynton Beach, owner Donna Erickson says, "She has
sold me wonderful, wonderful puppies." Pet store owners who agreed to speak with The Post all
said they were unaware of USDA violations by suppliers. "If they don' t have a license in good
standing, and if problems are not corrected, then that is not something we would want to deal
with," said Alan Garson, co-owner of Palm Beach Puppies and Boutique in Boca Raton and
Palm Beach Puppies of Wellington, where puppies are kept in baby cribs and European doggie-
designer clothing hangs from the walls.
"I will not use them anymore," Top Shelf Puppies owner Debora Vanoort said of the Lourances.
"I didn' t know" about the USDA violations. " And Waggs to Riches owner Kim Curler
emphasized she used Fletcher Creek only one time and no longer buys puppies from the kennel.
A spokesman for Tiny Paws, who refused to identify himself but stated that he spoke on behalf
ofthe owners, said ofbreeders with violations: "You live and you learn. There are some bad
ones out there and we try to stay away from them. "
To be sure, not every local pet store relies on mass-scale, out-of-state breeders. Some rely in part
on local "hobby" breeders.
But local pet stores said using out-of-state breeders remains necessary - and in some cases,
preferable to local breeders. "There are just as many problems with local breeders," Vanoort
said.
Pat Boyd, a boxer breeder and president of the Jupiter-Tequesta Dog Club, said local hobby
breeders, prevented by local law from breeding more than 19 puppies a year, cannot keep up
with the demand for pure-bred animals. "I am not a fan of pet stores selling dogs, but there is no
way the hobby breeders can keep up with any of this," Boyd said.
Little dogs, big bills
USDA regulations require that a veterinarian examine puppies before they' re shipped for sale,
and every puppy coming into Florida from out of state has a vet sign off on its health. In
addition, most pet stores advise buyers to have a veterinarian check out the puppy within 48
hours of purchase.
Palm Beach Puppies' Garson emphasized that Molly the pug had been cleared by a vet as healthy
enough to fly to New Jersey to her new owner. "But sometimes when you ship a young puppy,
the flights are stressful, and unfortunately they can get sick. " The pug was healthy when he
received her, he said, regardless of any USDA violations on the breeder' s part.
Yet buyers who wind up with puppies from large-scale breeders also may wind up with large vet
bills. That' s because such ailments as kennel cough and parasitic infections have been linked to
intensive breeding in close quarters.
"Structural or genetic deformities are also common and are a result of poor breeding practices,
primarily inbreeding and breeding animals with known genetic issues such as hip dysplasia,"
said the ASPCA' s Rickey.
The kennel that sold Barb Sciandra's Missouri-bred Y orkie, Mitzy, got a clean bill of health
from the USDA, but, said Sciandra, the puppy from Star Pups was ill from the outset with kennel
cough and sores on her neck, ailments that helped push vet bills to more than $1,500.
Pam Ratfield said of her own puppy from Star Pups, "We noticed right away he was not feeling
well. " The puppy had kennel cough and giardia, a parasite that interferes with a dog' s ability to
digest food. As the dog' s condition worsened, "We really thought he was not going to make it. "
Star Pups paid for the weeks of vet care needed to nurse the puppy back to health.
Palm Beach Gardens resident Brittney Flynn purchased a pug-beagle mix - a puggle named
Moxon- from a Miami-Dade County pet store. The puppy was sick the day he arrived home,
and soon developed pneumonia requiring a nine-day veterinary hospital stay. He pulled through,
and is now a therapy dog. The Oklahoma breeder who originally sold Moxon was named in a
lawsuit brought by another local pet owner whose puppy was sick.
"I have learned my lesson and as much as I love my dog, I will never buy a dog from a puppy
store again," Flynn said. "I refuse to put any more money in the system of puppy mills."
Palm Beach County commissioners, meanwhile, are poised to discuss a law calling on puppy
stores and distributors to disclose more information about the animals they are selling. "It would
require pet shops to give a purchaser very detailed information about the pet' s dealer and
breeder," said Assistant County Attorney Shannon Fox.
Pet stores would be required to place placards on cages disclosing where the puppy was born or
bred. And puppy brokers who sell out of their homes would be required to tell consumers where
require pet shops to give a purchaser very detailed information about the pet's dealer and
breeder," said Assistant County Attorney Shannon Fox.
Pet stores would be required to place placards on cages disclosing where the puppy was born or
bred. And puppy brokers who sell out of their homes would be required to tell consumers where
the dog came from. "It would let consumers know absolutely who the broker or dealer
middleman was so they could have the opportunity to research it themselves," Fox said.
Palm Beach County Commissioner Shelley Vana, who is pushing for the county ordinance, said
many consumers simply don' t understand that pet-store puppies are frequently shipped in from
large out-of-state breeding operations.
"I think if people knew they were getting puppies that were born of a mother that has never seen
the light of day, they wouldn' t want that puppy," Vana said. "People don' t know."
Staff writer Adam Playford and researchers Michelle Quigley and Niels Heimeriks contributed
to this story.
How this report was done
The Palm Beach Post examined thousands of puppy health certificates filed every time a dog is
brought into Florida. The certificates, signed by licensed veterinarians to show pets are healthy
and vaccinated, list who brought the puppies into the state, their destinations, breeds and ages.
However, the certificates are not reviewed by the state. They are simply boxed and filed .
Staff writer Jennifer Sorentrue sorted through thousands of certificates filed between June 2009
and April with the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services in Tallahassee.
The Post found 2,718 dogs brought to Palm Beach, Martin and St. Lucie counties but removed
adult dogs and greyhounds from its analysis. Some certificates were incomplete or illegible.
Staff writer Pat Beall cross-checked the breeders who sent two or more dogs to Palm Beach or
St. Lucie counties against more than 100 U.S. Department of Agriculture inspections.
Staff writers Hana Engroff, Annette Jones, Holly Baltz and Liz Balmaseda contributed to this
report.
Not only are there pages and pages of records filed with Palm Beach County Animal Control listing sales
of puppies from puppy mills in Delray Beach, we found proof of sales of puppies to Waggs to Riches
from six of the Humane Society's worst of the worst, their " Horrible Hundred" commercial breeders
(Included here are the sales documents filled out in the store's own handwriting from Waggs to Riches
and submitted to Palm Beach County Animal Care and Control as well as Veterinary Inspection
certificates verifying delivery of the dogs from these "Horrible Hundred" commercial breeders to Waggs
to Riches)
They include:
Audrey Rottinghaus
Krystal and Sandra Rottinghaus
Darlene and Charlene Koster
Lori lee Thomas
Kimberly Coleman
Johana Abernathy and Terri Schnieders
OF THE UNITED STATES
A Horrible Hundred
Problem Puppy Mills in the United States
In recent years The Humane
Society of the United States
(HSUS) has assisted in
rescuing almost 10,000 dogs
from more than 50 different
puppy mills across the
country. While The HSUS
stands ready to assist law
enforcement with closing
down illegal puppy mills
whenever feasible, there
remain an estimated 10,000
puppy mills across the United
States, and many of them are
legal. Although most of the
dogs at these mass-breeding
facilities have no real quality
of life, living continually in
small wire cages with little or
no personal attention,
exercise or veterinary care,
there are very few laws to
protect them as long as they
are being provided with food,
water, and shelter.
Many dogs at Royal Acres Kennel in Magnolia, C, -ere
dachshund suffered from paralysis as well as secondar.
body along the concrete. With the assistance of e
dogs from Royal Acres in February 2013, including is
home. But authorities declined to close down the pu
sell puppies online. /The HSUS 2013
But hundreds of puppy mills can't-or won't-meet even the most basic mini
Some facilities have been cited repeatedly by federal or state departments o agri
dogs who had not been treated by a vet, keeping dogs in filthy conditions, s bjectJ
cold or stifling heat without adequate protection, performing invasive surgeri es o
veterinary license, and even in some cases shooting their unwanted dogs.
This report is a list of some of the nation's dog breeding kennels that are of hi gh co ce o -
repeated problems with animal health or animal care. It is not a list of all puppy mills, nor a of a
problematic facjlities. The li st does not include other problematic puppy mill dealers, s c as :::r e-s a-:
stores, nl ess the operators are also breeding dogs.
e Horribl e Hundred The Humane Society of the United States, May 2013 I CONTENTS
Legal name: Audrey Rottingaus
Customer No. 33821
Certificate No: 48-80313
Certificate Status: Active
Status Date: Aug 20, 2008
Photographer. R. Bacon
Legal Name:
43-9-0313
Photo T
UDREY R OTTIN HAUS
en
Tue. Jan 10. ' 12 300P
1nspect10 1112121123057Q
Description: Front photo Cf Sh tzu I 018 tx:l7 w ~ dental disease
Legal Name (DBA): Krystal Rottinghaus
Customer Number: 324943
Certificate Number: 48-A-2120
Certificate status: ACTIVE
Status Date: Oct 8, 2010
Photographer: R. Bacon
Photo Taken: Tut. J.an 10, '12 300 P
Inspection: 11121211230579
Legal Name:
UDREY ROTT1 GHAIJS
Description: Chihuahua I 087 123 018w h ao open wound on r ~ t h.Jnd stde.
48- EHl313
Under Rottinghaus, there are a series of violations. Note in Oct 2010, they canceled their
license.
There are horrible reports on this entire family. Lots of evidence AND Delray Beach suppliers.
Audrey Rottinghaus I Wendy Pets- Seneca, KS: Dog's Head Trapped in Broken Cage, Family
History of Failure to Care for Dogs
In 2012 alone, the puppy mill linked to Audrey Rottinghaus, Wendy Pets {48-B-0313), was cited
for several dogs in need of veterinary care, including a limping dog and a dog with an open,
swollen wound; housing so unsafe that a Yorkie's head was found entrapped in a gap in a cage
lid, and initially refusing to let a federal inspector photograph a dog with oozing
11
blackish
discharge" coming out of his ear, among other problems. Wendy Pets houses more than 100
dogs and puppies. USDA #48-B-0313
Krystal and Sandra Rottinghaus- Seneca, KS: Repeat Violations for
Emaciated and Limping Dogs
During her last routine inspection in April 2013, Krystal Rottinghaus was cited with a
11
Repeat,
Direct" noncompliance by USDA inspectors for numerous dogs in urgent need of veterinary
care, including several lame and limping dogs, a shih tzu who was so thin that her
11
backbone
and hip bones were protruding," a Boston terrier with lesions on the surface of his eyes, and
other erious repeat violations.
In April 2012, Krystal Rottinghaus was cited for 5 dogs in need of medical care and several
issues with unsafe housing that could injure the dogs. Krystal and Audrey {USDA licenses 48-A-
2120 and 48-B-0313) are believed to be the daughters of Kale and Sandra Rottinghaus. Kale and
Sandra Rottinghaus. Kale and Sandra essentially transferred their previously essentially
transferred their previously licensed puppy mill, which had been cited again and again for
horrific animal care violations, into Krystal's name on October 5, 2010. Since then, conditions
clearly have not improved. Sandra Rottinghaus remains closely associated with Krystal's
business. In June 2011 Sandra signed a Kansas kennel inspection report that noted an
emaciated dog, a limping dog, matted dogs, and rusted and unsafe housing. According to the
most recent records available from the USDA, more than 600 dogs and puppies are confined in
the puppy mill. USDA #48-A-2120.
Truck.
Certft::ate of Veterlnry Inspection
Kansas Animal HeaCtn Department
Companion Animal
712 Kansac Ave Suite 48
Topeka, Kansas 66603-3808
Perm\t *
454721
Safe
Consignor. Audrwy Rottinghaus USDA# HOBBY
1377 144th rd
ConsJgnee:
waggs to rtches
Seneca, KS &6538 505 e atlantic ave
delrav beach, FL 33483
Mlmala In tttl1 shloment are a0dlnlata4 tD "" .,., aftd ._,.._511f .,_ \o S-f'. ant too
youn9 for 111blu vcx:lnatton, exa=pt Wlflerw notlld on lrtdi1dual ntCDPIII end IN not hum en area under q\larwntlne for
... bill.
USDANumbllr Sex
llreed CoiDr
OA02020055 F 8 weeks Cock A Poo
TotaJ Number: 1 Species: Shipment Purpose: Pets
\. ... " 11n 'ft'ttll'lnal'lan \'hat \'he abcve nlmali l!ava been 1r11peded by me a net that tttey are not: aho"'na
stgn of lnf'l!t.tlous, mnblgloua, lftd/or comrnuniCIIble cllteha, 111herw nobld). The wcctndons end results of
the test arw Indicated 1111 the hJith 11terd. To 1M Octt or my kncnlleiiJJe, the nJm.u. .br.Jt on Jlt.W o.rtlftc:a
1t1t1 of daantton and .. qul .. rnents. No rnnty It mde or
-
Date: Ttne: SlgnatuN:
Reference
Number:
111

453038
CWI_. k41f'ltlr11Yh ra*rt
eca .... Animal Haith DePirtlnent
Comp.nton Anlnwt

T!P!!f!, ICIInaa 11103-3108
TNCk '-mit#
Consignor: RDttlnghluB USDA# HOBBY
13" 1+tt, 111
C:O..Ignee
ptortches
Sal a
seneca, ICS 1&538 505 e atlntlc eva
ct.lll'lly beech, A.
Mlrfta .. IR tltltl ....... tllt , ........... 111ft,._... ..._lrP IM ..... ., -- ,...._ .. ena ...
,. ..................................................... _ .. ,.... ...................... .
---. .
. ..... :
.......... , __ .... -.r .............................. ., ......
tt t:-...,_u: 1 , .... -.(c r,c...,.._..J. ,.. ...... ..,.,,.. ........ ,
....... , 7 - .._._._, ...... -., ................................. ..
.... ., ..................... ............. ----......... !IIIH.

Frnfotto fCS IIC27
.......... .
...... "
.... ,.,, ,.......,.., II&Wl4111# ,_, t >e _ ... .,.,, . ,
t"\ \ 1 \ (_\ } \3 C\<eciY'f\ k-tJM
:P:>Pt 6 \ 20 I (o D00 L\ \ I \
lt.f<.#tt Qd
0- l{:M53 8
T Qu&J<
\<QL\3 Bee\ c."", VL-
( exJJ \;) w "' -1-Lj \)\ C\('? I (J'U\d Ya {2.:\:,
iLt( 6 'COS I \ .-? .g;.Or:!-0 1(Q t5ZP'0
B-retede:e. f.- mmfe,v eJ rn

N 1J 4\\\CJLa- 'r&;L-
Ct:,\\(\'\. PN W4 B.t(1c..\r\ I t'L 36r\\
' f t j\ 2 1 1 Q\.oe '-'\ v A
u"-n 3J16/I:J oos 4 itt /I.)
rl.txlu
1
(,h_,R.k- t qos 5t> U l UD t '3
t l\'Q.. rri . .. . . . .
lO'Ql(; wrot-e Ct j -eoca


02/ 23/ 2013 20 : 29 FAX

lgJ 001
454376
Cert;lllcate of Vetarlnary lnepection
Kansas Animal Health Department
Companion Animal
712 Kansas Ave Suite 48
Topeka, Kansas 66603-3808
Truck Permit #
Consignor: Sandra Rottinghaus USDA# HOBBY
1122.128th Rd
Seneca, KS 66583
sale
Consignee:
. waggs to rtd1es
505 e atlantic ave
delray beach, FL 33483
Animals in l:tlis .;hlpment are acdlrnftad to above S5F and below45Df dOIIII'I to 50f, Animals are tno
young vaodnltlon, C'l(cept \tlllerw notad on Individual reauds and aN not from "" area under quarantine ror
rabltt.
USDA Number Sex 8.-.ed Color
OA02053863 F 8 weeks Paperanlan
Total Number: 1 Species; Shipment Purpose: Pets
I certifY, as an acredltld veterinartan that the above wnlm hve been IO$pected by me ancl that they Dn!l not hoAng
slgnc of lnf'ettious, enttglotu:, and/or com m unlea ble disease, (exr:l!pt \till ere noted). The Ylla:inatlons and resuh:l Of
the tilt trt IndiCated PO the ttmrd. To the best of my kncwtdgc, the animals liSted on thie certificate !T'e't tne
state of destlnatkm and federllll.ntcratate requlremenbl. No WBrranty Ia macle or impliad.
' .
Veterlnarllln SignatuN
La8t Feed and Wter recelvadl
Time: Signature:
Date Vet Code
Reference
Number:
WaggstoRiches
5612728101 p.3
[t)._ \'&{;/i- er J?lrL.!.f un.a.rt_es M a-/17/ J 3 Blat?/ tlll h 1'1-t-, u<-l1
DC< it : t-f I t7/13 005: 5/.3-K /13
P&lli'J ltwy -FJ"1 /VJCX(LC;
1t1 o w s&-w
PurcJJ.c..Jer : e.. . s 'iJLitf t/it@_in la.,
. Boyn-roh fL :33L-J3t;
fv!oru e r 3/1'7/1 B!au::. f tOvfj 70-JS
[)Oftl": S/ {/OS: 5/3//13
Breeder$> JUne SnidOW Po Box 134-, (jcUt .
M 0 w 4 (.J)t-f I
fiA YtMOSer-- : l5CVLk70A..Cl; . 7o Fv deJ--- POf/ld J2o/F
. . ... . . . /0i'ddl tr()h J Mit . ()Jq'-1 ':1 . .
------- -- -- --- --- --- - --- I
i
Legal Name: Charlene Koster, Darlene Koster
Customer Number: 6013
Certificate Number: 48-B-0271
Certificate status: ACTIVE
Status Date: Sep 8, 2004
Darlene and Charlene Koster/ Rainbow Ranch Kennel- Minneapolis, KS:
Received Official Warning from USDA for Animal Welfare Violations In September 2011, Rainbow Ranch
received an Official Warning from the USDA for violating the Animal Welfare Act regulations. This
warning cited six non-compliances from different inspections during the years 2009-2011, including a
direct noncompliance for failing to provide veterinary care. This issue refers to a June 2011 inspection
where the inspector found ten animals in need of immediate medical attention: a Chihuahua who "has a
sagging appearance to his lower jaw," five boxers and a pug that "have wounds at the base of the ears"
with flies buzzing round them, a schnauzer that had a wound on the left side of his body that oozed a
"thick, bloody discharge" when the inspector palpated it, a Boxer with "patchy hair loss on her chest,
shoulder areas, and sides," and an English Bulldog that had a " pink, fleshy mass in the corner of the right
eye."
This facility has been monitored by The HSUS since 2007, when it was cited by USDA inspectors for
having dogs in 86 degree temperatures without adequate cooling measures and several dogs without
adequate shade. In more recent years, the kennel has neglected to allow access to USDA inspectors
upon three of their last four attempted visits, a waste of inspectors' time and taxpayer dollars as well as
a serious violation of the Animal Welfare Act regulations. USDA #48-B-0271.
http://www. human esociety .org/ assets/pdfs/pets/puppy _mi lls/100-pu ppy-mi lis-report. pdf
The teeth have a build up of brown and black matter. (May 15, 2011)
Koster, Charlene & Darlene
USDA License # 48B0271
Breeds Pug, Boxer, Shih Tzu, Golden Retriever, Bulldog (English), Beagle, Pug mix, Schnauzer,
Bloodhound puppies in Minneapolis, KS
USDA Inspection Notes from June 20, 2013 (unless otherwise noted), 92 photographs [Inspection notes
under photograph]
(June 28, 2011)
(June 28, 2011)
Outdoor enclosures with sharp points where the boxers access their water bowls (June 28, 2011)
The enclosure housing a Boxer and her puppies has an accumulation of hair, food and debris in the
corners (June 28, 2011)
?urclz-dSl!,r' S497.ds
.. 33c.f3'/'
J ')/Yl

12./b r-1
7 Jq '//;'-!JY3 I s7p /13 -
tS .
.
Jk./a/1 i.L? ;sp/J
c!.,? U:-8Yb
'/Jlpt,.(// po o )Vl ;)-/_?-? /1 . .
'f n , 5/3/1.3 DOS . s (4/ ;3 -11:-- O'-:y3 t I
V' 7;>&6 Mo
,..-

c-a_. M l/'1 t1?a rc/o / 533;;r &/'lo#'"tL UJa_'f
LU-ice 11.-'" rL 3 3'-14> 1
--/11 !t3 .
I 1!)0 ft \.(I '1 I I . ()DS 5 I I 2/13 -
/:!:oS-ier- lc /66

[)rem .. . Ga>dn.ev 213'( !Zt.<.-r--
_!);;eace. . P-5-- i . 3
Legal Name: Lorilee Thomas
Customer Number: 324086
Certificate Number: 48-B-0329
Certificate status: ACTIVE
Status Date: Jun 11, 2010
Thomas, Lori 4880329 11-12 reports. Over 1,000 dogs- SEVERAL VIOLATIONS
AUGUST 27, 2012: Governor Sam Brown back appointed Lori lee Thomas as a member on the Kansas Pet
Animal Advisory Board. Read more about the Kansas Dept. of Agriculture at
http://www.ksda.gov/animal
Kansas Pet Animal Advisory Board Lorilee Thomas Board Member- Animal Breeder (785)873-3517 Term
expires: June 30, 201417454 K-9 Highway Whiting, KS 66617 Lorilee Thomas, Whiting, is the owner of
Puppies Extraordinaire, LLC, and acts as a liaison between retailers and professional breeders. She also
owns Royale Kennel, Inc., and manages a staff of 11 employees. Thomas is a licensed animal breeder
representative.
Legal Name: Kimberly Coleman (TLC Kennel)
Customer Number: 11169
Certificate Number: 43-A-4973
Certificate status: ACTIVE
Status Date: Oct 3, 2006
Kimberly Coleman/ TLC's Kennel- Clinton, MO: Fined $8,250 by USDA TLC's Kennel has more than
300 dogs and puppies, but USDA inspectors were not able to check on their welfare in January
2013, when the operator failed to make the facility available during regular business hours for
inspection (a violation). Previous violations at the kennel include dogs in wet or freezing weather
without adequate protection, including 37 dogs which the inspector noted had "soiled or wet hair
coats," and dogs kept in rusty enclosures with holes in the flooring, strong odors and flies
throughout the facility. In 2010, the operator entered in to a settlement agreement with the USDA
and was fined $8,250 for violations of the Animal Welfare Act regulations. USDA #43-A-4973.
# ..
Waggs to Riches
S}i !pD.O fh j/'1 }r3 B r,ncJ/JL-
. o t A : I.D J "3 J J .3 OD s : '.D J g / r.?

C1i.J+.onf11't/
1
mLJ
Purd-w ttr: EJ J -e.n Utplan
Ciubs,d C 1 r-cle.,
5612728101
p.2 .
15oc:a
'-"=-- r

-e- "i IJ -:1 [5)&}( 1Tt:1n PFJ-0 1 .rc -s -or


o.c.A- : ttb. <tit,. DDJ '. Jol /S'}rJ

' Lf (;:_ t./06 eei
El rn.o
f I : W. f1;) lt.t Y1 . l--J DU(JJ'YWl,Yl
I
I
I
I
I
I
. I
I
f/p]Lj L dO t 3
1Ju ,L-fl U Y . ?at&Le-fk v-dJ
. (}C)l/ b ;11frt . Y)/ . ;4(;/ (
- ..
. .
L\S Rc\ \'\-k O.t\'2Pn
. t \&"{& '0QSe... \j t?O i l f 'R?Ci lY\ JA OJ}O lifCJ '3 'fo
" Don <11Lj D')0 4./ 4Jt3 - .
. l:tn'\, d-..qctAJf, Ycb
ec nas.e ?. _ A:\vl Vi D.u Y1 rJL _ .
.. L\] '21. t:crh.J'\!B c. I \\J\ \) '2005+
N\6Q\( ,-e._ F \ l1t.a I \ s \0-lK tq Yl. CfJ'Db \C\ 35
o)f\ :J/2>\)13 txJS<:4..fi.Q]I3 .
: _ . . .
_ _ .. 1 'd-W> :?-- 1 c, o )41...-1-er rno
V\ V1 .. _ .. . . . .. . . .. .
rt
1
eoc.a. . e&-wY.\ fL.
- ------ ----- ------ ----------- .. ------- -------- --- -- ------- -- -- --- - I
Legal Name: Johana Abernathy, Terri Schnieders
Customer Number: 7946
Certificate Number: 73-A-2671
Certificate status: ACTIVE
Status Date: JullS, 2013
Legal Name: Johana Abernathy, Terri Schnieders
Customer Number: 7946
Certificate Number: 73-A-2444
Certificate status: CANCELLED
Status Date: Apr 30, 2013
Pictures from this breeder
Abernathy, Johanna and Schnieders, Terri
Quapaw, OK
USDA Licence # 73A2444
USDA Inspection notes: April 26, 2011, 9 photographs [No inspection notes]
Waggs to Riches 5612728101 p.2
#{.J.i...T-poo M Ar/U<..OT y,jt'8( 13 tfDI'-+fl 'f3?t.fl
V"A: tl/ l (I 3 (iS
]yeeJ<UL . f;:J/ln-1-U:. . zJc;c rYJo
?.o-\h pe(.l_c.J.- l=L
Jo,< "'td"' r Arr t ,.f" 1 .-; 41= .,....., , .A
td-jt3{ 1? P(d-'+( l'S
-
1
.l
0 1
s &'-to ok:-. r43ftt'S
vr : ' ( 5c...h ,...;cde...fL.'S
. yl;;.rc. 'DiN 0-j tOo Af{;;,;l,; 9 a.
M . .GAo d.d.Y.'3'5(c.Y
'D:>A-, 1 t3 .
B . 0 1\. ' 1'-' '* '( t..Pe ' \:l. r{ e... .. I> f-.'< l<> I' 1<. AN% (, 7.<f:>-O
furt.<c\IASJ2. : f'<M. y HA<2.T J?l <>"'-""" T;"e. f'A<-K :>.>" CA 'l<J l'$'f
t/ 1"\A-L-G?oo M A f 1<-twT .-:;f:F 0 <.!-5'54-4
U,Pr: \\/t"1./t3 'Dos.
I-!,< e"' .\<> rt- . fb f4,,4{e.. 7-;J-&0 Fit- .9-/'76 4'ic'
00
6 S/b<rl
. T..J'j {e:\,t.O<..utl- .3<nt llr. &.St ?.,1 ... P-.h javki'J) R..
1 ;H'tfl>
\J F f.-tE"a.L.G' to/4/ t1
t3 'DoS . td-( ;)l/'3
. t>fYI<:<_J<> r 30fod Cov"-1<, <tJ '5olt"' """gt,.o <::ltriA1>J\o
S u.G Artu.S.e> LA:J'3)(1
-JMALTBIF 1"'1 t,.J '!1- oM.;>.<>Bd.3?'l ,.._
DoA-: voS . .
1
:>-/IC{/
. t'2-u..Tt\- Sr.Jc t> i;}.'-l 3.....:> i ocT1tflJ> As 13.u.rt..'( A-to (oL(
. S he..l\0 ;J.o w. tJ'/
P
I' , SOS Eosl /'.t nnl ic Avenue Q.-ol
.one 561.2/l.8l00 tax 511 2./"u l OI .... rcyacach. "l orida33Mi3
' L u v;wv.; \voggst 1 J or c 'es.com klmfl'woggstonches c
We would like to suggest any pet stores currently selling puppies from puppy mills in Delray Beach
contact the Humane Society of the United States (HSUS) and seek their assistance in converting into a
humane pet store, where everyone in the city can visit and shop without supporting the torturous
conditions the puppies left behind where they were bred.
Puppy-Friendl y Pet Stores : The Humane Society of the United States http://www.humanesociety. org/issues/puppy _mills/facts/puppy _fri end ...
1 of3
APRIL 30, 2014
Puppy-Friendly Pet Stores
We support the stores that don't support cruel puppy mills
The Humane Society of the United States
Alsip Home & Nursery in St. John, Indiana,
converted both stores to offer puppies and
dogs for adoption instead of sale. Jason
Gail/For The HSUS
Joe's Pet Depots in Wyoming celebrated
their new shelter adoptions with kick-off
events. Kristin Murphy/For The HSUS
Alsip Home & Nursery expects to have the
potential to find homes for about 1 ,000
puppies and dogs per year per location.
Jason Gail/For The HSUS
Not limited to adorable dogs and puppies,
Joe's Pet Depot even had cats and kittens
available for adoption. Kristin Murphy/For
The HSUS
We can help pet stores that sell puppies switch to a more humane model.
By offering puppies for adoption from nearby shelters or moving to a supplies-only model , stores can save the
lives of animals in search of homes, and save the breeding dogs trapped in puppy mills. The humane model can
also bring in new customers and attract positive media attention for the store.
5/7/2014 7:42AM
Puppy-Fri endly Pet Stores : The Humane Society of the United States http :1 /www.humanesociety.org/issues/puppy _mills/facts/puppy _friend ...
2 of3
Many dog lovers prefer to buy supplies from a puppy-friendly pet store and get a puppy the right way.
Pet stores are part of the solution
We can guide your store through this process free of charge, creating a winning outcome for everyone,
especially for the animals who would otherwise be homeless.
Possible benefits
Increased name recognition for your store
Consumer loyalty, financial support, word-of-mouth outreach, and repeat visitors
Stronger community ties thanks to your partnership with the local animal shelter(s)
A free listing for your store on HSUS's Puppy Friendly Pet Stores web page and in other media
A free listing through our phone texting application so shoppers can find you from anywhere
'' [T]his decision was the
right thing to do for the
animals and for our
community in addressing
the pet overpopulation
problem."
-Joe Seneshale, Joe's
PET DEPOT, Gillette
and Rock Springs, Wyo.
Ways we might help you
Free, customized guidance through the entire process
Answers to your questions about the benefits of providing adoptable animals at your store
Advice from other store owners who have already converted to a more humane model
Help finding animal shelters in your area to partner with
Publicity for your conversion via a grand reopening, induding:
media advisories
posts on social media outlets
a ribbon-cutting ceremony
free t-shirts, raffles, and other giveaways
invitations to local celebrities
and more
Follow-ups to track progress
What puppy-friendly pet store owners say
Ready? Pledge to be a puppy-friendly pet store, and email us to get started!
What consumers can do
1 . Encourage local pet stores to become puppy-friendly
Contact us with your name, phone number, city, and state. We can send instructions and a copy of the invitation
and pledge, or you can download and print them.
Download the invitation 1 Download the pledge
Visit local pet store(s) to explain the benefits of the program and invite them to sign.
Return the signed pledge(s) to our Stop Puppy Mills campaign and we will do the rest!
5/7/2014 7:42AM
Puppy-Friendly Pet Stores : The Humane Society of the United States http:/ /www.humanesociety.org/issues/puppy _mills/facts/puppy _friend ...
3 of3
2. Find a puppy-friendly pet store near you
Text "PUPPY" to 30644 to see puppy-friendly stores near you (message and data rates apply)
Browse lists of puppy-friendly stores by state:
Select a state
5/7/2014 7:42 AM
Letters to the Commission from ASPCA and HSUS supporting the humane treatment of dogs and the end
of puppy mills and the sale of puppies in pet stores in Delray Beach.
Mayor Cary Glickstein
City of Delray Beach, FL
Delivered in person
Apri116, 2014
Re: Retail puppy sales in Delray Beach
Dear Mayor Glickstein:
CoriA. Menkin, Esq.
Senior Director, Puppy Mills
Campaign
520 8th A venue
New York, NY 10018
corim@aspca.org
(212) 876-7700 ext. 4549
Cell: (917) 748-1794
www .aspca.org
It has come to our attention that the city of Delray Beach is considering an ordinance banning the sale of
puppies in pet stores within the city. The ASPCA fully supports such a measure, and we encourage you,
as the town's leader to support the ordinance as well.
The poor conditions in which breeding dogs at commercial breeding facilities are typically kept are well
documented by USDA. The ASPCA, through its national No Pet Store Puppies campaign, has made
public over 10,000 photographs taken by the USDA inside federally licensed commercial breeding
facilities during routine inspections. The photos were obtained by the ASPCA from the USDA through
the Freedom oflnformation Act and can be seen at www.nopetstorepuppies.com/buy-a-puppy. The
photos show the grim reality of where pet store puppies really come from and what the adult breeding
dogs are forced to endure year after year. The photos attached to this letter are photos of breeding
facilities which we know, from a search of publicly available importation records, have supplied puppies
to Waggs to Riches in Delray Beach. Even though the owner of this business claims that she does not get
her puppies from puppy mills, the pictures tell a different story. In the pictures, you'll note some of the
conditions that the ASPCA views as quintessential signs that an operation is a puppy mill, including
telltale signs of neglect like dental disease, lack of grooming, and malnutrition, failure to provide
adequate protection from the elements seen in photos of dogs living outside all year, injured paws from
the use of wire flooring in primary enclosures, and administration of expired medication to name just a
few. It is important to remember that the conditions depicted in these pictures show how the breeding
dogs in these facilities live 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, 365 days a year for years on end.
The ASPCA defines a "puppy mill" as a large-scale commercial breeding operation where profits are
given a higher priority than the well-being of the dogs. We estimate that 99% of puppies sold in pet
stores come from puppy mills. Truly responsible breeders do not sell their puppies via pet stores or
brokers. They want to ensure that their puppies go to good homes, and therefore always meet the
prospective purchaser prior to completing a transaction. Moreover, responsible breeders follow their
dogs' bloodlines closely to eliminate any hereditary or genetic problems, such as hip dysplasia, from their
breeding stock. There is simply no way to track genetic problems if your puppies are sold to unknown
purchasers, as many genetic problems do not surface until after one year of age.
By law, any breeder with more than three breeding female dogs who sells puppies to brokers or pet stores
must be licensed and inspected by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA). Unfortunately,
1
this requirement is no guarantee of humane treatment for the breeding dogs. To the contrary, it is a
certification that the entity is engaged in the practice of commercially breeding dogs for a profit.
Additionally, the standards that USDA licensed breeders are required to meet fall far short of what most
people would consider humane. For example, the minimum cage size for dogs housed in USDA licensed
facilities is only six inches longer than the dog in each direction. It is legally permissible, and
commonplace, for commercial breeders to house breeding dogs in tiny, wire-bottomed cages stacked on
top of one another for the dogs' entire lives. To put this in perspective, a dog the size of an average
Beagle can be kept in a cage about the size of a household dishwasher for her entire life.
For the foregoing reasons, I respectfully urge you to support the proposed ordinance prohibiting the sale
of dogs in Delray Beach pet stores.
Please do not hesitate to contact me with any questions or concerns you may have. Thank you for your
time and consideration.
Sincerely,
Cori A. Menkin
2


HUMANE SOCIETY
OF THE UNITED STATES
Enc L. Bernthal, Esq.
Charr of the Board
Jenmfer leanrng. M.D., S.M. H.
Vice Chalf
Kathleen M. ltnehan, Esq.
Board Treasurer
Wayne Pacelle
President & CEO
M1chael Maritanan
Chref Program & Polrcy Officer
laura Maloney
Chref Operarmg Offrcer
G. Thomas Wa1te Ill
Treasurer & CFO
Andjew N Rowan, Ph.D
Chref lntemarronal Officer
& Chrld Scienrrfic Officer
Roger A. Krndler
Genera/ Counsel
Vrce Presrdent & CLO
Janet D. Frake
Secretary
DIRECTORS
Jeffrey J. Arcmraco
Eric L. Bernthal. Esq
MIChael J. Blackwell, DVM., MPH
Jerry Cesak
James Costas
Anita W Coupe. Esq.
Nerl B. Fang, Esq., CPA
Jane Greenspun Gale
Cathy Kangas
Jonathan D. Kaufelt, Esq.
Paula A. Kislak, D.VM.
Jenmfer leanrng, M.D. S M H.
Kathleen M. Linehan, Esq
John Macl-.ey
Mary I. Max
Patrick l. McDonnell
Judy Ney
Sharon lee Patnck
Judy J. Perl
Marian G. Probst
Jonathan M Ratner
Joshua S Re1chert, Ph.D
Walter J. Stewart, Esq
Andrew Wemstem
JasonWer>s
Davrd 0 Wrebers, M.D.
lana Wrlliams
April 9, 2014
Delray Beach City Council
100 NW 1st Avenue
Delray Beach, Florida 33444
Honorable Mayor, Vice-Mayor and City Commissioners:
On behalf of the Humane Society of the United States (HSUS) and our more
than 800,000 members of the state of Florida, I am writing in support of your
locality's proposed ordinance to prohibit the sale of puppy mill dogs in pet
stores.
The HSUS opposes the sale of puppies bred in inhumane conditions everywhere
that they are sold, including in Delray Beach pet shops.
Most pet stores sell puppies from inhumane sources
The Humane Society of the United States has conducted numerous hidden-
camera investigations
123
which consistently reveal that pet stores supply
unsuspecting consumers with puppies from inhumane large-scale commercial
breeders known as puppy mills. The investigations have revealed:
o All stores videotaped by HSUS investigators purchased their puppies
from large-scale commercial breeding facilities, despite specific claims of "no
puppy mills" or misleading statements implying that their sources were small
"private breeders." When HSUS investigators filmed some of these breeding
facilities they found hundreds of dogs confined to small cages.
o All of the stores visited by investigators were found to be buying
puppies from suppliers with known Animal Welfare Act violations, including
some with citations for filthy conditions, lack of adequate space, underweight
breeding animals, dogs found in the freezing cold or high heat without adequate
weather protection, or sick or injured dogs in need of veterinary care.
Problems associated with pet shop puppy sales
In 2005, the Animal Protection Institute conducted an investigation of
California pet shops. From this investigation, a graphic report entitled "Little
1
Can be found at:
http://www.humanesociety.orglnews/news/2011 / lllny_puppy_mill_ ll09ll.htrnl#. UvkvXWJdWAg
2
Can be found at: http://www.humanesociety.org/news/press _releases/20 12/12/puppy-mill-investigation-chicago-
121012.html
3
Can be found at: http://www.humanesociety.org/assets/pdfs/pets/puppy_mills/ investigation-report-texas.pdf
Celebrating Animals Confronting Cruelty
2100 L Street. NW Wash1ngton. DC 20037 t 202 452.1100 f 202 778 6132 humanesocrety org
Shop of Sorrows"
4
was produced: 44% of the locations visited had sick and neglected animals,
32% of the animals were confined in unhealthy, cramped, or crowded conditions and 25% of the
animals didn' t even have adequate food or water.
A landmark 2011 study appearing in Applied Animal Behavior Science analyzed behavioral
characteristics of 1, 1 00 dogs rescued from puppy mills who had been in their new homes an
average of 2 years, and found that the dogs had significantly elevated levels of fears and phobias,
compulsive and repetitive behaviors, and heightened sensitivity to being touched
5

Most recently, a 2013 study published in the Journal of American Veterinary Medicine, entitled
"Differences in behavioral characteristics between dogs obtained as puppies from pet stores and
those obtained from noncommercial breeders,"
6
concluded that obtaining dogs from pet stores
versus noncommercial breeders represented a significant risk factor for the development of a
wide range of undesirable behavioral characteristics, especially aggressive behavior. Due to the
results of the study, the authors stated that they cannot recommend that puppies be obtained from
pet stores.
Federal laws and regulations are insufficient to prevent the proliferation of dogs sourced
from inhumane origins
The federal Animal Welfare Act provides survival standards for dogs, not humane care
standards. The USDA has repeatedly asserted that their regulations and standards are minimum
requirements and can be built upon by the states (See 7 U.S.C. 2143(A)(8), stating that the
federal Animal Welfare Act does not preempt state laws.). Indeed, the agency's own Animal
Welfare Act Fact Sheee states "Although Federal requirements establish acceptable standards,
they are not ideal. Regulated businesses are encouraged to exceed the specified minimum
standards. "
The Act ignores veterinary science regarding dogs' needs. To cite just two examples:
o The American College of Theriogenologists (ACT) and Society for
Theriogenology (SFT) recommend that breeding females should not be bred on
consecutive estrous cycles unless they have regained appropriate body condition
and "are deemed healthy on the basis of veterinarian examination prior to the
onset of the next proestrus,"
8
and that dogs not be bred more than 5 times in a
lifetime.
9 10
Similarly, the American Kennel Club says "One month before
breeding, the bitch should have a thorough pre-breeding physical examination by
a veterinarian." Yet the A W A offers no restriction on litter frequency or
limitation.
4
Animal Welfare Institute, "Uttle Shop of Sorrows: An Undercover Investigation into California Pet Shops,"
http://www.bornfreeusa.org/downloads/pdf/PetShops Report.pdf, (accessed 5 Dec. 2013).
5
McMillan FD, Duffy Dl, Serpell JA. Mental health of dogs formerly used as 'breeding stock' in commercial breeding establishments. Applied
Animal Behaviour Science. 2011;135(1-2):86-94.
6
McMillan, Franklin D, DVM, DACVIM; James A. Serpell, PhD; Deborah l. Duffy, PhD; Elmabrok Masaoud, PhD; lan R. Dohoo, DVM, PhD,
" Differences in behavioral characteristics between dogs obtained as puppies from pet stores and those obtained from noncommercial
breeders," Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association 242, No.10 (2013), 1359-1363.
7
U.S. Department of Agriculture, Animal Plant and Health Inspection Service, "Fact Sheet: Animal Care. The Animal Welfare Act, " in http://ca-
biomed.org/pdf7media-kit/oversight/USDAA WA.pdf (accessed 5 Dec, 2013).
8
Society for Theriogenology, " Position Statement: Welfare of Breeding Dogs," http://www.therio.org(lpage=PositionStatement#Breeding
(accessed 5 Dec, 2013).
9
Olson, Patricia N., DVM, PhD, DACT, "Breeding Protocol Review and Recommendations, " email from author, July 2012.
10
American Kennel Club, "A Guide to Breeding Your Dog," http://images.akc.org!pdf7breeders/resourceslguide to breeding your dog. pdf
(accessed 5 Dec, 2013).
o Science clearly indicates that solid flooring is the most appropriate for terrestrial
species
11
such as canids. One study demonstrated that foxes were willing to work
to gain access from a wire mesh floor to a solid one. On the solid floor, they
performed a greater variety and a higher frequency of normal species-specific
behaviors such as play, rooting (exploring with their muzzles) andjumping
12
In
severe cases, including at a facility that sold puppies to Danbury-based Puppy
Love, puppies have been found with paws so damaged that their bones protrude
through the skin, with exposed muscle and flesh
13
--dogs' limbs may slip through
wire mesh flooring, causing severe lacerations or even unintentional amputation
ofthe limb.
14
The American Veterinary Medical Association specifically
recommends that "dogs should be provided with an area of solid flooring. A
dog' s welfare needs for comfortable housing are better met by a kennel with solid
flooring. "
15
A review of housing needs for dogs kept for research purposes
found, in part, that "the majority of experts recommended solid or at least only
partially gridded floors and agreed that dogs preferred solid flooring. Whatever
the flooring type, a safe, solid area of sufficient size for all dogs to comfortably
and simultaneously lie down should be provided."
16
Yet even though USDA
inspection reports routinely document injuries caused by wire mesh flooring, the
agency in 1999 actually removed a regulatory requirement that breeders provide a
solid resting platform for dogs housed on wire,
17
stating that the requirement had
been "erroneously added" and was an "unnecessary and unintended requirement. "
Research indicates a systemic problem with the mass production of dogs in commercial facilities,
in that continuous confinement frequently causes animals to suffer from chronic anxiety, social
isolation, inadequate stimulation, and lack of physical exercise.
18

19
,2,
21

22
,2
3
This is an important consideration because it underscores the notion that even if a commercial
breeding facility was properly inspected and was fully compliant with all federal laws and
regulatory requirements, that facility could, and typically is, keeping dogs in constant
11
Hardy A, Windle CP, Baker HF, et al. Assessment of preference for grid-flooring and sawdust-flooring by captive-bred marmosets in free-
standing cages. Tuber DS, Miller DD, caris KA, et al. Dogs in animal shelters: problems, suggestions and needed expertise. Psychological Science.
1999;10:379-386. Appl Anim Behav Sci Jan 2004, 85(1-2) 167-172.
u Koistinen, T, Mononen, J. Blue foxes' motivation to gain access to solid floors and the effect of the floor material on their behaviour. Appl
Anim Behav Sci Sept 2008, 113{1-3) 236-246.
13
12 Aug, 2012 USDA Inspection report for Joseph & Rhoda Graber of Odon, Indiana (#32A0350),
http://acissearch.aphis.usda.gov/LPASearch/faces/CustomerSearch.jspx (accessed 6 Dec, 2013).
14
United States Department of Agriculture, Office of Inspector General, " p.ll, 53, "Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service Animal care
Program: Inspections of Problematic Dealers," Audit Report 33002-4-SF, May 2010, ppll, 53.
15
American Veterinary Medical Association, " Model Bill and Regulations to Assure Appropriate Care for Dogs Intended as Pets," April 9, 2010.
16
Moore, Graham, "Assessment of Animal Housing Needs in the Research Setting Using Peer Reviewed literature Approach: Cats and Dogs,"
The Development of Science-Based Guidelines for Laboratory Animal care: Proceedings of the November 2003 International Workshop. (The
National Academies Press, 2004)
17
"Animal Welfare: Solid Resting Surfaces for Dogs, Final Rule. " Federal Register 64 (April 20, 1999): 19251-19254. Print
18
Griffin B, Hume KR. Recognition and management of stress in housed cats. In: August JR, ed. Consultations in Feline Internal Medicine. 5th ed.
St. Louis, MO: Elsevier Saunders; 2006:717-734.
19
2 Hennessy MB, Davis HN, Williams MT, Mellott C, Douglas CW. Plasma cortisol levels of dogs at a county animal shelter. Physiology &
Behavior. 1997;62(3):485-490.
20
Patronek GJ, Sperry E. Quality of life in long term confinement. In: August JR, ed. Consultations in Feline Internal Medicine, Current Therapy 4.
Philadelphia, PA: WB Saunders; 2001:621-634.
21
Stephen JM, Ledger RA. An audit of behavioral indicators of poor welfare in kenneled dogs in the UK. Journal of Applied Animal Welfare
Science. 2005;8:79-95.
22
Tuber DS, Miller DD, caris KA, et al. Dogs in animal shelters: problems, suggestions and needed expertise. Psychological Science. 1999;10:379-
386.
23
Wemelsfelder F. Animal boredom: Understanding the tedium of confined lives. In: McMillan FD, ed. Mental Health and Wellbeing in Animals.
Ames, lA: Blackwell Publishing; 2005: 79-91.
confmement, on wire flooring, and in a perpetual cycle of breeding, nursing, and weaning until
the animal is no longer capable of turning out sufficient litters to be profitable.
The USDA fails to adequately enforce the Animal Welfare Act
o The USDA's Inspector General issued a report in 2010
24
stating, in part, that USDA
inspectors misused guidelines to lower penalties for violators. Specifically, OIG found
that APHIS inconsistently counted violations, applied "good faith" reductions without
merit, allowed a "no history of violations" reduction when the violators did have a history
and arbitrarily changed the gravity of some violations and the business size.
o A 2005 USDA/OIG report mirrored those findings. The Detroit Free Press reported in
2006
25
that "the USDA in 2004 opted not to fme Heartland Kennels [a puppy mill in
southwestern Minnesota]- which sent at least 123 pups to local pet shops in 2005-
after citing the facility for repeated violations that included confining dogs to cramped,
dirty cages that offer no protection from the wind, rain, and snow. In a letter to the
facility, the USDA said its run of violations used to result in fines or closure, but current
policy ' is to encourage compliance through education and cooperation rather than legal
action' .... The USDA's Office of Inspector General has criticized the agency since the
1990s for failing to adequately crack down on violators. And in a blistering September
2005 report, the inspector general found an ineffective monitoring and inspection system
and concluded the USDA failed to take action against 'violators who
compromised ... animal health. "'
o Facilities fmd ways to skirt the rules. The Animal Welfare Act requires, in part, that
operators who keep dogs outdoors must receive certification from a veterinarian stating
that the dogs are acclimated to prevailing temperatures. The HSUS is in possession of a
letter from a Kansas Veterinarian to that state's Animal Health Department stating that
"The short-haired breeds of dogs, including pugs, beagles, chihuahuas, and dachshunds
owned by Keith Ratzlaff are acclimated to the outside environmental temperatures in
Kansas. As long as adequate shelter, bed material, food and water are provided, these
animals are acclimated to temperatures from zero to one hundred ten degrees
Fahrenheit."
26
(emphasis added).
The commercial pet industry fails to provide pet stores with humanely raised dogs
From Amy Cirincione, owner of Feed Bag Pet Store in Cutchogue, NY: "J have found that there
is no way for me to sell puppies from my retail establishment that does not contribute to the
suffering of both the parent dogs and the puppies bred from them. Reputable breeders with high
standards of care do not sell their puppies to ANY pet stores for resale. The only option for pet
stores wishing to make a profit selling puppies are puppy mills. I do not sell animals in my store
because it is impossible to do so without contributing to this barbaric trade. "
27
Responsible breeders do not sell to pet shops
2
United States Department of Agriculture, Office of Inspector General, ibid.
25
Neavling, Steve. "Agency Faulted for Not Cracking Down on Violators," Detroit Free Press, 12 Jul 2006.
http://www.freep.com/article/20060712/NEWSOS/60712002 (accessed 6 Dec 2013).
26
Handlin, Mark DVM. Heartland Veterinary Clinic, McPherson, Kansas. Letter to State of Kansas Animal Health Department, date obscured.
Copies available to Task Force members upon request.
27
Cirincione, Amy, "Opinion: Feed Bag Owner Says She Will Not Sell Animals in Her Store," North Fork Patch, 29 Jun. 2011,
http://northfork.oatch.com/qroups/oalitics-ond-electionsloJopinion-teed-boq-owner-sovs-she-will-not-sell-onima/scbb9519ddc (accessed 6 Dec.
2013)
The Task Force has heard substantial evidence that reputable breeders do not sell their puppies to
pet stores. The HSUS reviewed Codes of Ethics for the National Breed Clubs representing all
178 dog breeds recognized by the AKC, and found that 96% of those National Clubs include
statements to the effect that their breeders should not and/or do not sell to pet stores. A copy of
our data is available upon request.
The HSUS proudly supports responsible dog breeders
The humane community has rallied around responsible dog breeders, and seeks only to disallow
the sale in Florida pet shops of dogs acquired from puppy mills. The HSUS helped establish a
Breeder Advisory and Resource Council (BARC)
28
, comprised of responsible dog breeders from
around the nation who share an interest in curbing the mistreatment of dogs in puppy mills. On
our website, we encourage those families and individuals seeking a purebred puppy to seek a
responsible breeder, and even offer advice on how to locate a breeder?
9
The HSUS proudly supports humane pet shops
We have worked directly with pet shops that have stopped selling dogs from inhumane sources
and have found customers more than willing to purchase older rescued dogs.
Similarly, we have found that pet shops who switch to a humane business model, refusing to sell
dogs acquired from inhumane sources, have been very successful and are proud to have rejected
the unnecessary cruelty of puppy mills.
From Cynthia Socha, owner ofH3 Pet Supply in Stratford, CT: "As the owner of a successful pet
store that does not sell commercially bred animals, I can vouch for the fact that not selling such
animals does not guarantee a demise in business. The fact that over 85% of the pet stores that
operate in Connecticut do not sell puppies or kittens should be proof enough ... This [humane]
model has helped us become successful as it generates a tremendous amount of goodwill in the
community". Ms. Socha urges the Connecticut legislature to "look past the baseless claims of
large scale job loss ... and do what is correct in the name of humanity. "
From Rene Karapedian, owner of Pet Rush in Los Angeles, CA: "Dogs sold in pet stores come
from puppy mills. We should not support puppy mills ... .I switched over to what I call the
"humane model "-animal adoption instead of animal sales ... Most of these shelters that I go
pick up dogsfrom, they are putting down anywhere from 50 to 70 dogs a day. So this is one way
to stop that from happening. "
From Joe Sheneshale, owner of Pet Depot in Gillette and Rock Springs, WY: "With millions of
dogs and cats being euthanized each year due to a lack of homes, I realized that this decision
was the right thing to do for the animals and for our community in addressing the pet
overpopulation problem. "
In fact, initial successes have led us to create specifically designed programs to assist pet store
owners seeking transition to the humane model.
30
28
http://www.humanesocietv.org/issues/puppy mills/facts/breeders advisory resource council.htmi#.Ugi91BXTnVQ (accessed 6 Dec. 2013).
29
http://www.humanesocietv.org/issues/puppy mills/tips/finding responsible dog breeder.html
30
http://www.humanesocietv.org/issues/puppy mills/facts/puppy friendly pet stores.htmi#.Ugi-ZXXTnVQ
Conclusion
The morals and values of Delray Beach cannot be represented by allowing the continued sale of
puppy mills dogs - an industry so intrinsically linked to unnecessary animal suffering and so
seemingly unwilling to change. Delray Beach pet store customers should not be duped into
unwittingly supporting the cruel puppy mill industry, and into buying puppies exposed to the
unique set of physical and behavioral problems created by such a substandard upbringing.
Delray Beach residents should no longer have to accept the importing of puppies from puppy
mills while their tax dollars are spent sheltering and euthanizing dogs for which there are no
homes.
We thank the Commission for considering this important animal welfare and consumer
protection ordinance, and remain willing and eager to assist going forward.
Sincerely,
Kate MacFall
Florida State Director
kmacfall@humanesocietv.org
t 850.508.1001 f 850.386.4534
The Humane Society of the United States
1624 Metropolitan Circle, Suite 8, Tallahassee, FL 32308
humanesocietv.org
Join Our Email List Facebook Twitter Slog
t { ~ THE HUMANE SOCIETY
Of TH UNITED STATES
To support The Humane Society of the United States, please make a monthly donation, or give in another way, via a
gift donation or memorial donation or donating your vehicle. You can also volunteer for The HSUS, and see our 55
ways you can help animals.
The HSUS is rated a 4-star charity (the highest possible) by Charitv Navigator, approved by the Better Business
Bureau for a/120 standards for charity accountability, voted by Guidestar's Phi/anthropedia experts as the #1 high-
impact animal protection group, and named by Worth Magazine as one of the 10 most fiscally responsible
charities.