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14WMWcov_wtrRM_140128_1 1 1/28/14 2:16 PM
MARCH-APRIL 2014
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M A T T E R S
Fire detection
Goes infrared
A German SRF production facility is using an
infrared thermography system to prevent fre
V
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1
5
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Europe prepares for
Tighter emission controls
What can the WtE industry expect from coming
changes to EU emission regulations?
Zorba
Get it sorted
Sensor based sorting ofers a big opportunity
to recover non-ferrous metals from Zorba
Official Publication of:
Including
IFAT
Show Guide
P40
1403WMW_C1 1 4/9/14 11:44 AM
WE CARE
SHRED IT
GRIND IT
SCREEN IT
CHIP IT
DOPPSTADT GmbH
Barbyer Chaussee 3
39240 Calbe, Germany
Tel: +49 (0)39291 55-0, Fax: -350
info@doppstadt.com
For more information, please visit our website
www.doppstadt.com
The Recycling
Specialist.
Q
S
2
M
.
d
e
For more information, enter 1 at WMW.hotims.com
1403WMW_C2 2 4/9/14 9:33 AM
CONTENTS
MARCH-APRIL 2014
8 19
14
IFAT SPECIAL
40 IFAT 2014 Preview
As the waste industry prepares for its biggest bi-annual
show, IFAT, taking place in Munich this May, WMW talks
to Eugen Egetenmeir, managing director of organising
company Messe München, to fnd out what the 125,000 plus
visitors can expect.
42 IFAT Floor Plan
Don't forget to check out WMW's foor plan highlighting
some of the must see exhibitors at this year's show.
44 Exhibitor Highlights
WMW brings you a rundown of some of the most important
exhibitors at IFAT 2014, and fnds out what you can expect to
fnd on their booths.
ANALYSIS: RDF IN THE SPOTLIGHT
5 Call for Evidence Over RDF in UK
The UK government has called for evidence over the increas-
ing volumes of refuse derived fuel being exported for use in
overseas waste to energy facilities.
REGULARS
3 From The Editor
4 ISWA Comments
5 News
74 ISWA Information
76 Diary
76 Index To Advertisers
FEATURES
8 Recovering the Hidden Value in Zorba
Zorba, a mix of shredded and pre-treated non-ferrous
scrap metals, is often ofoaded for low prices by recycling
companies, but with the rising demand for metals such as
aluminium and copper, could sensor based sorting ofer a
valuable new revenue stream?
14 Infrared Fire Detection
For waste and recycling companies, the risk of fre is very
real. But the danger can be mitigated with the use infrared
detection technology, backed up by automated and tar-
geted fre prevention systems.
19 Preparing for the Revised WI BREF
When it comes to controlling emissions from waste to
energy plants Europe has led the way for many years. Now
operators are preparing for the imminent revisions to the
regulations governing in the implementation of Best Avavi-
labe Techniques.
26 Trash Talking: RDF Standards
With many countries in Europe increasing their output of
refuse derived fuel in a bid to comply with EU legistation,
the material is increasingly crossing boarders. But could
the implementation of minimum quality standards on its
production beneft the industry?
31 A New Approach to Pyrolysis
Researchers at Aston University's European Bioenergy Re-
search Institute are collaborating with businesses to develop
a Pyroformer which is capable of recovering energy from a
wide variety of organic waste streams, including digestate
from anaerobic digestion.
35 Hybrid Drive RCVs Arrive in Ibiza
Refuse collections on the island of Ibiza are getting cleaner
and quieter thanks to the addition of three Geesinknorba
hybrid drive refuse collection vehicles to waste and recycling
collection company, HERBUSA's fleet.
1403WMW_1 1 4/9/14 9:22 AM
Member, BPA Worldwide
Published by PennWell International Publications Ltd
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2 WASTE MANAGEMENT WORLD MARCH-APRIL 2014
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1403WMW_2 2 4/9/14 9:22 AM
3 MARCH-APRIL 2014 WASTE MANAGEMENT WORLD
FROM THE EDITOR
IT’S SHOWTIME
The stage is set for a fascinating IFAT with so many
technical, political and regulatory developments
I
t’s hard to believe that the last IFAT exhibition in Munich was almost two years ago
- my feet have only just recovered - but the industry’s biggest show is once again
upon us.
As for many in the industry, it’s a busy time for us here at WMW. Nowhere else
sees more new products being launched or more innovative new technologies being
showcased. As a journalist covering the waste and recycling industry, it’s a gold mine of
new and interesting stories.
And it’s not just the wide variety of new products on show. There’s also the hugely
impressive line-up of speakers in the conference programme. From politicians to industry
professionals and academics, it’s a great place to find out about what’s going on at the
cutting edge of the industry and learn about projects that are pushing the boundaries
of what is possible.
On the topic of the role played by academia in the waste industry, which ISWA
President David Newman has discussed at some length in this issue, on P31 you can
read my report from a recent trip to Aston University to see some innovative solutions
being developed to tackle biowaste. Home to the European Bioenergy Research Institute,
researchers at the university are currently testing and developing a Pyroformer capable of
pyrolysing AD digestate, among other organic waste products.
It’s an interesting project on a number of levels, not least because of the growing
need to utilise digestate, which cannot always be simply applied to land, and in some
cases can become a liability rather than a marketable product.
It’s a topic that also came up in a recent conversation I had with Craig Shaw, CEO and
founder of Advetec, a small UK company which is rapidly growing sales of its Bio-Thermic
Digester.
It’s a modular containerised system which uses extremophiles harvested from deep
in the oceans to process a wide a variety waste streams, including digestate and mixed
MSW. After 72 hours the waste is reduced by around 97%. The by-products are water and
a dry powdery RDF. It certainly sounds like an interesting technology. Keep your eyes
peeled for an in-depth look in a coming issue of WMW.
On the subject of RDF, don’t miss this issue’s Trash Talking feature (p26) where we ask
a number of industry leaders for their thoughts on the need for quality standards for RDF.
It’s been something of a thorny issue of late, exacerbated by the rapidly increasing cross
border movements of the material within Europe.
Elsewhere in the issue, on p19 Hubert de Chefdebien and Guillaume Perron-Piché
help decipher the upcoming revisions to the European legislation governing emissions
from waste to energy facilities. On p8 Jöerg Schunicht looks at the potential value in the
mixed non-ferrous metals in shredder residue, collectively known as Zorba.
For more on what to expect at IFAT in May turn to p40 for WMW’s guide to some of
the most exciting exhibitors. See you at the show.
Ben Messenger
Managing Editor
Follow WMW magazine on Twitter: www.twitter.com/WMW_Magazine
It’s a modular containerised
system which uses
extremophiles harvested
from deep in the oceans to
process a wide variety of
waste streams
Ben Messenger Managing Editor
1403WMW_3 3 4/9/14 9:22 AM
ISWA COMMENT
CALLING ACADEMIA
As the waste industry races to find answers to the multitude
of questions asked of it by society, closer collaboration with
academia could provide the solutions.
A
cademics and ISWA normally inter-react through our WM&R journal but today
in WMW I want to discuss the relationship between academia and the waste
sector to a broader audience.
Science is important in supporting our industry in predicting the future,
interpreting and making new technological discoveries, understanding economic and
social aspects of waste management and influencing policy makers and investors.
Scientists challenge contemporary thinking, which may be perceived as unwanted
interference. But their research to improve the performance of WtE, AD, MBT and
composting facilities cannot be underestimated. It is also thanks to pure research that the
biobased chemical industry is growing rapidly. As biobased and compostable packaging
and products enter our waste streams, we will find new challenges in handling them
correctly. And biobased, I am convinced, will also mean in the near future, “made from
organic waste”. We may soon be at the centre of a new, research-founded industrial sector.
While waste managers are responsible for managing such technology and maintaining
continual improvement as technology become more sophisticated, academics contribute
to our development by continuous study and monitoring of our performance.
Today the interface between waste managers and academia develops most rapidly
on socio-economic questions of waste management which attract academic interest as
waste and resource management contribute to the Green or Circular economy. Societal
changes, as waste impacts upon living conditions of even the poorest worldwide, have
for some time attracted research, widening the scope of waste management.
Research remains a weak link, yet leads us to play a more forceful role in clean
technology and production. Academic research on POPs pollution from, e.g. flame
retardants, and the need to collect and find ‘final sinks’ for these chemical products, has
lead to the Stockholm Convention and leads us to finding solutions. We must both search
for technical solutions and use academic research to advocate for changes in production
methods and the assumption of responsibility based on the Producer Pays Principle. Here
academic research may become a political tool for clean production and EPR systems.
Understanding material flows through societies and how humans can most safely
deal dispose of waste in final sinks, is a rapidly developing, but niche area of study.
Similarly, as untreated waste proliferates globally, informal and often illegal economic
activities develop in recycling in all nations. Academic research has offered us a
methodology for understanding how to deal with these phenomena. And this, among
the social problems our industry faces, is very contentious. Academics may help in finding
solutions and building bridges between sectors of opposing interests.
Finally, new models and understanding on the economics of waste are required from
academia. The recycling society is a model considered ethically and economically suitable
for modern economies. Yet promoting it in developing nations mostly fails. What new
models, or adaptations, are needed? We cannot lose more time failing in these countries.
I hope that such a debate on the economics of waste occurs in a future WM&R
publication because unequivocal messages must be transmitted to such nations so they
can organise themselves for a more sustainable future.
My appeal, in this article, is for closer and wider cooperation between industry and
academia on research into the technological, societal and economic challenges we face
on a growing scale as waste volumes double over the next two decades. Only a collective
and collaborative effort will bring success in such enormous tasks.
David Newman,
President, ISWA
We must search for both
technical solutions and
use academic research to
advocate for changes in
production methods and the
assumption of responsibility
David Newman President, ISWA
4 WASTE MANAGEMENT WORLD MARCH-APRIL 2014
1403WMW_4 4 4/9/14 9:22 AM
I
n March the UK Government’s
Department for Environment,
Farming and Rural Affairs
(Defra) launched a call for
evidence looking at the
exportation of Refuse Derived
Fuel (RDF) to waste to energy
plants overseas.
This followed two other reports
on the topic and demonstrates an
increasing interest in the topic from
the European waste community.
These included CIWM’s ‘Research
into SRF and RDF Exports to Other
EU Countries’ and the APSRG’s
‘Exporting Opportunity? Putting UK
waste to work at home and abroad’.
Currently, RDF is classed as
“wastes from the mechanical
treatment of wastes (sorting,
crushing, compacting, pelletising)
and SRF as “processed to a greater
extent than RDF… generally a
more valuable form of RDF as it
has a higher calorific value and low
moisture content”.
Currently in the UK material
classed as RDF can be used
domestically to produce energy.
However, this is not classed as
“recovery” unless the facility meets
the requirements of the Waste
Framework Directive.
The challenge comes when
trying to export RDF. Without
treatment, mixed MSW cannot be
exported. However, if it is classed as
RDF it can be exported but subject
to rules governing its transport.
After treatment to turn it into
RDF only then can it be exported for
energy recovery in a R1 compliant
facility and not for disposal. This
ruling has been put in place so that
countries don’t have to deal with
the disposal of each others’ wastes.
Yet the UK government is
concerned about the level and
quality of treatment to turn
waste into RDF. If pre-treatment is
minimal, then what is supposed
to be an RDF could be actually
little different to unsorted waste.
“This goes against the principle of
making the best use of resources
and undermines the waste
hierarchy,” according to the report.
Latest figures obtained
showed that incineration and co-
incineration facilities in the UK
received 333,730 tonnes of RDF
in 2011. However the amount of
RDF exported was considerably
more. From virtually nothing in
2010 to 1.5 million tonnes in 2013,
according to provisional figures.
One reason for the sharp increase
has been an increase in domestic
landfill tax, from £8 per tonne in
1996 to £72 per tonne in 2013/14.
A discrepancy between the
amount of RDF/SRF reported to
authorities for shipping and the
actual amount shipped, as picked
up by the CIWM in its report, was
also highlighted. Defra said it
“would like to know the reasons
why so much more is notified than
actually exported to make such a
difference to the figures”.
In terms of environmental
considerations, Defra advised
that all recyclable material
should be removed from RDF
“wherever possible”. However, if
the UK increased its RDF exports,
this could have an impact on
renewable energy.
As the biodegradable portion
of RDF is considered “renewable”,
any energy gained from it counts
towards the EU Renewable Energy
Directive for the UK to source 15%
of its total energy from renewable
sources by 2020. The export of
RDF means that some of the
biodegradable waste is lost to the
UK and won’t count towards its
renewable energy targets.
One question raised by
the industry is, when is waste
considered RDF and what quality
does it have to be to make this
classification? Currently there is no
formal definition or standard for
RDF, either in EU or UK legislation.
Defra said that while it has
received suggestions from several
sources that it should introduce a
standard for RDF, it would “welcome
evidence on other possible options
for intervention”.
Regarding implementing a
standard for the production of
RDF, Defra concluded: “If it was
decided that introducing a formal
standard or other intervention
around the production and/or use
of RDF was necessary, we would
need to consider the form that
the intervention should take, any
necessary enforcement and its
potential impact.”
The call for evidence is
available to UK WtE operators and
investors, local authorities and
waste companies until May 9 and
responses should be sent by email
to efw@defra.gsi.gov.uk.
For more on the debate
surrounding RDF standards turn to
p26 where it is the subject of this
issues’ Trash Talking feature.
CALL FOR EVIDENCE
OVER RDF EXPORTS
Credit: Conway Port
5 MARCH-APRIL 2014 WASTE MANAGEMENT WORLD
NEWS
SEND YOUR NEWS TO WASTE MANAGEMENT WORLD
e-mail: benm@pennwell.com
NEWS
1403WMW_5 5 4/9/14 10:15 AM
IN BRIEF
PLANNING DELAYS CAUSING A PICKLE FOR
24 MW WASTE TO ENERGY PLANT IN UK
Officers at Norfolk County Council
will recommend the termination of
a contract to build a 275,000 tonne
per year waste to energy facility in
Kings Lynn UK.
The latest setback to the contro-
versial Willows Power & Recycling
Centre was delivered in a report to
the authority’s cabinet.
The 24 MW Cory Wheelabrator
plant has been beset by planning
delays. In July 2012, the council
awarded planning permission, but
in August that year the Secretary
of State for Communities and Local
Government, Eric Pickles, ‘called in’
the application for consideration.
Furthermore, in October 2013
the government withdrew its £169
million pounds of waste infrastruc-
ture credit funding.
In a strongly critical statement
of Pickles, the council said that
since calling the application in, he
has failed meet his own timetable
for delivering a decision.
“Pickles’ decision - or rather the
total lack of it - has been the real
game-changer, and has made a
nonsense of Government rhetoric
about speedier decisions on major
infrastructure projects,” comment-
ed George Nobbs, leader of Norfolk
County Council.
“What has been even more
damaging has been his subse-
quent point-blank refusal to give us
any idea of when, if ever, he might
make a decision,” he continued.
As such, the report to the coun-
cil recommend the termination of
the contract with Cory Wheelabra-
tor, on the grounds it has failed to
secure planning permission.
Cory Wheelabrator said in a
statement that it was “naturally ex-
tremely disappointed” by the rec-
ommendations in the report.
“We believed that the Public
Inquiry would have provided a fair
hearing for all parties and that a
decision would be based on pure
planning grounds. We, and the in-
dustry, have also made it clear to
government that planning delays
to major infrastructure projects are
costly and can jeopardise them and
this project looks set to become yet
another example,” said a spokesper-
son for the developer.
According to Cory Wheelabra-
tor, the delay to the planning deci-
sion have resulted in considerable
costs to all parties without resolv-
ing the issue of what to do with
Norfolk’s residual waste.
“The fact still remains that there
is no firm solution,” the spokesper-
son concluded.
NANJING WASTE TO ENERGY PROJECT TO
BE EXPANDED TO 4000 TPD IN CHINA
Hong Kong based waste to energy
developer, China Everbright Inter-
national has signed an agreement
to expand the Nanjing waste to
energy project with an additional
2000 tonne per day of capacity.
The company said that the
agreement with Nanjing Municipal
Urban Management Bureau, which
will lead to the construction of
Nanjing Project Phase II, represents
a total investment of approximate-
ly RMB 987 million ($160 million).
With the rapid development of
the city, the amount of household
waste in Nanjing has increased dra-
matically.
In order to deal with waste dis-
posal effectively, the company ex-
plained that the Nanjing Municipal
Government has decided to ex-
pand the Project with phase II.
The new facility is to be con-
structed on a BOT basis and be
transferred at the same time as
Phase I.
According to China Everbright, all
gas emissions will comply with the
Euro 2000 Standard and the plant
is expected to be completed for
commercial operation at the end
of 2015.
Construction Phase I is expect-
ed to be completed, and commer-
cial operation to commence, in the
second quarter of this year. Once
both Phase I and II are operational
the facility will be the company’s
largest waste to energy plant.
TOYOTA HARNESSES COPPER RECYCLING
Toyota Motor Corporation (TMC)
has developed a new system for
recycling the copper contained in
the wiring harnesses of end of life
vehicles.
According to the company,
when wiring harnesses are re-
moved using conventional meth-
ods, it is extremely difficult to sepa-
rate the copper from the fuse box
and other components.
To tackle the problem, in 2010
TMC, Yazaki, Toyota Tsusho and
eight other partners began col-
laboration in a number of areas,
including establishing pre-pro-
cessing quality requirements for
dismantling companies.
Working in partnership with
component manufacturers and
auto recyclers, Toyota said that it
has completed trials using the re-
cycled copper to manufacture new
components.
The company said that the new
mechanical sorting method it has
developed can recover copper to a
purity of 99.96%.
TMC added that it now expects
to use approximately 1000 tonnes
per year of copper recycled from
harnesses in new components by
2016.
Waste2Tricity Secures First
Fuel Cell Sale
London based Waste2Tricity
has brokered its frst order for
a low-cost alkaline fuel cell
which it claims can increase ef-
fciency at a small scale waste
to energy gasifcation plant be-
ing developed by Powerhouse
Energy Group (PHE).
W2T said that it has been
working with PHE to evaluate
its Pyromex Ultra High Tem-
perature Gasifcation technol-
ogy, in particular the potential
of its use with the AFC Energy
fuel cell which W2T holds the
license to in a number of ter-
ritories.
John Hall, managing direc-
tor of Waste2Tricity explained
that the PHE system operates
not only on MSW, but also a
variety of biowaste materials.
Harvest Power Secures Feed-
stock for Florida AD Plant
Organic waste specialist, Har-
vest Power has teamed up with
Orlando based fresh produce
distributor, FreshPoint Central
Florida to recycle 100% of its
organic residuals at its Energy
Garden in anaerobic digestion
facility in Central Florida.
Harvest Power explained
that the vegetative overs –
including fruit and vegetable
peels, are now being diverted
from landfll and used as
feedstock at its 6MW com-
bined heat and power biogas
plant that produces enough to
power for over 2000 homes.
The tie up makes Fresh-
Point the latest local business
to come on board Harvest
Power’s ‘Orlando Or Landfll?
Responsible Food Recovery’
campaign.
John Kovalik, executive vice
president of FreshPoint Central
Florida said that the program
has also helped the company
reduce its hauling fees.
NEWS
6 WASTE MANAGEMENT WORLD MARCH-APRIL 2014
1403WMW_6 6 4/9/14 10:15 AM
MAY-JUNE 2013
M
AY-JUNE 2013
Improvinguponpaper’s
success story
Paper recycling is around 70%in Europe and
the US. How can it be improved further?
Rock solidlandfll liner
protection
A look at the increasing use of highly durable
dense asphaltic concrete
Whichwastes carry most
weight inthe EUbiofuel mix?
Evaluating proposals underway in Europe to
double count biofuels made from waste
Official Publication of:
WMWSpecial:
Collection &
Transport
W
ASTE M
ANAGEM
ENT W
ORLD
W
ASTE M
ANAGEM
ENT W
ORLD
JULY-AUGUST 2013
TOXIC
TANKERS
Why ship recycling needs
to clean up in South Asia
Fire in
the hole
Landfll fres are common, but what can you do
to minimise their impact on your bottom line?
W
ITH DIRECTORY OF SUPPLIERS
Havinga gas
over gasifcation
Opinions are divided on the need for waste
gasifcation. Find out what the experts think
WithDirectory
of Suppliers
Fuel cells: comingtoa
landfll near you?
An innovative project in Vancouver will see a
carbonate fuel cell powered by biogas
Official Publication of:
SEPTEMBER-OCTOBER 2013
RESPONSIBLE
RECYCLING
U.S. legislators move to tackle exports
Callingtime
onthe EuropeanWtE boom
Following years of growth is the European
market for waste to energy slowing?
Amsterdamnights
for biogas hybridRCV
A new compact biogas powered hybrid RCV is
extending working hours in Amsterdam
WMWSpecial
Recycling
ERPgains ground
inthe U.S.
There are now over 80 extended producer
responsibility laws in the U.S. and rising
Official Publication of:
Dedicated to Serving the Global
Solid Waste Management Industry
Get Your Free Subscription at:
www.wmw-subscribe.com
Don’t Stop There -
Engage With Us:
IN BRIEF
GE TO SUPPLY JENBACHER GAS ENGINES
TO BULGARIAN GASIFICATION PLANT
TGeneral Electric is to supply a
three fuel flexible Jenbacher en-
gines to a 5 MW organic waste to
energy combined heat and power
facility currently under construc-
tion in Stroevo, Bulgaria.
The company said that it will
supply one J612 and two J620
units, which will be powered by
syngas derived from straw and
wood chip waste.
The facility itself is being de-
veloped by EQTEC Iberia, part of
Spanish holding company Ebioss
Energy AD, and is the latest devel-
opment in Ebioss’ strategy to apply
its Integrated Biomass Gasification
Cogeneration Power Plant (IBGPP)
technology throughout Europe.
According to GE, organic waste
such as that being used at the new
facility is normally difficult to gasify
effectively, but tight integration of
EQTEC Iberia’s biomass-gasification
technology with its Jenbacher gas
engines will provide high levels of
emissions performance, efficiency
and economy.
The company added that us-
ing the EQTEC Gasifier Technol-
ogy, steam and hot water can be
generated with no reduction in
output power, so overall plant ef-
ficiency will be much higher when
the plant is used for district heating
or other cogeneration applications.
Leon van Vurren, global sales
leader, Jenbacher gas engines for
GE’s Distributed Power business
added: “Using syngas as a fuel is
uncommon in such plants and rep-
resents an innovative solution to
the energy challenges Bulgaria and
many other nations face.”
“However, it is challenging to
develop an integrated gasifica-
tion design that doesn’t produce
syngas containing impurities that
can foul engines. The selection of
technologies to work together is
important,” said van Vurren.
The project is scheduled for
completion by the end of this year.
Luis Sanchez, CEO of Ebioss,
said: “A typical Rankine thermal cy-
cle-based plant offers an electrical
efficiency of 18 to 20% from con-
verting biomass to electricity com-
pared to using GE’s Jenbacher gas
engines that offer approximately
28 percent electrical efficiency and
almost 70% total combined heat
and power efficiency.”
Bulgaria has a target for 16% of
its energy to be met by domestic
renewable sources by 2020.
EQTEC and GE have previously
worked together in 2008 with a co-
generation plant in Spain.
EU GLASS RECYCLING
RATE REACHES 70%
The latest glass recycling figures for
the EU show that since the 1990s,
recycling rates for glass have in-
creased by 131% in Europe, with
average recycling rates across the
Member States reaching 70% in
2012.
According to FEVE, the associa-
tion of European manufacturers of
glass containers and machine-
made glass tableware, this means
that over 25 billion bottles and jars
were collected throughout the EU
in 2012 to make new bottles.
As a result, the organisation said
that there has been a big reduction
in the use of raw materials, as well
as the production of CO2 and a re-
duction in energy consumption.
FEVE said that available industry
data now shows a distinct decou-
pling of industry growth from re-
source demand and environmental
impacts, with 189 million tonnes of
raw materials saved; and 138 mil-
lion tonnes of waste diverted from
landfill.
“Recycling makes good sense
for us,” commented Stefan Jae-
necke, president of FEVE. “That’s
why already 40 years ago we
helped to put in place glass collec-
tion schemes, to inform the public
and to treat recycled glass bottles
and jars as a precious resource for
our industry.”
“We did not call it at that time
the ‘circular economy’ but this is it,”
he added.
However, FEVE also cautioned
that more needs to be done to im-
prove the quality of collected glass
that can be effectively recycled in
a circular economy, as well as to
collect the remaining 30% of used
glass that currently is wasted.
Filip Kaczmarek, Member of the
European Parliament commented:
“As policy makers we need to pre-
serve and support such business
models that enhance economic
growth, produce high value goods,
generate value from waste. We
need therefore to work on a legisla-
tion that acknowledges and incen-
tivises such business models.”
Advanced Disposal Secures
Grant for CNG Conversion
Florida based waste and
recycling company, Ad-
vanced Disposal, , is one of 25
companies and organisations
to be awarded grants from
the state of Pennsylvania to
convert feet vehicles to run on
Compressed Natural Gas (CNG)
by Governor Corbett.
The company explained
that the Governor awarded
$7.7 million as a part of Act 13
to assist the 25 companies in
making the switch to natural
gas for their heavy-duty feet
vehicles.
With the award of the
grants, Advanced Disposal
will convert 40 vehicles to
CNG over the next 18 months
increasing the feet by 25%.
NEWS
7 MARCH-APRIL 2014 WASTE MANAGEMENT WORLD 7
1403WMW_7 7 4/9/14 10:15 AM
The global market for recovered mixed metals is continuing to expand. But when it
comes to Zorba, a mix of shredded and pre-treated non-ferrous scrap metals, most
metal reprocessors and MRF operators are missing a trick. There are commercial
opportunities to exploit this often overlooked material.
By Jöerg Schunicht
ZORBA:
SMALL PARTICLES
BIG OPPORTUNITIES
ZORBA:
SMALL PARTICLES
BIG OPPORTUNITIES
ZORBA RECYCLING
8 WASTE MANAGEMENT WORLD MARCH-APRIL 2014
1403WMW_8 8 4/9/14 9:22 AM
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M
any reprocessors are being
limited by using only traditional
processing methods for zorba,
while others are selling on the
mixed material instead of directly recovering
high quality fractions themselves.
Zorba is the collective term for shredded
and pre-treated non-ferrous scrap metals, most
usually originating from End-of-Life Vehicles
(ELVs) or Waste Electrical and Electronic
Equipment ( WEEE). The specifications for
Zorba were established by the Institute of
Scrap Recycling Industries (ISRI) in the U.S.,
which defines Zorba as a ‘shredded mixed non-
ferrous metals consisting primarily of aluminium
generated by eddy-current separator or other
segregation techniques’.
Other non-ferrous metals found in Zorba
include copper, lead, brass, magnesium, nickel,
tin and zinc in elemental or alloyed (solid)
form. Stainless steel is usually only present in
small quantities as, depending on the grade of
material, eddy current separators are normally
not able to extract it from the product.
THE CURRENT MARKET
On a global scale, industrial production in all
areas of modern life are creating an enormous
demand for the non-ferrous metals that are
commonly found in Zorba - in particular, copper,
nickel and brass.
The potential market for these valuable
fractions can be seen all around us in the
products we use every day. The use of electronic
products is now so widespread in all areas of
life that there is vast demand for non-ferrous
metals for use in production. As an example,
the global requirement for copper to be used
for on-board electrical systems in cars alone
amounts to 1.5 million tonnes per year, equating
to approximately 10% of global copper mine
production.
An average ELV weighing a tonne contains
not only steel, but approximately 79 kg of
valuable non-ferrous metals such as copper,
brass, aluminium and zinc. Nowadays, a
large share of the overall resources used in
production is obtained by using recycled metal
components – a trend which is rising.
The recycling of aluminium scrap is also
extremely lucrative – up to 95% of the energy
costs can be saved when compared to the
laborious extraction of the more costly primary
resource. At the same time, worldwide demand
for aluminium is steadily increasing in markets
such as car manufacturing due to its lightweight
properties.
As a result, it makes both commercial and
economic sense to use high quality secondary
raw material in place of a share of the virgin raw
materials.
In response to this strong market demand,
the recycling of non-ferrous metals from
shredded end-of-life equipment, such as cars
and domestic appliances, is steadily increasing
in importance, with many raw materials such as
copper or aluminium recovered in this manner.
However, market competition dictates
that these fractions must be capable of being
extracted to a higher degree of purity than ever
before, with values of refined individual non-
ferrous fractions being significantly higher than
that of non-sorted ferrous mixtures. It is quickly
becoming clear that the traditional methods
of sorting Zorba often do not fulfill the quality
requirements needed today.
COMMON TECHNOLOGIES
The most commonly used methods for sorting
mixed non-ferrous metals such as Zorba are
manual sorting (handpicking) and sink-float
treatments. These traditional methods can be
limited in their success and/or especially their
throughput, resulting in limited profits due to
the high labour costs and low capacity speeds.
Manual sorting or handpicking of
autoshredder fractions is a cost-intensive process
in industrial countries, with a natural lower limit
in terms of material recovery. Smaller metal
parts under 20mm and wires cannot be easily
sorted or, if they are, require a large amount
of time and effort. Optically indistinguishable
metals cannot be sorted and are therefore lost.
For example, it is not easy to manually
identify and separate small pieces of various
aluminium grades and metals, or to spot zinc or
steel attachments encapsulated in aluminium.
There is also the problem that colour sorting
is nearly impossible for identical coloured
materials, such as the all-grey metals of
aluminium alloys, zinc and lead.
Sink-float processes, also known as dense
media plants, are used to separate metals with
different densities, such as separating aluminium
from other non-ferrous metals. This process
requires large amounts of water and other
additives, the processing and disposal of which
are an additional burden to the environment.
In terms of productivity, the sink-float
method can only separate materials with
different densities, while materials such as the
valuable heavy metal mix of copper, brass,
zinc and other heavy metals presenting an
irresolvable problem for this method as they
have similar densities. Furthermore, as sink-float
processes normally use a water-based medium
that moves with a current, there is the risk
that light materials as well as materials with a
large surface are captured by the current and
misplaced into the wrong fractions.
Although there are dense media separation
plants in Europe which successfully employ
both of these methods, many plants still sell on
their Zorba to processing contractors in low-
wage countries which employ manual sorters
and resell the fractions at a high profit.
An alternative to this third party involvement
is for recyclers to upgrade their own mixed
metals material on site and sell individual
Manually sorting the diferent, yet visually similar, metals found in Zorba is not easy and can hamper
both quality and throughput
ZORBA RECYCLING
10 WASTE MANAGEMENT WORLD MARCH-APRIL 2014
1403WMW_10 10 4/9/14 9:22 AM
For more information, enter 4 at WMW.hotims.com
1403WMW_11 11 4/9/14 9:22 AM
fractions of materials such as copper, brass and
zinc onto the market for higher profits than
ever before. This is where sensor-based sorting
technology plays a vital role.
WHY SENSOR-BASED SORTING
MAKES SENSE
Globally, there is an increase in demand for
sensor-based sorting technology for the
treatment of Zorba. Different sensors can be used
to perform different sorting tasks, combining
superior precision with high throughputs and
consistently high quality end fractions with very
high purity rates.
Sensor-based sorting for metals works by
combining different technologies to enable the
recovery of high purity metal fractions from
even the most difficult fractions in terms of
composition, grain size and mix from mixed
waste and metal streams.
By using X-ray transmission (XRT)
technology to identify and separate material
based on its atomic density and also targeting
fractions by colour, it is possible to remove any
SENSOR-BASED
SORTING: HIGH GRADE
ALUMINIUM FROM ZORBA
Alumetal is one of the largest aluminium
casting alloy producers in Europe. The
Alumetal Group, which dates back to 1953,
includes three manufacturing facilities
located in Kęty, Gorzyce and Nowa Sól in
Poland. These plants produce aluminium
alloys manufactured from recycled
aluminium scrap.
The Nowa Sól facility is the latest
addition for the Group, and was opened in
2011. The facility is set up and designed to
produce high grade aluminium scrap for
re-melting and supply to the automotive
industry, which then reprocesses the
recovered material into eco-efficient, high-
end products.
Installed within the plant are three
high speed sensor-based sorting systems,
capable of processing up to 30 tonnes of
Zorba material per hour.
After the material has been processed
by shredding and screening, the X-ray based
machines remove the heavy metals and high
alloy aluminum, resulting in a high quality
product ready for re-melting.
“The use of sensor-based sorting
technology was new to us,” explains Andrzej
Slupski, Alumetal’s business development
manager.
“It gives additional benefits when
compared to conventional sorting methods,
and the installation of these devices has
allowed the purchasing and processing of a
higher amount of a specific grade of scrap.
We’re delighted with the results achieved to
date at our Nowa Sól plant,” he adds.
With the high global demand for non-ferrous metals it is increasingly important to maximise the recovery of these materials from the waste stream.
And doing so ofers some signifcant economic opportunities for the recycling industry
ZORBA RECYCLING
12 WASTE MANAGEMENT WORLD MARCH-APRIL 2014
1403WMW_12 12 4/9/14 9:22 AM
heavy metals from aluminium scrap to produce
a melt-ready aluminium fraction, and then to
sort the remaining heavy metals to recover
clean fractions of copper, brass and mixed
heavy grey metals.
Sensor-based sorting also presents
opportunities for processing fractions that
were previously unattainable using traditional
methods, such as fine materials or Printed Circuit
Boards (PCBs). Due to the growing demand for
commodities in general, and the increasingly
smaller sizes of electronic components, it is now
worthwhile to focus more on the treatment of
small grain sizes below 10mm.
An example of this can be seen in
copper fines. Copper granulate, recovered by
the recycling of copper containing wires, is
already a high-value resource. However, not
all impurities can currently be removed by
common technologies, such as screening or
densimetric tables, with non-copper materials
like brass, lead or stainless steel remaining
in the product. With sensor-based sorting
technology, it is now possible to detect and
efficiently sort material below 1mm and
automatically remove these finest particles,
upgrading copper granulate to a purity of
up to 99.9%, and consequently substantially
increasing its value.
ZORBA’S FUTURE
There’s no denying that the sorting process
for Zorba is more complex than processing
other fractions, but the commercial advantages
are clear to see. The sorting of Zorba leads to
high quality end fractions of a range of metals
including aluminium, copper and brass, which
can then be sold on to re-melters – both within
domestic regions and overseas – at a much
higher market values.
Employing sensor-based sorting methods
adds value to each of the target metals
and guarantees high quality end fractions.
The systems do not represent a massive
investment, and their flexibility allows them to
work effectively in conjunction with existing
processing methods where needed, helping to
keep start-up and operational costs down.
The technology is also suitable for smaller
processors or those wanting to explore more
‘niche’ markets. Whereas methods such as
dense media separation only work with high
throughput, sensor-based sorting can also be
used by operators that have lower amounts of
material available and are more flexible in their
approach to processing different materials.
The markets for Zorba – both for the initial
untreated material and for the final treated
fractions – are thriving. Consumer demand for
consumables such as cars and electronic devices
shows no sign of slowing down, providing
a steady stream of both input material and
valuable opportunities for quality end fractions.
With the predicted continued growth
in worldwide demand for high quality non-
ferrous metal fractions, it is time for a new
approach to processing this valuable and
in-demand Zorba waste stream. The traditional
manual and dense media methods historically
used represent a tried and tested way of
extracting value but, with sensor-based sorting,
reprocessors now have a genuine opportunity
to achieve top market prices for high quality
recovered fractions.


The metal recycling industry has a lot of
potential due to the considerable global
demand for secondary raw materials. However,
without using the latest sorting equipment,
valuable materials can be lost in the residual
waste stream and the quality of the recovered
fractions can fail to generate real value.
Jörg Schunicht is business development
manager at TITECH.
This article is on-line.
Please visit www.waste-management-world.com
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ZORBA RECYCLING
13 MARCH-APRIL 2014 WASTE MANAGEMENT WORLD
1403WMW_13 13 4/9/14 9:22 AM
For waste and recycling facilities, fire is a huge danger. Detecting fire hazards
before a fire breaks out, and quickly fighting the potential source of fire in a
targeted manner can potentially save millions in revenue. Fire protection systems
which use infrared thermography can offer significant advantages.
By Dr Jörg Lantzsch
FIRE DETECTION
Tracking the Source
A huge fre at recycling facility which contained 100,000 tonnes of paper and plastics sent a plume of smoke 1800 metres into the air in Smethwick, UK last year
Credit: West Midlands Fire Service
14 WASTE MANAGEMENT WORLD MARCH-APRIL 2014
FIRE DETECTION RECYCLING
14 WASTE MANAGEMENT WORLD MARCH-APRIL 2014
1403WMW_14 14 4/9/14 9:23 AM
C
ement is an important material
for the manufacture of concrete,
screed and mortar. During the
manufacturing process of cement,
raw materials (clay and chalk) as well as any
necessary additives are ground and burned at
around 1450°C to create clinker. This is then
mixed with other basic materials and ground
to a fine powder. The burning process has a
considerable energy requirement, which can
often be met with substitute fuels.
This substitute or secondary fuel can often
be manufactured from waste. This method
conserves valuable primary fuels, such as coal,
and thus reduces CO
2
emissions. In Western
Europe, substitute fuels used in cement works
satisfy between 50% and 70% of the energy
requirement.
SUBSTITUTE FUEL FOR CEMENT
WORKS
Ehrenhausen, Austria based ThermoTeam
Alternativbrennstoffverwertungs, which
produces waste derived substitute fuels at its
plant near Graz, supplies a nearby cement works
with just such a conditioned substitute fuel.
ThermoTeam was founded in 2002 as
a joint venture between the waste disposal
firm, Saubermacher, construction materials
manufacturer, Lafarge. The plant processes
energy-rich waste and uses it to produce
conditioned substitute fuel. The input material
includes the high calorific fraction of packaging
waste from Austrian packaging compliance
scheme, Altstoff Recycling Austria, which cannot
be materially recycled.
Another source of waste material processed
by the company is various types of commercial
waste, for example from cellulose production,
which also has an appropriately high calorific
value.
The first step in the process involves crushing
the input materials and feeding them into the
sorting line. Here, an overband magnet first
separates out all ferrous metals. Then the non-
ferrous metals, such as aluminium packaging,
are separated. Inert materials are also sorted into
another fraction. In addition, parts made of PVC
and PET, which can be materially recycled, are
selectively removed.
Once the impurities have been removed,
the shredders crush the material further and
move the fully conditioned substitute fuel to
the so-called output store. A tube belt conveyor
transports the fuel directly into the nearby
cement works.
“The cement works in Retznei operate
using only our conditioned substitute fuel”, says
The fnished substitute fuel is transported via
a tube belt conveyor directly into the nearby
cement works
For more information, enter 6 at WMW.hotims.com
15 MARCH-APRIL 2014 WASTE MANAGEMENT WORLD
FIRE DETECTION RECYCLING
1403WMW_15 15 4/9/14 9:23 AM
Josef Kulmer, director at ThermoTeam. “We are
therefore already rapidly approaching our goal
of largely replacing primary fuels in cement
manufacture.”
It is for this reason that the company
was awarded the Styrian ‘Umweltschutzpreis’
(environmental protection award) in 2003.
ThermoTeam currently processes almost
100,000 tonnes of input material each year
and also supplies other cement works with the
conditioned substitute fuel.
FIRE - A SERIOUS RISK
Because the plant handles flammable material,
fire protection is extremely important. Metal
sorting is a particular hazard. For example,
batteries that may be included in the metal
fraction can cause a short circuit, which may in
turn cause a fire.
Back in 2009 a serious fire caused damage
worth millions of Euros, and led the company
to the decision to improve fire protection. Until
then, a conventional fire alarm system was
in use, which is essentially based on a smoke
aspiration system.
“The smoke aspiration system is extremely
high-maintenance, especially in such a difficult
environment like ours,” says Kulmer.
The system is not triggered in the halls,
which are up to 12 metres high, until the fire is
already well and truly underway. Because of this
and the fact that it can take up to ten minutes
between the fire brigade being alerted and
arriving on the scene, a considerable amount of
damage may be caused.
The aim was to find a system that detects
fires earlier and therefore enables a rapid and
effective extinguishing operation. That search
paid off at the IFAT trade fair in Munich, where
Kulmer came across the Infrarot-Systeme from
Walluf, Germany based fire detection specialist,
Orglmeister.
In PYROsmart, Orglmeister offers an early fire
detection system that uses infrared technology.
Combining the system with automatic
extinguishing activation ensures that fires are
extinguished fully automatically. In an ideal
situation, it will not even be necessary to alert
the fire brigade.
INFRARED TECHNOLOGY
The early fire detection system consists
of a high-resolution infrared camera, which
constantly scans the area being monitored.
The plant crushes the material with shredders and separates unwanted components, such as metal
and inert materials
For more information, enter 7 at WMW.hotims.com
16 WASTE MANAGEMENT WORLD MARCH-APRIL 2014
FIRE DETECTION RECYCLING
1403WMW_16 16 4/9/14 9:23 AM
Panorama thermal imaging is initiated in this
way and used, along with the video images from
a second camera, to create a full-screen video
panorama image. The thermal image provides
highly precise and accurate temperature
information about the entire monitored area.
The panorama video image ensures fast and
clear identification of the hazard area.
At the ThermoTeam facility images from
three PYROsmart systems are displayed in the
plant’s control room. The operator can detect
the temperatures of the various areas at any
time using a false colour display of the infrared
panorama image, by moving the mouse over
the relevant section. The system also indicates
the location currently exhibiting the highest
temperature in the monitored area, thereby
giving the operator a rapid overview.
The patented early fire detection system is
fitted to a special high precision pan/tilt drive,
and can therefore provide full monitoring of
even very large areas. Thanks to the infrared
technology, smoke and dust in the monitored
area cannot cause incorrect measurements.
To prevent the lenses of the two cameras
from becoming dirty, there is a monitored
compressed-air flushing system integrated in
the housing.
TARGETED FIRE FIGHTING
The system does not just record and display
temperature values. If the temperature exceeds
a specified limit at one location, an alarm is
triggered. This alarm is raised long before the
smoke aspiration system would be able to detect
the fire. As automatic extinguishing systems are
each controlled by the three systems, a fire can
then also be fought in a direct, targeted manner.
At the ThermoTeam facility, RM15C
extinguishers made by Austrian firefighting
equipment manufacturer Rosenbauer are used.
These are coupled directly to the early fire
detection system.
“With this automation, fires can be fought
as soon as they break out, quickly and in a
targeted manner before they can spread and
cause significant damage”, explains Kulmer.
This is possible because the early fire
detection system determines the exact
position of the fire and uses this information
to specifically target the source of the fire. This
targeted firefighting method keeps the quantity
of quench water required, and therefore the
damage caused, to a minimum.
The integrated control system is also capable
of recognising whether a fire does indeed exist
or whether there is another heat source within
the monitored area. As the exhaust pipes of
the wheel loaders used in the input area or
INFRARED TECHNOLOGY
FOR EARLY FIRE DETECTION
All objects emit electromagnetic radiation
which lies primarily in the infrared range.
The exact spectral distribution of this
infrared radiation, which was first described
by the German physicist Max Planck in 1900,
is dependent on the temperature of the
object.
Measuring the infrared radiation enables
a very precise temperature measurement
to be taken. With modern infrared cameras,
you can view an exact infrared image of the
selected area - a so-called thermal image.
This technology is used typically in the
building industry to expose weaknesses in
building insulation, or when maintaining
machines and damaged ball bearings are
revealed, for example, as a result of excessive
heat build-up.
In terms of fire protection, infrared
technology makes it possible to detect fires
very early, when the temperature threshold
is still below the ignition temperature.
KEEP UP TO DATE WITH SENSOR-BASED SORTING AT:
The world‘s waste streams are a valuable
resource. Our sensor-based sorting technology
is helping to make the most of it.
WWW.TOMRA.COM/RECYCLING
IFAT 2014
Neue Messe München,
Germany
5 - 9 May 2014
Hall C2, Stand 235/334
For more information, enter 8 at WMW.hotims.com
17 MARCH-APRIL 2014 WASTE MANAGEMENT WORLD
FIRE DETECTION RECYCLING
1403WMW_17 17 4/9/14 9:23 AM
of the trucks that deliver the material, for
example, can become very hot, care must
be taken to ensure that a false alarm is not
triggered. To avoid this, it is possible to define
attributes of disturbance variables within the
system control, which are then not considered
in the alarm values thanks to the intelligent
software algorithms.
Furthermore, internal pre-alarms can also
be defined in the control system that do
not immediately trigger the fire reporting
process. Staff can then be warned about rising
temperatures while they are still far below
the ignition temperature. Employees are
therefore able to react in good time, before a
fire breaks out.
If the system detects an actual fire, it
initiates the automatic extinguishing process
immediately. Simultaneously, the whole plant
comes to a stop and a horn sounds to warn
employees. Text messages can also be set up
to notify employees at weekends, for example,
when the plant is not in operation.
If the alarm is not acknowledged on the
system by an employee, then the alarm is also
automatically triggered at the fire brigade
regional warning/alarm centre. In the event of
a fire, upon arrival at the plant the fire brigade
can use the extinguishers directly. For this,
remote controls are installed on the outside of
the building which allow the extinguishers to
be operated manually. The joystick controls on
the extinguishers correspond to those used in
modern fire engines.
IN SERVICE
Orglmeister delivered and commissioned
the three PYROsmart systems in 2012. The
commissioning process involved setting up
the system and gaining approval from the
responsible authorities. The early fire detection
system has been in continuous operation since
summer 2012. Kulmer is very happy with the
plant’s new early fire detection system, which he
says “has already extinguished three fires in their
early stages near the impurity sorter.”
“We are certain that relatively large fires can
be reliably prevented with the new early fire
detection system,” adds Kulmer.
To date no maintenance or repair work has
been required, only the annual inspection of the
extinguishing system and fire alarm system has
had to be carried out.
Dr Jörg Lantzsch is a specialised freelance
journalist based in Wiesbaden, Germany.
E-mail: j.lantzsch@drlantzsch.de
This article is on-line.
Please visit www.waste-management-world.com
In the control room, the early fre detection system provides employees with a rapid overview
The high calorifc fraction of residual packaging waste means it is susceptible to the threat of fre
The PYROsmart system detects fres early and
triggers automatic and targeted fre fghting
using the integrated extinguishers
The extinguishers can also be operated
manually via a remote-controlled joystick
18 WASTE MANAGEMENT WORLD MARCH-APRIL 2014
FIRE DETECTION RECYCLING
1403WMW_18 18 4/9/14 9:23 AM
For many years European
industrial emissions policy
has taken an integrated
approach, with the use of
Best Available Techniques
at its heart. While not
originally mandatory,
by 2010 the reference
document outlining
best practice for waste
incineration became
legally binding. Now
however, those reference
documents are to be
revised, along with the
emission limits they set.
By Hubert de Chefdebien and
Guillaume Perron-Piché
E
urope leads the world in environment
protection policies, in particular thanks
to the Best Available Techniques (BATs)
and BAT Reference Document (BREFs)
which seek to minimise industrial activities’
environmental impacts through the use of
proven techniques and technologies. With the
new approach under the Industrial Emissions
Directive (IED), where BREFs become legally-
binding, the way they are written needs to be
changed.
As the revision of the Waste Incineration
(WI) BREF is about to commence, it is important
to note that the European Waste Incineration
industry already achieves very good emission
results.
Since the mid-1990s, the cornerstone of the
European industrial emissions policy has been
an integrated approach. Simply put, it is not
wise to protect an environmental media, such
as air, by shifting the burden on – for example
through greater energy or water use.
The integrated approach was outlined in
12 criteria listed in the Integrated Pollution
Prevention and Control (IPPC) Directive from
1996. These criteria include for instance the
emissions to air and water, the consumption of
raw materials, the energy efficiency, the need to
prevent risks or accidents and the use of low-
waste technology.
The IPPC Directive became the leading
Europe-wide legislation assessing industrial
activities’ impacts while also balancing each
industry’s specific realities and costs related to
environmental protection.
The IPPC Directive brought this integrated
approach to the permitting process, whereby
all EU industrial installations were henceforth
required to have an environmental permit to
operate and to implement BAT to reduce their
environmental impact.
The Directive stopped short of mandating
uniform limits for all industries at the
European level. Some sectors, such as the
waste incineration industry, though, were
already covered at a European level and many
Member States of the then EU15 had stringent
requirements on other industries.
What these Best Available Techniques for
various industries are was to be laid down at
a later stage in BAT Reference Documents, the
well-known BREFs.
INCINERATION
IN THE SPOTLIGHT
REVISED WI BREF
The Ardley Waste to Energy plant under construction in Oxfordshire, UK implements
the Best Available Technique which will be described in the future BREF
Photo by APS (UK) Ltd and courtesy of Clugston-Viridor and CNIM
19 MARCH-APRIL 2014 WASTE MANAGEMENT WORLD
BREF REVISIONS WASTE TO ENERGY
1403WMW_19 19 4/9/14 9:23 AM
THE EU AS FORUM TO
DETERMINE BATS BY ACTIVITY
The IPPC Directive created an Information
Exchange Forum, managed by the European
Commission’s Joint Research Centre’s Seville
location, called the European IPPC Bureau
(EIPPCB). The Forum, convened by the
Commission and comprising industries, Member
States and NGOs, also created industry-specific
Technical Working Groups.
These were set-up to exchange and identify
BATs based on input from the involved parties,
and agree on what could be done, for example,
to minimise air emissions. From this exchange,
33 BREF documents were written covering all
the industries in the scope of the IPPC Directive.
These massive technological textbooks, each
hundreds of pages long (precisely 638 pages
for the Waste Incineration BREF published in
2006), include a list of Best Available Techniques,
some of them with related BAT Associated
Emission Levels (BATAELs), which indicate the
average emission levels reachable under normal
operation.
50
45
40
35
30
25
20
15
10
5
0
0 h 1000h 2000 h 3000 h 4000 h 50000 h 6000 h
Dry Flue Gas Cleaning process HCl ½-hr averages over 1 year – Data in chronological order
7000 h 8000 h 9000 h
1/2 averages
(mg/Nm
3
)
Figure 2: In chronological order all the ½-hr average values of HCl measured over a year after treatment in a typical and efcient Flue Gas Cleaning system of
the Dry type installed on a Municipal Solid Waste incinerator line.
When looking at this graph, the typical LEVEL of emissions to consider (i.e. BATAEL s according to the IPPC directive) for this line would be, let us say, between
1 and 6 mg/Nm
3
. However, the value from this line to consider in order to establish a CEILING VALUE NOT TO BE EXCEEDED by Emission LIMIT VALUES (i.e.
BATAEL s according to the IPPC directive) will be around 50 mg/Nm
3
. (Graph by L. Kosior, SITA)
Figure 1: Under the IPPC Directive, BATAELs were typical average values obtained in operation when
implementing the Best Available Techniques. The new IED-compatible BATAELs, which aim at capping
the ELVs set up in the permits, must be elaborated diferently

GLOSSARY
BAT: Best Available Technique
BATAEL: Best Available Techniques
Associated Emission Level
BREF: BAT Reference Document
EIPPCB: European IPPC Bureau (Seville)
ELV: Emission Limit Value
EOT: Effective Operating Time
IED: Industrial Emissions Directive
(2010/75/EU)
IPPC: Integrated Pollution Prevention and
Control Directive (96/61/EC)
NGO: Non-Governmental Organisation
NOC: Normal Operating Conditions
OTNOC: Other Than Normal Operating
Conditions
WI BREF: Waste Incineration BREF
WID: Waste Incineration Directive
(2000/76/EC)
ELVs (LIMIT)
according to WID 2000
The same values became Max
ELVs (”Safety net”) under IED
IED-BATAELs = Ceiling for
ELVs to be set up in permit
IPPC-BATAELs = Typical
LEVELS obtained in
operation when using BATs
IPPC
(mg/Nm
3
)
IED
New ceiling for ELVs
20 WASTE MANAGEMENT WORLD MARCH-APRIL 2014
BREF REVISIONS WASTE TO ENERGY
1403WMW_20 20 4/9/14 9:23 AM
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1403WMW_21 21 4/9/14 9:23 AM
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Helping you recover energy from waste
50
(mg/Nm
3
)
Dry FGC process
HCI ½-hr average over 1 year – Data arranged by value
= 0.9% of the total HCI emissions
0.9%
(Beneft)
(COST)
(yearly average: 2.7 mg/Nm3)
45
40
35
30
25
20
15
10
5
0
0 h 1000h 2000 h 3000 h 4000 h 50000 h 6000 h 7000 h 8000 h 9000 h
HCI outliers mass fow
(between 10 and 50 mg/Nm3):
Figure 3: (Same data as in fgure 2 but arranged by value)
On this example, lowering the ½-hr HCl ELV from 60 to 10 mg/Nm
3
would reduce the already very low HCl emitted fow by 0.9% but would require over 1000
times more reagent in mass (Original graph by L. Kosior, SITA)
For more information, enter 10 at WMW.hotims.com
22 WASTE MANAGEMENT WORLD MARCH-APRIL 2014
BREF REVISIONS WASTE TO ENERGY
1403WMW_22 22 4/9/14 9:23 AM
The existing BREFs, which are available freely
online, were to give operators and competent
authorities information on what can be
considered BAT for the sector and what levels of
emissions can be reached when implementing
them.
However applying the BATs from these
BREFs was not mandatory and there was no
direct link between the levels of these IPPC-
BATAELs and the Limits set up as Emission Limit
Values (ELVs) in the permits.
A STRENGTHENED APPROACH
Between 2007 and 2010, the EU institutions
recast the IPPC Directive, keeping the Integrated
Approach and merging it with six other
Directives, including the Waste Incineration
Directive, the Large Combustion Plants
Directive, covering the thermal power plants
sector; and four other sectoral directives) under
the IED. And this new proposal had teeth:
the implementation of techniques achieving
the performances of Best Available Techniques
described in the part of the BREF called BAT
conclusions became legally-binding.
Moreover, the ELVs laid down in the former
directives for incineration and a few other
industries were copied in the IED. The difference
is that they became considered as maximum
ELVs, a kind of “safety net”: the new general rule
is that the ELVs to be set up in the operating
permit by the competent authority must not be
higher than the sector’s BATAELs.
There is therefore a major change in the
BATAELs’ essence since, instead of a typical level
as it was under the IPPC, it will be from now on
a ceiling value for Emission Limit Values in the
permit. This is actually recognised by Article
13.7 of the IED, implying that the existing (IPPC)
BATAELs are not to be used to set ELVs with the
legally-binding nature of the new Directive. And,
therefore, new IED-compatible BATAELs must be
elaborated.
WASTE INCINERATION UNDER
THE IED
In 2010, when the IED was published, Waste
Incineration had already been complying for
years with very strict requirements, in stark
contrast to other sectors that demanded
and obtained transitional plans in the IED to
continue emitting more than the ELVs.
Indeed, Waste Incineration has been
regulated by the WID (Waste Incineration
Directive) since 2000, itself a follow-up of two
Directives from 1989 on prevention of air
pollution from municipal waste incineration
plants. For example, despite the large
fluctuations in pollutants load upstream of the
Flue Gas Cleaning systems, Waste Incineration
plants are controlled on a much larger number
of substances than any other industry.
For the few substances also regulated
in other industries (such as SO
X
or Dust), Waste
Incinerators have lower ELVs and with much less
possibility to derogate or exceed ELVs. Finally,
ELVs for incineration plants are mandatory, not
only in Normal Operating Conditions (NOCs)
like for other industries, but also during Effective
Operating Time (EOT) which also includes
some Other Than Normal Operating Conditions
(OTNOCs).
The generalised compliance with
these very stringent requirements was the
result of a combination of a dynamic industry
supplying flue gas cleaning equipment
guaranteeing compliance with ELVs, and of
the widespread use of such flue gas cleaning
equipment at Waste Incineration plants.
EVOLUTION OF WASTE
INCINERATI ON SINCE 2006
When examining government-issued emission
reports compiling all emission sources, it is clear
that Waste Incineration is not a problem for air
quality. This was even recognised by leading
decision-makers, including for example, Jürgen
May 5–9, 2014
MESSE MÜNCHEN
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23 MARCH-APRIL 2014 WASTE MANAGEMENT WORLD
BREF REVISIONS WASTE TO ENERGY
1403WMW_23 23 4/9/14 9:23 AM
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Trittin from the Green Party , who was Minister for
the Environment in Germany. These declarations
were also supported by scientific studies, all
recognising that the current emissions from
Waste incinerators in the EU are so low that they
are not a key issue for Environment and Health.
On the other hand, unlike many other
sectors that still have room for reducing their
emissions – and for which the IED was designed
– there is nearly no margin to lower limits for
incinerators because the levels currently obtained
result from the use of Best Available Techniques
for decades. In short, since operation already is
at the optimum trade-off between releases and
consumptions, further lowering air emissions at
Bourne Construction Engineering worked on the 2000+ tonnes of structural steel, with the scope of works including delivering the
super structure to support the structural steel for both the envelope and bunker cranes, waste bunker, ofce blocks Credit: Bourne
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24 WASTE MANAGEMENT WORLD MARCH-APRIL 2014
BREF REVISIONS WASTE TO ENERGY
1403WMW_24 24 4/9/14 9:23 AM
CNIM, your partner for turnkey Waste-to-Energy projects
The plants we build implement the Best Available
Techniques which will be described in the future BREF
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More than 280 units built around the world More than 280 units built around the world More than 280 units built around the world
©

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the stack would increase environmental impacts
elsewhere.
For instance, in some cases it is possible to
slightly reduce the emission of a certain pollutant
by overdosing a reagent. But at the emission
level already reached by incineration, a slight
improvement for air will require consuming far
more resources (see Figure 3), thus generating
more waste. This is because each extra quantity
to capture beyond the optimum is exponentially
more difficult and costly to abate than the first
ones in a raw gas. Would it not have been better
to use this extra reagent on other sectors where
such pollutants are poorly or not abated?
Plants are approaching the limit of the
emission abatement capabilities and of the
measurement systems, which cannot reliably
detect lower concentration levels than those
emitted by incineration plants. Still, technology
suppliers kept on seeking improvements in
Waste Incineration’s environmental impact.
Plants built today reach low long-term
emission levels more efficiently in terms of
reagents and energy: less residues are produced
and operation is cheaper. But the heterogeneous
nature of waste still implies that some emission
peaks will occur, justifying, inter alia, the need to
keep a margin between typical operation and
Emission Limit Values.
WHAT ARE THE CHALLENGES
FOR THE WI BREF REVISION?
The IED recognises the need to reset the BREFs,
the BAT Conclusions and the BATAELs to adapt
to the new approach of the IED. The BREFs upon
which the legally-binding ELVs will now be
based must all be revised, and this is imminent
for the waste incineration sector.
Since the technology already yields
excellent emissions abatement results and
the incineration sector contributes very little
to overall pollutant emissions, the challenge
remaining is to quantify this and in particular
to take into account that emissions from waste
incineration inevitably fluctuate due to the
inhomogeneous nature of this very peculiar fuel.
Compared to many other waste treatment
activities for which hardly any monitoring was
done on their pollutant releases and transfers,
there are huge datasets of operational values
from incineration plants which must now be
translated into legally-binding BATAELs.
This is a statistical exercise that is particularly
challenging because of the very low level of
current emissions of incineration. This industry
is the only one which must comply with ELVs
even in some Other Than Normal Operating
Conditions, and which must cope with a fuel
that is ever-changing due to its intrinsic nature.
If an emission peak is caused by the waste input,
should a high emission value be discarded as
non-BAT? Or should it instead be included in
the averages to reflect the changing nature of
waste, and not be discarded as alleged result of
a failure of air protection equipment?
MORE TO COME
For more on this important topic don’t miss
the follow up feature in the July/August issue
which will look into the ways to derive BATAELs
from operating values. This procedure aims at
characterising the excellent results already
obtained in European plants and integrating these
values into workable and legally-binding BATAELs.
Hubert de Chefdebien is chairman of
ESWET’s Technical Committee and is a
member of various waste management
organisations He represents the Waste
to Energy sector in numerous forums,
including at the European Commission’s
BREFs Technical Working Groups.
Guillaume Perron-Piché is policy officer
at ESWET .
This article is on-line.
Please visit www.waste-management-world.com
For more information, enter 13 at WMW.hotims.com
25 MARCH-APRIL 2014 WASTE MANAGEMENT WORLD
BREF REVISIONS WASTE TO ENERGY
1403WMW_25 25 4/9/14 9:23 AM
T
r
a
s
h
talking
REFUSE
DERIVED FUEL
Is it time for minimum treatment standards?
While Solid Recovered Fuel (SRF) is required to meet strict quality requirements,
Refuse Derived Fuel (RDF) is not. WMW asked a number of sector leaders for their
thoughts on whether the introduction of minimum treatment standards for RDF
would benefit the industry?
26 WASTE MANAGEMENT WORLD MARCH-APRIL 2014
1403WMW_26 26 4/9/14 9:23 AM
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1403WMW_27 27 4/9/14 9:23 AM
28 WASTE MANAGEMENT WORLD MARCH-APRIL 2014
TRASH TALKING
The distinction between SRF and RDF might not
be so large in terms of quality, not least given the
characteristics of the lowest class of SRF. In principle, if
quality standards were able to ensure an improvement
in beneficial outcomes commensurate with their cost,
then this might be a sensible idea.
In practice, however, requiring exported RDF to
meet standards which do not have to be met by waste
generated within the receiving country, and which
enters the very same facility, may simply increase costs
for no benefit, and might be considered a form of
trade barrier. Many receiving facilities have their own
preparation processes, and preparation prior to export
may actually pose more problems than it solves.
The key is to prevent illegal exports and waste
crime: to ensure that waste is not causing problems
while being stored or transported. This suggests
a focus on matters such as moisture content, and
perhaps, rough shred size, and bale density. Over and
above basic standards designed to protect health,
standards to commodify waste as an energy source
ought to be (is) demand-led by receiving industries.
The designation of incineration as ‘recovery’ was
explicitly sought by the European incinerator lobby.
It flows from this that waste can cross borders where
destined for such facilities. Current (not legally binding)
European Guidance on this allows for the heat used
within the plant to be counted when assessing
whether a plant qualifies as recovery or disposal.
This makes it feasible to achieve the R1 criterion
through only generating electricity. A more challenging
threshold based on the amount of heat and power
exported and utilised would give greater confidence
that where residual waste was exported for recovery,
in whatever form, the efficiency of the energy recovery
and use would be high.
Much has been made of the fact that export of
waste for incineration undermines the development
of domestic incineration capacity. Our concern is that
it risks undermining prevention, reuse and recycling
also, because of the potential to suppress the costs of
dealing with residual waste.
Some countries, such as Sweden, are continuing to
build capacity to satisfy the export market. One way
to address this would be through an incineration tax.
Complementary measures are requirements
to sort waste. Given the relatively finely balanced
economics at present, and the desirability of giving
greater certainty in the market, it seems a sensible
time to push forward on a requirement to sort food
waste. Other materials could also be included in such
requirements, as per the Scottish approach.
DR DOMINIC HOGG
CHAIRMAN AND FOUNDER
OF ENVIRONMENTAL
CONSULTANCY, EUNOMIA
RESEARCH & CONSULTING
STANDARDS SHOULD BE DEMAND LED BUT FOOD WASTE NEEDS SORTING
STANDARDS NOT NECESSARY BUT WASTE DERIVED FUELS MUST CONTINUE TO BE A ‘WASTE’
The need for quality criteria for waste derived fuels, be
it SRF or RDF, depends on where they are to be used.
If the destination is a dedicated Waste-to-Energy
plant, a pre-treatment or input criteria for the waste
is not necessary, as the plants are equipped with
sophisticated flue gas cleaning systems.
This enables WtE plants to accept heterogeneous
waste while achieving the strict emissions
requirements set in the Industrial Emissions Directive
and the appropriate Best Available Techniques.
However, if the waste is to be used at co-incinerating
industrial facilities, for example cement kilns, then it is
in the plant’s own interest for certain input criteria be
met to avoid technical problems such as corrosion or
negative impacts on their product. This is because RDF
is made of mixed waste materials including residual
municipal waste, and is therefore quite heterogenous.
For this reason, the industry has developed its
own requirements on the use of SRF within the
European Standardisation Committee (EN15359).
However, this does not necessarily set environmental
criteria, but provides fitness-for-use criteria setting
out under which conditions a waste can be accepted
without damaging the plant. Therefore, the European
Standardisation Committee (CEN) sets limits for the
chlorine content. It also establishes a net calorific value,
which is an economic factor. The only environmental
criterion is regarding Mercury (Hg).
In general, heterogeneous waste such as RDF
should be treated in dedicated waste-to-energy
plants which are equipped with specific flue gas
cleaning systems, whereas SRF can be suitable for
co-incineration in industrial plants.
MUST REMAIN ‘WASTE’
I cannot underline enough that both SRF and RDF
must remain under the waste legislation in order to
ensure a high level of environmental protection. The
application of waste law guarantees that the burning
of SRF and RDF comply with air pollution control
legislation and Best Available Techniques, as set for
waste incineration and co-incineration.
This will prevent damage to health and the
environment from the burning of heterogeneous
material in poorly designed boilers and unregulated
facilities lacking proper flue gas treatment or in facilities
which do not comply with Best Available Techniques.
It is also central to the application of the EU Waste
Shipment Regulation with its necessary controls over
its destination and where SRF or RDF might end up.
For reasons of traceability, tracking and control of
this material, SRF and RDF should also never become
‘Green List’ waste, as in this case prior notification is not
requested for transboundary shipments.
FERDINAND KLEPPMANN
PRESIDENT OF THE
CONFEDERATION OF EUROPEAN
WASTE-TO-ENERGY PLANTS
1403WMW_28 28 4/9/14 9:23 AM
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30 WASTE MANAGEMENT WORLD MARCH-APRIL 2014
TRASH TALKING
Market demand for fuel derived from waste is driven
by the need for sustainable solutions to low-cost
energy and unavoidable non-recyclable waste.
While some users require SRF, there exists ample
demand for RDF, which can be cheaper to produce.
Arguments about recyclable material remaining
in RDF can be quashed by introducing requirements
to extract what is practicable from the waste stream.
Quality standards certainly have their place, and
it is important that waste processors can achieve
certification to provide the market with the assurances
it requires. But since not all facilities have such specific
requirements, it would perhaps be unnecessarily and
burdensome on the industry to insist that all residual
waste is processed to SRF standards.
That said, it is important to ensure that valuable
recyclable materials are not being exported in RDF, and
RDF processors worth their salt are already extracting
whatever value is practicable from the waste stream.
It is simple economics: why pay for a material to be
recovered when you can generate an income stream?
Extracting the value of materials domestically is always
going to be beneficial.
An important consideration with tightening
regulations around SRF/RDF is the increasing amount
of material that is rejected, which then ultimately ends
up back in landfill. It’s an important balance to strike,
and the European Recovered Fuel Organisation is
making great strides in strengthening this side of the
industry.
So there is an argument for introducing quality
standards in terms of the process and limiting the
amount of recyclables left in the material. That would
certainly benefit both waste producers and waste
processors. But since SRF and RDF are two distinct
products, it is important not to take a hammer to
crack a nut, and respect the role in the market for both
types/standards of material.
The UK may harm itself if it introduces a single-
tier quality standard, meaning that all residual waste
destined for energy recovery needs to meet SRF
requirements. That could price the country’s RDF
producers out of the market for lower grade fuels,
and potentially result in stockpiles of waste with no
destination.
Particularly since much of the UK’s SRF/RDF is
currently exported to Europe, it makes sense to
provide what is needed. It’s always good to make sure
that all parts of industry are served, and that includes
low-cost waste disposal and affordable energy.
GAVIN WILLIAMS
DIRECTOR FOR RECYCLING & IRM
AT BIFFA
RDF IS A COMMERCIAL OPPORTUNITY BUT RECYCLABLES MUST BE SEPARATED
While SRF is manufactured to a defined quality
specification, RDF is much cruder. This is not because
we don’t have the technology to produce a more
refined substance. On the contrary, innovative
processing equipment exists to enable us to achieve a
homogenous and highly segregated material.
However, RDF customers have not dictated a strict
specification like SRF users have, because they are
happy with the quality of fuel being supplied.
It’s not surprising really. After all, there is wealth
in waste. So, at present, RDF importers seek volume
and the ability to charge higher gate fees. They are
also undoubtedly happy with high levels of valuable
revenue-generating recyclates such as metals and
plastics, being shipped with the fuel. However it could
be argued that this commercially-driven interest is
perhaps to the detriment of environmental gain.
As the EU strives to achieve its resource efficiency
goals, we should all be working harder to recover more
recyclates during the RDF production process.
A quality specification would also give greater
peace of mind regarding RDF utilisation. What’s more,
a quality grading would go some way to improving
public perceptions surrounding alternate fuels,
certainly in countries such as the UK where waste to
energy is less warmly embraced by the public.
It is important to consider the apparent growth
of the RDF market too. UK export levels alone
reportedly rose from just under 900,000 tonnes in
2012, to 1.5 million tonnes in 2013. More and more
countries will undoubtedly increase RDF production in
acknowledgement of this high level of trade. However,
if a quality standard is not in place, how will the market
protect itself from spurious imports?
A minimum quality grade would act as a barrier to
entry for less scrupulous manufacturers who perhaps
want to make a ‘quick buck’.
The ‘walk before we can run’ phrase is potentially
relevant here. To introduce a complex grading system
overnight may cause too much market disruption.
However, a minimum standard would drive some
initial improvements and the subsequent phased
implementation of a quality framework could help to
achieve even more of the above benefits.
It’s great the UK government is consulting industry
to define what a realistic specification could be. Criteria
such as particle size, calorific value and metallurgical
content should be considered.
Admittedly, policing this will not be easy, especially
when organisations such as the Environment Agency
face continued cut-backs. However, perhaps TFS
regulations could be adapted to help monitor quality.
Plus, if governments better acknowledged the long-
term economic and renewable energy benefits of
waste to energy, maybe more resource would be
allocated to safeguarding this area of industry.
CHRIS OLDFIELD
MANAGING DIRECTOR OF WASTE
SHREDDING SPECIALIST UNTHA
UK
MINIMUM STANDARDS COULD DRIVE RECYCLING AND BOOST PUBLIC PERCEPTION OF WTE
1403WMW_30 30 4/9/14 9:23 AM
THE PYROFORMER
Reforming Low Value Biowaste Treatment
When it comes to
commercialising
new technologies for
processing wastes and
recovering valuable
materials and energy,
competing with well-
established technologies
can often prove an
insurmountable obstacle.
Aston University’s
European Bioenergy
Research Institute
hopes to negate this by
complementing existing
technologies with its new
intermediate pyrolysis
reactor.
By Ben Messenger
P
yrolysis is a process that breaks
carbon based materials down by
heating them in an oxygen deprived
environment. In its simplest form
it has been used for thousands of years to
produce charcoal.
In more modern iterations pyrolysis can
be used to process a variety of abundant
biowastes, producing not only solid output,
or biochar, but a variety of useful liquid and
gaseous products. But as a technology it hasn’t
really taken off in a big way. That’s something
that the Aston University’s European Bioenergy
Research Institute (EBRI) is hoping to change
with the development of its new Pyroformer™.
While currently still in development at the
EBRI’s new £16.5 million facility, the technology
offers the potential to integrate into existing
technologies such as Anaerobic Digestion
(AD) and gasification to improve efficiency
and operating economics. The facility itself has
been jointly funded by the University and the
European Regional Development Fund (ERDF),
and features six research suites, laboratories and
technology demonstration facilities.
The Pyroformer is currently being
demonstrated alongside a biomass gasifier, with
both being used to fuel the site’s Combined
Heat and Power (CHP) system.
“Pyrolysis is interesting because it’s a very
variable process. By changing the conditions
of the process you can maximise the charcoal.
You can get about 35% solids, together with
gases and liquids which don’t have a great deal
of value. Or you can maximise liquids, which
is a technology called fast pyrolysis,” explains
Professor Tony Bridgwater, director of EBRI on a
recent visit to the demonstration plant.
“When you combust anything, firstly you
dry it, then you pyrolyse it into a solid and
a vapour and then you partially oxidise the
solid and vapour into gases of value. Any
combustion process is sequential, drying,
pyrolysis, gasification and combustion. There’s
been a lot of interest in separating those out
physically,” he adds.
The intermediate pyrolysis technology at
the heart of the Pyroformer sits in the middle
and produces some liquids, some gases and
some solids.
HOW IT WORKS
Currently the Pyroformer can process around
100 kg of various biomass feedstocks per hour.
The feedstock is pre-processed into pellets
of between 3mm and 10mm and enters the
Pyroformer through a hopper. It is then moved
through the reactor via a twin screw drive.
31 MARCH-APRIL 2014 WASTE MANAGEMENT WORLD
RETHINKING PYROLYSIS BIOWASTE
1403WMW_31 31 4/9/14 9:23 AM
Currently the reactor is heated using electric
blankets to around 450°C, although the heating
arrangement is something that Tom Anderson,
EBRI business development manager tells WMW
wasn’t the focus of the current research into
getting the reactor itself to work. For the next
reactor a hot oil recycling system is likely to be
implemented.
To get the reactor up to temperature requires
around 50% parasitic load, but this drops to just
15% once the operating temperature has been
achieved.
The feedstock travels the length of the
reactor in the inner screw before falling into
the outer screw, which then brings it back
down the outer side of the reactor. By the time
it finishes its journey through the Pyroformer
the material has been transformed into a highly
absorbent catalytic biochar which is collected in
a container beneath the reactor.
The rest of the outputs from the Pyroformer
come off as a vapour stream which, Anderson
says contains both permanent and condensable
gases.
“Within the reactor you start to get a
reforming process, meaning that we’re taking
out some of the nasties from the material
and the gas and oil we get off are slightly
cleaner. That’s the ‘reformer’ part of Pyroformer,”
he explains.
The hot gases from the reactor go through
various scrubbers and cleaners. To separate out
the oils, the condensable part of the vapour
stream is sprayed with biodiesel. Because the
pyrolysis oil, depending on the feedstock used,
is normally a bit viscous, slightly acidic and
doesn’t have a high enough heating value to be
able to put directly into an engine, it needs to be
upgraded slightly. An electro static precipitator
is also used to remove any aerosols from the
gases.
“What we do is in-situ upgrading,” says
Anderson. “We spray the vapour stream with
biodiesel which quenches the condensable
parts of the gas. We start to get an oil fraction
and upgrade it at the same time and we are left
with a pyrolysis and biodiesel mix which is ready
to go into the CHP engine.”
According to Bridgewater the Pyroformer
technology is particularly suitable for handling
multiple different materials.
“It gives you four products; a solid char
which has interest as a biochar for adding to
soil; a gas which can be used in an engine;
an organic liquid; and an aqueous liquid,” he
explains.
“We’re interested in looking at adding the
aqueous liquid to anaerobic digestion, partly
as a means of disposing of it and partly as a
means of increasing the gas production in the
digestion of wastewater. The digestate from
AD can then be fed back in. It’s not a perpetual
motion machine, but the idea is to integrate
appropriate technologies to maximise the
recovery of energy,” adds the professor.
LINKS TO LOCAL BUSINESSES
As part of the ERDF funding, which provided
the capital to build the building and part of the
Pyroformer and gasification plant, the EBRI is
currently working alongside regional businesses
in the Greater West Midlands area.
“What we’re looking to do is take waste
streams from those companies and test and
see if we can run the Pyroformer using dried
and pelletised versions of that feedstock. The
gasifier itself runs on wood pellets. It’s the
pyrolysis technology for which we are looking
at the more novel biomass feedstocks,” explains
Anderson.
“We’ve looked at things like dried and
pelletised digestate residue from anaerobic
digestion, olive stones, rape seed oil pressings,
the residue from meat and bone meal - a whole
range of low grade, very cheap feedstocks,” he
continues.
According to Anderson, the next growth area
in ‘bioenergy’ is going to be in converting
high value biomass into high value products,
whether its fuels, chemicals, catalysts, polymers,
pharmaceuticals or nutraceuticals. Only low
grade residual biomass will be used for direct
energy conversion.
“That’s happening right now. Companies
like Unilever already have teams looking at
replacing individual components within a
product with bio-based components, if it can be
cheaper more sustainable and a better product
for the consumer,” he says.
COMPLEMENTARY
TECHNOLOGY
According to Anderson one of the benefits the
Pyroformer offers is that it can complement
other technologies.
“We’re looking at coupling it directly to
an AD plant,” he says. “It’s not a case of trying
to break open a new market and saying it’s a
pyrolysis reactor instead of other technologies.
As the AD sector grows there’s going to be
more and more issues around the management
of digestate.
“We speak to lots of people that are
interested in AD, and what they’re really
interested in is producing biogas to generate
electricity or to inject to the grid. They’re not
even thinking about digestate management.
There’s perhaps a view that they can either just
give it away, or sell it for land application. But
that’s seasonal, and if you have a wet summer
you can’t spread to land,” he continues.
There are also issues around the type of
feedstocks that can be used if the digestate is
to be spread to land. According to the EBRI the
management of digestate is going to be as big
The Pyroformer can be fed on a variety of
pelletised biowaste feedstocks
The plan is ultimately to connect the output of the pyroformer to directly feed the gasifer
32 WASTE MANAGEMENT WORLD MARCH-APRIL 2014
RETHINKING PYROLYSIS BIOWASTE
1403WMW_32 32 4/9/14 9:23 AM
a part of operating an AD plant as producing
biogas, enabling the Pyroformer to become a
management solution.
“There’s still a stage of pre-processing, so
you need to dry the material and pelletise it. But
that’s relatively minimal additional costs, bearing
in mind that the Pyroformer will produce further
heat and power and increase the gas yield. And
the biochar can still be used for land application.
It has potassium, phosphorous and nitrogen,”
says Anderson.
“It’s very absorbent so you can blend it with
synthetic fertilisers and it will retain that fertiliser
in the soil for longer, so potentially it’s quite a
nice addition to the business model for running
an existing AD plant. From our perspective, for
commercialisation, there’s a readymade market
to sell into. It’s more ‘bang for your buck’ for the
AD sector,” he adds.
PLUGGING INTO GASIFICATION
The Pyroformer is not the only advanced
conversion technology being demonstrated
with the CHP system at the EBRI’s new facility. A
fluidised bed gasifier which runs on woodchips
is also plugged into the system. Unusually, the
gasifier features a bed of molten dolomite.
Most gasifiers use sand as the heat medium,
but Anderson explains that the dolomite
both retains the heat in the reactor and is also
slightly catalytic - reducing the formation of
contaminants such as tars and particulates in
the syngas.
The dolomite is heated to 900°C, becoming
a molten magma like material through which
the biomass is fed to form a syngas. Because of
the high temperatures the gas produced is very
clean. However, it still requires cleaning before it
can be combusted in the CHP system’s engine.
This is taken care of by a range of equipment
including a cyclone filter that removes ash
particles.
But it’s what the researchers are planning to
do with the gasifier that’s really interesting. EBRI
is planning on connecting the two technologies
together. Instead of the vapours from the
Pyroformer being used separately, what they’re
planning on doing is taking those vapours
and sending them directly into the gasifier.
Essentially, the plan is to gasify the pyrolysis
outputs.
“The reason for doing that is that at the
moment gasifiers are like the thorough bred
of the bioenergy world. They’re very good, but
they’re very expensive and they can only really
utilise more expensive fuels or wastes like wood
pellets for good quality energy production.
Conversely, the Pyroformer can take low grade
material, ideally with a gate fee,” says Anderson.
“If you could reduce the cost of wood
pellets to say 50% and top up the rest of
the energy input by introducing gases from
the pyrolysis reactor, which is generating a
gate fee to process low grade materials such
as non-woody garden waste that the gasifier
wouldn’t be able to handle, you’ve completely
changed the economics of operating a gasifier,”
he continues.
Currently electric blankets are used to heat the
Pyroformer to its 450°C operating temperature
For more information, enter 16 at WMW.hotims.com
33 MARCH-APRIL 2014 WASTE MANAGEMENT WORLD
RETHINKING PYROLYSIS BIOWASTE
1403WMW_33 33 4/9/14 9:23 AM
However, according to Anderson, to make
such a combined gasification/pyrolysis system
economically viable, it would likely need to be
operated at a fairly large scale with gasifiers of
around 20 MW.
CHP CONTROL
The CHP system being fuelled by the Pyroformer
and gasifier is actually a trigeneration system
which delivers heat, cooling and power. The
challenge of optimising the delivery of that
energy has led to the EBRI developing bespoke
energy management software.
“We can provide heat, electricity and
cooling to this building, to the power plant
building or export it to the student guild,” says
Anderson. “What you want to do with any CHP
system is you want it to be perfectly efficient,
throttled to the max and working efficiently.
But that means if we don’t need that much
heat and power here, what do we do with it?
“There’s no point in bringing down the
CHP because you’re going to lose efficiency, so
we would then be able to switch it to go to the
guild. But equally, we’ve got heat demand from
the guild and the gasifier building, electricity
demand and cooling - and we can pull in from
the mains. The university also has its own CHP
system.
“We need to know what’s the cheapest
way at any moment in time to be able to satisfy
all those heat and power demands. So we’ve
developed quite a clever piece of software
with a company called ADI to try and do that
balancing. That side of demand management
is a huge growth area for conventional
technology,” Anderson adds.
CONCLUSIONS
The university has set up a wholly owned spin-
off company called Optimus Energy which will
be responsible for taking EBRI’s technologies
to market. At the moment a lot of that work is
focused on the Pyroformer because it’s at a later
stage of development, but it is still a technology
and not a finished product. It needs to be
optimised and further developed.
“We want to do more testing. But at the
same time we’ve put feelers out with potential
investors to find out where they see a technology
like this being relevant, and that’s led us down
this integration with AD route,” says Anderson.
Such collaborations are commonplace in
the U.S., and becoming more so in the UK. By
listening to industry, and developing technology
that complements, rather than competes with,
established technologies, the EBRI’s shiny new
facility at Aston University could just be onto a
winner in the shape of its Pyroformer.
Ben Messenger is managing editor of WMW
This article is on-line.
Please visit www.waste-management-world.com
Unlike most gasifers which use sand as a heat
medium, this one uses molten basalt
For more information, enter 17 at WMW.hotims.com
34 WASTE MANAGEMENT WORLD MARCH-APRIL 2014
RETHINKING PYROLYSIS BIOWASTE
1403WMW_34 34 4/9/14 9:23 AM
Ibizan waste
management firm
HERBUSA has recently
purchased the first three
Geesinknorba hybrid
drive refuse collection
vehicles mounted on
Volvo FE Hybrid chassis
in Spain. But how are they
fitting into its established
collection system and
what benefits have they
brought?
By Timothy Byrne
P
rivately owned waste management
firm, HERBUSA, has been collecting
waste on the island of Ibiza for
fifty years. The family run company
originally took the name of its founder, Vicente
Bufi Tur until 1980, when the name was
changed to HERBUSA. The company provides
environmental services on the island of Ibiza, and
currently collects waste for the municipalities of
Santa Eularia Des Riu, Sant Josep De Sa Talaia
and Sant Joan De Labritja.
These municipalities are coastal resorts
and are populated by both tourists and local
residents. HERBUSA provides waste and recycling
collection services for between 90,000 and
100,000 people across the three municipalities,
while in the summer the population swells with
the arrival of thousands of tourists to around
250,000. With this influx, the production of
municipal waste increases from March until
August, before falling from September onwards.
Waste is collected in containers ranging
from 800 to 1000 litres in capacity, which are
matched to rear loading refuse collection
vehicles. The containers are positioned at
communal collection points along the street
serving both households and small businesses.
The largest producers of waste, such as
hotels, apartment blocks, and bars producing
over 200 litres of waste a day, buy their own
1000 litre containers, which must be compliant
to DIN standards so that they can be emptied
on the lift of the rear loading collection vehicles.
These businesses have their own collection
point within their own grounds.
In addition to providing municipal waste
collection services, the company also provides
many other services. These include street
and beach cleaning, the collection of glass,
paper and plastic recyclables in igloo and
underground containers positioned along the
streets of the municipalities, as well as the
maintenance of parks and gardens through a
subsidiary company called Mejoras y Servicios
Pitiusos (MESPISA). This company is also involved
in supplying urban furniture, traffic information
signs and providing litter bin maintenance.
HERBUSA also provides commercial services
to industry and commerce on the island.
Some of these services are commercial waste
HYBRID DRIVE RCVS
Mixing it up in Ibiza
35 MARCH-APRIL 2014 WASTE MANAGEMENT WORLD
GEESINKNORBA HYBRID COLLECTION AND TRANSPORT
1403WMW_35 35 4/9/14 9:38 AM
collection which includes the provision of waste
containers from 800 to 1000 litre wheeled bins
to larger containers of 2m
3
to 20m
3
capacities.
Containers can be provided either on a rental
basis, or purchased directly by the customer for
the storage of their waste.
In recent years the company has also
provided commercial waste collection services
to an event in the Port of Ibiza, supplying and
collecting thirty 1000 litre containers.
HERBUSA is also licensed to collect Maritime
waste from ships, and from the Maritime
industry in general.
This service is known as the Marpol service,
derived from the Marpol Convention of 1978
to maintain cleanliness of the seas and oceans.
This waste includes sewage sludge and general
waste produced by tourists and commercial
traffic.
The company also manages the collection
of hazardous waste for all municipalities
across the island of Ibiza. The hazardous waste
collected includes end-of-life light bulbs,
batteries, Waste Electronic and Electrical
Equipment (WEEE), cooking oil, asbestos and
plasterboard. Once collected, the WEEE is
delivered to another processor on the island
which processes a proportion of it while the
remainder is transported to Barcelona or
Valencia for processing.
GOING HYBRID
The collection service starts at 2.30am every
day as the company believes that this is the
best window to provide the service due to the
minimal volume of traffic on the streets, as well
as fewer tourists, thus helping to provide an
efficient waste collection service.
The company collects 60,000 tonnes of residual,
commercial and recyclable waste per annum
from the three municipalities it serves. To
achieve this it has recently invested in three
Geesinknorba GPM III hybrid waste collection
vehicles complete with bin lift to empty DIN
type containers from 80-1100 litres capacity.
“HERBUSA needed to replace some older
waste collection vehicles so, the company
decided to buy three Geesinknorba GPM III
hybrid waste collection vehicles mounted onto
the Volvo FE hybrid three axle chassis,” explains
Antonio Ribas Bonet, director of HERBUSA.
SPECIFICATIONS
The Geesinknorba GPM III vehicles supplied
to HERBUSA are of 21m
3
capacity and features
a GCB 1000 bin lift to facilitate the emptying
of Din type containers from 80 to 1100 litres
capacity. The lifting equipment comprises two
trunnion arms and a comb lift.
The hybrid Mark V version, as sold to
HERBUSA, can be charged by plug in connectors
which have been installed at the operator’s
vehicle park in Ibiza town. The three new vehicles
will be recharged at the end of each collection
shift so that they are ready to commence their
next shift at 2.30am the following morning.
The load cell batteries for the Geesinknorba
range of waste collection vehicles have been
specially designed for refuse collection vehicles
and are claimed to be more powerful and
efficient. The battery pack is 72 volt and delivers
620 amps per hour.
The batteries have enough capacity to
complete three collection shifts, for example,
three full vehicle loads. The battery pack can
run down to a level of 20% before the driver can
transfer the bin lift and compaction operations
over to the conventional Volvo diesel engine.
The advantage of this is that it does not affect
the productivity levels of the collection service.
Another advantage is all round fuel savings,
enabling the operator to reduce their costs.
At speeds of less than 30 kph, the vehicle
operates on battery power, thus producing zero
emissions. Above 30 kph and the diesel engine
kicks in.
When not working in hybrid mode the GPM
III hybrid system uses the Smartpack system,
which enables control of binlift speed and other
functions. It automatically senses how much
pressure the system will require to lift the bin
Volvo FE hybrid 6x2 rear steer chassis complete with Geesinknorba GPM III hybrid waste collection
vehicle of 21 cubic metre capacity and with GCB 1000 bin lift for the Municipality of Santa Eularia Des Riu
36 WASTE MANAGEMENT WORLD MARCH-APRIL 2014
GEESINKNORBA HYBRID COLLECTION AND TRANSPORT
1403WMW_36 36 4/9/14 9:38 AM
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THIS SIMPLE
For more information, enter 18 at WMW.hotims.com
1403WMW_37 37 4/9/14 9:38 AM
Management and representatives from HERBUSA and the municipality of Sant Josep De Sa Talaia at the
presentation of their new Geesinknorba GPM III hybrid waste collection vehicle
For more information, enter 19 at WMW.hotims.com
38 WASTE MANAGEMENT WORLD MARCH-APRIL 2014
GEESINKNORBA HYBRID COLLECTION AND TRANSPORT
1403WMW_38 38 4/9/14 9:38 AM
Please visit our website at www.ntm.f
· Contact NTM Finland Phone: +358-6-2626200
See you at
IFAT Fair
5-9.5 2014
in München
and pack the contents, thus saving fuel. The
vehicles are also fitted with LED lighting which
HERBUSA chose to help to save energy.
The 26 tonne Volvo FE Hybrid chassis is a 6x2
rear steer chassis and is fitted with a cab that has
room for a driver and two collection operatives.
The chassis is powered by a conventional 340
hp Euro V Volvo engine, as well as the 200 hp
electric motor which drives the hybrid system.
Because of the combination of the
conventional diesel engine and the electric
motor, the vehicle is fitted with a heavy duty
12-speed Volvo I-Shift automatic transmission.
The latest hybrid RCVs from Geesinknorba
are the result are the result of several years
collaboration with Volvo. The first prototype
unit entered into service in Sweden in 2005.
Since then, both Geesinknorba and Volvo have
continued to develop the product.
The RCVs supplied to HERBUSA will be
supported through the Geesinknorba service
network in Madrid and Barcelona. The company
has also been provided with a remote control by
Geesinknorba, which can be connected to the
hybrid units in case there is a fault.
The problem can then be downloaded
by Geesinknorba technicians in Madrid or
Barcelona who can identify any fault in the
system and rectified.
BENEFITS
Prior to purchasing the three vehicles, HERBUSA
had discussions with the three municipalities it
provides services for to discuss their thoughts
on hybrid waste collection vehicles.
“They were keen on the idea because they
believed that hybrid collection vehicles are the
future of waste collection and will give a better
service to both the tourists and the inhabitants
in these two municipalities,” says Ribas Bonet.
Juan Ribas, councillor for the environment,
at the Municipality of Sant Josep De Sa Talaia
adds: “The new Geesinknorba hybrid waste
collection vehicles are ecological, giving
reduced noise levels and massive savings in
fuel. The new collection vehicles will contribute
to reducing the carbon footprint since.”
“The waste collection service in Sant Josep
De Sa Talaia starts at 2.30am in the morning,
so the hybrid collection vehicles will achieve
reduced noise levels compared to the current
diesel collection vehicles operating in the
municipality,” he continues.
His colleague, Raul Luna, technician for
environmental services, agrees and also points
out that the vehicles will be the first on Ibiza.
“The main global benefits to using the
hybrid equipment is reduced carbon emissions,
reductions in levels of carbon dioxide CO
2
, as
well as the local benefits of reduced noise,”
concludes Luna.
Miguel A. Morales, commercial director
for Geesinknorba Spain and Portugal, adds:
“Reduced fuel consumption when using the
equipment and chassis in hybrid mode which
gives a fuel saving of 60% and noise levels are
significantly reduced as well as levels of CO
2
.”
CONCLUSIONS
Geesinknorba have always utilised advanced
technology, and the manufacturer says that
it is keen to continue to improve its products
through research and make them more
environmentally friendly.
That this aim is commercially successful is
borne out by HERBUSA, in conjunction with the
municipalities on the island of Ibiza, purchasing
the first full hybrid Geesinknorba RCVs in Spain.
Perhaps the larger cities in Spain will follow suit?

Timothy Byrne, MCIWM chartered waste
manager, ISWA international waste
manager and associate member of
Ategrus (Spanish Solid Waste Association).
This article is on-line.
Please visit www.waste-management-world.com
For more information, enter 20 at WMW.hotims.com
39 MARCH-APRIL 2014 WASTE MANAGEMENT WORLD
GEESINKNORBA HYBRID COLLECTION AND TRANSPORT
1403WMW_39 39 4/9/14 9:38 AM
With 125,000 visitors attending and nearly 3000 exhibitors from the around
the world, IFAT has earned a name for being the biggest solid waste, water and
wastewater trade show. So what can visitors expect from the 2014 show?
Eugen Egetenmeir, managing director of organising company Messe München,
shares some insight.
1. WHY HAS THE NAME OF THE
EVENT BEEN CHANGED BACK
FROM IFAT ENTSORGA TO IFAT?
The name ENTSORGA was included in the
show’s title in 2010, to communicate to the
sector the fact that this event was moving
from Cologne to Munich. That message has
been understood, and so we went back to our
original, succinct name of IFAT.
2. WHAT ARE YOU GOING TO
DEVELOP THE EVENT THIS YEAR
COMPARED TO TWO YEARS
AGO?
As far as the product categories and the
whole set-up of IFAT are concerned, we stick
to the successful concept of the past editions.
However, there will be some differences:
Compared to the last show in 2012, not only the
exhibition space at IFAT 2014 will increase by
15,000 square meters, we are also expecting a
new record attendance regarding our exhibitors.
Furthermore, we expect the proportion of
international exhibitors as compared to the
previous events will expand still further.
3. SPECIFICALLY, WHAT WILL
BE THE FOCUS OF THE WATER/
WASTEWATER SECTIONS?
ALSO, FOR SOLID WASTE
MANAGEMENT WHAT WILL BE
THE MAIN ATTRACTIONS?
A very well-known but still sensitive issue is the
treatment of sewage sludge. In all countries
THE BIG ONE
IFAT PREVIEW
40 WASTE MANAGEMENT WORLD MARCH-APRIL 2014
1403WMW_40 40 4/9/14 9:42 AM
around the world sewage sludge is produced,
yet many countries are still struggling with the
best way to treat it. So even though this topic
isn’t entirely new it will be comprehensively
covered at IFAT due to its still being up-to-date.
For waste collection vehicles and other
municipal vehicles one highly topical subject is
the emissions norm Euro VI which has been in
force since the end of 2013, beginning of 2014.
Many companies have had to find solutions
to the higher space requirements of the larger
components in the exhaust system as compared
to Euro V.
Furthermore, phosphorus recycling is still a
hot topic as phosphorus is extremely important
for biological organisms and the resource is – as
many others – getting scarce. So, recovering
the natural and limited resource of phosphorus
is one of the biggest challenges in securing
worldwide food production in the future.
And last but not least, the recycling of
building material becomes more and more
important. This topic isn’t a new one too.
Nonetheless, raw materials are a limited resource.
And for years a range of different techniques has
been developed for recovering raw materials.
The job involves not only recovering valuable
materials, but also removing extraneous matter
and any harmful substances that may be
present.
4. WHAT ARE YOU DOING TO
MAKE THE EVENT APPEAL
TO A WIDER INTERNATIONAL
AUDIENCE BUT STILL ATTRACT
THE DOMESTIC GERMAN
MARKET?
We are constantly developing IFAT, e.g. by
including new live-demonstrations or –
whenever appropriate – new topics. Thereby we
try to keep the show attractive for all different
sectors and countries. Moreover, I would like to
point out that IFAT is simply the world largest
and most important show for the environmental
industry and the international meeting place for
key-players and decision makers. This is the place,
where exhibitors present their innovations and
product novelties. In this context, IFAT reflects
not only the latest market developments but
also sets new trends. And last but not least
IFAT features an exceptionally large share of
international exhibitors and visitors.
5. IFAT (PREVIOUSLY IFAT
ENTSORGA) IS KNOWN FOR ITS
STRONG EXHIBITION AND HIGH
ATTENDANCE (100,000+). HOW
ARE YOU DEVELOPING THE
CONFERENCE TO INCREASE ITS
PRESENCE?
IFAT revolves around state-of-the-art know-how
and features an exceptional events program
including two forums – one in hall A5 and one
in hall B1. The forums are platforms for company
presentations, panel discussions, country
specials, technical discussions and special
events. Trade associations and manufacturers
will hold practice-oriented live demonstrations
of machines and systems at the open-air
site. Besides the already well-known Practical
Days organized by the German Engineering
Federation (VDMA), the Trucks in Action
organized by the German Municipal Vehicles
and Equipment Industry Association (VAK) and
the Professional Competition organized by the
German Association for Water, Wastewater and
Waste (DWA), IFAT features several premieres:
One of the premiers is the live demonstration
on car recycling, organized by a new partner
of IFAT, the steel recycling association BDSV.
Another premiere will be the live demonstration
on building material recycling organized by
another new partner of IFAT, the Verband der
Baubranche, Umwelt- und Maschinentechnik
(VDBUM).Furthermore, the DWA organizes the
special event “Think Green — Think Future”
in hall B0. Here, exhibitors can present their
companies and talk to interested candidates
– young professionals as well as experienced.
Topics there are research, education and human
resources. And last but not least – for the first
time ever – IFAT will be the host of one of the
most important environmental and business
awards in Europe: IFAT 2014 will open with
the presentation of the 2014 GreenTec Awards.
These awards bring together protagonists
from the widest variety of sectors, i.e. from
industry, politics, society and the media. It is a
platform with a unique network and one where
exhibitors and customers can communicate.
6. WITH EXHIBITION SPACE
SELLING OUT, HOW WILL YOU
BE EXPANDING THE EVENT
IN THE FUTURE? WILL IFAT BE
MOVED TO A BIGGER VENUE?
No, IFAT will definitely stay in Munich. For 2016,
we can only grow in the outdoor area – the
halls are fully booked. However, we will be able
to provide more space for the show in 2018 for
Messe München will build two more halls, C5
and C6. As this can only be done in between
the world’s biggest show, bauma, we have to
wait until 2016 when the next bauma takes
place. After that the construction of the new
halls begins.
7. WOULD MESSE MUENCHEN
CONSIDER MOVING THE
EVENT FROM BI-ANNUALLY TO
ANNUALLY?
No. We are constantly in contact with our
conceptual sponsors, the members of our
Executive and Advisory Board as well as our
exhibitors. The two-year-cycle of IFAT and the
innovation cycle of the industry are directly
connected with each other. Every two years,
IFAT is the place, where exhibitors present their
innovations and product novelties. So, there is
no need to move IFAT to annually.
8. IF PEOPLE HAVE NOT VISITED
THE SHOW BEFORE, HOW
WOULD YOU DESCRIBE IT IN
FIVE WORDS?
Inspiring, innovative, sustainable, intelligent and
elementary.
IFAT PREVIEW
41 MARCH-APRIL 2014 WASTE MANAGEMENT WORLD
1403WMW_41 41 4/9/14 9:42 AM
42 WASTE MANAGEMENT WORLD MARCH-APRIL 2014
IFAT PREVIEW
Eggersmann Anlagenbau: Turnkey solutions
for mechanical and biological waste treatment.
BRT Better Recycling Technologie: Equipment
for waste sorting and recycling.
BACKHUS EcoEngineers: Turning technology
for composting, waste treatment and
bioremediation.
Hall C2, Booth 335
AUT Anlagen- und Umwelttechnologie GmbH
is an expert in the area of recycling and
waste management. We develop, engineer
and deliver turn-key system solutions and
technologies for the treatment of different
types of waste.
Hall C1, Booth 413/513
MARTIN GmbH will highlight its latest
technologies and references. Experts from all
our fields of activity will be available.
Hall B3, Booth 479/578
Eriez, manufacturer of magnetic separation,
metal detection, vibratory and filtration
equipment will demonstrates the efficiency
of the newly designed eddy current separator.
You’re welcome to bring your samples to IFAT.
Hall C1, Booth 232
The LM-GROUP combines the core
competences of three specialists. L&M
Entsorgungs-Systeme, manufacturer of
pressing technology. Sutco RecyclingTechnik,
for waste business, design and delivery of
treatment sorting systems. unoTech GmbH
develops channel baling presses.
Hall B2 - Booth 203/302
HSM is a leading manufacturer of electro-
hydraulic baling presses and PET/UBC
solutions worldwide. The HSM solutions
provide effective and economic disposal of
recyclable waste materials.
Hall C1, Booth 243/342
Eldan will bring 40 tonne equipment to IFAT
introducing a ACSR Cable Shear with a live
demonstration, a Cable Stripper (M8), a Twin-
Shaft Shredder (TS1460) and a heavy duty
Multi Purpose Rasper (MPR200HD)
Hall C2, Booth 433/536
The revolutionary CLARITY nexxt is Binder+Co’s
highly efficient development for sorting glass
and plastics starting from 1 mm. Binder+Co,
leading specialist for sorting transparent and
non-transparent bulk materials.
Hall C1, Booth 220
ARJES offers individual shredding solutions
for the processing of biomass, green waste,
plastic, paper, domestic & commercial waste,
industrial waste, scrap metal, used tires and
lots more.
Hall C1 - Booth 101/202
Babcock & Wilcox Vølund is one of the
world’s leading suppliers of equipment and
technologies designed to convert household
waste and biomass into heat and power.
Hall B3, Booth 269
1403WMW_42 42 4/9/14 9:42 AM
43 MARCH-APRIL 2014 WASTE MANAGEMENT WORLD
IFAT PREVIEW
May 5–9, 2014
World’s Leading Trade Fair for Water, Sewage,
Waste and Raw Materials Management
NIPPON STEEL & SUMIKIN ENGINEERING is a
waste gasification and melting technology
firm and exhibits the reliable technology
Direct Melting System with more than 40
references and 35 years operation.
Hall B3, Booth 239
For over 30 years ANDRITZ MeWa has been
offering recycling machines and complete
plant solutions for end of life tires, oil filters,
electrical and electronic scrap, refrigerators,
cable scrap, metal compounds, aluminum
scrap, or household and industrial waste.
Hall C2 - Booth 445/546
Neuson Ecotec GmbH is a company
with an international focus and a leading
provider in the forestry and environmental
technology segments. Chippers, compost
turners, shredders, screens and harvesters are
designed and built on three assembly lines in
Haid, near Linz.
Hall C2, Booth 520
The Presona Pre-Press Technology Balers are
probably the most efficient balers = best
relation between energy consumption and
throughput ratio = more value for money.
Hall C1, Booth 341/442
Rheinbraun Brennstoff GmbH is responsible
for worldwide marketing of activated
lignite HOK® - an inexpensive and efficient
adsorption and filter medium for various
waste gas and wastewater applications.
Hall B3, Booth 410
Vermeer offers customers a full line of high-
quality agricultural, environmental, tree care
and surface mining equipment.
Hall C1, Booth 403/502
For more than 40 years, we have been the
reliable and competent partner
in shredding technology. On the basis
of cutting-edge technology and highly
qualified staff, we develop and produce
innovative and custom-made shredding
solutions for individual tasks.
Hall C2, Booth 121/222
Leader in the design, engineering,
manufacture, installation and maintenance
of waste treatment equipment. The company
manufactures individual equipment, builds
“turnkey” plants and makes available to its
customers engineering, consulting and
maintenance services.
Hall C2, Booth 321/422
Komptech will present four new machines -
the Axtor 6010, the Crambo direct, the Topturn
X and the Hurrifex.
Hall C2, Booth 403/502
JFE Engineering is a leading supplier of EfW
technologies with more than 160 EfW reference
plants and also offers its unique JFE High-
Temperature
Gasifying and Direct Melting System.
Hall B3, Booth 330
1403WMW_43 43 4/9/14 9:42 AM
EXHIBITOR PROMOTION
44 WASTE MANAGEMENT WORLD MARCH-APRIL 2014
A
s an industrial and agricultural equipment company, Vermeer
manufactures machines that make a real impact in a
progressing world. Vermeer offers customers a full line of high-
quality agricultural, environmental, underground construction,
tree care and surface mining equipment. Vermeer machines carry a
reputation for being built tough, built to perform and built for value.
Headquartered in Pella, Iowa, U.S., Vermeer has a global reach and a
local impact that comes through its 2800 employees and more than
500 independent dealers worldwide. Vermeer is committed to meeting
customers’ needs in more than 60 nations. Those customers are at the core
of the business and supported by reliable, localized customer service and
support provided by independent dealers. That support has been part of
the culture at Vermeer for more than six decades.
As a global leader in managing natural resources, Vermeer equipment
is filling a productivity void, allowing green waste processors to expedite
harvest and processing. Wood waste and compost processors are now
benefiting from the speed and efficiency of Vermeer organic recycling
equipment. With a full line of horizontal and tub grinders, trommel screens
and compost turners available, wood and green waste processors are able
to bring biofuel and compost products to the market more quickly.
THE FUTURE OF BIOMASS
Just as oil, coal and natural gas eventually overtook wood as the most
widely used fuel sources for energy generation more than a century ago,
there is another movement afloat within the biomass energy arena that is
gaining momentum, albeit not as quickly as many would hope.
While wood remains far ahead of non-wood sources as a feedstock
for fueling today’s biomass energy movement, the future success of
bioenergy as a viable, affordable complement or possible eventual
replacement to energy generated by fossil fuels will likely evolve from an
integrated approach of feedstock options.
While several non-wood biomass sources are showing promise - such
as grasses; corn stover; straw from sugar cane; rice or wheat; forestry
residues; and an organic component present in municipal and industrial
wastes — wood is still used most often. Yet there’s a lot of interest in
alternatives, especially in countries where wood is not so plentiful or
importing wood makes it financially restrictive.
COMPOST PROVIDING A USE FOR GREEN WASTE
Landfill space is a precious commodity, and around the globe composting
is gaining acceptance as a viable alternative to help ease the strain on
burgeoning landfills and growing problems of land use permitting for
disposal sites. Composting helps divert green and organic waste from the
landfills and provides new use for green and organic waste by turning it
into a usable product such as topsoil for landscaping and erosion control.
Even biosolids from wastewater treatment facilities can be turned into
compost - effectively changing the game by proving that almost anything
organic is reusable.
VERMEER PROVIDING FULL EQUIPMENT
SOLUTIONS
The challenge is being able to identify the needs within this emerging
industry, often changing course in the early stages of development.
Manufacturers have long recognized the importance of advancing
sustainable energy sources and many remain committed to supporting
various bioenergy process initiatives by offering equipment that helps to
more efficiently expedite the harvest, transport and processing of various
feedstock.
At Vermeer, we’re seeing a tremendous opportunity - and challenge -
for the future. We are approaching countries with total packages to meet
all their equipment needs. We have an opportunity to develop solutions
that turn material once considered to be waste to good use.
www.vermeer.com
VERMEER PLAYS A MAJOR ROLE
AS BIOENERGY/COMPOSTING
TECHNOLOGIES EVOLVE
1403WMW_44 44 4/9/14 9:42 AM
Vermeer, the Vermeer logo and Equipped to Do More are trademarks of Vermeer Manufacturing Company in the U.S. and/or other countries.
© 2014 Vermeer Corporation. All Rights Reserved.
EQUIPPEDTODOMORE.com
Agriculture Biomass Landscaping Organic Recycling Pipeline Rental
Surface Mining Tree Care Utility Installation Wood Waste Processing
Visit us at IFAT Booth C1 403/502
For more information, enter 21 at WMW.hotims.com
1403WMW_45 45 4/9/14 9:42 AM
T
his year, Eldan will bring 40 tonnes of equipment to IFAT and
introduce an ACSR Cable Shear with a live demonstration,
a Cable Stripper (M8), a Twin-Shaft Shredder (TS1460) and a
heavy duty Multi Purpose Rasper (MPR200HD).
At the exhibition, Eldan will also introduce a new product area – Waste
Handling Systems. By extending the current product range to also include
vacuum systems, waste collection systems and bin cleaning systems,
the company is able to assist its customer with waste logistics and other
complementing services. The products have already been introduced
to existing Eldan customer, and they have been very well received. By
offering these kinds of services, Eldan is once again one step ahead of the
rest of the recycling industry.
Employees and representatives from all over the world will be present
in Munich; e.g. from Benelux, Chile, China, France, Germany, Hungary,
Poland, Russia, Turkey, United Arab Emirates and United Kingdom. “The
IFAT exhibition in 2012 was a huge success for Eldan, and we have great
expectations for this show as well. We use the exhibition as an excuse
to gather Eldan personnel and representatives from around the world,
partly to be able to meet the high number of visitors, but also to have
the opportunity to all meet face to face,” says Dr. Toni Reftman, Managing
Director of Eldan Recycling.
ELDAN DELIVER COMBI-LINE TO TURKEY
Danish manufacturer of recycling equipment Eldan Recycling A/S has
delivered and commissioned their first combi-line in Turkey. The Turkish
customer, Ugur Metal in Dilovası/Kocaeli will processing WEEE and cable
scrap in the plant with an input capacity of up to 4 tons per hour.
When founded Ugur Metal was active within traditional collecting
and manual sorting and selling. The founder, Ugur Meral saw that the mix
of “raw material” was continuously changing, and soon realized that the
need of thinking and acting differently was important.
During negotiations between Ugur Metal, Eldan Recycling A/S and
local sales agent: Ferrostaal A.S. Istanbul, Mr Meral had the opportunity
to visit a number of reference plants already operating Eldan installations.
Finally a tailor-made layout for the processing line was ready. Mr. Meral had
from the very first moment the vision that the line should be as flexible,
and that it should be operating automatically, yet with the option for
individual hand-picking when required.
“We are proud to commission this unique line for Mr. Meral here
in Turkey. The line includes our Ring-Shredder, Eddy Current Separator,
Rasper, Granulator and separation equipment” says Territory Manager
Henning Nørgaard, Eldan Recycling A/S. We see Turkey as a very important
market for Eldan Recycling and we have come to know the buyers in
Turkey as very professional people who know what they are looking for.
We are happy to see the efforts we make together with our local sales
agent in Turkey also give results.
“We knew from the beginning that our visions and ideas were a
challenge for the equipment and solution providers in the international
market. We did a scan to find the best possible supplier and ended up with
Eldan Recycling A/S, who has set up and commissioned the line to our full
satisfaction” says Mr. Meral.
Photo: From left to right: Ersel Oflu (Project Manager at Ferrostaal
A.S), Ugur Meral (owner of Ugur Metal) and Henning Nørgaard (Territory
Manager at Eldan Recycling).
ELDAN EQUIPMENT TO LEADING CHINESE
RECYCLER
Eldan Recycling A/S has sold a complete Cable Recycling Plant to leading
Chinese recycler, Tianjin Xinneng Renewable Resources Co Ltd. The
line is capable of processing up to 3 ton/production hour into valuable
copper or aluminium granulate as well as plastics from the insulation.
When processing scrap cables into copper granulates, the purity is very
important and the Eldan equipment ensures up to 99.5% metal purity.
The Eldan equipment will be used to support Tianjin Xinneng Renewable
Resources Co Ltd’s Spanish and Italian copper smelting equipment.
At the end of 2013 the President and Vice President of the company,
Mr. Zhang and Mr. Wang, travelled from Tianjin, China to visit the Eldan
production facility in Faaborg, Denmark. “We are very proud that Mr.
Zhang and Mr. Wang found time to visit our factory in Denmark. It is very
important to us that everything works smoothly, when the processing
equipment arrives at its destination. Therefore - in deals like this - we
always send one of our Project Managers to the customer site to clarify
all details concerning the installation etc. before production of the
equipment is actually started-up. This is done to ensure a successful
installation and commissioning on site”, says Mr. Henning Nørgaard,
Territory Manager, Eldan Recycling A/S
“We were happy to visit the Eldan factory to see how the Danish people
develop, design and produce all the equipment in their facilities in Faaborg
Denmark. All machines were tested to our full satisfaction during our stay
and we now look forward to receiving them in our factory in Tianjin” says Mr.
Zhang President of Tianjin Xinneng Renewable Resources Co Ltd.
Eldan will be present in hall C2, stand 433/536.
www.eldan-recycling.com
40 TONNES OF EQUIPMENT
from left Michael Andersen, Project Manager, Eldan Recycling A/S, Liu Jingya
Ferrostaal (Beijing), Mr. Zhang, Tianjin Xinneng Renewable Resources Co Ltd,
Mr. Henning Nørgaard, Territory Manager, Eldan Recycling A/S, Xiuya Hong,
Ferrostaal (Beijing) and last to the right Mr. Wang, Mr Zhang, Tianjin Xinneng
Renewable Resources Co Ltd.
EXHIBITOR PROMOTION
46 WASTE MANAGEMENT WORLD MARCH-APRIL 2014
1403WMW_46 46 4/9/14 9:42 AM
FOR THE TOUGHEST JOBS
NEW Multi Purpose Rasper MPR200HD
NEW WEAR RESISTANT
ROTOR DESIGN
Rotor is hard-surfaced welded.
Can run 5 times longer before
any maintenance is required.
NEW DESIGNED WEAR PLATES ON
ROTOR
Wear plates can be easily exchanged.
New design keeps material from building
up inside the rotor housing. Extended
lifetime for the wear segments.
NEW TRANSMISSION
2x132 kW electrical motors,
belt driven, each side being
individually adjusted. Using
the same components in
each drive side maintenance
costs are reduced.
INCREASED CAPACITY
Increased power (264kW) and
double inertia in the 2 belt/
fywheels. RPM is increased
to 144 rpm: enabling a
remarkable increase in capacity.
INCREASED ROTOR DIAMETER (40%)
For more powerful process.
NEW BEARING/
PROTECTION 100%
New designed protection cover
protect the bearing 100% from
steel, dirt, material getting into it.
QUICKER
MAINTENANCE
Innovative gadgets.
LARGER HOUSING
ELDAN RECYCLING A/S
Værkmestervej 4
5600 Faaborg
Denmark
Phone: (+45) 63 61 25 45
Telefax: (+45) 63 61 25 40
E-mail: info@eldan-recycling.com
Homepage: www.eldan-recycling.com
Stand: C2.433/536.
For more information, enter 22 at WMW.hotims.com
1403WMW_47 47 4/9/14 9:42 AM
M
asias Recycling has developed the ‘Waste to Cash’ (WtC)
methodology to define profitable solutions for managing
municipal waste. The methodology is being used to study,
analyse, and design integrated solutions for the treatment
of municipal solid waste in the most optimal, cost-effective way, tailoring
it to the needs of its customers. WtC is the methodology to get the
maximum value from waste.
The first plant conceived under this new concept was the Resitejo
Plant in Portugal. This is the company’s first project managed around this
new way of looking at the waste cycle, reducing the final rejects of the
plant to a minimum and multiplying its profit ratios fivefold.
The Waste to Cash methodology encompasses all the factors that
intervene in the waste cycle from the customer’s standpoint to define
what plants would best suit their needs; all of this results in a BlackBox
presentation, the specific Masias Recycling solution for optimal, cost-
effective waste management.
It is also much more than a technological solution; in addition to
analysing all aspects of the materials to be treated, it also focuses on the
micro- and macroeconomic environment of the costumer, the industry
and the country, analysing everything from the derivative costs of the
plant operations to the possibility of financing, re-engineering and
reinvestment, according to the timeline of each project. The aim of Masias
Recycling is to make it easier for their customers to make decisions, as the
BlackBox has nearly all the answers to their needs, whether they come
from a technological or economic standpoint.
Not every BlackBox, or solution, works for everyone. That is why, using
Waste to Cash, Masias Recycling helps you to choose and define the best
solution for ‘YOU’. This was the objective set by the multinational, and it
has already become a reality in Resitejo, which managed to close its waste
cycle, reducing its MSW treatment plant rejection level to under 6%.
The system developed in Resitejo, apart from recovering resources,
yields a brand-new product called Green SRF (Solid Recovered Fuel). This
is a product originating from the organic fraction and cellulose contained
in the waste whose composition and calorific value is similar to biomass,
and is considered as such in Portugal. Another substance that is obtained
is a plastic SRF with a high calorific value, which can be used for burning
in cement kilns. These facilities, which began operations in the autumn of
2013, are planned to treat approximately 100,000 tonnes of waste in 2014,
with a profit ratio of over 20%.
PHASE ONE:
In the first phase, the material is fed into a treatment line using overhead
travelling cranes to load the material, contained in a properly monitored
pit, onto a feeding conveyor belt. Once bulky items have been separated
out with a sieve drum, the waste is separated into two fractions. Fractions
larger than 400 mm are sent for manual sorting, while the rest is sent on
to a primary shredder to later be converted into plastic SRF.
Fractions less than 400 mm continue on to two large Biodrums (rotary
drums) which homogenise, disintegrate and partially
degrade the material, which heats up slightly due to
the beginning of the degradation process (causing
a slight evaporation of water), thus making it easier
to separate the wet (organic and cellulose/paper)
and the dry parts formed largely by plastics and tins.
After approximately 36 hours the outgoing material
undergoes mechanical selection (sieve drum and
ballistic separator) to recover as much of its organic
component (organic + cellulose) as possible, which
is then transported to some continuous dryers that
reduce its moisture content from 55% down to 10%.
In this way, by not destroying the carbon bonds, the
calorific value is not lost. This is how to make a fuel,
which is called Green SRF, with an LCV comparable to
plant biomass that can then be sold or reused at the
same facility. The Green SRF has a moisture content
of 10%, a chlorine content of <0.6% and and LCV of
3100 Kcal/kg.
The dry part of the waste (plastics) is used to
produce a high-quality plastic SRF to be sold to
co-incineration facilities. In this way, the 3D fraction
separated in the ballistic separator, which may be
metals or other materials (such as high-quality plastics
and those containing chlorine) are subsequently
recovered separately.
The remaining products that still have not been
recovered are then separated according to density
in a Windsifter, where the entire heavy fraction is
considered as reject material, while the light fraction,
together with the 2D fraction separated in the ballistic
separator and the outgoing fraction from the initial
shredder, is sent to secondary shredders which then
WASTE TO CASH
EXHIBITOR PROMOTION
48 WASTE MANAGEMENT WORLD MARCH-APRIL 2014
1403WMW_48 48 4/9/14 9:46 AM
reduce the size of the incoming fraction to approx. 30 mm, thus creating
a product called plastic SRF, which has a high calorific value.
The Plastic SRF has a moisture content of 30%, a chlorine content of
<0.5% and an LCV of 5050 Kcal/kg.
Furthermore, the entire plant operates totally automatically and can
be considered to be a low-maintenance production line.
The amount of rubbish which ends up in the landfills mostly consists
of inert materials and small stones separated in the Windsifter. The most
expensive part of the treatment is the drying process, but even so, it is still
cheaper than a treatment based on conventional composting.
PHASE TWO:
In addition, and despite the fact that drying the organic waste is less
costly than composting, the natural gas used in the dryers still remains the
highest cost in the first phase. An integrated vision would imply an energy
production facility that used 25% of its Green SRF to produce the steam
needed to dry the organic material.
The Portuguese Government has accepted the use of this Green SRF
as a biomass, which allows us to employ a biomass boiler to produce the
amount of energy needed to obtain the steam used in the dryers, with
two very significant advantages: one, avoiding costs derived from the
use of natural gas, and two, bringing in extra income from the sale of the
excess energy generated from these boilers.
CONCLUSIONS:
We can describe our approach as a new way of thinking about the
problem of non-selected municipal waste, where we try to eliminate all
the disadvantages of existing systems and include their advantages.
The use of landfills is reduced to a minimum, becoming a simple
deposit for waste. The energy yielded from waste is considered as a type
of biomass, where normal forest material is used along with organic and
paper waste (Green SRF). In this way it will be energetically efficient, since
the residual heat from the production of energy is recovered to dry the
material which will in turn be used to produce this energy. If there is
no way of selling the high-quality SRF, it can be incorporated into the
operation through gasification, using the gas as direct fuel.
This system has the potential of being highly flexible, given its
totally integrated properties. Depending on the existence of various
taxes or levies, complementary facilities (such as cement plants) and the
governmental component to the overall configuration of the plant, the
degree of material recovery may vary in terms of restrictiveness.
www.masiasrecycling.com
EXHIBITOR PROMOTION
49 MARCH-APRIL 2014 WASTE MANAGEMENT WORLD
For more information, enter 23 at WMW.hotims.com
1403WMW_49 49 4/9/14 9:46 AM
C
omminution, the reduction of solid materials from one average
particle size to a smaller average particle size, is arguably one
of the most important and vital processes in nature. In fact,
there is one elementary cutting and grinding tool that we all
carry with us at all times: our teeth.
However, size reduction is also one of the earliest mechanical
treatment processes applied by human beings as it is both simple and
highly effective. Comminution media, like our teeth, hammers, knifes and
any other beaters, serve to prepare input material in a way as to enable
further processes to take place or to be initiated (Redeker 2003). Looking
at it from a more philosophical point of view, crushing or grinding are
not primarily means of destruction but above all they form a basis for
recreation and production.
The main idea of comminution is the generation of new product
properties (Redeker 2003). In the first instance of course, it is smaller grit
sizes this process aims for. If one takes into account the many situations
in everyday life in which getting material down to smaller particles is
required, one cannot help but acknowledge that comminution is pretty
much omnipresent.
This holds specifically true for a great number of industrial treatment
and production processes such as mining, concrete production and, of
course, waste management, making size reduction a key subject across
industries. By today, an estimated eight per cent of the global power
demand is allocated for comminution, granulation and agglomeration
(Macko 2012). This makes sense if one considers that about 50 per cent
of the comminution process costs are created by the electrical energy
needed to run the process (Radziszewski 2002).
Interestingly, the other half of the process costs are related to the
manufacture of wear parts like grinding media and liners (ibid.). Even
though wear is probably as old as the comminution process itself, it still
is a crucial factor with regard to the comminution (energy) efficiency of a
grinding or shredding machine (Musa & Morrison 2009).
Furthermore, it can have great implications on a machine’s availability
for production due to down times required for the exchange of wear
parts. For this reason, wear is yet another constant companion that
manufacturers of shredding or grinding equipment need to deal with,
apart from improving and increasing output quality and size as well as the
capacity of their equipment.
In fact, at AUT Anlagen- und Umwelttechnologie GmbH, wear is a
rather prevailing topic which has taken centre stage in discussions with
our engineers and suppliers many times in the past and is likely to do
so again in the future. Our Cross Flow Shredders are entirely lined with
wear-resistant steel plates at the bottom and at the lower part of the wall
of the machine.
Naturally, we have done extensive research on wear-resistant steel,
hard-facing, etc. and have tried out very different types of materials in
order to find the one most suitable for our application. The same applies to
other machine components exposed to impact and abrasion such as the
fixing unit for the beating chains and the screen plates used for material
discharge.
A lot of effort, time and reason were put in the development and
design of our machines as well as the choice of high-quality materials
to ensure a continuous and preferably never-ending comminution
process. Frankly, however, the process of wear by abrasion and impact is
something that we will never be able to put a stop to in a communition
process whose operating principle relies on exactly these two physical
processes.
Instead of denying that wear exists, we have developed efficient ways
to get ahead of it. Experience has shown that a machine’s design plays a
key role when it comes to the length of down times as a result of wear.
For this reason, we have developed our machines in a way as to
keep down times as short as possible by enabling operators to quickly
exchange crucial wear parts like beating chains, wall linings and screen
plates. However, a maintenance-friendly design is just one way to speed
up times of non-use. For this reason, we recommend every operator of
shredding machinery to stock up on wear parts.Find out more about our
machines at the IFAT 2014 in Munich: Hall C1, Booth No. 413/514.
www.aut-chemnitz.de
A SUCCESS STORY OF COMMINUTION
– challenging wear and machine down times
EXHIBITOR PROMOTION
50 WASTE MANAGEMENT WORLD MARCH-APRIL 2014
1403WMW_50 50 4/9/14 9:46 AM
www.aut-chemnitz.de
hall C1 / booth no. 413/514
For more information, enter 24 at WMW.hotims.com
1403WMW_51 51 4/9/14 9:46 AM
B
ACKHUS EcoEngineers invite you to
come and visit us at the IFAT 2014 in
Munich, Germany, May 5 – 9, 2014,
in hall c2 at booth 335. Our team of
experts will be available to answer any questions
you may have and show you our 1000th BACKHUS
windrow turner – the BACKHUS 21.60 in the IFAT
open-air area.
BACKHUS is internationally synonymous with
compost turners throughout the globe. As the
world’s largest turner manufacturer, BACKHUS
offers a complete line of turners for windrows,
trapezoidal piles and agitated bay systems. The
BACKHUS LT Lane Turner is ideally suited to
enclosed applications and indoor plants such
as MBT or in vessel composting setups where
turning is required within a controlled closed door
environment.
The new BACKHUS 21 Series combines
the latest in cutting edge turner technology
with industry proven BACKHUS features such
as industry leading fuel economy, quality
craftsmanship and large turning throughput
capacities. Features include a new larger cabin,
redesigned undercarriage (with interchangeable
wheels and tracks), new engine compartment and
real-time data feedback.
Like its predecessors, the 21 Series windrow
turners offer an array of options including
transportable cabin, side conveyor, cover winder
and windrow irrigation.
Take one look at the BACKHUS 21 Series and it
won’t be your last!
Facts
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cabin
t &BTZ BDDFTT GPS SPVUJOF NBJOUFOBODF BOE TFSWJDF
t -POH MJTU PG TUBOEBSE GFBUVSFT
t 0VUTUBOEJOH QFSGPSNBODF GPS QSPGFTTJPOBM
application
For more information about our waste
processing solutions please contact us at sales@
backhus.de. We look forward to seeing you in
Munich!
www.backhus.com.
JOIN US IN
CELEBRATING THE
1000TH BACKHUS
WINDROW
TURNER SOLD!
www.backhus.com
Over 1,000 sold
BACKHUS
machines
speak for
themselves!
For more information, enter 25 at WMW.hotims.com
EXHIBITOR PROMOTION
52 WASTE MANAGEMENT WORLD MARCH-APRIL 2014
BACKHUS
1403WMW_52 52 4/9/14 9:47 AM
I
t is a multi-purpose plant that provides energy, waste treatment,
and a local architectural attraction. Copenhagen’s new waste to
energy plant, Amager Bakke, combines the latest in technology and
architectural innovation to lead the way to a future in which such
plants will be welcomed rather than detested by its neighbours.
It is safe to say that waste to energy plants are not usually known
for being tourist attractions. But this is all set to change when Amager
Ressource Center’s new plant, Amager Bakke, opens for operation in 2017.
Once open, ski enthusiasts will be able to zip down the roof of a building
that will be designed with the local community in mind when it comes
to supplying energy, waste treatment, and fun. That is because Amager
Bakke will consist not only of bold, visually appealing architecture, but a
functional artificial ski slope and fresh air, as well.
The plant sets itself apart in terms of environmental considerations,
energy production, and its working environment. It is also located near
the airport and just five kilometers from Copenhagen’s Town Hall Square,
so Amager Bakke is not just an industrial installation, but a landmark of the
Danish capital, as well. Flocks of people who would otherwise never take
an interest in a waste to energy plant will stop by to have a look.
A SUPREME ENVIRONMENTAL SOLUTION
Amager Bakke utilises more than 100% of the fuel’s energy content, has
a 28% electrical efficiency rate, reduces sulfur emissions by 99.5%, and
minimizes NOx emissions to a tenth, compared to the old plant. The last-
mentioned characteristic is possible thanks to a B&W Vølund flue gas filter,
the SCR (in cooperation with the catalyst manufacturer Haldor Topsøe),
which will be installed for the first time in a Danish waste to energy plant.
When Copenhagen residents come to enjoy in the architecture or
try out the ski slope, they will be able to breathe freely without having
to worry about inhaling harmful fumes from the fully operational plant,
which will still treat some 400,000 tons of waste produced by over a half
million inhabitants of the five municipalities that own the project.
Beyond the minimal emission of harmful fumes contained in the flue
gas, the high degree of energy recovery is one of the main reasons why
the plant’s state-of-the-art technology is tough to compete with on the
environmental front. Amager Bakke will operate with steam data as high as
440 degrees and 70 bars, which provides a high level of electrical efficiency.
With the Amager Bakke technology, we are able to use the organic
fraction contained in the waste in an incredibly efficient manner. B&W
Vølund is constantly working to increase the steam data to ensure that
the level of energy recovery is fully on par with alternative technologies
used in waste treatment and energy production. Our goal is to reach 525
degrees and 100 bars within the foreseeable future.
A DYNAGRATE® AT HEART
The ever innovative technology of the DynaGrate® will be installed in the
Amager Bakke Plant. DynaGrate® is unique in its fuel flexibility, optimized
combustion and minimal maintenance cost.
The mechanical design of the DynaGrate® is developed in response
to the general waste to energy plant vulnerability to e.g. metal contents
in waste.
Today, plant operation is not interrupted by melting metals. Further,
the mechanical break-up of the waste layer on the grate results in
thorough agitation and superior combustion conditions. The water-
cooling system allows high heating values that are vital to fuel flexibility.
Together, the water-cooling and mechanics result in high plant efficiency
and excellent burnout of the waste, evident for example from very low
TOC values (around 0.2%) in bottom ash.
The DynaGrate® reduces maintenance cost because the entire cooling
system is well integrated and protected in the steel shaft. There are no
sensitive hose connections inside the furnace. Damages due to grate
siftings, melting tin, aluminium, and the like are efficiently prevented. The
driving mechanism is situated outside the furnace which means that the
mechanism is not exposed to an aggressive environment and offers easy
access for maintenance.
Finally, the mechanical set-up secures that movable grate parts are
not in contact, thereby reducing wear and tear of the grate.
www.volund.dk
B&W VØLUND IS TAKING
TECHNOLOGY FURTHER WITH
AMAGER BAKKE
EXHIBITOR PROMOTION
53 MARCH-APRIL 2014 WASTE MANAGEMENT WORLD
1403WMW_53 53 4/9/14 9:48 AM
T
he MARTIN reverse-acting grate Vario was launched during the
IFAT 2010 in Munich as the MARTIN grate for the future. This grate
was developed in order to give operators more flexibility over the
lifetime of a plant, which can very well be 30 years or more.
Over this long period, waste qualities/quantities will inevitably change, as
lifestyle and waste regulations will not stay constant. Three independent
drive zones are one of the key differences to the well proven MARTIN
reverse-acting grate. Several plants have been equipped with this grate
and are in operation or under construction.
The reverse-acting grate Vario was mainly developed to treat fuels
with high heating value and low ash content (e.g., a refuse-derived fuel,
RDF). The grate uses the same proven and unique reverse-acting principle
but its angle of inclination is 24° and it has three independent drive zones
along the length.
The stair-like grate steps are alternately arranged in stationary and
moving grate bar rows. The interaction between the upward stoking force
and the downward pull of gravity ensures constant mixing of the red
hot mass with the fresh fuel. This results in optimal combustion and fully
burned-out bottom ash.
At the same time, the grate is always covered with a thick fuel and ash
layer which insulates the grate surface and provides excellent protection
against thermal radiation from the furnace (>1,100 °C), thus guaranteeing
a long lifetime of the grate bars. The operating experience from numerous
plants obtained over many years of continuous service time have
conclusively proven that through the reverse-acting principle, this grate
does not require water cooling, even for high heating-value fuel.
Along its length, the reverse-acting grate Vario is divided into three to
six separate air zones, so that underfire air is supplied across the grate in a
controlled manner and as needed for combustion. The underfire air flows
into the fuel bed through narrow gaps at the head of the grate bars. These
air gaps are kept free of impurities during operation because every second
grate bar in a row moves, relatively to its adjacent bars, at the end of each
agitation stroke. The effect of the relative stroke is to clear the air gaps,
thereby allowing a long period between maintenance outages.
The reverse-acting grate Vario is of modular design. Each module
comprises a complete grate run with a width of 1.5 - 3 metres. The
modules can be fully preassembled at the factory and then shipped to
the plant site. Up to eight grate-run modules can be arranged in parallel
to produce a total grate width of over 15 metres.
A clinker weir is installed at the end of the grate to control the height
of the fuel bed and bottom ash layer. The weir can be adjusted to suit
actual combustion conditions. From there, the bottom ash drops into the
bottom ash discharger.
MARTIN is a family owned engineering company, designing and
building Energy-from-Waste plants for more than 50 years. MARTIN can
supply components, grate/boiler lots or complete, turnkey plants. MARTIN
carries out intensive research and development activities and is one of the
world market leaders in its field. MARTIN is closely cooperating since many
decades with strong partner companies worldwide.
www.martingmbh.de
THE MARTIN REVERSE-ACTING
GRATE VARIO
EXHIBITOR PROMOTION
54 WASTE MANAGEMENT WORLD MARCH-APRIL 2014
1403WMW_54 54 4/9/14 9:48 AM
Building thermal waste treatment plants is our line of work and our passion. We function as
partner for engineering services, supplier for key components, or general contractor for
turnkey plants. From planning through construction and commissioning to service, our
company's specialists are in place to assist and advise our customers. As a family-owned
company we look back on more than 85 years of tradition. The combustion lines we have
equipped at sites all over the world number more than 770, including those joint-ventured with
competent partner companies. Unceasing technological evolution, particularly with regard to
resource conservation, is essential to all our endeavours.
Engineering today,
benefitting generations to come.
www.martingmbh.de
For more information, enter 26 at WMW.hotims.com
1403WMW_55 55 4/9/14 9:48 AM
A
RJES was founded in 2007 by Tetyana and Norbert Hammel.
For the last 25 years Hammel has developed innovative
machines for the recycling industry. To realise his vision of
future recycling machinery around 100 employees work in
the headquarters in Leimbach, Germany.
Year after year ARJES optimises its products – both the existing and
new ones. All products are available with electric drive. Therefore our
customers do not depend on the fluctuation of fuel prices to recycle their
waste, scrap metal or wood. They are protecting resources and generating
new ones with their ARJES machines.
Different types and models make it easier for the customer to choose
the right machine for their requirements. Ranging from the Raptor and
BioMaster series, which are specifically designed for the forest industry, to
the high end model VZ 950 with high capacities for shredding cars and
scrap metal.
All our machines generate end product sizes between 500 mm and
200 mm. Our newly developed ARJES Ventimill can generate even finer
end product sizes of up to 15 mm.
ARJES has also just launched the brand new new metal separation
system ARJES MVS 35 - the ideal solution for a low cost entry into metal
processing.
Visitors of IFAT 2014 can marvel this newly patented Ventimill from
May 5th through 9th, in hall C1, booth 101/202.
www.arjes.de
COME MARVEL AT THE VENTIMILL
EFFICIENT & RELIABLE
RECYCLING SOLUTIONS
Patented T-Blade cutting geometry
Energy savings up to 15%
Automatic reversing function
Protects against fracture of the blades
Precise final product quality
Seconday shredding up to 50 mm
5. – 9. May 2014
Munich/Germany
COME VISIT US
HALL C1
BOOTH 101/202
For more information, enter 27 at WMW.hotims.com
EXHIBITOR PROMOTION
56 WASTE MANAGEMENT WORLD MARCH-APRIL 2014
1403WMW_56 56 4/9/14 9:48 AM
I
FAT 2014 in Munich, Germany, May 5 – 9, 2014. You will find us in hall
C2 at booth 434. Come to our stand and run through our system
configurator based on your own requirements!
As a worldwide leader in the supply of both the mechanical and
biological stages of MBT, Eggersmann offers turnkey systems for the
future. Our waste processing solutions are characterised by
Q Modular setup that guarantees highest flexibility
Q Maximisation of energy and raw material recovery– instead of landfilling
and incineration
Q Reduction of disposal costs
Q Reduction of CO
2
-emissions, based on energy production from biogas
and substitution of fossil fuels with RDF in power stations and cement
plants as well as recovery of resources.
Mechanical systems play an important part in ensuring the efficient
recovery of valuable materials from mixed waste. Mechanical recycling
equipment supplied by Eggersmann separates recyclable materials by
composition and particle size to deliver the recovered raw materials in a
particularly effective and efficient way, in accordance with application and
material requirements.
Organic waste is both an ideal source of valuable energy and
a raw material for use in the manufacture of nutrient-rich compost
and fertilisers. The natural fermentation-based recycling of organic
waste provides us with a potentially inexhaustible source of energy.
The fermentation of organic waste releases energy-rich methane
gas, the high quality and economic efficiency of which makes it a
viable alternative to fossil fuels. In addition to the recovery of biogas,
Eggersmann recycling systems also provide nutrient-rich compost for
use in the gardening and agricultural sectors.
For more information about our waste processing solutions please
contact us at anlagenbau@f-e.de. We look forward to seeing you in Munich!
www.f-e.de.
EGGERSMANN ANLAGENBAU AT
THE IFAT 2014 – Transform your waste
TRANSFORM YOUR WASTE
www.f-e.de
For more information, enter 28 at WMW.hotims.com
EXHIBITOR PROMOTION
57 MARCH-APRIL 2014 WASTE MANAGEMENT WORLD
1403WMW_57 57 4/9/14 9:53 AM
B
inder+Co is a leading specialist in sensor-based separation
of transparent and non-transparent bulk materials. Since the
beginnings of this technology, Binder+Co has always been a
market leader in the processing of waste glass.
With CLARITY, Binder+Co has brought to market the first 3-way-
system which simultaneously sorts waste glass on the basis of color (16
millions shades) and separates contaminants such as ceramic and stone.
CLARITY recognises heat-resistant and lead glass and thus secures a
crucial competitive advantage for its customers. By fusing a UV sensor with
a RGB camera, heat resistant special glasses and lead-containing glasses
can be identified and reliably excluded without using X-ray fluorescence.
Waste glass recyclers increasingly have to face more impurities in
cullet, but at the same time the industry is trying to increase the yield of
glass from waste. The sensor-based sorting technology from Binder + Co
ensures minimum glass loss with a maximum degree of separation.
In order to optimally prepare the waste glass cullet for sorting,
Binder+Co has developed cullet sublimation. Mostly independent of
fluctuating moisture and the degree of soiling from fine adhering cullet
and foreign particles, the cullet is cleaned making it more detectable. The
essential process steps are: drying - cleaning - polishing - dust removal.
The revolutionary CLARITY is Binder+Co’s highly efficient development
for sorting glass and plastics starting from 1 mm. The 4th generation of
CLARITY targets both the glass and the plastics industry, offering a sorting
system for fine fractions which had been landfilled or sold at low prices.
It is equipped with high speed valves and the highest resolution sensor
technology, ensuring precision sorting of a granulometry from 1-15 mm.
Based on Binder+Co AG´s R&D over the past 30 years, different sensor-
based sorting systems constitute the leading machinery used in recycling
plants today. Modern sensor techniques, engineering and know-how are
integrated to produce customised systems.
Binder+Co AG also offers planning, project management and
construction of turn-key waste-glass processing plants.
www.binder-co.com
SORTING OF GLASS, PLASTICS
AND MINERALS
clarity
the next dimension
of fi nes sorting
World premiere at IFAT 2014
Visit us at: IFAT, May 5-9, C1.210
Waste Expo, April 29 - May 1, 5019
1
mm
1/25“
The revolutionary CLARlTY nexxt is Binder+Co's highly em cient
development for sorting glass and plastics up to 1 mm!
Fine fractions don't need to end on landflls or as
low price products. They turn into your proft!
Welcome to the next dimension of fnes sorting.
www.binder-co.com
For more information, enter 29 at WMW.hotims.com
EXHIBITOR PROMOTION
58 WASTE MANAGEMENT WORLD MARCH-APRIL 2014
1403WMW_58 58 4/9/14 9:53 AM
A
NDRITZ MeWa is the new global brand for recycling
machinery and process solutions. For over 30 years ANDRITZ
MeWa, located near Stuttgart, Germany, has been offering
recycling machines and complete plant solutions for different
areas.
End of life tyres, oil filters, electric and electronic scrap, refrigerators,
cables, metal compounds, aluminum scrap or household and industrial
waste, it does not matter, ANDRITZ MeWa‘s technical solutions keep on
setting international standards. As pioneer work these innovations have
become the trademark for the company, with implemented projects in
over 40 countries all over the world.
WORLDWIDE SERVICE LOCATIONS
As part of the international ANDRITZ GROUP, ANDRITZ MeWa can access
an extensive network of production and service locations throughout the
whole world.
From the manufacturing of machines, the planning of the plant
to assembly and the service, ANDRITZ MeWa offers the customers the
complete service spectrum from one hand. This service quality assures
high service and quality standards and enables a reliable, long-living and
economical operation of the plants.
PRESENTATION AT IFAT
At the international world leading exhibition for environment technologies,
IFAT in Munich the former MeWa Recycling Maschinen und Anlagenbau
GmbH will present itself as ANDRITZ MeWa GmbH. Also in the future,
the new global brand for recycling technologies stands for innovative
solutions, convincing quality, economical plant concepts, extensive
process know-how and an outstanding service.
At the 200 square metre exhibition booth ANDRITZ MeWa will present
a variety of solutions for different kinds of materials on a total of five
product islands:
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For all areas ANDRITZ MeWa offers optimally fitted solutions.
Worldwide references show the high customer satisfaction. A special
highlight at the booth is the presentation of the newest WEEE recycling
plant which was opened recently. Here not only electronic devises
are processed, but also end of life fridges can be recycled in an
environmentally sound way. The result is clean metal fractions that can
be resold easily.
Also for the other recycling issues ANDRITZ MeWa offers the
corresponding information for the exhibition visitors. From end of life
tyres, oil filters, household and industrial waste to niche solutions for
very particular materials like for example spray cans or batteries: With its
innovative solutions ANDRITZ MeWa has the answers to the most urgent
questions concerning recycling.
www.andritz.com
ANDRITZ MEWA:
The next step ahead in
recycling technology
ANDRITZ MeWa is the new
strong brand for recycling
machinery and process solu-
tions.
Whether e-scrap, refrigerators,
cables, metal composites, used
tyres, oil flters, household and
commercial waste or very specifed
solutions: ANDRÌTZ MeWa
stands for innovative solutions,
exceptional quality, economic
investment concepts, competent
advice and reliable service.
www.andritz.com/mewa
ANDRITZ MeWa GmbH
Gueltlinger Strasse 3
75391 Gechingen, Germany
Phone: +49 (7056) 925-0
info.mewa@andritz.com
ANDRITZ MeWa
Recycling technologies
Visit us
in Hall C2 Stand 445/546
May 5-9, 2014
Messe München
For more information, enter 30 at WMW.hotims.com
EXHIBITOR PROMOTION
59 V/|´|ű/|||| 2014 WASTE MANAGEMENT WORLD
1403WMW_59 59 4/9/14 9:53 AM
B
RT Better Recycling Technologie invites you to join us at the IFAT
2014 in Munich, Germany, May 5 – 9, 2014. Please stop by and
visit us in hall c2 at booth 335.
Learn about the latest trends in solutions for the waste sorting
and recycling industries:
Q SCHLITZ-O-MAT – Bag Opener
Q CARG-O-MAT – Moving Floor Conveyor
Q PERF-O-MAT – PET Perforator
Q SEP-O-MAT – Rotor Screens
Q BAL-O-MAT – Bale Breaker
Q BAL-O-MAT – Bale Dewiring Machine
Q SORT-O-MAT – Balistic Separator
Q DOS-O-MAT – Feed and Metering Hopper
Q CRACK-O-MAT – Dismantler for Electric Appliances
Moreover, IFAT 2014 will also be the venue where we present our
latest innovation for the very first time: the Mobile SCHLITZ-O-MAT Bag
Opener – an economic alternative to shredding technology. The Mobile
SCHLITZ-O-MAT is based on established technology that conforms to
highest formal and functional demands, meeting the growing demands of
flexibility. It opens and empties almost 100 percent of all plastic bags and
provides almost unlimited fields of application. Packaging material, heavy
MSW, mixed materials containing large cardboards or organic waste are
processed with ease.
In Germany and worldwide, BRT has gained the confidence of customers
ranging from private waste disposal contractors, municipal recycling
facilities, waste management companies as well as the energy sector
and plant engineering firms. Together with our international distribution
partners, we have established a sales and service network, putting our
focus on customer satisfaction. For more information about our exhibit or
our equipment offering please contact us at sales@brt.info.
We look forward to seeing you in Munich!
www.brt.info
BRT BETTER RECYCLING
TECHNOLOGIE
www.brt.info
WORLD PREMIERE @ IFAT 2014
For more information, enter 31 at WMW.hotims.com
EXHIBITOR PROMOTION
60 WASTE MANAGEMENT WORLD MARCH-APRIL 2014
BRT
1403WMW_60 60 4/9/14 9:53 AM
A
revolutionary new Eddy Current Separator (ECS) developed
by Eriez will be introduced to continental Europe at IFAT in
May.
The Eriez RevX-E achieves significantly greater separation of
valuable non-ferrous metals from a wide variety of mixed waste streams
than existing market-leading products. In independent third-party tests, it
was shown to throw aluminium fines nearly 20% further.
This provides materials recycling facility operators with:
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The new rotor of the RevX-E is the result of extensive research and
development by Eriez. It greatly improves the efficiency of eccentric ECS,
where an eccentric smaller diameter magnetic rotor is offset at the top
of a larger outer shell with a belt transporting material for separation.
The eccentric design focuses the strong eddy currents produced by the
magnets into a ‘zone of separation’ at the end of the belt.
This repels non-ferrous materials more efficiently, projecting them
further from the belt and allowing improved recovery of them while also
enabling ferrous material to be released more easily.
The rotor position is adjustable to enable optimum separation of
materials. The eccentric design of the rotor also reduces long-term wear
on the belt caused by the accumulation of ferrous material.
In addition, the new-design RevX-E is more compact than ECSs of similar
capacity, so it requires less space and is easier to install in MRFs. The access
panels are also conveniently located for easy servicing.
Eriez has produced two different versions of the RevX-E; the ST2 for
materials typically between 25mm and 150mm in diameter and the ST22
for fines smaller than 25mm. Both will be shown off at the Eriez stand Hall
C1 Stand 232 at IFAT in Munich which runs from May 5th - 9th.
Eriez Europe Sales Director Gareth Meese said: “These superb pieces
of kit show just how much good R-and-D-based design can achieve. We
first showed them at the RWM show in September and they created huge
interest.
“They take eddy current separation into a new era, extending
the boundaries of recycling. For instance, customers can achieve an
aluminium flake reduction of 92% from a single pass or a clean PET yield
of between 97 and 99%.
“We see the RevX-E as being hugely beneficial when used with
automobile shredding, glass cullet, plastics, electronic scrap, co-mingled
recyclables, wood and incineration ash.
“We look forward to demonstrating this at IFAT and if you cannot wait
a video demonstrating the clean separation achieved with the ST-22 can
be found on our website.”
www.en-gb.eriez.com
ERIEZ TO SHOW OFF NEW EDDY
CURRENT SEPARATOR AT IFAT
For more information, enter 32 at WMW.hotims.com
EXHIBITOR PROMOTION
61 V/|´|ű/|||| 2014 WASTE MANAGEMENT WORLD
1403WMW_61 61 4/9/14 9:54 AM
H
SM GmbH + Co. KG, the southern German manufacturer of
baling presses, PET solutions and document shredders will
present its innovative products in hall C1, stand 243/342.
ENERGY SAVINGS OF UP TO 40% WITH
THE VK 12018 R FU CHANNEL BALING PRESS
The presentation of one of the largest presses, the HSM VK 12018 R FU,
will certainly be very impressive. VK stands for fully automatic channel
baling press, 120 for 1200 kN pressing power, 18 for the length of the
loading aperture (1800 mm), R for recycling and FU for frequency-
regulated drive. This drive makes a huge contribution to environmental
protection and efficiency with savings in energy costs of up to 40%.
This drive is available as an option for many of the HSM baling presses
and multi-stage shredder systems. With a drive of 2 x 90 kW, the HSM VK
12018 can press up to 35 tonnes of mixed paper per hour, each weighing
approx. 1 tonne. With foil, each bale will weigh approximately 700 kg.
However, it is not just the weight, but also the quality of the bales which
is crucial for disposal companies.
The tighter the bales are pressed, the more stable they are for storage
and therefore the better able they are to meet the requirements of the
paper mills Another critical criteria for disposal companies is the size of the
bales. With dimensions of 1.10 m x 1.10 m, they are ideally sized for truck
loading and, compared to smaller presses, save around 1/3 of the wire.
The V-Press 860 L and the V-Press 1160 V-Press will represent the vertical
baling press range at the IFAT trade fair. The so-called “rapid traverse
technology” was developed by HSM especially for the V-Press range. The
results are certainly impressive: the energy consumption and the driving
power are significantly reduced while, at the same time, increasing the
throughput capacity.
This technology reduces cycle time by approx. 25-30%. Vertical
baling presses, also known as cabinet presses, are frequently used in the
food industry, as well as by discount chains, for pressing cardboard from
packaging into valuable product bales.
Technical details: The V-Press 860 L compresses used packaging
material such as cardboard and foil effortlessly thanks to both a pressing
power of 532 kN and the extremely stable press ram guidance. The bales
reach a weight of up to 460 kg regardless of the material and are bound
4-fold with wire strapping as a standard. Polyester strapping is also
available as an option. Special profiles in the bale ejection door, in the
filling hatch and in the press ram form recesses in the bales. Thus the use
of pallets is no longer necessary. The bales can be moved directly with a
pallet truck or stacker.
The V-Press 1160 also works with a pressing power of 532 kN,
produces bales however weighing up to 550 kg and with a bale size of
1200 x 1100 x max. 1200 mm (L x B x H).
www.hsm.eu
HSM PRESENTS ENERGY SAVING
BALING PRESSES
HSM GmbH + Co. KG · Germany · info@hsm.eu · Tel. +49 (0) 75 54 / 2100-0
Great Products, Great People.
ENVIRONMENTAL
TECHNOLOGY
Come
at
and
see
us
HSM – More than a baler.
All our energy is in each HSM machine. Because we, as HSM staff, are behind
every single product we manufacture – before and after the product has been sold.
Expect more from us at IFAT. We look forward to your visit!
IFAT, München, 5. – 9. Mai 2014, Halle C1
www.hsm.eu
For more information, enter 33 at WMW.hotims.com
EXHIBITOR PROMOTION
62 WASTE MANAGEMENT WORLD MARCH-APRIL 2014
1403WMW_62 62 4/9/14 9:54 AM
M
odern and environmentally-friendly technologies, multi-
functionality and comprehensive one-stop service
solutions – that’s Hako.
Whether sweepers for the thorough cleaning of outdoor
areas, multi-functional implement carriers with articulated steering for
all-year-round employment or compact implement carriers & transporters
equipped with three attachment compartments and up to 100 possible
attachments – Hako’s municipal technology offers individual solutions for
economic and reliable city cleaning, real estate, park and sports ground
maintenance as well as for winter service tasks.
At the IFAT 2014, Hako will be presenting a cross-section of its
municipal technology product segment. Highlights of the exhibition
presentation, for example, will be a further development of the basic
model TREMO T,
the new TREMO T+ - a flexible, compact and manoeuvrable narrow-
gauge implement carrier - the ultra-compact implement carrier Citymaster
600 as well as the new flagship of the implement carrier range, the
Multicar M31.
Comprehensive services such as computerised profitability
calculations, fleet management solutions and financing & procurement
options supplement and complete the machine presentation.
Hako Finance GmbH will be presenting their wide range of customized
leasing & rental options, offering great advantages in terms of financial
flexibility.
www.hako.com
HAKO – Uncompromised Solutions
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Hako-Citymaster –
Our Mission: Keeping the City Clean!
Whatever the surface or area of employment, our machines carry out every task efficiently. From multi-functional implement carriers with
articulated steering to machines quipped with a 3-way-broom system or scrubbing deck, they offer uncompromised multi-functionality – for
example for lawn maintenance or professional winter service.
Cleaning Technology · Municipal Technology
Hako GmbH · Head Office · Hamburger Str. 209-239 · 23843 Bad Oldesloe · Phone +49 (0) 45 31- 806 0 · info@hako.com · www.hako.com
Find just the right machine
for your needs at
www.hako.com/citymaster
Citymaster 2000
3-broom system
Citymaster 600 Citymaster 2000
2-broom system
Citymaster 1250
For more information, enter 34 at WMW.hotims.com
EXHIBITOR PROMOTION
63 MARCH-APRIL 2014 WASTE MANAGEMENT WORLD
1403WMW_63 63 4/9/14 9:54 AM
T
he ECO 5003 from Neuson Ecotec is intended for all operators
having to re-stack high volumes of materials (such as digestate,
contaminated soil, MBT, or compost, etc.) in a short time in
confined space.
It has been specifically developed for indoor operation. It is able to work in
most confined space and also at high ambient temperatures. The standard
equipment of the cabin includes appropriate protective ventilation and air
conditioning. Of course, this conception and comfort features make it also
perfectly fit for efficient outdoor use.
Other than conventional tunnel machines the ECO doesn‘t need any
travelling paths, but it will make its way on its own – through each and
every material. The windrow turner is provided with a rotor at the front
that mixes and scoops the material at low speed, transports it through the
machine on a conveyor belt to then discharge it behind (or beside) the
machine. The result: gentle mixing, better aeration and loose re-stacking
of the windrow – for 20% shorter rotting times and less development
of odour. And most importantly: the ECO 5003 can easily process
overlapping windrows – even tabular ones.
This patented system can save up to 30% of surface area. It will
re-stack up to 2800 m3/hour and can process triangular, trapezoidal, and
tabular windrows up to a height of 3.0m.
In windrows up to 3 meters in height, the innovative compost turner
ECO 5003 by Neuson Ecotec is completely in its element: it doesn‘t need
any travelling paths and stacks the gently mixed and loosened material
behind (or beside) the machine after passing. This makes it perfectly
suitable for indoor operation. Up to 30% of the surface area can be saved.
www.neuson-ecotec.com
SPACE-SAVING STACKING
PROCESS WITH THE WINDROW
TURNER ECO 5003
Simple. Better. Sustainable. Neuson Ecotec forestry and environmental
equipment facilitates your work, ensures the attainment and compliance with
mandatory industrial standards and boosts the overall value generation:
An upgrade for the industry that delivers better performance and is made of
higher quality material. A good investment into the future.

Welcome to the lounge of the very best.
Neuson Ecotec GmbH, Actualstraße 32, 4053 Haid, Österreich
Tel.: +43(0)7229 78 000-0, Fax: +43(0)7229 78 000-100
office@neuson-ecotec.com, www.neuson-ecotec.com
facebook.com/Neuson.Ecotec
||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||
The Green Business Class.
For more information, enter 35 at WMW.hotims.com
EXHIBITOR PROMOTION
1403WMW_64 64 4/9/14 10:17 AM
H
aving successfully cooperated with the three companies -
L&M Entsorgungs-Systeme (Meppen), Sutco RecyclingTechnik
(Bergisch Gladbach) and unoTech GmbH (Niederlangen) the
LM-GROUP was founded to combine the core competences
of three specialists well established in the waste market.
L&M - Ludden & Mennekes Entsorgungs-Systeme - handles the design,
construction and implementation of efficient and trend-setting systems
for disposal engineering.
A wide range of different machines and systems for the entire waste
disposal industry are produced at the company’s site in Meppen/Emsland
in the North of Germany.
Ludden & Mennekes Entsortungs-Systeme was founded in 1991
by Heinz Ludden and Peter Mennekes and experienced an expansive
development of the company in the last years, the company combine
all core competences of innovative technology for returning recyclable
material to industrial cycle.
Sutco RecyclingTechnik is the oldest of the three companies. During
its history of 28 years the company has become a specialist in design,
production, installation and commissioning of sophisticated treatment
and sorting systems for the waste industry, e.g. for household waste,
industrial waste, substitute fuels etc.
Together with its affiliates, Sutco Polska in Poland, Sutco UK in Great
Britain, Sutco Iberica in Spain and Sutco Brasil in Brasil, the company has
implemented more than 430 systems worldwide.
unoTech is specialised in the development, design and construction
of channel baling presses.
Embedded in a powerful group of companies, unoTech manufactures
fully automatic baling presses with pressing forces from 500 kN to 2300 kN
in its premises at the Niederlangen site.
With its UPAMAT and UPAMAX trademarks the company offers two
complete series of channel and two-ram baling presses which are tailored
to the different target markets, individual customer specifications and
requirements.
The LM-GROUP‘s field of activity can be summarised by the keywords
serving the objective of resource preservation and sustainability:
t $0--&$5*/( = L&M
t 4035*/( = Sutco
t #"-*/( = unoTech
The synergy effects of the group of companies are efficient in every
direction and are advantageous in all respects: The LM-GROUP companies
operate a joint distribution structure, use proven machinery and
guarantee a continual interface optimization of all components offered.
The customer will profit from the successful bundling of competences
within the LM-GROUP.
www.lm-group.com
LM-GROUP. THREE COMPANIES –
one strong partner
SORTING
WWW.SUTCO.DE
COLLECTING
WWW.LUDDEN.DE
BALING
WWW.UNOTECH.DE
THIS YEAR YOU WILL FIND US IN
HALL B2 - STAND 203 / 302
PROVEN CONCEPTS OF SOPHISTICATED
TECHNOLOGY FOR WASTE INDUSTRY.
For more information, enter 36 at WMW.hotims.com
EXHIBITOR PROMOTION
65 MARCH-APRIL 2014 8"45& ."/"(&.&/5 803-%
1403WMW_65 65 4/9/14 10:18 AM
J
FE Engineering is one of the world’s leading suppliers of EfW
technologies with more than 160 waste to energy reference plants.
With its unique technology, JFE High-Temperature Gasifying and
Direct Melting System, we can achieve high level EfW solutions
through successful proven Gasification Technology.
JFE’s gasifying and melting furnace has a simple shaft type furnace
configuration. Waste charged into the furnace is gasified under high
temperature condition,approximately 600°C - 700°C, while residues are
melted under very high temperature about 1600°C - 2000°C at the bottom
of the furnace.
Thanks to its unique technology called “continuous slag discharging”,
the molten slag and metal are continuously discharged from the furnace
bottom. The molten slag / metal are quenched to form particles, then
recovered separately.
The slag is confirmed significantly stable so that it can be utilized as
construction material, such as roadbed material; as such the amount of
residues necessary to be landfilled can be extremely reduced.
Syngas produced via waste gasification is burned in the downstream
process to recover its heat energy to supply electric power as well as heat
to outside. This system can also minimize emission of DXNs and other
hazardous substances, which enables very low environmental impact.
JFE Engineering has 10 reference gasification plants in Japan, all of
which have been successfully operated over the last ten years. Still, some
are under construction. JFE Engineering will have a stand at IFAT 2014,
B3-330. Please come and visit us for more details.
www.jfe-eng.co.jp
Gasifying and Direct Melting
Waste
Syngas
Slag/Metal
(MSW, RDF, Medical waste, etc.)
Coke & Limestone
Freeboard
(Gas remorming zone)
> 850
º
C
Gasifying layer
(Drying and Gasifying zone)
600 – 850
º
C
Coke bed layer
(High temperature melting zone)
1,600 – 2000
º
C
Continuous slag discharging
For more information, enter 37 at WMW.hotims.com
EXHIBITOR PROMOTION
66 WASTE MANAGEMENT WORLD MARCH-APRIL 2014
1403WMW_66 66 4/9/14 9:56 AM
R
heinbraun Brennstoff GmbH will present innovative product
solutions for wastewater and waste-gas cleaning that are based
on HOK® activated carbon produced from Rhenish lignite.
This activated carbon produced by RWE Power AG, which is
used in the capture of pollutants and is marketed worldwide by RBB
under the brand name “Activated Lignite HOK”, has special properties
that yield an adsorbent and catalyst which is in demand in numerous
environmental fields.
Typical applications – besides waste-water and drinking-water
treatment – include waste-gas and waste-air cleaning in refuse incineration
and in the steel industry, where HOK is deployed globally as competitive
and highly effective sorbent.
Thanks especially to the favourable pore structure and catalytic
properties, Activated Lignite HOK has the capacity to retain a large
number of pollutants. This applies particularly to the emission-relevant
pollutants of organic compounds, such as dioxins and furans, as well as to
those of heavy metals, such as mercury.
Carbon activation of the lignite extracted in RWE Power AG’s opencast
mines near Cologne takes place in the so-called rotary hearth furnace
process which gave Activated Lignite its brand name HOK (German
abbreviation for Herdofenkoks = rotary hearth furnace coke). The activated
lignite thus produced has the typical pore structure characteristic of HOK
which results in high separation efficiency for a multitude of pollutants.
The favourable pore structure present in HOK permits easy access
to the inner surface area which is decisive, among other things, for
the adsorption of compounds such as those of dioxins and furans. The
process, which has been optimised on a basis of decades of experience,
guarantees a low-priced bulk product at a constant high quality level.
At present, some 180,000 tonnes of activated lignite are produced in
compliance with DIN ISO 9001 per year.
Interested trade visitors are welcome to visit representatives of
Rheinbraun Brennstoff GmbH at IFAT stand 410 in hall B3.
www.hok.de
HOK® ACTIVATED
LIGNITE:
Efficient filter
technology for the
environmental sector –
a global success
say HOK
®
.
And it’s okay.
I f y o u t a l k
a b o u t
e n v i r o n m e n t
a n d i n d u s t r i e s ,
HOK
®
Activated lignite. Flue gas adsorbent and
catalyst. First choice for gas cleaning in refuse
and special waste incineration and metallurgical
processes.
Substantial reduction of dioxins and furans.
Sometimes, a single, well-considered decision
is all it takes: for the bene⇒t of your company,
for the good of the environment.
The choice is HOK
®
. HOK
®
is OK.
See for yourself! Come see us at the
IFAT 2014 exhibition in Munich,
Germany, hall B3, stand 410! We are
looking forward to meeting you!
Rheinbraun Brennstoff GmbH
D-50416 Köln
Tel.: +49 221-480-25386
www.hok.de
For more information, enter 38 at WMW.hotims.com
EXHIBITOR PROMOTION
67 MARCH-APRIL 2014 WASTE MANAGEMENT WORLD
1403WMW_67 67 4/9/14 9:56 AM
K
omptech will present four new machines - the Axtor 6010, the
Crambo direct, the Topturn X and the Hurrifex. As always with
Komptech, it was customer requirements that drove these
developments. And the results are impressive.
The centre piece will no doubt be the Axtor 6010, the little brother of
the proven Axtor 8012. Numerous components have been downsized to
fit the lower power, like the feed ramp, intake opening and chipping drum,
which in no way diminishes utility - in fact, it does the opposite.
The Axtor 6010 is the right size for most facilities and operators, who
can use it to capacity. This naturally has a very advantageous effect on
pricing. The Axtor 6010 rounds out Komptech’s biomass processing range.
In fast-running shredder mode it generates material for composting,
while in slow-running chipper mode it makes fuel for heating plants.
Depending on the input material, it chips or shreds with shredder blades.
Power from the Caterpillar C18 engine is transferred to the drum via
a manual gearbox. A 3-axle central axle trailer and new a semi-trailer or a
chain drive lend the Axtor mobility.
CRAMBO DIRECT – GREEN AND EFFICIENT
The Crambo is indisputably one of the best machines there is for
shredding all types of wood and green cuttings. In addition to the
existing hydraulic-drive model there is now a mechanical-drive version,
the new Crambo direct.
The Crambo direct has a drive train that combines both the
functionality of hydraulic with the efficiency of mechanical drive.
The new mechanical drive with automatic transmission combines the
advantages of higher efficiency and lower fuel use, with full functionality
like overload protection, reversing and two shredding speeds.
The new Crambo direct is one of the machines in Komptech’s new
green efficiency® innovation programme. Green efficiency machines have
lower consumption and higher performance, making them extremely
economical to run. Naturally they also have the latest emissions technology.
TOPTURN X – THE THIRD GENERATION
And then there’s the new Topturn. Starting with the X53 variant, the
product line has been updated through and through. Using experience
gained in many thousands of operating hours, numerous modifications
were made to improve operator comfort, controls and maintenance, and
reduce emissions to meet the latest standards.
HURRIFEX – WINDSIFTING AND STONE REMOVAL
IN ONE
The Hurrifex is a new class of machine that combines the benefits
of the Stonefex and the Hurrikan, performing windsifting and stone
separation in one pass.
This makes the Hurrifex especially suitable for composters and green-
cutting processors who have to battle not just stones but also plastic
contaminants in order to turn out a clean fuel product.
You can find us at IFAT, Hall C2, Booth 403/502
www.komptech.com
NEW MACHINES, NEW CAPABILITIES
www.komptech.com
Shredding and chipping made easy.
Neat and tidy feeding please:
Huge feed table (5.7 x 1.4 metres)
with hinged hopper
AXTOR 6010 -
Universal shredder for
green waste and wood
A huge mouth: 1450 x 850 mm
feed opening with aggressive
feed rollers
From shredding to chipping:
Change tool elements, switch
speed and away you go!
Always the right particle size:
Simple screen basket exchange with
screen basket rotatable to the rear
Yellow powerhouse:
CAT® C15 engine with 590 HP in
maintenance-friendly underfloor position
Material in abundance:
Throughputs up to 300 cubic
metres per hour
Visit Komptech at the
IFAT in Munich
5
th
- 9
th
of May 2014
Hall C2, Stand 403/502
NEW
For more information, enter 39 at WMW.hotims.com
EXHIBITOR PROMOTION
68 WASTE MANAGEMENT WORLD MARCH-APRIL 2014
1403WMW_68 68 4/9/14 9:56 AM
F
or more than 40 years, VECOPLAN AG has designed, engineered, manufactured, and commissioned technologically advanced machines and
systems that shred, convey and process primary and secondary resources in production and recycling processes.
Our systems capabilities include
unloading of raw feed-stocks, pre-
shredding, ferrous separation, conveying,
screening, air classification, re-shredding, non-
ferrous separation, sampling and testing stations,
storage, and delivery of fuel to the Precalcination/
Mainburner of cement kilns or power plants.
VECOPLAN systems can be found in sophisticated,
commercial scale plants as well as directly in the
Cement industry.
With different types of shredder which differ
fundamentally in their structure and form of
shredding, we have the appropriate and perfectly
tailored technology available for different materials.
For preshedding different materials we offer
single-shaft as well as double-shaft shredders with
a torque range of up to 55,000NM and a maximum
rotor length of 3.1m. VECOPLAN double-shaft
shredders are built for extreme duty, delivering
throughputs of up to 100 t/h.
Once shredded, material passes through bar
screens or is pulled back into the cutting chamber
and re-cut until it passes through the screen bars.
The interaction between the rotors and the counter
knife, combined with the bar screens produces a
homogeneous, consistently sized particle output.
For application with less throughput or other
special needs we are also able to provide a single
shaft Preshredder which is based on our VAZ
Modell - the so called VAZ 2000 MF-T “V”. Based on
knowledge of the VAZ series and the knowledge of
RDF production VECOPLAN released the new RDF
Reshredder VEZ 2500 T in 2013.
It is a robust and compact single-shaft shredder
that has been built for shredding pre-shredded
ferrous/nonferrous and air classified recyclables
The unit comprises a large cylindrical solid steel
rotor and two solid counter knives with double
the number of cuts per rotation to give users
the highest performance at very homogeneous
output.
The VEZ 2500 is provided with the patented
HiTorc® drive unit, a drive without gear with
speed-controllable HiTorc® motor that is virtually
maintenance-free and noiseless. The equipment
also offers advanced frequency converter for an
energy-efficient and economic shredding process.
www.vecoplan.de
RDF PREPARATION WITH
VECOPLAN TECHNOLOGY
Shredding is our core competence –
Quality made in Germany
KEY-COMPONENT IN MODERN WASTE RECYCLING PLANTS
www.vecoplan.com
Energy efficient – Cost effective – Ultimate
performance. VECOPLAN waste treatment plants
generate recyclable materials according to size,
composition or material and customer require-
ments. VECOPLAN engineers combine various
processing steps. The new VECOPLAN shredder
VEZ 2500 is a heavy duty re-shredder with high
capacity, best suitable for the production of refuse
derives fuels (RDF) from production and sorting
waste, packing material as well as the high
calorific fraction from domestic and commercial
waste for the energetic use in cement and power
plants. Once again VECOPLAN sets the standard
with the new innovation. The advantages of the VEZ 2500:
Easy access for maintenance and service, high torque,
start under full load and maximum availability.
On top the shredder is equipped with the energy efficient
drive system HiTorc
®
.
VEZ 2500 T 1 x 247 kW HiTorc
®
drive,
144 knives (4 knife bars), 10 to 15 t/h
VEZ 2500 T 1 x 247 kW HiTorc
®
drive,
216 knives ( 6 knife bars), 12 to 18 t/h
VEZ 2500 TT 2 x 247 kW HiTorc
®
drive,
288 knives (8 knife bars), 15 to 25 t/h
DERNWASTE RECYCLING PLANTS WASTE RECYCLING PLANTS
AVAILABLE
IN THREE
VERSIONS
VISIT US
HALL C2, BOOTH 431/532
RDF SHREDDER VEZ 2500
For more information, enter 40 at WMW.hotims.com
EXHIBITOR PROMOTION
69 MARCH-APRIL 2014 WASTE MANAGEMENT WORLD
1403WMW_69 69 4/9/14 9:56 AM
P
resona AB is one of the world’s leading designers and
manufacturers of balers, all featuring our pre-press technology
for efficient baling of the most varieties of recyclables, from
paper and plastic to household and industrial waste. The
product range also includes pneumatic waste extraction systems for the
graphics industry, paper and packaging manufacturers as well as sorting
plants for municipal waste.
At IFAT 2014, May 5 – 9 in Munich, we are proud to launch a new
member of our LP Series baler, the LP 110 CH, “big brother” of our LP 85
VH launched at RWM in Birmingham 2013. The LP 85 VH was received
with a great deal of interest at the show.
We now look forward to introducing the LP 110 CH baler at IFAT in
Munich. The LP Series baler is, in the true sense of the word, a smarter
baler. The Presona Pre-Press Baling Technology is by far a very effective
method of volume reduction. To reduce volume of material into dense,
squre bales is of course the whole purpose of buying a baler.
The Presona LP Series, all equipped with the Pre-Press Technology,
is probably the most efficient baling method; no extra power is
required for cutting operations, the energy input in relation to material
throughput is extremely favourable in comparison to traditional shear
baling technology.
The LP 110 CH is a state of the art baler with a range of functions
and features to enhance performance and to bring a favourable life
cycle cost for our customers. We have developed a new friction channel
design with two heavy-duty pulling cylinders to enhance bale density
and reduce wear and tear.
The baler has a smart relation between fixed bale channel and friction
channel to better control the added press force, to warrant the best
possible bale density and perfectly shaped bales. The friction channel has
a compact design to reduce wastage.
The “slimline “ design makes it possible to ship the baler in one piece,
even though it is a massive piece of equipment, to save on transport
costs and for more effective and quicker installation. The baler has big
inspection doors and hatches for easy service and maintenance access.
We know we have once again built a great machine and it is always exiting
to show a machine for the first time.
www.presona.com
PRESONA LP SERIES –
The Smarter Baler
Use reprints to maximize your marketing initiatives and strengthen your brand’s value.
CUSTOM REPRINTS
For additional information, please contact Jill Kaletha at Foster Printing Service, the
official reprint provider for Waste Management World.
Call Jill at 866.879.9144 ext. 168 or pennwellreprints@fosterprinting.com
The Smarter Baler
Come and look for yourself in our
stand No C1 441/341. Welcome!
Presona AB - Tel +46 417 19900 - Fax +46 417 19932 - Email sales@presona.com www.presona.com
For more information,
enter 41 at WMW.hotims.com
EXHIBITOR PROMOTION
70 WASTE MANAGEMENT WORLD MARCH-APRIL 2014
1403WMW_70 70 4/9/14 9:56 AM
I
nterest in waste gasification has grown in several countries in recent
years. The gasification of MSW and biomass as an energy recovery
method has been widely researched as an ‘Alternative Thermal
Treatment Technology’ all over the world.
The Direct Melting System (DMS) is a shaft-furnace type gasification and
melting process and is classified as an atmospheric moving bed gasifier. The
DMS has been in commercial operation at more than 40 plants from 10,000
to 230,000 t/annum in Japan and South Korea since 1979.
The Direct Melting System has several advantages, which can minimise
environmental impacts and maximise the resource recovery from waste.
Firstly, the DMS shows the waste flexibility and stable operation which
can be achieved by high-temperature gasification (1800ºC). MSW can be
processed with various kinds of waste without any pre-treatment, which
is different from other gasification technologies. C&I waste, sewage sludge,
incombustible and combustible residues, clinical waste, automobile
shredder residues (ASR) and landfill waste can be processed and converted
into power and materials.
In addition, HCl and SO
2
emissions from the gasifier are relatively
low due to the de-acidification by limestone injection to the gasifier. This
indicates that the DMS has possibilities for reducing the environmental
impacts.
The high-temperature gasification also leads to stable operation and syngas
with higher net heating values (NCVs). The NCVs of the syngas ranged from
4.4 MJ/m3N,db and 5.9 MJ/m3N,db in the case of processing waste with the
NCVs of 6.5 and 9.1 MJ/kg.
Secondary material can also be recovered. Inert materials can be
recycled as slag and metal. Due to the high-temperature and reducing
atmosphere in the gasifier, toxic heavy metals are completely volatilised
and distributed in fly ash. The slag produced contains few hazardous
heavy metals, is stable and can be recycled without additional treatment.
The metal produced is also recycled. Iron and copper are mainly
distributed in metal, which can be recycled in a steel factory. Toxic heavy
metals such as lead and zinc, are mostly distributed in fly ash. From this
point of view, the DMS can contribute to environmental conservation and
resource recycling.
Lastly, the long-term operating and maintenance experiences show
its reliability. The first DMS plant was constructed in 1979. It operated
for 31 years. Due to the stable and safe operation over 31 years, the
municipality decided to employ the same technology for its replacement.
Given above-mentioned findings, the DMS has great potential to be
an ideal approach to environmental conservation and resource recycling.
www.eng.nssmc.com/english
WASTE GASIFICATION AND
MELTING TECHNOLOGY:
Energy and Material Recovery from Waste
For further information please contact European offce
AM SEESTERN 8, 40547 DÜSSELDORF GERMANY
www.eng.nssmc.com/english/ TEL.+49-211-528095-0
Gasifcation as an Alternative Waste to Energy
Waste gasifcation technology is recognized as an alternative thermal treatment technology.
NSENGI's gasifcation and melting technology is a proven waste gasifcation technology
based on more than 34 years operating experience.
Photo courtesy of Kitakyushu City
Direct Melting System
(Main)
Shinmoji Plant
Capacity 10 t/h, 3 lines
Start Up Apr. 2007
Waste to be treated
MSW, Incombustibles, Sludge
(Upper)
Waste Pit & Waste Crane
(Lower)
Interior of Facility
For more information, enter 42 at WMW.hotims.com
EXHIBITOR PROMOTION
71 MARCH-APRIL 2014 WASTE MANAGEMENT WORLD
1403WMW_71 71 4/9/14 10:00 AM
W
ith the re-launch of the highly acclaimed XR shredder
range, UNTHA sets even greater standards in the
recycling of household, commercial and bulky waste.
Thanks to clever in-built technology, which achieves
minimal operating costs with maximum performance, this new waste
shredder is a true innovation. Not only does this new model stand out in
the marketplace; it also places UNTHA shredding technology in a league
of its own, when it comes to waste recovery.
The new XR model range is the logical next step in the development
of a very successful shredder brand and offers many new features. The
revolutionary robust drive concept, UNTHA Eco Drive, ensures up to
50% less energy consumption over electro-hydraulic drive options.
Furthermore, the water-cooled drive motors require no fresh air supply
and are thus absolutely safe in the event of thermal outages.
The utilisation of cutting-edge synchronous motors also achieves
a maximum level of efficiency, which makes the UNTHA Eco Drive one
of the most energy efficient drive systems in the market. In addition,
maintenance expenditures can be reduced to a minimum as coupling,
belt, hydraulic pumps and shaft stub are no longer required.
In order to meet individual customer requirements, UNTHA engineers
have developed two different, configurable cutting systems. The new XR
shredder can therefore be equipped with either the “ripper” or the “cutter”
system. In combination with the patented XR strainer bar system, this
ensures a specified fraction size of 50 to 400 mm.
A resqueezing feeder inside the cutter system improves the feeding
behaviour of the rotor, in the event of low material density, and the self-
contained nature of the system, ensures efficient processing of all material.
During development, special emphasis was put on ease maintenance.
The ripper teeth (rippers) can be easily replaced and the multiple use
cutter plates (cutters) reduce downtime to a minimum. And if extraneous
materials block the reliable cutting system, the fully automatic flap for
non-shreddable items ensures quick removal.
The machine is operated comfortably via a 7-inch touch screen colour
monitor, containing a visual display of all parameter settings, programs
and fault alerts. Smoother, quicker and safer access to all machine
components, and a service platform that ensures ergonomically correct
posture when working have been very well received by service engineers.
Furthermore, the compact design of the XR model range makes
installation in existing systems easier, and the low filling height ensures a
smooth material charge with the wheel loader.
“We are convinced that with the launch of the XR model range we are
ushering in a new age in the field of efficient and modern shredders. There
is no smarter way to shred waste!” says Christian Lanner, head of product
management at UNTHA.
The range will be launched at and all interested visitors are invited to
explore the multitude of new innovations and quality features in hall C2,
booth 121 / 222. UNTHA shredding technology looks forward to your visit!
www.untha.com
NEXT GENERATION UNTHA XR:
The smarter way to shred waste
The reliable brand!
VISIT US AT: IFAT / Munich, 05 - 09 May, hall C2, stand 121/222
Experts in waste to
energy shredding
technology.
Turning today´s waste into
tomorrow´s profits.
Xr2000S Tr3200
UNTHA shredding technology
Moldanstrasse 141, A-5431 Kuchl / Salzburg, Austria
Tel +43 6244 7016 0, Fax +43 6244 7016 1, info@untha.com
www.untha.com
DO
N
’T M
ISS
THE LAUNCH OF OUR
NEW WASTE
SHREDDER,
IFAT 2014
For more information, enter 43 at WMW.hotims.com
EXHIBITOR PROMOTION
72 WASTE MANAGEMENT WORLD MARCH-APRIL 2014
1403WMW_72 72 4/9/14 10:00 AM
MAY-JUNE 2013
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Paper recycling is around 70%in Europe and
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A look at the increasing use of highly durable
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Whichwastes carry most
weight inthe EUbiofuel mix?
Evaluating proposals underway in Europe to
double count biofuels made from waste
Official Publication of:
WMWSpecial:
Collection &
Transport
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• New Contracts • Mergers & Acquisitions • Regulatory Updates
• Video Case Studies • NEW Technology
Global Coverage Of The Entire Waste To Energy Sector – Delivered To YOU.
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Monthly eNewsletter
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HAAS TYRON
Double Shaft Slow Speed Shredder
Phone: +49(0)26 61/98 65-0
Fax: +49(0)26 61/98 65-20
E-mail: info@haas-recycling.de
Website: www.haas-recycling.de
HAAS Holzzerkleinerungs-
und Fördertechnik GmbH
Unter den Weiden 6
56472 Dreisbach/Germany
WOOD WASTE . ROOTS . RAILWAY
SLEEPERS . DOMESTIC . INDUSTRIAL
AND BULKY WASTE . CABLE DRUMS
TYRES . MATTRESSES . PALLETS
PAPER ROLLS . GREEN WASTE
The HAAS TYRON crushes
diffcult material such as
5.-9. May 2014
Exhibition grounds Munich
Hall C2 Booth 413
We‘re looking forward
to meet you
For more information, enter 44 at WMW.hotims.com
EXHIBITOR PROMOTION
73 MARCH-APRIL 2014 WASTE MANAGEMENT WORLD
1403WMW_73 73 4/9/14 10:01 AM
PROMOTING SUSTAINABLE WASTE MANAGEMENT WORLDWIDE
74 WASTE MANAGEMENT WORLD MARCH-APRIL 2014
ISWA
INFORMATION
VISIT WWW.ISWA.ORG FOR MORE INFORMATION
WASTE MANAGEMENT & RESEARCH (WM&R) –
THE SCIENTIFIC JOURNAL OF ISWA
Under the leadership of the new New Editor-
in-Chief, Prof. P. Agamuthu from the University
of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, WM&R
publishes a range of research papers on topics
including: wastes (focus on solids), processes
and technologies, management systems and
tools, and policy and regulatory frameworks,
sustainable waste management designs,
operations, policies or practices.
WM&R encourages the submission
of well organized manuscripts relating to
sustainable waste management designs,
operations, policies or practices and those
addressing issues facing both developing and
developed countries. Mass flow analyses, life
cycle assessments, policy planning and system
administration, innovative processes and
technologies and their engineering features
and cost effectiveness are among the key
issues that WM&R seeks to cover through
well documented reports on new concepts,
systems, practical experience (including case
studies), and theoretical and experimental
research work. Submit a paper to the journal:
http://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/WMR
Every month, the Editor of Waste
Management & Research selects a key article
from the latest issue of WM&R, which is made
freely available to all. The February Editor’s
choice was: “An overview of waste crime, its
characteristics, and the vulnerability of the EU
waste sector”, by Professor Jim Baird (above).
The article addresses the important issue of
waste crime, and how it makes breakthroughs
in sound waste practices much more difficult.
The collection of Editor’s Choice articles is
available at: wmr.sagepub.com
ISWA STUDY TOUR WASTE-TO-ENERGY, 23 TO 27 JUNE,
AUSTRIA AND CZECH REPUBLIC
The ISWA Study Tour Waste-to-Energy is the fifth of its kind, always taking
place in Austria and a neighbouring country, which this time will be the
Czech Republic. It will be held from June, 23rd to 27th.
The ISWA Study Tour Waste-to-Energy will take you through the
beautiful Danube Valley in Upper Austria to Brno in the Czech Republic.
You will see and learn about the most remarkable technologies and
installations for Waste-to-Energy based on BAT (Best Available Technology)
in Europe. This Practical Seminar on Sustainable Waste Management
focuses on advanced Resource and Energy Efficiency, Recovery, Treatment,
and safe Intermediate Storage of wastes - which allows for diversion of all
organic waste exceeding 5 % TOC from landfill.
Do not miss out on this exclusive one week seminar and technical
tour to see 10 different state-of-the-art waste treatment facilities! For
further information and registration, please visit www.iswa.org
2013 ISWA Study Tour Waste-to-Energy
1403WMW_74 74 4/9/14 10:01 AM
75 MARCH-APRIL 2014 WASTE MANAGEMENT WORLD
ISWA CALENDAR 2014
3RD ISWA SUMMER SCHOOL, 18 – 29 AUGUST, ROMANIA
ISWA Summer Schools provide advanced
knowledge in the field of waste management
to an international audience of existing and
emerging solid waste experts.
At the joint ISWA, ARS and Technical
University of Cluj-Napoca Summer School in
Romania, students will have the opportunity to
gain knowledge on the particular challenges
of solid waste management in developing
economies. Students will learn to understand
the municipal waste flows for each category
(household, packaging, commercial, WEEE, ELV
and hazardous waste), technologies for separate
collection, transportation, sorting, recycling,
recovery and disposal, with the focus on
technical, economic and environmental aspects
for recycling, recovery and landfilling activities.
For further information and registration, please
visit www.iswa.org
2013 Summer School at the University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
APRIL 2014
2nd Africa Sustainable Waste Management
Conference
22-24 April 2014
Angola, Luanda
Carla Galier
apesb@apesb.org
MAY 2014
IFAT - resources.innovations.solutions.
05-09 May 2014
Germany, Munich
IFAT
info@ifat.de
Working Group Meeting on Recycling and
Waste Minimisation
06 May 2014
Germany, Munich, IFAT
Gerfried Habenicht
ghabenicht@iswa.org
Working Group Meeting on Collection and
Transportation Technology
06 May 2014
Germany, Munich, IFAT
Jiao Tang
jtang@iswa.org
Working Group Meeting on Landfill
08 May 2014
Germany, Munich, IFAT
Rachael Williams
rwilliams@iswa.org
Working Group Meeting on Energy
Recovery
22-23 May 2014
Finland, Vaasa, WtE Facility
Jiao Tang
jtang@iswa.org
JUNE 2014
Board Meeting
05 June 2014
Singapore
Hermann Koller
hkoller@iswa.org
Working Group Meeting on Healthcare
Waste
05-06 June 2014
Latvia, Riga
Rachael Williams
rwilliams@iswa.org
ISWA Beacon Conference on Waste
Prevention and Recycling: Resource
efficiency - Closing the Loops
16-17 June 2014
Denmark, Copenhagen
Gerfried Habenicht
ghabenicht@iswa.org
ISWA European Group Meeting
16-17 June 2014
Belgium, Brussels
Kim Winternitz
kwinternitz@iswa.org
ISWA Study Tour Waste-to-Energy
23-27 June 2014
Austria, Vienna
Julia Schönherr
jschoenherr@iswa.org
AUGUST 2014
ISWA Summer School
18-29 August 2014
Romania, Cluj-Napoca
Kim Winternitz
kwinternitz@iswa.org
SEPTEMBER 2014
Board Meeting
06 September 2014
Brazil, Sao Paulo
Hermann Koller
hkoller@iswa.org
STC Meeting
06 September 2014
Brazil, Sao Paulo
Rachael Williams
rwilliams@iswa.org
ISWA World Congress
06-11 September 2014
Brazil, Sao Paulo
Kim Winternitz
kwinternitz@iswa.org
ISWA Study Tour Collection, Sorting &
Recycling
22-26 September 2014
Austria, Vienna
Kim Winternitz
kwinternitz@iswa.org
OCTOBER 2014
Working Group Meeting on Legal Issues
09-10 October 2014
Romania, Bucharest
Gerfried Habenicht
ghabenicht@iswa.org
NOVEMBER 2014
Working Group Meeting on Recycling
and Waste Minimisation
13-15 November 2014
Israel, Tel Aviv
Gerfried Habenicht
ghabenicht@iswa.org
1403WMW_75 75 4/9/14 10:01 AM
DIARY
DIARY OF
EVENTS
ADVERTISERS’ INDEX
ISRI CONVENTION AND EXPO 2014
Las Vegas, U.S.
6 - 10 April, 2014
T: +1 202 662 8500
W: www.isri.com
IFAT
Munich, Germany
5-9 May 2014
T: +49 89 949-11358
F +49 89 949-11359
W: www.ifat.de/en
E: info@ifat.de
WORLD WASTE TO ENERGY CITY
SUMMIT
London, UK
20-22 May, 2014
T: +44 127366 9914
W: wastetoenergy.rethinkevents.com
E: jennie.moss@rethinkevents.com
CARS - COMPLETE AUTO RECYCLING
& SECONDARY MATERIALS SHOW
Doncaster, UK
5-6 June 2014
T: +44 20 7633 4500
F: +44 20 7633 4519
E: iona.s@environmentmedia.co.uk
W: www.cars-expo.com
PAWS PLANT AND WASTE
RECYCLING SHOW
Paignton, UK
10-12 June 2014
T: +44 (0)1962 870355
F: +44 (0)1962 870956
E: info@pawrs.co.uk
W: http://www.pawrs.com
10TH INTERNATIONAL RECYCLING,
ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGIES
AND WASTE MANAGEMENT FAIR
Istanbul, Turkey
12-14 June, 2014
T: +90 (212) 275 75 79
E: rew@ifo.com.tr
W: www.rewistanbul.com
CHARTERED INSTITUTE OF WASTES
MANAGEMENT CONFERENCE
London, UK
18-19 June, 2014
T: +44 (0)1604 620426
E: kent@ciwm.co.uk
W: www.ciwmconferences.com
RWM IN PARTNERSHIP WITH CIWM
Birmingham, UK
16-18 September
T: +44 (0)203 033 2494
W: http://www.rwmexhibition.com
E: info@rwmexhibition.com
BIR AUTUMN CONVENTION
27-28 October, 2014
Paris, France
T: +32 2 627 5770
E: bir@bir.org
W: www.bir.org
ECOMONDO
Rimini, Italy
5-8 November, 2014
W: www.ecomondo.com
E infovisitatori@riminifera.it
POLLUTEC 2014
Lyon, France
2 - 5 December 2014
T: +33 1 4756 5097
W: www.pollutec.com
WASTETECH-2015
Moscow , Russia
2-4 June 2015
W: www.waste-tech.ru
76 WASTE MANAGEMENT WORLD MARCH-APRIL 2014
For information on advertising,
Please contact:
Terry Ash
International
E: terrya@pennwell.com
T: +44 1992 656 600
F: +44 1992 656 700
Roy Morris
International
E: rmorris@pennwell.com
T: +44 1992 656 613
F: +44 1992 656 700
Dottie LaFerney
Regional Manager, Southeast
E: dottiel@pennwell.com
T: (512) 858-7927
F: (512) 858-1910
Craig Wiggins
Regional Manager, East
E: craigw@pennwell.com
T: (610) 430-8181
F: (610) 430-0910
Amy Bailie
Regional Manager, Central/West
E: amyb@pennwell.com
T: (918) 832-9241
ADVERTISING
ANDRITZ MEWA GMBH .................. 59
ARJES GMBH ......................................... 56
AUT ANLAGEN- UND
UMWELTTECHNOLOGIE GMBH
................................................................50-51
BABCOCK & WILCOX
VOLUND .............................. .......53, OBC
BETONBLOCK........................................ 13
BINDER+CO AG ................................... 58
BRT RECYCLING
TECHNOLOGIE GMBH ..................... 60
CNIM .......................................................... 25
CROSS WRAP OY ................................ 21
DOOSAN POWER SYSTEMS LTD ... 22
DOPPSTADT CALBE GMBH ......... IFC
EGGERSMANN ANLAGENBAU
CONCEPT GMBH................................. 52
EGGERSMANN ANLAGENBAU
KOMPOFERM GMBH ........................ 57
ELDAN RECYCLING A/S ...........46-47
ERIEZ MAGNETICS EUROPE ......... 61
FISIA BABCOCK
ENVIRONMENT GMBH .................... 23
FLIR COMMERCIAL SYSTEMS ..... 38
GICOM B.V. ............................................. 34
HAAS RECYCLING .............................. 73
HAKO WERKE ........................................ 63
HAMMEL
RECYCLINGTECHNIK GMBH ......... 11
HSM GMBH + CO. KG ...................... 62
ISWA ......................................................... IBC
JFE ENGINEERING
EUROPE GMBH ................ ................... 66
KEPPEL SEGHERS BELGIUM NV .. 27
KOBELCO ECO
SOLUTIONS CO. LTD. .... ................... 24
KOMPTECH GMBH ............................ 68
LINDNER RECYCLINGTECH ........... 15
MACPRESSE EUROPA S.R.L. ..............2
MARTIN GMBH .............................54-55
MASIAS RECYCLING ...................48-49
METSO DENMARK A/S ......................9
NEUSON ECOTEC GMBH ............... 64
NIPPON STEEL & SUMKIN
ENGINEERING CO., LTD. .................. 71
NTM AB .................................................... 39
ORKEL COMPACTION AS ............... 33
P&L SOFTWARE SYSTEMS LTD. ... 37
PRESONA AB ......................................... 70
PTF HAEUSSER GMBH . ................... 16
RAMBOLL ENERGY &
ENVIRONMENT .................................... 29
RHEINBRAUN
BRENNSTOFF GMBH......................... 67
SUTCO GMBH ....................................... 65
TOMRA SORTING GMBH ................ 17
UNTHA SHREDDING
TECHNOLOGY GMBH .. ................... 72
VECOPLAN AG ..................................... 69
VERMEER ..........................................44-45
1403WMW_76 76 4/9/14 10:02 AM
The 4th ISWA Beacon Conference on Waste
Prevention & Recycling will be held in
Copenhagen, Denmark, 16-17 June 2014.
The conference title is
Resource Efficiency – “Closing the Loops!”
The Beacon conference will focus on closing material loops by quan-
titative and qualitative waste prevention and resource efficiency, by
designing loops without waste and by bringing valuable waste materi-
als back in the raw material loops.
Waste prevention and recycling are not goals by themselves, but
rather methods of reaching the goal of resource efficiency by closing
the material loops. The growth issue is one of the main drivers of
the agenda, which means that the school of circular economy will be
presented and discussed.
Visit
www.beacon-cph.dk
for programme, sign-up and further informations.
w
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.
b
e
a
c
o
n
-
c
p
h
.
d
k

For more information, enter 45 at WMW.hotims.com
1403WMW_C3 3 4/9/14 9:33 AM
www.volund.dk
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Amager Bakke waste-to-energy plant i Copenhagen, Denmark.
The plant features an artificial ski slope inspired by the ski slopes in the alps.
IFAT: Meet us at
stand B3.269

Visit our stand at IFAT and hear more about the Amager Bakke
project and it’s advanced waste-to-energy technology.
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For more information, enter 46 at WMW.hotims.com
1403WMW_C4 4 4/9/14 9:33 AM

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