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OREGON OBSERVER

The
Thursday, May 22, 2014 Vol. 129, No. 46 Oregon, WI ConnectOregonWI.com $1
112 Janesville Street, Oregon, WI 53575
Phone: 835-8276 Fax: 835-8277
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History guru teaches
about Civil War era
SCOTT DE LARUELLE
Unified Newspaper Group
One-hundred-and-fifty
years ago, teenagers and
young men right off the
farms of Dane County went
off to fight and die in
the Civil War.
Thankfully for the Bad-
ger St at e, bat t l es were
fought far from home, but
the effects were felt all
over Wisconsin, as more
than 12,000 men from the
state died during the war,
of the 91, 000-plus who
served. The impact on the
areas history was great,
and though its faded by the
passing of each generation,
people like Lyle Laufen-
berg do their part to pass on
importance of remembering
the Civil War, and those
who fought in it.
Laufenberg, a life-long
Dane County resident and
Oregon School Di st ri ct
teacher of 41 years, just
cant shake the history bug
during his recent retirement
years. And the students at
Rome Corners Intermediate
School who know him as a
faithful volunteer and liv-
ing history guru, they are
all the better for it.
Laufenberg, whos volun-
teered at the school for the
past five years, sets up shop
in an open team area a few
times a week during stu-
dents lunch breaks, talking
about history in general, but
more specifically about the
Civil War.
Its an interesting group,
and the kids find the Civil
War interesting, he said.
I dont focus on war and
blood and guts, rather the
time period that made it
quite a shift in this coun-
trys history.
Not coincidentally, he
started getting interested in
history at about the same
age as the kids.
I was in grade school
and had a cousi n who
did some research on the
Laufenberg family history
and background, and there
turned out to be knights
and castles over in Germa-
ny; part of Charlemagnes
r eal m, he sai d. I ve
always been interested in
history, but my parents
were tenant farmers, so
we moved frequently and
didnt have a lot of ties.
A teacher named Bob
Hoffman helped him study
about his familys origins,
going back many genera-
tions. When he found out
his wife Lindas several
great grandfather served
in the Union Army out of
Wisconsin, he was hooked.
Since Linda was also a
Photos by Scott De Laruelle
Volunteer and long-time district teacher Lyle Laufenberg swears in RCI students with the military
oath of allegiance used by the state of Wisconsin during the Civil War.
Turn to Past/Page 4
Pump house restoration
plans move forward
Organizers goal:
convert historic
building to a
welcome center
BILL LIVICK
Unified Newspaper Group
The hi s t or i c pump
h o u s e b e l o w t h e
downtown water tower is
about to get some much-
needed attention in the
coming month or two.
Oregon resident Randy
Glysch has been making
plans and raising funds
to restore the small build-
ing, which was built in
1899 and is on the State
and National Registers of
Turn to Pump/Page 2
Leading the
Herd
Farmer, mentor teaches
local youth to show cattle
VICTORIA VLISIDES
Unified Newspaper Group
Oregon FFA member
Jordan Beyler doesnt have
any farm animals of her
own, but shell still have
a chance to show cattle
because of the help she gets
from a local farmer whos
been mentoring kids like
her for about a decade.
Beyler is among count-
less Oregon-area youth
who have been able to get
hands-on experience with
showing cattle because of
help from the Caine family
of Fitchburg.
Local farmers since the
1940s and business own-
ers since 1955, Jeanne and
Tom Caine laid a founda-
tion in community service
and farming for their son
Pat, 47, to continue having
kids come out to the farm.
Weve all always been
into the cattle, Jeanne
said.
Pat, a Fitchburg native,
lives at the fifth-genera-
tion dairy operation with a
two-story farm house. The
1985 graduate of Oregon
Hi gh School grew up
showing horses competi-
tively.
Photo by Becki Clark
Pat Caine, of Fitchburg, has mentored Bailey Clark for years in
cattle showing. She is one of many Oregon-area youth who will
show Caines cattle at area fairs this summer.
Turn to Cattle/Page 8

alive
History
comes
2
May 22, 2014 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
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Historic Places.
He hopes eventually to
turn the building into a wel-
come center for Oregon
residents and visitors to the
community. He also hopes to
enlist the help of folks from
the Oregon Senior Center in
staffing a future welcome
center.
It could be to welcome
people coming into town, or
also it could be for people in
the village to use it for any-
thing that seems appropri-
ate, he said.
Glysch planned to discuss
the idea with the villages
Historic Preservation Com-
mission on Wednesday this
week, and later seek Village
Board approval.
Glysch last held a fund-
raiser for the restoration proj-
ect on March 30 at Masons
on Main. At that point, hed
al most si ngl e-handedl y
raised $5,000 for the project,
which added to an existing
village water tower fund of
about $3,300.
Glysch told the Observer
on Monday that the account
now has $12,735, and he
plans to hold another fund-
raiser as soon as the Village
Board approves it.
Were going to push brick
pavers as a new kind of fund-
raiser, for the walkway up to
the front door, he said. Ive
worked out a good deal with
Madison Block and Stone for
some really nice pavers.
The pavers would come
in two sizes: 8-inches-by-8
inches, and 8-inches-by-16
i nches. The 8-by-8 i s
going to be $150 with the
engraving; the 8-by-16 will
be $275, Glysch said.
Glysch said his long-term
goal is to raise $40,000 for
the project.
At Wednesdays meet-
ing, Glysch was scheduled
to discuss and seek approval
for tuckpointing the building,
cleaning its exterior brick
and repainting its trim. He
was also planning propose a
new gooseneck lighting fix-
ture for the building.
Once the tuckpointing is
finished, he plans to begin
planting and making land-
scaping improvements on the
building grounds.
All the landscaping plants
are waiting for me, he said.
June 28 is when were going
to install the landscaping.
Glysch secured donations
of plants and other landscap-
ing elements from several
area businesses.
Hes also received a new
bench that was donated by
the family of Dick and Don-
na Sheil.
Glysch said once the vil-
lage approves his various
plans for the pump house,
hell still needs the approval
of the State Historical Soci-
ety because the building is on
the State Register.
Since the early 1980s, the
building has been used most-
ly for storage and has gradu-
ally deteriorated.
For more information
about the pump house resto-
ration project, visit oregon
watertower.com.
Pump: Fundraising for restoriation ongoing
Continued from page 1
Photos by Bill Livick
Pump house restoration organizer Randy Glysch leads a group of contributors on a tour of the building
during the March 30 fundraiser.
Middle School student Dilame
Lindmeier (left) greets visitors
to the pump house.
A silent auction held at Masons on Main, which hosted the fun-
draiser, helped push the total amount raised during the event to
$1,305. By mid-April, Glysch and his collaborators had raised
$10,000.
May 22, 2014 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
3
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The Jean Lawry Family
would like to express
a sincere thank you to
friends, family, Gundersons,
Rev. Markquart and St.
John's for the outpouring
of generosity during this
sad time. The flowers,
meals, contributions and
kind words were extremely
appreciated.
UN351564
THANK
YOU
OREGON!
St. Johns Lutheran Church wants to thank the community
of Oregon for the continued support of our Fish Fry
Fundraisers. What started in 2006 as a way to help an
individual in need, has become so much more! Since
2006, you have helped our fundraising efforts to raise over
$65,000. Our latest events raised $5,300 for the Helping
Hands Fund, Oregon Food Pantry and the NINA Fund.
Thrivent Financial for Lutherans has approved $2,500 in
matching funds to also be distributed between these three
local funds. In addition, $63 was given for the Guatemala
eye glass ministry. We cant do this without you Oregon...
so we thank everyone that participates for their continued
support. We look forward to seeing you at the next events,
in the spring of 2015. Watch for our signs on the street
corners or iers around town.
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Only five projects
chosen from 86 in state
SCOTT DE LARUELLE
Unified Newspaper Group
Its hard to get students
to sign up by the dozens for
a class, but thats exactly
whats happening at Ore-
gon High School, where
staff recently won a $2,000
grant for the Oregon High
School video game devel-
opment class.
The OHS proposal was
one of only five projects
chosen from 86 applica-
t i ons f or a Wi sconsi n
Retired Educators Asso-
ci at i on (WREA) grant .
WREA officials said it was
the highest rated due to its
creativity and because they
like seeing students develop
things, said district tech-
nology director Jon Tan-
ner. The school has spent a
portion of the funds on new
monitors for students.
Students are getting the
training and hands-on expe-
rience to take advantage of
this cutting-edge opportu-
nity, he said.
The OHS program start-
ed i n Sept ember 2012,
when t he f i r s t Vi deo
Game Development class
launched as part of the
Technology Education pro-
gram. Teacher Erik Haak-
enson said the impetus for
beginning the program was
both requests from students
and the knowledge that
video games are rapidly
growing job market with
opportunities for program-
mers, artists, writers and
musicians. Students started
with low-level software and
have progressed to using
high-end, industry-standard
3D game technology. The
interdisciplinary work is
also connecting students
who may not normally col-
laborate, with tech ed stu-
dents working with the high
school music department
to develop musical scores
for games, and with the art
department to develop visu-
al art for the games.
Haakenson, who last year
presented information on
the program to the SLATE
(School Leaders Advancing
Technology in Education)
conference, said the class
provides students with con-
nections to the real world,
including bringing in game
design professionals from
nearby Raven software to
answer questions, describe
what its like to develop
games and give students
tips on their work. He said
students were thrilled to
get feedback from a devel-
oper who worked on the
popular Call of Duty game
franchise.
And no doubt, the vide
game development class is
popular among students,
who have already filled two
sections for next school
year, with a growing wait-
ing list.
Award
winners
District I: Rhinelander
High School, Rhinelander
Diversity Club
District II:
Wrightstown High School,
Wrightstown School,
Community, Occupations,
Real Life, Experience, for
Success (S.C.O.R.E.S.
School
District III: La Crosse
Logan/Central High School
(Joint Project), La Crosse
Leadership Camp on Pine
Ridge
District IV: Whitefish
Bay High School, Whitefish
Bay Putting Fun Back in
Science
District V: Oregon
High School, Oregon
Video Game Development
Class
Photo by Scott De Laruelle
OHS teacher Erik Haakenson
accepts an award from the
Wisconsin Retired Educators
Association (WREA) at the
May 12 Oregon School Board
meeting.
Oregon named 21st
safest city in state
A home security and
safety organization named
Oregon one of Wiscon-
sins 50 safest cities.
SafeWise, which focus-
es on comparing top secu-
rity providers to allow
consumers to best protect
their homes, compiled the
list based on the list of
crimes in part one of the
FBI Unified Crime Report
data.
That data focuses on
violent crimes like aggra-
vated assault, forcible
rape, murder and robbery
and property crimes such
as arson, burglary, larce-
ny-theft and motor vehicle
theft.
Or egon pl aced 21st
on the list, just behind
Kaukauna and ahead of
DeForest.
SafeWise found Oregon
had .32 violent crimes and
12.97 property crimes per
1,000 residents.
"In Wisconsin, direct
involvement from both
the police departments
and citizens helps foster
safe and positive environ-
ments," SafeWise security
analyst Carolyn Heneghan
said in a press release.
"All 50 cities on our list
made an impressive effort
to maintain a sense of
securi t y for resi dent s,
while ensuing an excellent
quality of life.
The city of Freedom
t opped t he l i st , whi l e
Altoona ended the list at
50.
Only cities with popu-
lation above 5,000 were
considered.
POLICE REPORTS
Reports taken from Oregon
Police log book.
March 28
7:30 p.m. A 36-year-old
woman reported she had
been stranded in Madison
since March 25, and could
not get to her apartment
on the 500 block of South
Perry Parkway to feed her
cat. She told police she had
no way back to Oregon and
no friends or family to take
care of the cat. The woman
asked the officer to provide
the cat with food and water,
and said her apartment door
was unlocked. An officer fed
and watered the cat and con-
tacted the Humane Society.
March 30
10:03 p.m. A 34-year-old
man reported his 36-year-
old neighbor on the 500
block on Main Street was
using the buildings washing
machine, which creates a lot
of noise. The man said the
noise wakes his child. The
36-year-old said he would
try to avoid doing laundry
after 9 p.m. when possible.
The reporter was concerned
neighbors might retaliate for
his complaining, and will call
back if problems come up.
March 31
5:30 p.m. A 67-year-old
man reported his 60-year-
old neighbor on the 200
block of Oak Street was
spreading that he was a thief
and stole her oxycodone.
The man denied he took any
oxycodone and wanted the
woman to stop talking about
him. Police told the two to
not have any further contact
with each other.
5:30 pm. A 29-year-old
man came into the police
station to pay a parking
ticket. The man was upset
about the ticket and said to
the police department clerk
that the ticket was extortion
and police better watch
(their) back. Police contact-
ed the man at his residence
and told him about the court
process to dispute a ticket
and discussed his behavior
and comments at the police
station. The man called the
department and apologized
to the clerk.
6:30 p.m. A 47-year-old
man and woman found a
pile of material under a pine
tree in their yard on the 600
block of Sumac Street. The
material was crystalized
with yellow, blue and green
colors and had a strong
chemical odor. They called
the DNR, and after that they
suspected it could have been
waste from a meth cook. The
woman had smelled the odor
for around a month, but just
found the material the day
before around 9:30 a.m.
They cleaned up the material
in trash bags and hosed the
area down.
April 1
5:35 p.m. A 52-year-old
woman reported a wild ani-
mal that looked like a wood-
chuck or muskrat was in
their familys window well
on the 700 block of Leeward
Lane. When police arrived,
the family had already freed
the animal.
Scott Girard
4
May 22, 2014 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
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POSTMASTER: Send Address Corrections to
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history buff, the two immediate-
ly got more interested in the time
period, immersing themselves as
historical re-enactors and educa-
tors.
Laufenberg said he gets a lot out
of an authentic re-enactor expe-
rience, though his body doesnt
respond like it used to.
Ive had to be a little bit care-
ful with my back after I had back
surgery, and the marching is get-
ting a little hard on my feet, he
chuckled.
Live fire
When he really wants to get up
close and personal with the Civil
War, Laufenberg helps load, aim
and fire an authentic 12-pound
1863 Napoleon cannon from
Battery B of the Wisconsin 2nd
Infantry, a group of southern Wis-
consin-based re-enactors. The gun
(which Laufenberg said is techni-
cally a gun/howitzer because it
can be elevated like a howitzer
but fired like a gun), belongs to
the Wisconsin National Guard and
was forged by the Revere Copper
Company, founded by Revolution-
ary War icon Paul Revere.
In history, the soldiers of the
2nd Wisconsin Volunteer Infan-
try Regiment (as well as the 6th
and 7th) were comprised of sev-
eral units from Dane County such
as the Stoughton Light Guard,
The Randall Guards and The
Anderson Guards.
The 2nd Wisconsin was one
of the first regiments to fight in
1861, suffering severe casualties
at the inaugural Battle of Bull Run
(Manassas, Va.), where their gray
uniforms with black trim caused
friendly fire, Laufenberg said, one
of many humbling events for a
confident Union army.
There was a great amount of
enthusiasm to get the war over in
90 days in one good battle, he
said.
Laufenberg said there are a
variety of types of people who
are Civil War re-enactors. Some
of the hard-core, detail-oriented
ones call themselves progressive
or authentics, (otherwise known
by some a bit derisively as stitch-
counters), while Laufenberg said
he and his comrades in the 2nd
Wisconsin simply try to match
their gear to that of the day, as best
as possible, without getting their
wool britches in a bundle.
We just try to be reasonably
authentic, because you can never
totally re-create it from back then -
the weaving was different, slightly
different materials, he said. The
uniforms I have are made from
patterns of the time, the materials
are as close as we can get.
The Civil War was a non-stan-
dard war the uniforms were of a
lot of variety, because they tended
to need things in a hurry.
Battery B is made up of around
two dozen members from all over
the southern part of the state and
as far north as Green Bay, who
have participated in events around
state and as far away as the Get-
tysburg in southern Pennsylvania.
The group does much of its work
with schools, giving presentations
throughout the year to groups big
and small. Members also spend
considerable time on training, to
make sure everyone is capable of
different roles, depending who can
make an event on a particular day.
One fellow used to drive in all
the way from Fargo, Laufenberg
said.
Passing on knowledge
So why in the world do people
drive to Dane County from Fargo,
and visit schools every week to
talk about something that hap-
pened so long ago?
It depends who you ask, of
course.
For Laufenberg, the Civil War
is and always will be important for
kids and adults to know about,
because it ended slavery and fun-
damentally changed the nature of
how all Americans viewed them-
selves and their country.
At a terrible cost in blood, the
union had been preserved.
Up until 1861, you were the
34 un-tied states, and everybody
said, Well, we could break off
if we really wanted to, he said.
Massachusetts talked about it
during the War of 1812, South
Carolina in the 1820s and 40s and
50s before they were actually the
first to do it.
Before the war, the United
States are a country - after the
war, the United States is a coun-
try.
Perhaps just as important, his-
torical re-enactors like Laufenberg
honor the everyday people who
experienced the horrors of the Civ-
il War, hoping to keep their lives
as normal as possible before they
returned.
These were real people going
through real things away from
home, and trying to get back
information; theyve got friends
and families, he said. Its tough
times. It isnt all blood and bugles
and glory. Its dealing with life as
you have it.
To help carry home the very
personal nature of what soldiers
were going through, Laufenberg
carries a beat-up, Civil War-era
tintype about 2 by 3 inches of
two young girls. The identity of
the owner of the tintype and the
girls is probably lost to history,
but the message remains.
My two daughters are grown
up now, but at one time they were
about the age of 4 and 6 about
the ages of the girls in this picture
and my girls would have looked
somewhat like that, he said. Its
one of those things you would
have carried; family was impor-
tant.
Past: Helping students learn about the Civil War
Continued from page 1
Corrections
A pull quote in an article last week about Mark
Belows 40 years with the Village of Oregon iden-
tified him as the retiring public works director.
Actually Below has no plans to retire.
We regret the error.
On the web
Second Wisconsin
Volunteer Infantry
Secondwi.com
Living Civil War
history
June 14-15: Sauk City Civil
War Historical Re-enactment
weekend, August Derleth Park,
saukprairieriverway.com/event/
civil-war-weekend/
July 19-20: Civil War
Encampment and Battle
Reenactment, Menomonee Falls
oldfallsvillage.com/event-
sofv.htm#civila
Aug. 1-4: Muskets and
Memories, Boscobel, musket-
sandmemories.net/
Sept.27: 24th Annual
Annual Wade House Civil War
Weekend (east of Fond du Lac)
Source: wadehouse.wiscon-
sinhistory.org
See something wrong?
The Oregon Observer does not sweep errors under
the rug. If you see something you know or even
think is in error, please contact editor Jim Ferolie at
845-9559 or at ungeditor@wcinet.com so we can get
it right.
By the numbers
According to the
Wisconsin State Historical
Society, 91,327 men from
Wisconsin served and
12,301 died during the Civil
War (3,802 killed in action
or battle wounds and 8,499
of other causes.
Photo by Scott De Laruelle
Volunteer Lyle Laufenberg shows RCI
student Kenneth Kritsch some items
soldiers used during the Civil War.
Photo by Scott De Laruelle
RCI students like Nathaniel Gray, above, were sworn
in recently with the military oath of allegiance used by
the state of Wisconsin during the Civil War (1861-65).
More than 12,000 state soldiers died during the war.
May 22, 2014 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
5
Computer
Services
Computer Set-up Wireless Networking
Printer Set-up Computer Tune Up
Data Back up and Transfer
Virus & Spyware removal
Training
System Restore
Repair Services
Upgrade Services
On-site
or In-store!
Computer
Services
Computer Set-up Wireless Networking
Printer Set-up Computer Tune Up
Data Back up and Transfer
Virus & Spyware removal
Training
System Restore
Repair Services
Upgrade Services
On-site
or In-store!
Computer
Services
Computer Set-up Wireless Networking
Printer Set-up Computer Tune Up
Data Back up and Transfer
Virus & Spyware removal
Training
System Restore
Repair Services
Upgrade Services
On-site
or In-store!
UN340875
Computer Set-up
Printer Set-up
Data Backup and
Transfer
Virus & Spyware
Removal
Training
System Restore
Repair Services
Upgrade Services
Wireless Networking
Computer Tuneup
Computer
Services
Computer Set-up Wireless Networking
Printer Set-up Computer Tune Up
Data Back up and Transfer
Virus & Spyware removal
Training
System Restore
Repair Services
Upgrade Services
On-site
or In-store!
On-site or
in store!
2384 Jackson St., Stoughton
877-9548
M-F: 9-8; S: 9-5: Sun. 10-5
613 E. Main St., Evansville
882-0680
M-F: 9-7; S: 9-5; Sun. 10-5
New Drop-Off Location
1015 North Main St., Oregon
835-2980
A RadioShack Franchise
New Patients
Always Welcome
Mueller Dental
(608) 835-0900
152 Alpine Pkwy, Oregon
www.muellerdental.com
Proudly Serving the Oregon Area for Over 16 Years!
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CARING
DENTISTRY
FOR THE ENTIRE
FAMILY
All Friends, Colleagues,
Past and Present
Students, and Parents
Thursday, May 30th
3:456:00 PM
Program at 4:45
Rome Corners Intermediate School
1111 S. Perry Parkway
You are invited to a Retirement Celebration at Rome Corners
Intermediate School to honor our Oregon School District
Retirees
Please come and wish them well.
Linda AltenburgDW
Chris AntonuzzoRCI
Daryl BoothRCI
Philayne ChoseDW
Judy DayOHS
Stan EddyRCI
Gwen Fabert MaitzenOHS/OASIS
Deanna FischerRCI
Mary GieseNKE
Carol GrayPVE
Barbara HoffmanOMS
Jerry JensenBus Contractor/Driver
Debbie JonesOHS
Bill Obmascher RCI
You are invited to a Retirement Celebration at Rome Corners
Intermediate School to honor our Oregon School District
2014 Retirees.
Sue Capelle - DW (15 Years)
Kris Deininger - BKE (22 Years)
Elizabeth Duvick - RCI (15 Years)
(Unable to Attend)
Anita Koehler - DO(16 Years)
Charlene McCartney - RCI (14 Years)
Nancy Outhouse - PVE (25 Years)
Paulette Sphatt - OHS (26 Years)
Tursday, May 29th
3:45-6:00 PM
Program at 4:45
Rome Corners Intermediate School
1111 S. Perry Parkway
All Friends, Colleagues,
Past and Present
Students, and Parents
Thursday, May 30th
3:456:00 PM
Program at 4:45
Rome Corners Intermediate School
1111 S. Perry Parkway
You are invited to a Retirement Celebration at Rome Corners
Intermediate School to honor our Oregon School District
Retirees
Please come and wish them well.
Linda AltenburgDW
Chris AntonuzzoRCI
Daryl BoothRCI
Philayne ChoseDW
Judy DayOHS
Stan EddyRCI
Gwen Fabert MaitzenOHS/OASIS
Deanna FischerRCI
Mary GieseNKE
Carol GrayPVE
Barbara HoffmanOMS
Jerry JensenBus Contractor/Driver
Debbie JonesOHS
Bill Obmascher RCI
NO TRASH PICKUP ON MEMORIAL DAY!
Residential Trash & Recycling Customers:
HAPPY MEMORIAL DAY!
Residents normally serviced the
week of May 26th-May 30th will be
serviced one day later than their
normal pickup day.
City of Fitchburg City of Middleton
DSI/Veridian/HOAs Town of Dunn Town of Pleasant
Springs Town of Verona Village of Arena Village of
Belleville Village of Brooklyn Village of McFarland
Village of Oregon Village of Shorewood Hills Village
of Waunakee
www.pellitteri.com
(608) 257-4285
NO TRASH PICKUP ON MEMORIAL DAY!
Residential Trash & Recycling Customers:
HAPPY MEMORIAL DAY!
Residents normally serviced the
week of May 26th-May 30th will be
serviced one day later than their
normal pickup day.
City of Fitchburg City of Middleton
DSI/Veridian/HOAs Town of Dunn Town of Pleasant
Springs Town of Verona Village of Arena Village of
Belleville Village of Brooklyn Village of McFarland
Village of Oregon Village of Shorewood Hills Village
of Waunakee
www.pellitteri.com
(608) 257-4285
NO TRASH PICKUP ON MEMORIAL DAY!
Residential Trash & Recycling Customers:
City of Fitchburg City of Middleton DSI/Veridian/HOAs
Town of Dunn Town of Pleasant Springs Town of Verona
Village of Arena Village of Belleville Village of Brooklyn
Village of McFarland Village of Oregon
Village of Shorewood Hills Village of Waunakee
Residents normally serviced the
week of May 26th-May 30th will be
serviced one day later than their
normal pickup day.
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CAST A VOTE at any UB&T
location for your high schools
BEST MILK MOOSTACHE

UB&T will donate to your
schools Ag Program
1st Prize: $200 2nd Prize $100
Contest runs June 1 30.
See more about UB&Ts support of
dairy and agriculture at www.ub-t.com

Visit our lobby on
Mon. June 2nd for a
delicious dairy treat!

See our lobby display
featuring a local dairy
farm neighbor.

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5
Benefit car show set for May 31
Supports Crohns and
Colitis Foundation
For Jason Frederick, this
fundraiser is personal.
He started the car show
four years ago t o ben-
efit the Crohns and Coli-
tis Foundation, because
he knows first-hand the
debi l i t at i ng ef f ect s of
the diseases. He has suf-
fered from Colitis since
the eighth grade and for
the past seven years has
developed Crohns Dis-
ease.
Frederick, 22, had five
surgeries last year due to
the diseases, and lost his
uncle, Denny Knoble, who
suffered from Colitis. But
he said hes not taking his
situation lying down.
Thanks t o gener ous
car enthusiasts from all
over the area, last years
fundraiser collected nearly
$3,000 to help fight the
diseases, and hes hoping
to exceed that total May
31 at Prairie View Ele-
mentary.
Regi st rat i on st art s at
9 a.m. and the show runs
from 11 a. m. t o 4 p. m.
The registration fee is $10
per car, and spect at ors
are free, with donations
much appreciated.
Dash pl aques wi l l be
given to the first 50 cars
and trophy plaques will
be given out for first and
second pl ace i n 12 di f-
ferent categories. Food,
drinks and baked goods
will also be available for
sale.
Fr e d e r i c k a l s o h a s
a t eam wal ki ng i n t he
Take St eps Wal k f or
Cr ohn s a nd Col i t i s
event at Warner Park in
Madison on June 14 and
wel comes anyone who
wishes to join along. For
information or to donate,
call him at 669-8860 or
emai l j us t i nf r eder i ck.
realestate@gmail.com.
If you go
What: Car show to benefit Crohns and Colitis Foundation
When: 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, May 31 (rain date is
June 1)
Where: Prairie View Elementary School, 300 Soden Drive
Info: 669-8860 or justinfrederick.realestate@gmail.com.
Memorial Day
services run all day
In honor of the many
men and women who have
given their lives, had loss-
es, and many POWs in
defending the U.S., Ameri-
can Legion Post 160 and the
VFW Post 10272 will salute
our fallen and lost comrades
on Memorial Day, May 26.
The groups will do cer-
emonies at nine locations in
the area including several in
Oregon, Brooklyn and Rut-
land, as well as Fitchburg
and the Town of Dunn. Cer-
emonies start at 8:45 a.m.
and go until 4 p.m.
The following is a sched-
ule and locations for pre-
sentations and performance
of the color guard, rifle and
bugle salute.
8 a.m. Jug Prairie Ceme-
tery, Smith Road, Brooklyn
8:45 a.m. Graves Cem-
etery, Rutland
9 a.m. Rutland Cem-
etery, Rutland
9:30 a.m. Story town
Cemetery, Oregon
10 a.m. War Memorial,
Oregon Triangle, down-
town Oregon
10:30 a.m. Oregon Prai-
rie Mound and St. Marys
Cemetery, Oregon
10:45 a.m. Dunn Burial
Ground(Cemetery), Town
of Dunn
11:15 a.m. Brooklyn
Cemetery, Brooklyn
12:45 p.m. Fitchburg
Wayside Memorial on Fish
Hatchery, Fitchburg
2-4 p.m. Liberty Pole
Hill Memorial, Brooklyn
Get Connected
Find updates and links right away.
Search for us on Facebook
as Oregon Observer
and then LIKE us.
And the beat goes on
Another art award for
OHS Zernick
Oregon High School senior Jen-
nifer Zernick is cleaning up the
awards this year. She earned sec-
ond place in the recent Annual
Congressional Art Competition
entitled An Artistic Discovery.
Her painting was a creatively
designed acrylic painting titled,
Faces of Us. At an April 24 cere-
mony at the Verona Public Library,
she received her award from U.S.
Rep. Mark Pocan of Wisconsins
2nd District. There were 30 entries
from various schools in the district.
Zernicks winning piece will be
displayed in Pocans Washington
D.C. office for the next year. It is
such an inspiration to see the cre-
ative artwork as I head to the house
to vote, Pocan said.
Submitted photos
Oregon High School art teacher Michael Derrick, U.S. Rep. Mark Pocan, OHS senior
Jennifer Zernick, and her parents Melissa and Michael Zernick. Right, Zernicks award-
winning acrylic painting, Faces of Us.
6
May 22, 2014 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
Coming up
Community calendar
Churches
ALL SAINTS LUTHERAN CHURCH
2951 Chapel Valley Rd., Fitchburg
(608) 276-7729
Pastor Rich Johnson
SUNDAY
8:30 a.m. classic service
10:45 a.m. new song service
BROOKLYN LUTHERAN CHURCH
101 Second Street, Brooklyn
(608) 455-3852
Pastor Rebecca Ninke
SUNDAY
9 a.m. Holy Communion
10 a.m. Fellowship
COMMUNITY OF LIFE LUTHERAN
CHURCH
PO Box 233, Oregon, 53575
(608) 286-3121
office@communityoflife.us
Pastor Eric Wenger
SUNDAY
10 a.m. Worship at 1111 S. Perry
Parkway, Oregon
COMMUNITY UNITED METHODIST
CHURCH
Brooklyn
(608) 455-3344
Pastor Dave Pluss
SUNDAY
9:30 a.m. Worship
FAITH EVANGELICAL LUTHERAN
CHURCH
143 Washington Street, Oregon
(608) 835-3554
Pastor Karl Hermanson
SUNDAY - 9 a.m. Worship
Holy Communion 2nd & last
Sundays
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
408 N. Bergamont Blvd. (north of CC)
Oregon, WI 53575
608-835-3082 - fpcoregonwi.org
Pastor: Bob Vetter
SUNDAY:
10 a.m. Blended Worship
11 a.m. Coffee Bar/Fellowship
11:15 a.m. All-ages activity

FITCHBURG MEMORIAL UCC
5705 Lacy Road, Fitchburg
(608) 273-1008
www.memorialucc.org
Pastor: Phil Haslanger
Associate Pastor Twink Jan-
McMahon
SUNDAY
8:15 and 10 a.m. Worship
GOOD SHEPHERD LUTHERAN
CHURCH ELCA
Central Campus: Raymond Road and
Whitney Way
SATURDAY - 5 p.m. Worship
SUNDAY - 8:15, 9:30 and 10:45
a.m. Worship West Campus: Corner
of Hwy. PD and Nine Mound Road,
Verona
SUNDAY - 9 & 10:15 a.m., 6 p.m.
Worship (608) 271-6633
HILLCREST BIBLE CHURCH
752 E. Netherwood, Oregon
Eric Vander Ploeg, Lead Pastor
(608) 835-7972
www.hbclife.com
SUNDAY
8:30 am & 10:15 am Worship service
at Oregon High School PAC
Quest for grades 1-6 during 10:15
service
HOLY MOTHER OF CONSOLATION
CATHOLIC CHURCH
651 N. Main Street, Oregon
Pastor: Fr. Gary Wankerl
(608) 835-5763
holymotherchurch.weconnect.com
SATURDAY: 5 p.m. Worship
SUNDAY: 8 and 10:15 a.m. Worship
PEOPLES UNITED METHODIST
CHURCH
103 North Alpine Parkway, Oregon
Pastors Jason and Johanna Mahnke
(608) 835-3755
www.peoplesumc.org
Communion is the 1st & 3rd
weekend
SATURDAY - 5 p.m. Worship
SUNDAY - 9 a.m. worship and
Sunday school; 10:30 a.m. worship;
5 p.m. The Gathering Sunday night
service with simple supper to follow
ST. JOHNS LUTHERAN CHURCH
625 E. Netherwood, Oregon
Pastor Paul Markquart and Pastor
Emily Tveite
(608) 835-3154
5 p.m. Saturday evening Worship
8 a.m. Traditional Sunday Worship
9:15 a.m. Sunday School & Coffee
Fellowship
10:30 a.m. New Community Worship
(9:30 a.m. Summer)
VINEYARD COMMUNITY CHURCH
Oregon Community Bank & Trust,
105 S. Alpine Parkway, Oregon - Bob
Groth, Pastor - (608) 513-3435
welcometovineyard.com
SUNDAY - 10 a.m. Worship
ZWINGLI UNITED CHURCH OF
CHRIST - Paoli
At the Intersection of Hwy. 69 & PB
Rev. Sara Thiessen
(608) 845-5641
SUNDAY -
9:30 a.m. Family Worship
7 p.m., Alcoholics
Anonymous meeting
at First Presbyterian
Church, every Monday
and Friday
7 p.m., Alcoholics
Anonymous closed
meeting, Peoples United
Methodist Church, every
Tuesday
6:30-7:30 p.m.,
Diabetes Support Group
meeting, Evansville
Senior Center, 320 Fair
St. Call 882-0407 for
information. Second
Tuesday of each month
6:30-8 p.m., Parents
Supporting Parents,
LakeView Church,
Stoughton. Third
Tuesday of every month
Relationship & Divorce
Support Group. State
Bank of Cross Plains.
Every other Monday
night at 6:30 p.m.
Support groups
Call 835-6677 to advertise on the
Oregon Observer Church Page
The Good News
Imagine a newscast every evening with headlines such as Crime Is
Down and Charitable Giving Is Up and People Are Helping Others
Everywhere. Miracle of Miracles, that is indeed the case in many
places around the world, but you wouldnt know it from watching the
news. But, perhaps one way to put all of this good news in perspec-
tive is to realize that people helping others is such a commonplace
practice that it doesnt make the news unless its something really
extraordinary. Likewise, the millionaires and billionaires who give
generously have become so commonplace that they even have their
own club and well over a hundred have signed onto a pledge, the
so-called Giving Pledge, which commits them to give away the
bulk of their fortunes. People who perform horrific acts of cruelty or
commit heinous crimes are pretty much the exception to the rule of
people acting decently, and that is why their heinous crimes make the
news. Its just too shocking to ignore. So, perhaps we should remind
ourselves every day of the Good News that is all around and spread
the word to others.
- Christopher Simon via Metro News Service
From the fruit of his mouth a man eats what is good, but the desire of
the treacherous is for violence.
Proverbs 13:2
Village of Oregon Cable Access TV program times same for both channels.
A new program begins daily at 1 p.m. and repeats at 4, 7 and 10 p.m. and at 1,
4, 7 and 10 a.m. 900 Market St., Oregon. Phone: 291-0148;
email: oregoncableaccess@charter.net, or visit www.OCAmedia.com.
Community cable listings Senior center
WOW 983 ORE 984
Kids triathalon registration
Registration is now open for the
Oregon Kids Triathalon, set for Sat-
urday, Aug. 9. For information, visit
oregonkidstri.org.
Field of flags
The Brooklyn Area Veterans Com-
mittee is selling U.S. flags to support
the construction of the Brooklyn Area
Veterans Memorial. The flags will be
on display on the southeast corner of
Douglas Drive and County MM near
the fundraising thermometer. Each
$5 will purchase an 8 X 12 flag.
Flags can be purchased by through
the Brooklyn Area Veterans Memo-
rial, P.O. Box 272, Brooklyn, Wis-
consin 53521.
For information, call 455-5049 or
email lyle@wanlessauctiongroup.
com.
Bocce ball
Come to the senior center for some
bocce, starting Thursday nights at 5
p.m. May 22.
Garden open house
There will be an open house at the
Oregon Community Garden from
6:30-7:30 p.m. Monday, May 26.
The garden is located on the grounds
of Peoples United Methodist Church
on the corner of County CC (Jeffer-
son St.) and North Alpine Parkway.
Prospective gardeners can view the
gardens and learn more about what is
involved in renting a plot for personal
use.
Anyone is welcome to stop in and
view the gardens, which include 26
plots. For more information, contact
Barbara Feeney at 843-2272.
Pantry pickup
Oregon-Brooklyn Food Pantry has
pickup coming up Thursday, May
29. Residents in the Oregon School
District are welcomed to come to
the pantry that goes from 3-7 p.m. at
1092 Union Road.
For more information, visit obfp.
org.
Cooksville concerts
The Cooksville Community Center
is sponsoring a concert given by the
Stoughton Chamber Singers and the
Bell Canto String Ensemble at 7 p.m.
Wednesday, June 4 in the Cooksville
Church.
Sing Me a Song and Play Me a
Tune is the title that the group has
chosen for their Spring program, to be
directed by John Beutel. The program
will be varied with a madrigal or two,
some sacred choral literature, a spiri-
tual, a folk song from the Sephardic
Jewish culture and music of Cole
Porter. The church is at the corner of
highways 59 and 138 in Cooksville.
Following the concert there will be
a reception at the Cooksville Com-
munity Center, two blocks east of the
church. All are welcome. Admission
is $5 at the door.
AARP CarFit event
This driver safety event will run
from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Thursday, June
5 at the senior center. Call 835-5801
for information or to sign up.
Thursday, May 22
7-9 p.m., Oregon Middle School
band concert, Oregon High School
Performing Arts Center
Monday, May 26
Memorial Day - library and
schools closed
8:30 a.m. 38th Annual Memorial
Day Equestrian Show; Triple K
Stables
Tuesday, May 27
7:30 p.m., OHS band concerts,
OHS PAC
Wednesday, May 28
7:30 p.m., OHS percussion and
jazz concerts, OHS PAC
Thursday, May 29
Library closed until 1 p.m.
7 p.m., OHS orchestra concerts,
OHS PAC
Friday, May 30
10 a.m., container gardening,
Stoughton Hospital, Bryant Health
center, 873-2356
Saturday, May 31
1-5:30 p.m., Academy of Sound
Spring Recitals, Oregon Performing
Arts Center, free, 456 N. Perry
Pkwy.
Monday, June 2
5-6 p.m., Picnic at the
Playground, Brooklyn Elementary
School
6 p.m., Oregon Village Board
meeting
Tuesday, June 3
6:30-8 p.m., Stoughton/
McFarland/Oregon Relay For Life
planning team meeting, for location
details: 220-8783.
Sunday, June 8
1 p.m., OHS graduation, OHS
Monday, June 9
Oregon Public Library summer
reading program kick-off week
(through June 14)
Brush collection, village of Oregon
6:30 p.m., Oregon School District
Board of Education meeting, Rome
Corners Intermediate, 11 S. Perry
Pkwy., 835-4000
Tuesday, June 10
1 p.m., Brooklyn Elementary
fourth-grade graduation, Brooklyn
Elementary School
Wednesday, June 11
Last day of school, Oregon
School District
Saturday, June 14
10 a.m. to 5 p.m., Hayloft Gallery
Art Fair, 1239 South Fish Hatchery
Road, thehayloftgallery.com
1:30 p.m., Putts for Paws golf
fundraiser for Oregon Police
Department, Foxboro Golf Club,
1020 County Road Mm
7:30 p.m., Art in the Barn Concert
featuring Lucy Kaplansky, a fund-
raiser for Haiti Allies, 5927 Adams
Road, Fitchburg, facebook.com/
artinthebarnwi
Thursday, May 22
Oregon Village Board
Meeting (of May 19)
Friday, May 23
Paris Blues Music @
Oregon Senior Center (May, 12)
Saturday, May 24
Byrd Bros. Music @
Oregon Senior Center (May 22)
Sunday, May 25
Worship Service: Holy
Mother of Consolation Catholic
Church-1st Communion
Monday, May 26
In the Fight U.S. Army
News
Tuesday, May 27
Sunnyside silent Chaplin
movie with live music @
Oregon Senior Center (May 23)
Wednesday, May 28
Oregon Summer Fest
Hilites-2013 (of June, 13)
Thursday, May 29
Oregon Summer Fest
Hilites-2012 (of June, 12)
Thursday, May 22
1-PVE Orchestra/Chorus
Concert (of May 20) 2-Oregon
School Board Meeting (May
19)
Friday, May 23
OHS Rugby vs 1-Waukesha
(of Apr. 25) 2-Madison West
(of May 5)
Saturday, May 24
BKE/NKE Orchestra Concert
(of May 20)
Sunday, May 25
OHS Variety Show (May 15)
Monday, May 26
OHS Honors Awards (of
May 21)
Tuesday, May 27
RCI Chorus Concert (May 22)
Wednesday, May 28
OMS Band Concert (May 22)
Thursday, May 29
PVE Pioneer Day (of May
23)
Monday, May 26
Closed for Memorial Day
Tuesday, May 27
Tatar Tot Casserole, Chuck
Wagon Corn, Blushing Pear
Half, Corn Bread, Cookie
VO: Tatar Tot Casserole
w/Soy
Wednesday, May 28
Chicken Macaroni Salad,
German Cucumbers, W.W.
Bread, Fresh Apple, Lemon
Dessert
VO-Mac Salad w/Diced
Cheese
Thursday, May 29
*Brat on Bun, Copper
Pennies Salad, Fresh Fruit,
Ice Cream Cup
VO-Veggie Dogs
SO: California Cobb
Friday, May 30
*Meatloaf, Baked
Potatoes, Spinach, Fruit
Cocktail, W.W. Bread
VO: Soy Loaf
Monday, May 26
Closed for Memorial Day
Tuesday, May 27
8:30 Zumba Gold
9:00 Pool Players
9:00 Arthritis Movement
9:30 Bingo
9:45 Tai Chi
12:30 Sheepshead
12:30 Stoughton Shopping
1:00 Sing-Along
Wednesday, May 28
AMFoot Care
9:00 CLUB
11:00 Smart Phone Class
1:00 Get Fit
1:00 Euchre
2:00 Knit/Crochet Group
Thursday, May 29
8:30 Zumba Gold
9:00 Pool Players
9:00 Arthritis Movement
12:30 Shopping at Bills
12:30 Protect Your Identity
1:00 Cribbage
3:00 Food Pantry Open
Friday, May 30
9:00 CLUB
9:00 Wii Bowling
9:30 Blood Pressure
1:00 Get Fit
May 22, 2014 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
7
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for tips to keep kids active, safe and
healthy this summer. Weekly prize
drawings are available from Memorial
Day to Labor Day.
Go to blogs.uwhealth.org/kids and
subscribe to Growing Up Healthy today.
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CH-39495-14
UN347546
Stamp of approval
OHS students place in national art contest
The coming of spring brings
the return of ducks and all sorts
of waterfowl to Wisconsin, so
its only fitting that this time of
the year marks the return of a
national duck stamp competition.
Ten Oregon High School stu-
dents were recognized for their
recent submissions for the annual
U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service
Junior Federal Duck Stamp com-
petition, including several who
earned top finishes. Senior Eliza
Neidhart took first place with
her watercolor painting of a pair
of blue-winged teal, while fel-
low seniors Abby Meier and Jen
Zernick garnered second place
finishes. This was the third year
Zernick placed in the competition
and the second for Meier. Junior
Marissa Wedderspoon earned a
third place ribbon with her acryl-
ic painting. Earning honorable
mention awards were: seniors
Ashley Quamme and Ellerey
Nault, juniors Rosilyn Phillips
and Alyssa Sieger and sopho-
mores Samantha Girard and Jil-
lian Moss.
The contest was created more
than two decades ago to raise
awareness and appreciation for
wetlands and waterfowl con-
servation for students in grades
K-12. It is modeled after the
Federal Duck Stamp Contest
for adult artists. Students create
original artwork showing North
American ducks, geese, or swans
in their natural habitats.
The national competition is
held on Friday, April 18,, and the
top winners piece will be made
into the Junior Duck Stamp,
which the U.S. Fish and Wildlife
Service will sell for $5 to raise
money for wildlife awareness
and education.
OHS art instructor Michael
Derrick said the competition
was the perfect opportunity for
students to learn about conserva-
tion and meet many of the state
and national standards regarding
the inclusion of environmental
education into the curriculum.
They began the project with a
presentation about the conser-
vation movement that began in
the 19th century to protect natu-
ral resources and habitat for the
future, and learned many promi-
nent leaders of the conservation
movement had Wisconsin ties,
including John Muir, Aldo Leo-
pold and the Dean of Wildlife
Artists, Owen Gromme.
Students were impressed to
discover that John Muir was
actually a teacher in the Oregon
School District early on in his
conservation career, Derrick
said.
Gromme, a Fond du Lac
native, was one of the first artists
to use his art and influences to
raise millions of dollars for con-
servation causes.
Find out more
The 2014 Wisconsin Junior
Duck Stamp Design Contest
drew 392 entries from students
across the state. The top 36 win-
ning entries from the state will be
showcased in two traveling dis-
plays across the state from May
through March 2015.
Each year the amount of
detail these young artists achieve
in their artwork is amazing, said
Katie Goodwin, Wisconsin Fed-
eral Junior Duck Stamp State
Coordinator.
For a schedule of the locations,
call the Necedah National Wild-
life Refuge at 565-2551 or email
necedah@fws.gov.
Submitted photos
Junior Marissa Wedderspoon earned a third-place ribbon for her acrylic painting.
Ten Oregon High School students were recognized for their recent sub-
missions for the annual U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Junior Federal Duck
Stamp competition, including several who earned top finishes.
8
May 22, 2014 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
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Pat woul d event ual l y
become the main caretaker
of his parents herd, which
includes about 40 main
milking cows, allowing him
to become the skilled in
everything about cattle.
Learning, growing and
caring for farm animals are
values Pat aims to pass on to
younger generations.
His farming experience,
education, including a 1988
farming and industry asso-
ciate degree at University
of Wisconsin-Madison, and
passion for the animals has
led him to allow youth, from
ages 8 or 9 to high school,
to show his herd, which has
a total of 112 Brown Swiss
cattle.
Its something he learned
to enjoy through watching
his parents Tom, 81, and
Jeanne, 80, as 4H leaders
when he was a kid.
But Pat said his teachings
go beyond showing cattle.
He wants students to know
how to care for their animal
thoroughly from ensur-
ing a proper diet to how to
groom it and he watches as
they build a bond that goes
beyond simply using the
cattle to win fair competi-
tions. His goal is for them
to also learn sound animal
care, cultivation and breed-
ing from the start of a calfs
life.
Always available
Pats dedication to teach-
ing kids about cattle is
part of what makes him an
amazing teacher, said
Becki Cl ark, parent of
Baily Clark, whos shown
with Caine for nearly three
years.
Hes constantly telling
them whats going on with
the calf, she said. All the
ins and outs about This is
how its born, and this is
how it eats. The kids are
extremely comfortable with
him and have a great time.
Though its not uncom-
mon for local kids who are
growing up in the suburbs
to find a farm that lets them
use their animals for show-
ing, said Becki, Pats flex-
ibility in working with the
kids schedule and always
being willing to answer their
questions makes him an
invaluable mentor.
Parent Pam Beyler said
Caine is always willing to
work around her daughters
schedule. Jordan, an OHS
sophomore is showing cattle
with Caine for the first time,
and her younger sister Cait-
lin, whos been showing
with Caine for nearly three
years, will reach out weekly
to come out to the farm.
They just call him up,
and he says, Yeah, come on
over to the farm, Pam said.
Beyler and Clark agreed
Caines students adore him.
Oregon FFA adviser Jillian
Beaty, who spoke with the
Star last week, added that
a group he mentored last
year even made T-shirts in
his honor that read Team
Caine.
They also agreed that
Caine is the last person who
would want to receive any
recognition for the time he
spends teaching the kids.
He says hell do it as
long as kids want to show,
Becki said.
A coach and teacher
The students show their
cat t l e at t he St ought on
Junior Fair, World Dairy
Expo and Dane County and
state fairs.
Cai ne s t eachi ng i s
hands-on, said Becki,
meaning hell walk with the
student to illustrate how to
show the animal as well as
care for it. And he invites
them to come learn on their
own time. For example, the
Clark family went out to the
300-acre farm on a Saturday
in March to see one of the
new calves being born.
Typically, Caine works
with about eight to 10 kids
weekly and helps out during
competition time, too. Caine
provides the transportation
for animals to the fair while
the families pay for items
like hay bales for the cattle.
Even though he works full
time on a dairy farm with
one farm hand and helps out
his parents, Caine still finds
the time to make each com-
petition.
During fair time, Pat is
there as soon as hes done
milking his cows to 11 p.m.
at night, said Becki Clark.
Long-time showers
Even though Caine has
been working with kids for
years, the process to get
started is pretty informal.
Theres no application
process. The ki ds st art
working with him by simply
asking.
Whoever wants to show
they can, Caine said.
Most hear about hi s
mentoring through word
of mouth or because their
parents know him through
growing up in the Oregon-
Fitchburg area. Kids have
to have a certain amount of
education points or credits
built up in their respective
organizations to ensure they
are familiar with the animal
and its needs before they
can begin. When asked how
much time he spends work-
ing with the kids, he said it
was hard for him to estimate
that because its not about
time.
You know, the way I
look at it, its great for the
kids to do this, he told the
Star. Its a good way to
introduce some of the farm
practices for kids that
dont have the opportunity
to work with cattle.
Caines mother, Jeanne,
recalls their family first
started to show animals in
the Stoughton Junior Fair
around 1947, and said she
isnt surprised her son has
continued to work with
youth as long as he has.
He does it because the
kids want to show, she
said.
Strong bonds
In addition to the edu-
cational value, Pat insists
having fun and being safe
are his priorities for the stu-
dents. For the most part, he
said, they are dedicated, and
hes never had a safety or
behavioral issue.
Throughout the years,
Ive worked with some of
the best kids and some of the
best parents that you could
ever ask for, he said.
Although Caine doesnt
have kids of his own, Becki
Clark said he loves his cattle
as he would his children.
The kids pick up on the
strong bonds he has with his
herd.
You develop a relation-
ship, Caine said. My own
cows have got individual
personalities. I treat them as
individuals, not as a group.
Letting the kids name the
cattle yes, they all have
names and Pat knows each
one by heart helps nurture
that bond so they make
friends, with the animal
they work with, Caine said.
Caitlin Beyler will again
show the same animal she
did a year ago, a winter
yearling heifer she named
Munch.
Beaty describes him as
an open and caring per-
son who has been involved
with Oregon FFA for a long
time and who has enriched
the area with his efforts and
who also has won the FFAs
annual Outstanding Family
Farm Award in 2013.
Hes just such an asset to
the community, she said.
(Hes someone who) we all
love.
Jeanne said Pats work
with the kids is a lot of fun
but it doesnt just benefit the
community.
Its been a great thing for
both him and the kids, she
said. For all of us really, I
should say.
Caine: Longtime mentor invites youth to farm to see how to care for and show cattle
Continued from page 1
Photo by Becki Clark
Team Caine from left are Bailey Clark, Emma Xander, Pat Caine,
Cole Xander and Caitlin Beyler at the Dane County Fair in 2013.
Whats fair
time like?
Participating in a
fair is similar to a
weekend-long sporting
competition that youth
prepare for starting in
April. Showing is done
in front of judges and
the student will present
their cattle, which will
be judged on different
criteria from how they
look to how they act.
The kids will spend
all day at the fair-
grounds on fair days.
That can entail get-
ting up before 5 a.m.
to wash and groom
their cattle and clean
out their pens and, of
course, show them in
competition. The day
can last past 11 p.m. or
longer.
Photo by Victoria Vlisides
Pat Caine is a local dairy farmer whos been volunteering his time
and his cattle to help interested youth show his animals and learn
about their care.
SPORTS
Jeremy Jones, sports editor
845-9559 x226 ungsportseditor@wcinet.com
Thursday, May 22, 2014
Anthony Iozzo, assistant sports editor
845-9559 x237 sportsreporter@wcinet.com
Fax: 845-9550
For more sports coverage, visit:
ConnectOregonWI.com
9
The Oregon Observer
Panthers earn
No. 7 seed
for WIAA D1
playoffs
ANTHONY IOZZO
Assistant sports editor
The Oregon High School
baseball team learned it is a
No. 7 seed in sectional 5 for
this years WIAA Division
1 playoffs.
The Panthers open the
playoffs with a regional
semifinal matchup against
No. 10 Monona Grove. Last
season, Oregon defeated
MG on the road to make the
regional final.
This season, the Panthers
host the regional semifinal
on June 3. The winner trav-
els to No. 2 Stoughton on
June 5 for a chance to make
sectionals.
Oregon continues the sea-
son with two home games
Thursday against Monona
Grove and Tuesday against
Oconomowoc. Both games
are at 5 p.m.
Ft. Atkinson 9, Oregon 0
Senior Pierce Peterson
picked up the only two hits
for the Panthers on May 14
in a 9-0 loss at Fort Atkin-
son.
Seni or Logan Las ki
picked up the loss. He went
3 1/3 innings and allowed
three earned runs on six
hits. He walked two and
struck out one.
Junior Travis Fluckiger
pitched 2 1/3 innings and
allowed two earned runs on
four hits. He walked two.
Junior Luke Mueller fin-
ished the final 1/3 inning
and struck out a batter.
Andrew Hozli picked up
the win for the Blackhawks.
He pitched five innings and
allowed one hit and two
walks. He struck out seven.
Oregon 6, Monroe 1
The Panthers bounced
Oregons relays, hurdles
propel Panthers at Badger
South Conference meet
ANTHONY IOZZO
Assistant sports editor
Oregon boys and girls track and
field head coach Ned Lease did the
math and figured Monona Grove and
Monroe were going to score above
140 points before Tuesdays Badger
South Conference meet at Stoughton
High School.
He expected around 90 for his
squad.
But on the strength of a first and
two-place finishes by the relays and
two first in the hurdles, the Panthers
were able to finish in third with 110
points, exceeding some expectations.
We have one of the most well-
rounded teams out there, Lease
said. We have the hurdles covered. We have the jumps covered. We
have the distance covered. We have
the sprints covered. We have the
relays covered.
I was pleased.
The 4x200 t eam of seni or
Lance Peterson, sophomore Lucas
Mathews, senior Jawon Turner and
junior Josh Sromovsky took first in
1:31.81. That same team took second
in the 4x100 in 44.07.
The 4x400 team of senior Nick
Track and field Baseball
Boys tennis
Photo by Anthony Iozzo
Sophomore Lucas Mathews hands the baton to senior Jawon Turner during the 4x100 relay Tuesday during the Badger South Conference meet at Stoughton High School.
The team, including senior Lance Peterson and junior Josh Sromovsky, took second in 44.07. The Oregon boys tack and field took third with 110 points.
Photo by Jeremy Jones
Senior No. 1 doubles players Dakota Tollakson (right) and Alec Onesti celebrate a point in
their third-set victory over Madison Edgewood last Wednesday. Tollakson and Onesti started
slow but finished strong, winning 3-6, 6-3, 6-4 to help propel the Panthers to a 4-3 victory
that is believed to be the teams first win over the Badger South Conference rival Crusaders.
Panthers finally put away Crusaders
JEREMY JONES
Sports editor
In a Badger South Conference
dual match chalked so fully of
drama that you could have cut
the tension with a knife, the Ore-
gon boys tennis team finally got
the better of Madison Edgewood
on Wednesday at Quann Park.
With players and coach-
es bickering back-and-forth
throughout the evening, it was
the steady play of freshman No.
2 singles player Calvin Schnei-
der that helped the Panthers
secure the 4-3 victory.
The first time in school his-
tory, its huge, said Schnei-
der, whose win helped sent
the seniors, including his older
brother Jackson, out with their
first win against the Crusaders.
Its a big deal for all these
seniors. Theyve worked so hard
everyday in practice, it was just
good to finally get the win.
Calvin breezed through his
first set against Billy OBrien
before having to fight back to
force a third set breaker.
I had a couple of match points
there and I thought if I could just
find a way to battle those off, Id
have a good chance at deuce,
Schneider said. I thought I had
the momentum and could get
him in the breaker.
He did just that to take the
match 6-2, 2-6, 7-6 (6) nearly
simultaneous to the win of soph-
omores Matt Reisdorf and Spen-
cer Kresbach 6-4, 4-6, 6-1 at No.
3 doubles.
Schneider was one of four
freshman to win their singles
flight as fellow underclassman
Charles Donovan cruised 6-2,
6-2 at No. 4 singles, while Madi-
son Edgewoods Philippe Cam-
pos and Cecil Ingrad survived
against a pair of Panther seniors.
Campos held off Brady Beh-
rend 3-6, 6-4, 6-0 at No. 3 sin-
gles, while Ingrad defeated Jack-
son Schneider in one of the most
competitive two-set matches
youll ever see 7-6 (4), 7-6 (6).
The Crusaders secured the first
match of the evening with Noah
Colletti and Thomas Thelen roll-
ing 6-3, 6-4 at No. 2 doubles.
Oregon however, answered with
Donovans win at No. 4 singles
and then picked up a huge win
by Dakota Tollakson and Alec
Onesti at No. 1 doubles.
Turn to Baseball/Page 11
Boys race to third place
Turn to Conference/Page 12
If you go
What: WIAA Division 1 track
and field regional
When: 4:15 p.m. Tuesday, May
27, (field events); 5 p.m. (track
events)
Where: Verona Area High
School
Turn to Tennis/Page 11
10
May 22, 2014 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
UN348705
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Home Talent League
Riffle chased in four-run eighth
ANTHONY IOZZO
Assistant sports editor
Pitcher Ben Riffle pitched against the
Verona Cavaliers in the Home Talent League
Final Four for Stoughton last season, but this
year he joined Oregon.
The Orioles rejoined the Home Talent
League after a seven-year hiatus this season,
and Riffle looked to continue his recent suc-
cess against Verona.
He didnt allow a run until the fifth, but it
was the eighth inning that ended Riffles day
in an 8-2 loss.
Derek Murphy reached on an error and
stole second base with two outs, and Bill
Engelhart drove him in to put the Cavaliers
up 3-2. An error by Oregons third baseman
allowed Danny Koss to score, and Matt Gust
followed with an RBI single to right field.
Eric Engler came in to pitch for Riffle, and
he allowed an RBI single by Justin Scanlon.
Engler later surrendered a 2-run home run
to Koss in the ninth.
At the plate, the Orioles were only able to
get two runs in the sixth during a dominant
performance by pitcher Ben Wallace.
After singles by Blake Watzke and Engler,
Jeff Spiwak hit an RBI double, and Ryan
Hoodjer followed with an RBI single to tie
the game at 2.
Verona struck first in the fifth with an
RBI double by Derek Burgenske that scored
David Lund. Zach Spencer followed with an
RBI single.
Riffle took the loss. He allowed two earned
runs on nine hits in 7 2/3 innings. He struck
out two and walked seven.
Wallace went all nine innings for Verona
and struck out 15 while walking one. He
allowed two earned runs on four hits.
Oregon travels to Hollandale at 1 p.m. Sun-
day and travels to Mount Horeb/Pine Bluff at
1 p.m. Monday.
Photo by Anthony Iozzo
Ben Riffle throws a strike in the sixth inning Sunday in a Home Talent League Western Section game
against Verona. Oregon lost 8-2.
Girls soccer
Panthers control destiny
ANTHONY IOZZO
Assistant sports editor
The Oregon High School
girls soccer team defeated Mil-
ton 5-0 Tuesday putting the
Panthers at 3-1-1 in the Badger
South Conference.
Oregon hosts Stoughton at
7 p.m. Friday. A win clinches
at least a share of the Badger
South Conference title. The
Panthers close the week with a
nonconference game at 7 p.m.
Tuesday against Sauk Prairie at
home.
Whitefish Bay 1, Oregon 0
Freshman Madelyn Peach
made 11 saves last Thursday,
but Oregon fell 1-0 to White-
fish Bay in a nonconference
game.
Amanda Pandl finished with
three saves for Whitefish Bay.
Erin Corrigan scored the only
goal.
Oregon 2, Memorial 1
Sophomore forward Jen
Brien and the rest of the Pan-
thers decided enough was
enough at halftime last Fri-
day at Madison Memorials
Mansfield Stadium.
The Panthers hadnt scored a
goal in five games despite aver-
aging 10-plus shots on goal per
game, but that changed in the
first 10 minutes of the second
half in the 2-1 win.
Brien dribbled into the penal-
ty box on a 1-on-1 and nudged
the ball past the goalie to the
center of the goal. That is when
sophomore forward Makena
Fleming finished the play to tie
the game in the 45th minute.
Brien once again was at the
center of a play a little more
than three minutes later. A
corner kick led to a scramble
for the ball in front of the goal,
and Brien came away with it.
She found the upper right-hand
corner of the net to make it 2-1
Oregon.
We just had our prep talk in
the locker room, Brien said.
We were pumped up and sick
of losing. Once you start off
strong in the second half, then
the mentality got up and the
energy and the positive-ness.
Head coach Julie Grutzner
decided to switch up the for-
mations after trailing 1-0 in the
first half. She moved Fleming
and Brien up in hopes that the
two friends would connect with
each other.
I knew we were faster
offensively, she said. They
are friends and worked off each
other and got those two great
goals. Finally, we scored.
Oregon had numerous
chances in the second half and
held Madison Memorial to just
one shot on goal. Freshman
goalie Abby Brietbach fin-
ished with three saves. Memo-
rial freshman forward Jen Roth
scored the first goal in the sixth
minute.
The Panthers had two shots
on goal in the first half and sev-
en in the second half. Memorial
senior goalie Dani Stroud fin-
ished with seven saves.
They dont give up many
goals. They are kind of like
us. We dont give up a lot of
goals, Grutzner said. After
they scored their goal, we
settled in a bit. We didnt play
a great first half, but in the sec-
ond half, I felt we really picked
it up.
She continued, (Stroud) is
Photo by Anthony Iozzo
Sophomore forward Makena Fanning (left) celebrates after her game-tying goal with teammates (from
left) junior midfielder Kelsey Jahn, sophomore forward Jen Brien and senior forward Dani Ironmonger
Friday, May 16, in a nonconference game against Madison Memorial at Mansfield Stadium. Oregon
won 2-1.
Turn to Soccer/Page 11
May 22, 2014 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
11
EARLY DEADLINES
Due to the Memorial Day holiday,
the display ad deadline for the May 28, 2014
Great Dane Shopping News
will be Wednesday, May 21 at 3 p.m.
Classified ad deadline will be Thursday, May 22 at Noon
Deadlines for the May 29, 2014
Oregon Observer, Stoughton Courier Hub and Verona Press
will be Friday, May 23 at Noon
In observance of the holiday,
our offices will be closed Monday, May 26.
back last Thursday with a
6-1 win over Monroe.
Host Oregon scored three
runs in the first and never
looked back.
Junior Mitch Weber led
the Panthers with two RBIs,
while senior Ross Galloway
was 3-for-3 with three runs
scored. Junior Andrew Plin-
er was 2-for-2 with an RBI
and a run scored.
Senior Jere Bauer, junior
Chris McGuine and Laski
all added RBIs. Senior Aus-
tin Adams and Peterson
each scored a run.
Weber pi cked up t he
wi n. He st ruck out 10
and walked two in seven
innings. He allowed an
unearned run on two hits.
Desmond Ford picked
up the loss. He allowed six
runs on seven hits in six
innings. He walked four
and struck out one.
Reedsburg 11, Oregon 3
Oregon traveled to Jones
Park in Fort Atkinson Sat-
urday to take on Reedsburg
in the Badger Challenge
and fell 11-4.
All of the Panthers runs
came in the third inning,
but it only cut the deficit to
7-3 at the time.
Peterson and Laski each
pi cked up RBIs, whi l e
Peterson, Pliner and Adams
all scored runs.
Seni or Jack Kr ueger
took the loss. He allowed
three earned runs on eight
hits in 2 2/3 innings. He
walked two and struck out
one. Mueller went 2 1/3
innings and allowed three
earned runs on four hits. He
walked four and struck out
three.
Fl ucki ger pi t ched t he
other two innings. He had a
walk and a strikeout.
Lucas Muchow picked
up the win. He allowed one
earned run on three hits n
four innings. He struck out
six and walked two.
Edgewood, Oregon (n/a)
The Panthers traveled
to Warner Park to take
on Madi son Edgewood
Tuesday but results were
unavailable by the Observ-
ers Tuesday deadline.
Look for results in next
weeks paper.
Baseball: Oregon opens playoffs on June 3
Continued from page 9
a good goalkeeper. She made two great
saves in the first half. We hadnt scored
in the last five games, so this is good.
What made the night even sweeter for
Brien and the Panthers was that Milton
and Madison Edgewood tied 2-2. That
score put Oregons Badger South destiny
back in its hands.
We have been playing really well,
Grutzner said. We are jelling, and I am
moving players around. Most games, I am
getting everyone in. We just havent had
that quality finish, so this was a nice notch
going forward.
Oregon 5, Milton 0
The Panthers got two goals by junior
Kelsey Jahn and one each by fresh-
man Meagan Brakob, senior Lara
Frankson and senior Kristin Marshall.
Peach finished with one save.
Soccer: Panthers move to 3-1-1 in the Badger South
Continued from page 10
Boys golf
Softball
Lacrosse
Swartzmiller takes the gold
Sophie Swartzmiller, a
9-year-old third grader at Prai-
rie View Elementary, brought
home the gold at the 2014
Wisconsin State Gymnas-
tic meet held on March 20 in
Brookfield.
Swartzmiller won the beam
with a 9.6 and added the floor
exercise competition with a
9.450. She went on to finish
runner-up on bars (9.475) and
fourth on vault (8.875), com-
peting in the 10 and under
level 8 division. Her 37.400
all-around score earned her
the title of All-Around State
Champion.
In addition, Swartzmiller
secured a spot on the Super
8 Regional Wisconsin 2014
team.
Regardless of age, the level
8 Super 8 Team consists of
the eight highest All-Around
top level 8 gymnasts of Wis-
consin. She scored the second-
highest all-around score giv-
ing her one of the eight slots to
represent Wisconsin.
Schwartzmiller headed to
regionals in North Dakota
on April 11, where she com-
peted as a level 8 junior (11
and under) for team Wiscon-
sin and as an individual all-
around.
Team Wisconsin took
fourth place.
Swartzmiller placed fifth
on floor, seventh on beam and
took 13th as an all-around in
Region 4, which consists of
seven states in the upper Mid-
west.
In 2013, she was ranked in
the top 100 9-year-olds inthe
nation.
Losing big after a lacklus-
ter start to the first set, the
Panther seniors responded by
taking the final two sets with
relative ease on their way to a
decisive 3-6, 6-3, 6-4 win.
Despite a sluggish start,
Onesti said, We knew we
had it within us. We just had
to find it in time. That second
set we started to have some
fun and went on to take the
match.
Panthers head coach Ben
Conklin, who had never
beaten the Crusaders, said,
It means everything to win
tonight, but this was really the
icing on the cake. Team state
is still the ultimate goal.
Oregon 6, Milton 1
Calvin Schneider, Behrend
and Donovan once again took
care of business at No. 2-4
singles. Calvin cruised 6-1,
6-0 at 2 singles Friday, while
Behrend took his 3 singles
match 6-0, 6-1. Donovan
added a quick 6-0, 6-0 shut-
out at No. 4 singles
Onesti and Tollakson
rolled 6-1, 6-2 at 1 doubles.
Chase Templeton, in his first
varsity match, teamed with
Jackson Wilhelm to take their
No. 2 doubles match 3-6, 6-1,
6-3.
Kresbach and Reisbach
added a second three-set vic-
tory, taking their No. 3 dou-
bles match 6-4, 5-7, 6-2.
Oregon invite
The Pant her s host ed
ninth-ranked Madison West
and Badger North Confer-
ence frontrunner Waunakee
in a three-team invite on Sat-
urday.
Oregon fell 4-3 against the
Regents in the first round.
The Schnei der s bot h
picked up wins once again
atop the singles lineup.
Jackson cruised through
the first set and then held
on to take his No. 1 singles
match 6-2, 6-4. Calvin,
meanwhile, cruised 6-2,6-1 at
2 singles.
Behrend and Donovan both
reached a third set, but were
unable to close out the dual.
All three doubles matches
went to a third set with Ore-
gon dropping each.
Oregon bounced back to
knock off a talented Wauna-
kee team 5-2 later over the
weekend.
Calvin Schneider won 6-3,
7-5 at No. 2 singles, while
Behrend and Donovan added
singles wins at 3 and 4 sin-
gles.
Onesti and Tollakson
paced the Panthers three
doubles flights, winning 7-6
(4), 6-4. Kresbach and Reis-
bach chipped in a victory at
No. 3 doubles.
Continued from page 9
Tennis: Earns sweet victory
Golfers take fourth at Blackhawk
ANTHONY IOZZO
Assistant sports editor
The Oregon High School boys golf
team finished the regular season last
week with a dual against Madison
Edgewood on May 14 and an invite
last Monday.
The Panthers also played in the
Badger South Conference meet
Wednesday, but the conference meet
happened after the Observers Tues-
day deadline.
Go to ConnectOregonWi.com for a
story and photos from the meet.
The Panthers travel to Pleasant
View Golf Course at 9 a.m. Tuesday,
May 27, for the WIAA Division 1
regionals. Follow @UNG_AIozzo for
updates, photos and video.
Edgewood 152, Oregon 165
Oregon traveled to Nakoma Heights
Country Club on May 14 for a dual
against Madison Edgewood and fell
152-165.
Junior Carson Torhorst led the
Panthers with a 38, while sophomore
Brandon Michek shot a 41. Sopho-
more Collin Bundy was next with a
42, and junior Austin Busler finished
the scoring with a 44.
Johnny Decker led Edgewood with
a 35.
Spartan invite
The Panthers traveled to Blackhawk
Country Club in Madison for the
Spartan invite Monday and finished
fourth out of 14 teams with a 335.
Torhorst shot an 80, while Bundy
finished with an 82. Busler (86) and
Michek (87) rounded out the scores.
Madison Memorial won the event
with a 319.
Badger Cup
Oregon participated in the Badger
Cup at the House on the Rock Golf
Resort on Tuesday and helped the
Badger South retain the cup with a
14-4 win.
The Panthers defeated Mount
Horeb 2-1. Torhorst defeated Jason
Peck 4-and-2, and sophomore Bran-
don Rogers and Michek won their
scramble 5-and-4.
If you go
What: WIAA Division 1 Middleton
regional
When: 9 a.m. Tuesday, May 27
Where: Pleasant View Golf Course
Updates:: Follow @UNG_AIozzo
for updates, photos and video
Panthers close out regular season searching for victory
JEREMY JONES
Sports editor
Oregon softball commited four errors
over two innings Tuesday to allow the
visiting Fort Atkinson Blackhawks to
pull away with a 9-1 Badger South Con-
ference victory.
The Panthers, who had just four hits in
the loss, close out the regular season at 5
p.m. Thursday at home against Monona
Grove.
Evansville, Oregon (canceled)
Mondays nonconference game at
Evansville was canceled due to light-
ning.
Waunakee 7, Oregon 3
Allie Greene finished 2-for-4 with a
double to lead the team at the plate last
Wednesday in a 7-3 loss at Waunakee.
Fluckinger was charged with seven
earned runs in the loss, allowing 10 total
and walking one.
Cooper Overton gave up three earned
runs for the Warriors, while striking out
eight and walking two.
Monroe 10, Oregon 0
Monroes Natalie Dillon tossed a two-
hit shutout over four innings Friday as
the host Cheesemakers blanked Oregon
10-0 in five innings.
Fluckinger took the loss for the Pan-
thers, allowing 10 earned runs on 15
hits. She struck out two and walked one.
Monroe had six doubles in the win.
Gymnastics
Girls knock off Wildcats and Lancers; Boys handle Baraboo
The Oregon High School girls
lacrosse team defeated Verona 12-11 on
May 14.
Mackenzie Torpy collected four
goals, while Hannah Kane added three.
Katie Golver and Brianna Tarantino
each scored two goals, and Maddy Hess
picked up one.
Goalie Tasha Martin made 12 saves.
Oregon 17, La Follette 6
Glover and Torpy each scored four
goals in a 17-6 win over Madison La
Follette last Thursday.
Rachel Dvorak and Kane each added
two goals and Hunter Klus, Kari Bertler,
Molly Bollig, Tarantino and Hess each
added one goal. Martin finished with
three saves.
Oregon plays at Verona at 5 p.m.
Thursday. The JV plays at 6:30 p.m.
BOYS
Oregon traveled to Baraboo on Thurs-
day, May 15, to take on the Baraboo
boys lacrosse team and finished with an
11-2 victory.
Trent Ricker led the scoring with five
goals and one assist. Christian Poe net-
ted a hat trick and added oneassist.
Senior Dan Gorman scored two goals
and chipped in twoassists, while fresh-
man Chase Morley scored his first goal
of the season.
Riley Collins and John Best ral-
lied the defensive team to help stop
the offensive attack by Baraboo.
Oregons next game is at 5 p.m. Friday,
May 23, against Stoughton.
If you go
What: Badger
Conference tennis meet
When: 9 a.m. Thursday-
Friday, May 22-23
Where: Nielsen Tennis
Stadium
12
May 22, 2014 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
Kapusta, sophomore Jonas
Tempte, junior Brennen
Deegan and sophomore
Chris Cutter took second in
3:33.79.
Junior John Hermus was
first in the 110 hurdles
(15.44), while sophomore
Alex Duff was fifth (16.25).
Duff later won the 300 hur-
dles (40.91) and Hermus was
sixth (43.31).
Mathews took fourth place
in the 200 (22.65), while
Kapusta was fifth in the 400
(53.37).
Cutter was fourth in the
800 (2:01.71), while junior
Benjamin Vogt took seventh
(2:08.15).
Cutter added a seventh-
place finish in the 1,600
(4:41.17), while junior Josh
Christiansen took eighth
(4: 44. 57). Chri st i ansen
added a fifth in the 3,200
(10:20.04).
Peterson was sixth in the
100 (11.58).
In the field, Sromovsky
took second in the long
jump (21-8), and he added a
fifth place in the triple jump
(39-10 1/2). Turner was
fourth in the triple jump (41-
1/2).
Hermus took sixth in the
pole vault (11-6).
Monroe (163) and Monona
Grove (144 1/2) took first
and second, respectively.
The boys and the girls
compete at regionals on
Tuesday, May 27, at Verona
Area High School. The field
events begin at 4:15 p.m.,
while the track events begin
at 5 p.m.
Tom Mueller invite
Hermus was second after
the 110 hurdle preliminar-
ies, but that didnt slow him
down on his way to victory.
Hermus cut nearly five tenths
of a second to sprint past
Mount Horebs Ryan Epping
with a time of 15.38 in the
finals. It was one of four vic-
tories by the host Panthers at
Fridays annual Tom Muel-
ler Invitational.
Oregon scored 117 points
Friday and held off Mount
Horeb (104) to win the invi-
tational. Baraboo (97.5)
rounded out the top three
schools.
Duff secured the 300 title
in 40.67, while Peterson,
Sromovsky, Turner and
Mathews added the 4x100
and 4x200 relay titles in
43.94 and 1:31.12, respec-
tively.
Five-hundredths of a sec-
ond separated Cutter from
first-place finisher Jack-
son Snow of Baraboo in the
800-meter run, and Vogt
added a second-place fin-
ish in the mile, stopping the
clock at 4:44.37 three sec-
onds behind Janesville Park-
ers David Green.
Turner also earned a sec-
ond-place finish in the triple
jump (40-0).
Mathews cleared 5-8 for
fourth place in the high jump.
Peterson took fifth place in
the 100-meter dash.
GIRLS
The Oregon girls track and
field team finished fifth with
at conference with 85 points.
Lease said he would have
liked to have a few more
points, but he was still proud
of the girls.
It is a really well-rounded
team, and we scored in every
event, Lease said.
It also hurt that senior
Jamie Wood was out with an
injury. Lease said she would
usually add 20 points just by
herself.
Lease said he hoped Wood
would be ready for regionals,
but he didnt know for sure.
Jones led the way with
a first place in the 800
(2: 19. 01), and added a
second place in the 1,600
(5:18.29).
Sophomore Maddie LeB-
run took third in the 400
(1:00.13). She also took fifth
in the 200 (27.49), while
sophomore Jillian Moss was
eighth (28.58).
Senior Ruby Carpenter
was sixth in the 100 hurdles
(17.68) and the 300 hur-
dles (50.2). Senior Lauren
Wysocky was eighth in the
300 hurdles (51.71).
Sophomore Emma Hughes
was seventh in the mile
(5:45.06) and eighth in the
3,200 (13:06.15).
The 4x400 relay of Jones,
Carpent er, LeBrun and
sophomore Samantha Girard
was second in 4:07.81.
The 4x100 relay team of
senior Bailey Adkins, senior
Halie Osborne, Girard and
Moss finished fourth in 52.8,
while the same team took
fourth in the 4x200 in 1:51.1.
In the field, senior Katie
Boehnen took second in the
discus (110-3) and added
a sixth place in the shot put
(31-11).
Jones tied for fourth in the
high jump (5-0), while Car-
penter tied for third in the
pole vault (8-6).
Adkins took fifth in the
long jump (15-2 3/4).
Stoughton won the meet
(193 1/2 points).
Tom Mueller invite
Jones dominated the 800
in her last showing before
conference, cruising to vic-
tory in 2:16.87 10 seconds
ahead of runner-up Nikki
Staffen of Stoughton.
LeBrun added the Pan-
thers only other win Friday
at the Tom Mueller Invi-
tational, taking the 400 in
59.85 as Oregon finished
fourth overall with 81 points.
Gi rard and Carpent er
joined Jones and LeBrun to
secure the teams top relay
finish, clocking a 4:10.25
to finish second behind Sun
Prairie.
The Panthers 4x200 relay
squad of Osborne, Adkins,
Moss and Girard took third
place, while the same quartet
placed fourth in the 4x100.
Meanwhile, Carpenter
added a runner-up finish in
the 300 hurdles (49.15), fin-
ishing seven-hundredths of
a second behind Fort Atkin-
sons Emma Bare. Adkins
also turned in a second-place
finish in the triple jump (32-5
1/2).
Boehnen was Oregons
lone thrower to score points,
taking second place in the
discus (114-8)
Jones tied for third in the
high jump with her clearance
of 4-10. Carpenter added a
third-place finish in the pole
vault at 9 feet.
Hughes finished fifth in
the mile, while Carpenter
matched the finish in the 110
hurdles. 2:02.33.
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Conference: Girls finish in fifth place, Jones finished in first place in the 800
Photo by Anthony Iozzo
Left, senior Valeries Jones runs in the 1,600 at conference. She took second in 5 minutes, 18.29 seconds; (above) junior John Hermus
races over an obstacle in the 110 hurdles. He finished first in 15.44 seconds.
Continued from page 9
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May 22, 2014 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
13
Marie Deegan
Marie Evelyn (DeVoss)
Deegan, age 85, of Brook-
lyn, passed away peace-
fully into Gods open arms
surrounded by her loving
family on Tuesday, May
13, 2014. She was born on
Oct. 6, 1928, in Chetek, the
daughter of Arthur and Lula
(Grey) DeVoss. She mar-
ried William Deegan Jr. on
July 17, 1948, at St. Patrick
Catholic Church in Janes-
ville. Marie cherished her
husband, her family and her
life.
She is survived by her
daught er, Li nda (John)
Deegan-Adams and their
children, Cassandra (David)
Slater, Guenevere Adams
and El i zabet h Adams;
daughter, Susan Deegan-
Crawford and her chi l -
dren, Heather, Adam and
Chr i st opher Cr awf or d;
daughter, Deborah (Dane)
Albright and their children,
Lindsay (Hayford) Adjavor,
Lana Albright and Land-
on Albright; son, William
Deegan III and his children,
Marshall Deegan, Joseph
Deegan and Cour t ney
Deegan-Fender; her sister,
Leota Hammel; and many
other relatives and friends.
She was preceded i n
deat h by her husband,
William Jr.; parents; four
brothers; and five sisters.
A Mass of Christian Burial
was held at Holy Mother
of Consolation Catholic
Church, 651 N. Main St.,
Oregon, on Tuesday, May
20, 2014, with Father Gary
Wankerl presiding. Burial
was held at Mount Hope in
Brooklyn.
The family would like to
thank Heartland Hospice
and the staff in the memo-
ry care unit at Huntington
Place in Janesville.
Online condolences may
be made at gundersonfh.
com.
Gunderson Oregon
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Obituaries
Delores E. Struck
Delores E. Struck, age 97,
of Oregon passed away on
Monday, May 12, 2014, at
Agrace HospiceCare. She
was born on April 29, 1917,
in Ridgeway, the daughter of
Elmer and Mabel (Shepherd)
Clark. She married John F.
Struck on May 26, 1939.
Delores moved to Madi-
son in 1920. She was a
graduate of Madison Cen-
tral High School, class of
1936. She and her husband,
John, owned and operated
Oregon Feed and Supply.
Del ores was a member
of the Town and Country
Womens Club, volunteered
for Meals on Wheels and as
a poll worker for elections.
She loved to bowl, play
cards and taking trips to
the casino. She especially
loved family get-togethers
with her extended family.
Delores is survived by
her daughter, Linda; nieces
and nephews, Marcia Mar-
shall, Roger Guetschow,
Mark Wernick, Mick Wer-
nick and Mary Lawry; spe-
cial friends, Sue Burkhold-
er and Cheri Johnson; and
other relatives and friends.
She was preceded i n
death by her parents; her
husband, John, in 1983;
her son, Tom; and nephew
Dean Guetschow.
Funeral Services were
held at Gunderson Oregon
Funeral Home, 1150 Park
St., Oregon, Saturday, May
17, 2014, with Father Timo-
thy Jones presiding. Burial
followed at Prairie Mound
Cemetery in Oregon. In lieu
of flowers, memorials may
be made to Agrace Hos-
piceCare or Dane County
Humane Society. The fam-
ily wishes to thank the staff
at Agrace HospiceCare for
their loving care and com-
passion. Online condolences
may be made at gunderson-
fh.com.
Gunderson Oregon
Funeral & Cremation Care
1150 Park Street
835-3515
Inez Lucille
(Retherford) Brown
Inez Luci l l e (Ret her-
ford) Brown, passed away
on Wednesday, May 14,
2014. Inez was the fourth
of 12 children born to Percy
and Dorothy Retherford in
Chisago City, Minn. After
high school, Inez relocated
to Madison, where she met
Herman Brown at a dance
at Turner Hall. They were
married on June 7, 1942,
and raised nine children.
Inez was known for her
hard work on the farm as
well as her homemade bread,
buns and cinnamon rolls.
Inez loved to pick strawber-
ries and generally canned
hundreds of quarts of fruits,
vegetables and meat each
year. After all the children
were in school, Inez worked
outside the home at the
Waterfall Restaurant, Qual-
ity Laundry and retired from
General Casualty Insurance
in November 1982. Inez and
Herman attended numer-
ous euchre tournaments and
you could count on a game
of cards most any weekend.
Inez loved to invite the chil-
dren and other relatives for a
delicious chicken dinner on
Sundays.
Inez is survived by seven
children, Judy (Vern) Arzt,
Dorothy (Jim) Wahner, Jer-
ry Brown, Barbara Nelson,
Sharon Knapp, Joe (Sally)
Brown and Jim (Betsy)
Br own; gr andchi l dr en,
Steve (Meghan) Owens,
Jeff (Sue) Owens, Dan
(Holly) Dent, Dave (Jess)
Dent, Traci (Jeff) Seger-
strom, Prudy Albis, Teresa
Arzt , Val (Mat t ) Lang,
Mike (Kristie) Oehrlein,
Terri Oehrlein (Tigani Elta-
hir), Janice Bedner, Juanita
(Jeremy) Kranz, Robert
Knapp, Tammy Deschner,
William Knapp, Celestia
Knapp, Michelle Washburn
(Michael Borgrud), Denise
Washburn (Anthony Krys-
tocek), Debra Jo Brown,
Kevi n Br own, Br enda
Krueger and Annie Brown;
gr eat - gr andchi l dr en &
great-great-grandchildren;
a sister, Barb Tangren; and
many nieces, nephews, oth-
er relatives and friends.
Inez was preceded i n
death by her parents; her
husband, Her man; t wo
daughters, Betty Reed and
Anna Maerz; son-in-law,
Jim Knapp; four grandsons,
Robert Washburn, Jason
McGuigan, Scott Owen and
Brad Knapp; a great-grand-
son, Ni chol as Femri t e;
three brothers; and seven
sisters.
Funeral Services were
held at Gunderson Oregon
Funeral Home, 1150 Park
St., Oregon, on Sunday,
May 18, 2014. Burial will
be at Graves Cemetery in
Rutland. Online condolenc-
es may be made at gunder-
sonfh.com.
Gunderson Oregon
Funeral & Cremation Care
1150 Park Street
835-3515
Herbert Urban Haas
Herbert Urban Haas, age
84, of Fitchburg, passed
away unexpectedly on Sat-
urday, May 10, 2014, at St.
Marys Hospital. He was
born Dec. 16, 1929, the son
of Norbert F. and Adelia
(Fass) Haas and grew up
on the home
farm in Rox-
bury. Herbert
and Frances
Meicher met while they
were in high school and
were married on Feb. 12,
1952, at St. Aloysius Cath-
olic Church in Sauk City.
Herbert was drafted into
the U.S. Army two years
later and they were moved
to Colorado Springs where
he served as a Battery Clerk
for two years. In 1956 they
returned to Wisconsin where
he continued to serve in
the Army Reserves until
his discharge in 1962. He
worked as a painter for Pal
Mar Painting for the next
couple of years; and then he
and Fran purchased Pal Mar
Painting, Inc. and went into
the painting business, which
his son, Brian, now owns and
operates. Herb continued to
work with Brian until his
last day, delivering paint to
job sites. He also continued
farming, purchasing their
farm on Irish Lane, where
they raised Black Angus
cattle. Herb also maintained
a collection of Minneapolis
Moline Tractors. He was a
regular at McDonalds in
Oregon for his morning cof-
fee to start the day and was
lovingly referred to as the
Old Grouch by his cof-
fee cronies there and at his
delivery stops. He enjoyed
hunting as a younger man.
Herb was a member of Holy
Mother of Consolation Cath-
olic Church in Oregon, the
Oregon VFW and American
Legion. Herb was a fam-
ily man first and foremost;
and will be remembered as a
good husband and wonderful
father.
Herbert is survived by
his wife, Frances Haas; his
son, Brian Haas; a brother,
Roman (Charlotte) Haas of
Roxbury; a sister, Joan San-
sone of Madison; sisters-in-
law, Nancy Coffey, Lor-
raine Jackson; brothers-in-
law, Wilfred (Vivian), Wil-
liam and Robert Meicher.
He was preceded in death
by his parents, Norbert and
Adelia; brothers and sisters,
Arline DuCharme, Victor
Haas, Dorothy Fuchs, Law-
rence Haas; in-laws, Donald
DuCharme, LeRoy Fuchs,
Betty Haas, Louis Sansone,
Vincent and Jerome Meich-
er, Serene France, and Clar-
ence and Joseph Meicher.
The family is grateful to
the EMS staff and the doc-
tors, nurses, chaplains and
staff of St. Marys E.R.,
Father Gary Wankerl and
staff of Holy Mother of Con-
solation for their compassion
and care at a difficult time.
A Mass of Christian Buri-
al was held Saturday, May
17, 2014, at Holy Mother
of Consolation Catholic
Church, 651 North Main
St., Oregon, with Father
Gar y Wanker l pr es i d-
ing. Burial followed at St.
Marys Catholic Cemetery,
Oregon. To view and sign
this guestbook, please visit:
ryanfuneralservice.com.
Ryan Funeral Home
& Cremation Services
5701 Odana Road
274-1000
Herbert Urban Haas
Inez Lucille (Retherford) Brown
Delores E. Struck
Marie Deegan
Legals
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
ON THE REZONING REQUEST
FOR PART OF LOT 1,
ALPINE MEADOWS, AND
OUTLOT 2, DRUMLIN
ADDITION TO ALPINE
MEADOWS (THE
PROPERTY).
VILLAGE OF OREGON
AMENDING THE PLANNED
DEVELOPMENT ZONING
PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that the
Planning Commission of the Village of
Oregon will hold a public hearing at 6:30
p.m. on Thursday, June 5, 2014 in the
Board Room of the Oregon Village Hall,
117 Spring Street, Oregon, Wisconsin,
to consider the rezone application of
Oregon Community Bank, owner of the
Property, to amend the General Develop-
ment Plan for the Property.
A map of the area requested to be re-
zoned is on fle at the offce of the Village
Clerk. Offce hours of the Clerk are 8:00
a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday.
Subsequent to the hearing, the Com-
mission intends to deliberate and act
upon the request.
Peggy S.K. Haag
Village Clerk
Published: May 22 and 29, 2014
WNAXLP
NOTICE
The regular meeting of the Oregon
School District Board of Education
scheduled for Monday, May 26, 2014 has
been cancelled.
The next regular meeting of the
Board of Education will be June 9, 2014.
A complete agenda will be published in
the June 5, 2014 issue of the Oregon Ob-
server.
Published: May 22, 2014
WNAXLP
* * *
TOWN OF OREGON
BOARD OF REVIEW
1138 UniOn ROad
OREGON, WI 53575
SATURDAY, MAY 31, 2014
9:00 A.M. 11:00 P.M.
The 2014 Town of Oregon Board of
Review will be held on Saturday, May 31,
2014 from 9:00 a.m. to 11:00 p.m. To ap-
pear at the Board of Review, it is required
that an appointment is scheduled 48
hours prior to the start of Board of Re-
view. Appointments are scheduled with
the Clerks Offce at 835-3200.
Denise Arnold
Town Clerk
Published: May 22 and 29, 2014
WNAXLP
* * *
NOTICE OF MEETING TO
ADJOURN BOARD OF
REVIEW TO A LATER DATE
The Village of Oregon, Dane County
Board of Review met on the 15th Day of
May, 2014 at 4:00 p.m. at the Oregon Vil-
lage Hall, 117 Spring Street, Oregon WI
for the purpose of calling the Board of
Review into Session during the thirty day
period beginning on the 2nd Monday of
May, 2014 pursuant to 70.47(1) of the
Wis. Statutes.
The Board of Review will be ad-
journed until the 3rd day of June, 2014 at
5:00 p.m. when it will meet at the Oregon
Village Hall, 117 Spring Street, Oregon
WI.
Notice is hereby given this 16th day
of May, 2014 by:
Peggy S.K. Haag
Village Clerk
Posted: May 19, 2014
Published: May 22, 2014
WNAXLP
* * *
* * *
JOINT RUTLAND PLANNING
COMMISSION/BOARD
MEETING
Wednesday, May 28,
2014 6:30 P.M.
Agenda:
Possible PC and Board action on
Petition 10672/CUP 2270 by Stoughton
Farms inc., located at 3768 Old stage Rd.
(Sec. 34) to rezone 15 acres from A-1 Ex.
to a-2(8) creating a parcel in order to con-
struct a FM radio tower.
Dawn George, Clerk
Published May 22, 2014
WNAXLP
* * *
TOWN OF RUTLAND
ADVERTISEMENT FOR
SEALCOATING (CHIP
SEALING) BIDS
PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that the
Town of Rutland is seeking bids for 2014
sealcoating (chip sealing) of several
Town roads as identifed below.
All bids shall be marked Seal Coat-
ing Quote, and submitted to the Town
Clerk, whose offces are located at 4177
Old Stage Road, Brooklyn, WI 53521 up
to and including 5:00 p.m. on June 2,
2014. Bids will be opened at _7:00_ p.m.
on June 3, 2014 at the town hall which is
located at 785 Center Rd. Contracts will
be awarded on the same night. The Town
of Rutland Boardreserves the right to re-
ject any/or all bids and to select the low-
est responsible bidder.
1. Project Description
The attached map shows the roads
proposed to be seal coated (chip sealed).
The Town may choose to do only the
highest priority roads, depending on
cost and budget considerations. Bidders
may wish to arrange a road inspection
trip with the Town s patrolmen to better
understand individual project needs and
to prepare a more accurate quote. Lead
Patrolman Nels Wethal may be reached
at 577-5691.
The possible candidates for 2014
seal coating are:
1. Biglow Road 5235x22.
2. Old Stone Rd Oak Ridge Rd to
Old Stage 7350x22
3. West Rutland Rd. 5855x22
4. Oak Ridge (north end) 2175x18
2. specifcations:
* Based on use of 3/8 aggregate
* length and width of each road pro-
posed
* estimated gallons of oil proposed
to be used and cost per gallon of oil to be
applied (gal./sq. yd)
* estimated number of tons of stone
to be used and the cost per ton of stone
* all quotes to include power broom-
ing prior to application of the seal coat
3. The award will be based on
* the proposed cost
* the proposed materials to be used,
* the references submitted and
* the warranties provided.
The Town Board will determine
which proposal is deemed to be in the
best interests of the Town.
The Town reserves the right to reject
any or all bids.
The successful bidder, upon notif-
cation, must provide the Town with
* a Certifcate of insurance naming
the Town as an additional insured.
* a statement holding the Town
harmless from any litigation or claims
resulting from the execution of this bid.
4. Scheduling
The Town wishes to have this work
completed during the 2014 road work
season, meaning done prior to Septem-
ber 1. 2014.
Attach a proposed time schedule
showing how soon the work can be
started after bid acceptance, and how
many days or weeks it will take before
completion.
5. Payment
Payment to the contractor will be
made within 30 days of the completion of
the seal coating and an approved inspec-
tion by the Town.
Dawn George, Clerk
Published May 22, 2014
WNAXLP
14
May 22, 2014 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
143 NOTICES
WCAN (Wisconsin Community Ad Net-
work) and/or the member publications
review ads to the best of their abil-
ity. Unfortunately, many unscrupulous
people are ready to take your money!
PLEASE BE CAREFUL ANSWERING
ANY AD THAT SOUNDS TOO GOOD
TO BE TRUE! For more information, or to
file a complaint regarding an ad, please
contact The Department of Trade, Agri-
culture & Consumer Protection 1-800-
422-7128 (wcan)
163 TRAINING SCHOOLS
DENTAL ASSISTANT Be one in just 10
Saturdays! WeekendDentalAssistant.
com Fan us on Facebook! Next class
begins 9/6/2014. Call 920-730-1112
Appleton (Reg. WI EAB) (wcan)
320 AIRCRAFT PARTS & SERVICE
AIRCRAFT HANGER at Baraboo/Dells
Airport. DLL,
Post-war, Quonset-style T-hanger.
New paint, some remodeling, heated.
$10,900/OBO. Everett 608-356-5324
340 AUTOS
DONATE YOUR CAR, BOAT or Motor-
cycle to Rawhide. Donate before Decem-
ber 31st for a tax deduction and help a
life in your local wisconsin community.
888-653-2729 (wcan)
342 BOATS & ACCESSORIES
1982 MARINER 30hp Long shaft, electric
start out board motor. Runs fine. Stough-
ton- 608-873-5906. $200
$2,000,000 LIQUIDATION @ Boat
World. Fininacing Available on over 700
new and used Pontoons, Fishing Boats,
Deck Boats, Ski-Boats, Bass & Walleye
Boats, Cuddys, Cruisers up to 35 Feet
& Outboards @ the Guaranteed Best
Prices! Crownline, Axis, Malibu, Triton,
Alumacraft, Mirrorcraft, Misty Harbor
& Crest Pontoons. American Marine &
Motorsports Super Center, Schawano.
Where Dreams come true. 866-955-2628
www.americanmarina.com (wcan)
SHOREMASTER DOCK & LIFT
Headquarters. New & Used. We do it
all.Delivery/Assembly/Install/Removal
American Marine & Motorsports,
Schawano = Save
866-955-2628 (wcan)
355 RECREATIONAL VEHICLES
ATVS SCOOTERS & Go-Karts. Youth
ATV's & Scooters (80mpg) @ $49/mo.
Sport & 4x4 Atv's @ $69/mo. Ameri-
can Marine & Motorsports, Schawano
=Save= 866-955-2628 www.american-
marina.com (wcan)
360 TRAILERS
TRAILERS @ LIQUIDATION Pricing.
Boat, ATV, Sled or Pontoons. 2 or 4
Place/Open or Enclosed. American
Marine, Shawano 866-955-2628 www.
americanmarina.com (wcan)
402 HELP WANTED, GENERAL
APARTMENT COMMUNITY in
Verona has two positions:
Grounds Keeper-Assistant
Maintenance. Full time. Landscaping
maintenance, light building
maintenance, painting and cleaning.
Leasing Agent: Flexible part time.
Will handle all aspects of leasing
apartments. Experience in sales or
hospitality is helpful. Strong customer
service a must. Please call
608-845-7255.

FOUR WINDS Manor, Inc., Verona,
is now hiring dedicated caregivers.
If you share our committment to a
positive attitude, respect for residents,
and are a team player who enjoys
working with the elderly please
consider joining us. We have various
shifts and positions available. A part
time housekeeper from 8am-2pm
in our assisted living facility. A full
time RN for the NOC shift. Full time
PM and NOC shift CNA's for our 60
bed skilled facility. A full time NOC
Resident Assistant for our CBRF and
part time PM shift. These positions
include every other weekend and
holidays with shift differential for
PM, NOC and weekends. Excellent
benefits with full time hours including
health, dental, PTO, flex spending
and 401K. Applications available at
www.fourwindsmanor.com or
303 S Jefferson St.
MECHANIC WANTED Part time to
full time. Flexible Hours. Call or text
608-576-5607(corrected#)
CLASSIFIED AD DEADLINE IS Noon
Friday for The Great Dane and Noon
Monday for the Oregon Observer unless
changed because of holiday work sched-
ules. Call now to place your ad, 873-6671
or 835-6677.
CLASSIFIEDS, 873-6671 or 835-6677. It
pays to read the fine print.
PART-TIME CARE SPECIALISTS ~
ALL SHIFTS.
Sienna Crest Assisted Living, Inc.
is looking for dedicated and caring
individuals to join our team of
compassionate care staff. We offer
competitive wages designed to
attract and retain qualified individuals.
Training provided. Preferred
candidate will have some assisted
living experience. Applicants may
download an application at www.
siennacrest.com or stop by to pick
one up.
Completed applications should be
returned to the Manager at your
choice location:
Sienna Crest, Attn:
Lois Gilbert, 981 Park St, Oregon, WI
53575 608-835-7781 or
Sienna Meadows, Attn:
Chris Kiesz, 989 Park St.,
Oregon, WI 53575
608-835-0000 EOE

SKI AND Furniture Service Person.
We are now accepting applications
for a part time and full time service
position working in our warehouse in
summer and our ski shop in winter.
This is an entry level position which
includes: unloading shipments,
assembling furniture, assisting on
deliveries, along with ski tuning and
repairs. Individual should have some
downhill skiing experience and a good
driving record. Chalet is a fun and
friendly place to work and we have
great appreciation for our employees
and customers. These positions are
year round jobs with flexible shifts on
weekdays and weekends. We offer
a generous starting salary with paid
training, free skiing at local hills, a
clean non-smoking work environment
and opportunities for advancement.
Apply in person at: Chalet Ski & Patio
5252 Verona Rd, Madison, Wl 53711
608-273-8263

SUMMER HELP 18 Years old+. Vehicle
needed. 40 HRS/Week. Some week-
end and holidays required. Moderate to
heavy lifting. Dependability a must. $11-
12.50 pr/hr. Apply: Nantucket Apts. 3141
Stratton Way, Madison. 608-848-3070
TINA'S HOME CLEANING
Hiring personnel for residential
cleaning position. Days only. Become
a part of our growing Team!
Call 608-835-0339
tinashomecleaning@gmail.com
TNT FIREWORKS IS looking for tent
operators. Make $1500-$3K in 8-10
days. No upfront money. Small credit
inquiry required. Call Matthew at
715-797-6885
WANTED:
Part-Time Teacher to Tutor
Students at Various Grade Levels.
Please Call Norland Learning Center
608-497-1299
423 WORK WANTED
COMPUTER REPAIR in your home.
Worried about your XPMachine? I will fix
it so you are safe, clean and get speed
back. Back up service available. $65/hr.
25+ years experience.
Raoul 608-698-1350
$10 off seniors and veterans.
CLASSIFIEDS, 873-6671 or 835-6677. It
pays to read the fine print.
440 HOTEL, FOOD & BEVERAGE
NOW HIRING Dishwasher/prep. Salary
based on experience.. Apply in person
between 8:30am and 11am Tuesday-
Friday. 176 E Main, Stoughton
449 DRIVER, SHIPPING
& WAREHOUSING
CLASS A NEW NEW NEW We offer?
True Regional! Midwest-South only! NO,
NO, NO EAST or WEST COAST! Dry
Van No Touch Pay based experience/
safety Minimum starting .40 TRANSI-
TION BONUS Do you have at least one
year. Apply or call today! www.transcorr.
com 1-888-446-4642
LOOKING FOR Experienced CDL semi-
driver. Our business has expanded. We
are adding new equipment. Must be
professional, courteous and have clean
MVR. Runs from Madison area to Ari-
zona and S. California. No touch freight,
paid mileage and insurance. Serious
inquries only. 608-516-9697
OTR DRIVERS WANTED
Above Average Mileage Pay including
Performance and Safety BONUSES!
Health/Dental/Vision/HSA/Matching
401K/Vacation pay and Holiday Pay.
Avg 2500-3500 miles/week 100% No
Touch 12 mo. CDL/A Exp Preferred
888-545-9351 ext 13 Jackson, WI www.
doublejtransprot.com (wcan)
ROUTE DRIVER Merchandiser
Grocery store experience helpful.
Contact Darrell 608-514-4148
452 GENERAL
OFFICE CLEANING in Stoughton M-F.
4 hours/night. Visit our website: www.
capitalcityclean.com Or call our office:
831-8850.
453 VOLUNTEER WANTED
PORCHLIGHT IS in need of volunteers
to help formerly homeless individuals
access quality food in our food pantry.
Each shift is 2 hours longs. Training and
orientation is provided. Volunteers should
be able to kneel, bend and lift up to 30lbs.
Up to 2 volunteers are needed to lead an
independent living resident low intensity,
range of motion chair-based excersize
at Oakwood Village University Woods
Retirement Community. Leaders are
needed weekly on Monday,Wednesday
and Friday mornings. Previous excersize
group leadership experience is beneficial
but volunteer leaders will receive train-
ing. Untied Way 2-1-1 is seeking new
volunteers to become Information and
Referral Specialists. If you are looking
for an opportunity to learn about com-
munity resources and would like to assist
people in finding ways to get and give
help, United Way 2-1-1 may be the palce
for you! Our volunteers staff our tele-
phone lines, answering questions about
resources available in the service area.
Call the Volunteer Center at 608-246-
4380 or visit www.volunteeryourtime.org
for more information or to learn about
other volunteer opportunities.
516 CLEANING SERVICES
SUNSHINE HOUSE CLEANING LLC
Since 1982 Detailed cleaning service.
Owner Operated. Weekly, bi-weekly, or
monthly. Call Jodi 608-835-2775
548 HOME IMPROVEMENT
A&B ENTERPRISES
Light Construction/Remodeling
No job too small
608-835-7791
CLASSIFIED AD DEADLINE IS NOON
Monday FOR THE Oregon Observer
ALL THINGS BASEMENTY! Basement
Systems Inc. Call us for all your base-
ment needs! Waterproofing? Finishing?
Structural Repairs? Humidity and Mold
Control? Free Estimates! Call 888-929-
8307 (wcan)
ASPHALT SEAL COATING
Crack filling, striping.
No Job Too Small.
Call O&H: 608-845-3348 or
608-832-4818

DOUG'S HANDYMAN SERVICE
GUTTER CLEANING
"Honey Do List"
No job too small
608-845-8110
HALLINAN-PAINTING
WALLPAPERING
**Great-Spring-Rates**
35 + Years Professional
Interior/Exterior
Free-Estimates
References/Insured
Arthur Hallinan
608-455-3377
NIELSEN'S
Home Improvements
Repairs, LLC
Kitchens/Bathrooms
Wood & Tile Flooring
Decks/Clean Eaves
*Free Estimates* Insured*
*Senior Discounts*
Home 608-873-8716
Cell 608-576-7126
e-mail zipnputts@sbcglobal.net

TOMAS PAINTING
Professional, Interior,
Exterior, Repairs.
Free Estimates. Insured.
608-873-6160
554 LANDSCAPING, LAWN,
TREE & GARDEN WORK
ARTS LAWNCARE- Mowing,
trimming, roto tilling, Garden
maintenance available.608-235-4389
JAYS LAWN MAINTENANCE
Spring Cleanup, Garden Roto tilling
Lawn mowing, Brick and Flagstone
walkways and patios, Hedge Trimming
608-728-2191
LAWN MOWER Blade Sharpening in
Stoughton. $5. per blade. Call 608-
235-4389
LAWN MOWING Residential and com-
mercial. 608-873-7038
ROTOTILLING, SKIDLOADER, Small
Dumptruck for Brooklyn, Oregon, Evans-
ville and surrounding areas. 608-513-
8572, 608-206-1548
SHREDDED TOPSOIL
Shredded Garden Mix
Shredded Bark
Decorative Stone
Pick-up or Delivered
Limerock Delivery
Ag Lime Spreading
O'BRIEN TRUCKING
5995 Cty D, Oregon, WI
608-835-7255
www.obrientrucking.com
SNOWMARE ENTERPRISES
Property Maintenance
Lawn Mowing
Bush Trimming
Powerwash Houses
Spring/Summer Clean-Up
Gutter Cleaning
608-219-1214
560 PROFESSIONAL SERVICES
10% AMERICANS have a drug or alco-
hol addiction. You can not fight it alone.
Start your recovery now. Most insurance
accepted. Call 800-849-0986 (wcan)
APPLIANCE REPAIR
We fix it no matter where
you bought it from!
800-624-0719 (wcan)
MY COMPUTER WORKS - Computer
Problems? Viruses, Spyware, Email,
Printer Issues, Bad Internet Connec-
tions - FIX IT NOW! Professional, US
based technicians. $25 off service. Call
for immediate help. 888-885-7944 (wcan)
ONE CALL DOES IT ALL! Fast and
Reliable Handyman Services. Call Ser-
viceLive and get referred to a pro today.
Call 800-604-2193 (wcan)
576 SPECIAL SERVICES
2EYEZ 4 Pawz Pet sitting and dog walk-
ing. 5 yrs experience. Call Tara 279-3330
RESEARCH SERVICES: We locate
Family, Former Friends, Neighbors
Classmates, Co-workers.
Joy 608-712-6286
586 TV, VCR &
ELECTRONICS REPAIR
DIRECTV 2 Year Savings Event. Over
140 channels only $29.99 a month. Only
Directv gives you 2 years of savings and
a FREE Genie upgrade! Call 800-320-
2429 (wcan)
DISH TV RETAILER. Starting at $19.99/
mo for 12 mos. High Speed Internet
starting at $14.95/month (where
available) Save! Ask about same day
installation! Call now -
800-374-3940 (WCAN)
REDUCE YOUR Cable Bill! Get whole-
home Satellite system installed at NO
COST and programming starting at
$19.99/mo. FREE HD/DVR Upgrade to
new callers, so call now. 888-544-0273
(wcan)
602 ANTIQUES & COLLECTIBLES
COLUMBUS ANTIQUE MALL
& CHRISTOPHER COLUMBUS
MUSEUM "Wisconsin's Largest
Antique Mall" Enter everyday
8am-4pm. 78,000 sq. ft.
200 Dealers in 400 Booths. Customer
Appreciation Week 20% discount
on all items $10 and over June 2-8.
Third floor furniture, locked cases.
Location:
239 Whitney St., Columbus,
WI 53925 920-623-1992 www.
columbusantiquemall.com

HOLIDAY FLEA MARKET MASSIVE!
May 24-25 Saturday-Sunday. Shawano
Fairgrounds 7am-4pm Zurko 715-526-
9769 (wcan)
636 COMPUTERS & ACCESSORIES
HP MEDIA CENTER Computer.
Flat screen, wired mouse, tower,
remote, keyboard. Mega Memory to use
for recording, streaming. New in 2005.
Make offer. 608-669-2243
638 CONSTRUCTION &
INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT
FARMI 3PT Logging Winch's,
Valby 3pt PTO Chippers, New 3pt
Rototillers, Loader Attachments and 3pt
Attachments, New Log Splitters. www.
threeriversforestry.com
(866) 638-7885 (wcan)
CLASSIFIED AD DEADLINE IS NOON
Monday FOR THE Oregon Observer
Dave Johnson
(608) 835-8195
We recommend septic
pumping every two years
B & R PUMPING
SERVICE LLC
U
N
3
3
6
1
9
5
U
N
3
4
7
7
4
2
Hardtland
Home Improvement, LLC
Roofng Siding Gutters
Shingle & Steel Roofng
Gutter Covers & Cleaning
(608) 845-9100
TomD@tds.net www.hardtland.net
Locally Owned Verona, WI
Serving U Since '72
U
N
3
5
1
7
0
7
We Can Remove Unsightly
Black Streaks From
Your Roof!
STOUGHTON
307 S Forrest
Retail or
Offce Space.
400 sq ft.
$299/month
utilities
included.
608-271-0101
Driveways
Floors
Patios
Sidewalks
Decorative Concrete
Phil Mountford 516-4130 (cell)
835-5129 (office)
Al Mittelstaedt 845-6960
U
N
3
3
7
5
1
5
PAR Concrete, Inc.
Increase Your sales opportunities
reach over 1.2 million households!
Advertise in our
Wisconsin Advertising Network System.
For information call 845-9559 or 873-6671.
AUCTION
300+ Guns at Auction: Saturday, May 31, Prairie du Chien
WI. Military, Ammo, reloading & related. Winchesters,
Colts, Rugers, Smiths & More! Kramer Auction (608-
326-8108) www.kramersales.com (CNOW)
FOR SALE- MISCELLANEOUS
SAWMILLS from only $4397.00- MAKE & SAVE
MONEY with your own bandmill- Cut lumber any
dimension. In stock ready to ship. FREE Info/DVD:
www.NorwoodSawmills.com 1-800-578-1363 Ext.300N
(CNOW)
HELP WANTED- SKILLED TRADES
HBI, Inc., UTILITY CONTRACTOR HAS Immediate
Opportunities In the Telephone Industry for: Aerial
Technicians, Cable Plow/Bore Operators, Foremen,
CDL Laborers. Training Offered. Travel Required for All
Positions. 920-664-6300. www.holtger.com EOE by AA
(CNOW)
HELP WANTED- TRUCK DRIVER
MARTEN TRANSPORT Regional Runs Available
CHOOSE the TOTAL PACKAGE: AUTOMATIC
DETENTION PAY AFTER 1 HR! Regular, Frequent
HOME TIME, TOP PAY, BENEFITS; Mthly BONUSES &
more! CDL-A, 6 mos. Exp. Reqd. EEOE/AAP 866-322-
4039 www.drive4marten.com (CNOW)
EXPERIENCED DRIVER OR RECENT GRAD? With
Swift, you can grow to be an award-winning Class A CDL
driver. We help you achieve Diamond Driver status with
the best support there is. As a Diamond Driver, you earn
additional pay on top of all the competitive incentives
we offer. The very best, choose Swift. Great Miles =
Great Pay Late-Model Equipment Available Regional
Opportunities Great Career Path Paid Vacation
Excellent Benefits Please Call: (866) 837-3507 (CNOW)
Knight Refrigerated CDL-A Truck Drivers Needed. Get
Paid Daily or Weekly. Consistent Miles. Pay Incentive &
Benefits! Become a Knight of the Road. EOE. 855-876-
6079. (CNOW)
INSTRUCTION, SCHOOLS
CETUSA seeks Coordinators to place/supervise
international high school students. Training, Stipend,
international travel opportunities. 1-888-238-8721;
Email resume: Joe@cetusa.ORG Also seeking host
families. (CNOW)
MISCELLANEOUS
This classified spot for sale! Advertise your product or
recruit an applicant in over 179 Wisconsin newspapers!
Only $300/week. Call this paper or 800-227-7636 www.
cnaads.com (CNOW)
Who wants to see a picture?
Visit
ungphotos.smugmug.com/oregonobserver
to share, download and order prints of
your favorite photos from
local community and sports events.
All orders will be mailed
directly to you!
May 22, 2014 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
15
648 FOOD & DRINK
ENJOY 100%GUARANTEED, delivered
to the door Omaha Steaks! SAVE 74%
plus 4 FREE burgers - The Family Value
Combo - ONLY $39.99. ORDER today.
800-831-1898 Use Code 49381GVT or
www.OmahaSteaks.com/sp25 (wcan)
SHARI'S BERRIES: ORDER mouthwa-
tering gifts! 100% satisfaction guaran-
teed. Fresh-dipped berries from $19.99
+ plus s/h. Save 20% on qualifying gifts
over $29! Call 800-975-3296 or visit
www.berries.com/happy (wcan)
652 GARAGE SALES
OREGON 655 Scott St., May 23, 8am-
5pm, May 24, 8am-1pm. Lots and Lots
of Jewelry too! Dishes, glasses, wreaths,
light fixture, fishing equipment, TV/Util-
ity Stand (Sauder) small table with drop
down sides (Sauder) cutlery, composter,
100% wool area rug (5'x8'6") and much
more!
STOUGHTON- 1309 Schefelker LN Sat-
urday, 5/24 7:30-1pm. Tools, Mortorized
Wheelchair, Stove, Fridge, Misc house-
hold and garden
STOUGHTON- 2759 Aspen Rd. 5/22
4pm-7pm, 5/23 7am-4pm, 5/24 7am-
1pm. Legos, camping/hiking gear, Bean-
ie Babies, DVDs, Desks and collectibles!
Something for everyone!
STOUGHTON- 2-ESTATES 1056
Moline St. Fri-Sat 5/23-5/24 8am-7pm
Unique dishes Vintage glassware/
pottery, 2-formal dining room sets,
Marble top dresser. Tools, collectible
misc, electronics, fishing, gardening.
See Craigslist

STOUGHTON- 319 E Washington St.
5/23 3pm-7pm, 5/24 7am-1pm. Unique
items for home and garage. Furniture,
antiques, household, tools and garden
art. Check it out!!
STOUGHTON- 3294 Brooklyn Dr. 5/24
8am-noon. Well cared for household
goods and furniture for sale. Some
antiques. Oak dining room table with 10
chairs and two leaves. Floral couch. '50s
table with four chairs. Glassware and
more! Call 608-333-1012
STOUGHTON- 812 Kriedeman 5/22-5/24
8am-? Antique sale. Radios, Signs, Beer,
Chairs, Tables, Railroad, Glassware,
Farm plus Home and yard items
664 LAWN & GARDEN
3'-12' EVERGREEN and Shade Trees.
Pick Up or Delivery! Planting available.
Detlor Tree Farms
715-335-4444 (wcan)
666 MEDICAL & HEALTH SUPPLIES
MEDICAL GUARDIAN Top-rated medi-
cal alarm and 24/7 monitoring. For a
limited time, get free equipment, no acti-
vation fees, no commitment, a 2nd water-
proof alert button for free and more. Only
$29.95 per month. 800-281-6138
SAFE STEP WALK-IN TUB Alert for
Seniors. Bathrooms falls can be fatal.
Approved by Arthritis Foundation. Thera-
peutic Jets. Less than 4 inch step-in.
Wide door. Anti-slip floors. American
made. Installation included. Call 888-
960-4522 for $750. off (wcan)
668 MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS
AMP: LINE 6 Spider IV 75 watt guitar
amp. Tons of built in effects, tuner, and
recording options. Like new, rarely used,
less than 2 years old. Asking $250 OBO.
call 608-575-5984
GUITAR: FENDER American made
Standard Stratocaster guitar. Tobacco
burst finish, mint condition. Includes
tremelo bar, straplocks, and custom fit-
ted Fender hard-shell case. Asking $950
OBO. Call 608-575-5984
676 PLANTS & FLOWERS
PROFLOWERS- ENJOY 33% Off our
spectacular bouquet with FREE choco-
lates. $19.99 plus s/h. Plus, as a special
bonus take 20% off all products over $29.
Go to www.proflowers.com/ActNow. or
call 800-315-9042 (wcan)
688 SPORTING GOODS
& RECREATIONAL
WE BUY Boats/RV/Pontoons/ATV's &
Motorcycles! "Cash Paid" now. Ameri-
can Marine & Motorsports Super Center,
Shawano 866-955-2628 www.american-
marina.com (wcan)
696 WANTED TO BUY
RECENT VETERAN looking for antique
firearms (military, percussion, flintlock,
lever or bolt action) Also, old military
items, Civil War to present (helmets,
knives, uniforms, medals, photos,
anything!)
Call Phil 920-248-6495
TOP PRICES Any Scrap Metal
Cars/Batteries/Farm Equipment
Free appliance pick up
Property clean out. Honest
Fully insured. U call/We haul.
608-444-5496
WANTED BARNS & Tobacco Sheds for
Salvage. Also buying barnboards and
tobacco laths. Leave message: Rudy
608-624-3990
WE BUY Junk Cars and Trucks.
We sell used parts.
Monday thru Friday 8am-5:30pm.
Newville Auto Salvage, 279 Hwy 59
Edgerton, 608-884-3114
WILL BUY Standing Timber/Wooded 40
acres or more. Northern WI or Upper MI.
Highest prices paid. Close in 30 days.
Send to: PO Box 544, Rhinelander, WI
54501 (wcan)
705 RENTALS
GREENWOOD APARTMENTS Apart-
ments for Seniors 55+, currently has 1
& 2 Bedroom Units available starting at
$695 per month, includes heat, water,
and sewer. 608-835-6717 Located at 139
Wolf St., Oregon, WI 53575
HAMILTON CONDO 1101 Hamilton St,
Stoughton. 1500 square ft of luxury. 2
bedroom, 2 decks, fireplace, washer/
dryer. Underground parking included.
$1350/mo. Available Now. 608-877-9388
ON LAKE KEGONSA Home to share
with single person 2nd floor Lakeside
bedroom $515 phone, internet &
cable & all utilities included Boat
house, Rec Building, great garden,
Water Falls. Large Pier. Laundry. No/
Smoking No/Pets. Quiet & great place
to live. Ideal for traveling salesman,
pilot or professional person.
815-238-1000
OREGON 1-BEDROOM Apartment.
2-Car garage. $650/month. No pets.
Jane 608-271-7071
OREGON 2-Bedroom in quiet well kept
building. Convenient location. Includes
all appliances, A/C, blinds, private park-
ing, laundry and storage. $200 Security
deposit. Cats OK. $665/month. 608-219-
6677
STOUGHTON- 2 bedroom upper Suit-
able for 2 adults. Available Now No Pets/
Smoking New carpets, laminate flooring
in kitchen, New stove, frig, dishwasher
furnished. Water divided with down stairs
tenant. Window A/C. Driveway with pri-
vate entrance. Share the large fenced in
back yard. room for garden. $750/mo +
utilities 608-873-3679.
STOUGHTON- 517 E Jefferson 2 bed-
room, Upper. $680 Utilities included Call
608-455-7100.
STOUGHTON AREA- 2 bdrm, 2 bath, all
appliances, fenced yard, 2 car attached
garage, 2 3 season porches, lots of stor-
age, in quiet rural subdivision between
Stoughton and Madison. $1,195 w/$500
sec dep. Please call 608-286-5282
STOUGHTON/KENILWORTH- QUIET
2-bedroom, balcony, water. Private
Owner. No Pets. $750/mo. Available
July/1 Handicap Accesible 608-212-0829
STOUGHTON- LARGE 2 bedroom 2
bath apartment in Castle Condominium
Building. Includes all appliances. Has
New Carpet and Fresh Paint. Call Tony
at 205-3030
STOUGHTON- UPPER apartment $650/
mo +utilites. 608-873-3432
720 APARTMENTS
OREGON-2 BDRM, 1 bath. Available
for spring/summer. Great central loca-
tion. On-site or in-unit laundry, patio,
dishwasher and A/C. $720-$730/month.
Call 255-7100 or www.stevebrownapts.
com/oregon
THEY SAY people dont read those little
ads, but YOU read this one, didnt you?
Call now to place your ad, 873-6671 or
835-6677.
ROSEWOOD APARTMENTS for Seniors
55+, has 1 & 2 bedroom units available
starting at $695 per month. Includes
heat, water and sewer. Professionally
managed. 608-877-9388 Located at 300
Silverado Drive, Stoughton, WI 53589
750 STORAGE SPACES FOR RENT
ALL SEASONS SELF STORAGE
10X10 10X15 10X20 10X30
Security Lights-24/7 access
BRAND NEW
OREGON/BROOKLYN
Credit Cards Accepted
CALL (608)444-2900
C.N.R. STORAGE
Located behind
Stoughton Garden Center
Convenient Dry Secure
Lighted with access 24/7
Bank Cards Accepted
Off North Hwy 51 on
Oak Opening Dr. behind
Stoughton Garden Center
Call: 608-509-8904
DEER POINT STORAGE
Convenient location behind
Stoughton Lumber.
Clean-Dry Units
24 HOUR LIGHTED ACCESS
5x10 thru 12x25
608-335-3337
FRENCHTOWN
SELF-STORAGE
Only 6 miles South of
Verona on Hwy PB.
Variety of sizes available now.
10x10=$50/month
10x15=$55/month
10x20=$70/month
10x25=$80/month
12x30=$105/month
Call 608-424-6530 or
1-888-878-4244
NORTH PARK STORAGE
10x10 through 10x40, plus
14x40 with 14' door for
RV & Boats.
Come & go as you please.
608-873-5088
RASCHEIN PROPERTY
STORAGE
6x10 thru 10x25
Market Street/Burr Oak Street
in Oregon
Call 608-206-2347
STORAGE MOTORHOMES
RV's, Autos, Boats
Climate Controlled Space
608-575-5173

UNION ROAD STORAGE
10x10 - 10x15
10x20 - 12x30
24 / 7 Access
Security Lights & Cameras
Credit Cards Accepted
608-835-0082
1128 Union Road
Oregon, WI
Located on the corner of
Union Road & Lincoln Road
801 OFFICE SPACE FOR RENT
2 UNITS in Brooklyn: 1050 sq ft.
Retail/Office/Pub/Sandwich, Ice Cream
or Coffee Shop with glass storefront,
energy efficient windows, private
restrooms, outdoor seating. Available
now- $895/month.
Office or Retail: 2700 sq ft currently
divided into 5 separate offices (one w/
gas fireplace), waterfall, break room,
2 restrooms, storage, and large open
areas. Available July 4th; $1490/month
608-712-6555
STOUGHTON 307 S Forrest Retail or
Office Space. 400 sq ft. $299/month utili-
ties included. 608-271-0101
STOUGHTON 316 S Gjertson St. Office/
Retail space. 1200 sq ft. $850/month,
utilities included. Will build to suit. Private
customer parking. 608-843-9125
VERONA- OFFICE/WAREHOUSE
1000 Sq Ft.$500 +Utilities.
608-575-2211 or
608-845-2052
965 HAY, STRAW & PASTURE
GRASS HAY, Big Squares and
Round Bales. Darris 608-938-4586
Monticello
970 HORSES
WALMERS TACK SHOP
16379 W. Milbrandt Road
Evansville, WI
608-882-5725
975 LIVESTOCK
SHEEP AND LAMBS: January Blue
Face rams and ewe lambs, feeder lambs,
ewes with lambs, yearling CVM ewe
lambs. Rainbow Fleece Farm. 608-527-
5311
CLASSIFIEDS, 873-6671 or 835-6677. It
pays to read the fine print.
980 MACHINERY & TOOLS
JD3020 GAS TRACTOR. Including 148
loader and 616 mower. $11,500
608-437-3555
990 FARM: SERVICE
& MERCHANDISE
RENT SKIDLOADERS
MINI-EXCAVATORS
TELE-HANDLER
and these attachments. Concrete
breaker, posthole auger, landscape rake,
concrete bucket, pallet forks, trencher,
rock hound, broom, teleboom, stump
grinder.
By the day, week, or month.
Carter & Gruenewald Co.
4417 Hwy 92
Brooklyn, WI, 608-455-2411
905 AUCTION SALE DATES
REAL ESTATE AUCTION June 7, 1pm at
5702 Murray Rd, Manawa, on a 52 acre
farm being sold in parcels. Visit www.
nolansales.com or call for maps. Nolan
Sales LLC, Maarion, WI 800-472-0290
Reg. Auctioneers #165 and #142
Part-time. Excellent Wages
20+ hours/wk. CDL bonus program
Paid training/testing. Signing bonus.
5501 Femrite Dr. Madison
Call Paul at 608-310-4870 or email
paulm@badgerbus.com
EOE

SCHOOL BUS DRIVERS
& PARATRANSIT
DRIVERS
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Attention College Students
and 2014 HS Grads!
Summer Work,
$17 base-appt, FT/PT
customer sales/service,
no exp nec, conditions apply,
all ages 17+, call now for
interview 608-662-2092
or apply online at
www.SummerWorkNow.com

Service Technician
Requirements are: Must have
clean driving record. Knowledge of plumbing
helpful. Background check. Pass a physical. Join a
great group of people! Must be able to work some nights
and weekends. Also looking for an ofce assistant. To
apply stop by our Mcfarland location or send resum to
4808 Ivywood Trl., Mcfarland, WI 53558
608-256-5189
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Screen Printer
Full-time start immediately. Seeking individual
with experience in all areas of screen printing
from screen making to actual printing.
Call for appointment
835-5791 or 276-6050
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** DRIVERS **
FULL TIME DRIVERS NEEDED FOR REGIONAL WORK
$1000 SIGN ON BONUS
$1000 RETENTION BONUS
$750 GUARANTEE WEEKLY
Tractor-trailer drivers needed for the Walgreens Private
Fleet Operation based in Windsor, WI. Drivers make hand
deliveries to Walgreens stores within a regional area (WI,
IL, IA, MN, ND, SD). Workweek is Tues ~ Sat. All drivers
must be willing & able to unload freight.
*Earn $21.90/hour (OT after 8 hours) or $0.4650/mile
* Full Benet Pkg includes Life, Dental, Disability & Health
Insurance with Prescription Card
*401k Pension Program with Company Contribution
*Paid Holidays & Vacation
*Home every day except for occasional layover
Drivers must be over 24 years old, have a min 18 months
T/T exp or 6 months T/T exp with a certicate from an from
an accredited driving school & meet all DOT requirements
Send resume to:
b.kriel@callcpc.com
or call CPC Logistics at 1-800-914-3755
Custodian Lead
Great employment opportunity with the UW-Madison
and to join a team focused on customer service.
As a Custodian lead worker with the UW-Madison,
responsibilities may include planning, scheduling
and monitoring assignments for crew; perform
oor care such as mopping, scrubbing, vacuuming,
stripping, waxing and polishing oors; clean xtures
and furniture; move and arrange furniture and equipment for special events;
check buildings for safety and security compliance to safeguard contents
and prevent vandalism. Check work, assist with training and instruction
on the proper cleaning methods and safe operation of all equipment.
Remove faulty equipment from service and make arrangements for repair,
order supplies and perform assigned custodial tasks. This position requires
a criminal background check. Starting pay is $12.069/hr. plus excellent
benets. Positions require the ability to drive a State Vehicle and work
evening, occasional weekend and/or holiday hours.
You must pre-register by June 4, 2014, online at http://bit.ly/
wimonthlyexams. Select Custodian Lead and WiscJobs will guide you
through the pre-registration process. If you provide e-mail address, you will
receive a conrmation message with location. If you do not have internet
access, you can call the pre-registration telephone line at 608-266-1536.
UN352420
CDL DRIVERS
WANTED
Health Insurance / Vacation / 401K
Call (608) 275-7627
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Equal Opportunity Employer
www.qpsemployment.com
GENERAL LABOR
ASSEMBLY
WAREHOUSE
PRODUCTION
QPS WANTS
TO FIND A GREAT JOB!
Madison
608-819-4000
Monroe
608-325-4690
www.qpsemployment.com
APPLY ONLINE TODAY AT:
GENERAL LABOR
ASSEMBLY - WAREHOUSE
PRODUCTION
Baraboo - Mauston
608-448-4411
608-647-8840
Richland Center - Sparta
16 - The Oregon Observer - May 22, 2014
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Kopkes Koupon
$
2 off
Any Hanging Basket
Valid 5/21/14-5/26/14
Limit one koupon per Kustomer per day.
Kopkes Koupon
Patio Planters or
Patio Tubs
$
2 off
Valid 5/21/14-5/26/14
Limit one koupon per Kustomer per day.
Kopkes Koupon
50

off
Perennials
Valid 5/21/14-5/26/14
Limit one koupon per Kustomer per day.
Limit 6. $3.00 total. Starting at $1.99.
Kopkes Koupon
Any Shepards Hook
$
2 off
Valid 5/21/14-5/26/14
Limit one koupon per Kustomer per day.
Memorial Day Planters
Come Early for Best Selection!
Quality Bloomers at Reasonable Prices
Visit Wisconsins Premier Grower of Quality Bedding Plants & Hanging Baskets
.
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CTY. M
Directions from Stoughton:
Take 138 toward Oregon. Go past Eugsters Farm Market, one
mile and turn right on Sunrise Rd. Go one more mile then turn left
on Town Line Rd. Continue on to Sand Hill Rd. (approximately
one mile) and turn right.
Directions from Fitchburg:
Take Fish Hatchery Road south to Netherwood Road. Turn left
and go into Oregon past Walgreens to a left on Sand Hill Road.
Directions from Verona:
Take Cty. M to Fish Hatchery Rd. Turn right and go to
Netherwood Road. Turn left at Netherwood Rd. into Oregon
past Walgreens to a left on Sand Hill Rd.
#
VISIT THE STOUGHTON AREA
FARMERS MARKET ON FRIDAY MORNINGS
IN FRONT OF DOLLAR GENERAL
RECYCLE YOUR POTS & CONTAINERS AT OUR FARM LOCATION.
SUPPORT LOCAL AGRICULTURE! SHOP OUTSIDE THE BOX STORE.
1828 Sandhill Rd.
Oregon, WI 53575
608-835-7569
Hours:
Mon-Fri 8:30 am-7:30 pm;
Sat 8:30 am-6 pm;
Sun 9 am-5 pm
Were open Monday, May 26
9 am to 5 pm
www.kopkesgreenhouse.com