Vol. 14, No. 10 | Thursday, May 22, 2014 www.thelighthousenews.

com
WHAT’S INSIDE
Photo by MC1 Charles Panter / nMCb 4
During a recent field training exercise (FTX) at Fort Hunter Liggett in Central California, CE3 Andrew Rexroad,
attached to Naval Mobile Construction Battalion (NMCB) 4, digs out a fighting position pit to ensure that if
the personnel on watch are attacked, they will be protected. NMCB 4 is preparing to deploy to the Pacific
theater later this year. Story, photos, Pages 16-17.
EARTH MOVER
If you want to take part in
the upcoming Admiral’s Cup
triathlon, register now at one
of the gyms at Naval Base Ven-
tura County.
“This event is advance regis-
tration only, and the cut-off day
Register now
for triathlon
Photo by andrea howry / lighthouse
Capt. Larry Vasquez, commanding officer of
Naval Base Ventura County (NBVC), gets his first
look at the remodeled clubhouse at NBVC Port
Hueneme’s Seabee Golf Course.
By Andrea Howry
Lighthouse
The clubhouse at the Seabee Golf Course,
Naval Base Ventura County (NBVC) Port
Hueneme has reopened after a 12-week re-
modeling project that visitors called “awe-
some”and said gives the base a much-need-
ed meeting space and a sense of commu-
nity.
Capt. Larry Vasquez, commanding officer
of NBVC, helped cut the ribbon Thursday
morning, May 15, then walked in and saw
for the first time how the renovation had
created an open, lodge-type feel to the facil-
ity.
The clubhouse restaurant, called the 19th
Hole Grill, has an expanded menu featuring
daily specials and Starbucks coffee.
“We wanted to bring something fresh and
newto the base,”explained Norman Verde-
prado, business activity manager for Navy
Region Southwest Dining Services.
Lt. Cmdr. Chris Casne of Naval Mobile
Construction Battalion 5 walked in shortly
Renovated clubhouse opens
It wins the coveted
Ney Award
See CLUBHOUSe, page 23
See TRIaTHLON, page 22
By Andrea Howry
Lighthouse
The galley at Naval Base Ven-
tura County (NBVC) Point
Mugu has been named the best
small shore galley in the U.S.
Navy.
Mugu galley
deemed best
See NeY, page 24
Kiare Moreno, the spouse of SW3
Patrick Moreno of Naval Mobile
Construction Battalion 5, hams it up
before walking into the photo booth
at the Military Spouse Appreciation
event Thursday, May 8. Page 4
A Seabee diver from Underwater
Construction Battalion (UCT) 2
guides a concrete pump during a
joint underwater concrete placement
with South Korean divers. Page 11

By Captain Larry Vasquez
NBVC Commanding Offcer
The LighThOuse is puBLished aT NO COsT TO The gOVerN-
meNT eVery OTher Thursday By The sTar, Of CamariLLO,
Ca. The sTar is a priVaTe firm iN NO way CONNeCTed wiTh
The deparTmeNT Of defeNse Or The uNiTed sTaTes NaVy,
uNder wriTTeN CONTraCT wiTh NaVaL Base VeNTura
COuNTy. The LighThOuse is The ONLy auThOrized CiViLiaN
eNTerprise Newspaper fOr memBers Of The u.s. NaVy,
CiViLiaN empLOyees, reTirees aNd Their famiLy memBers
iN The VeNTura COuNTy area. CONTeNTs Of The paper are
NOT NeCessariLy The OffiCiaL Views Of, NOr eNdOrsed By,
The u.s. gOVerNmeNT, aNd The deparTmeNT Of defeNse,
Or The deparTmeNT Of The NaVy aNd dO NOT impLy eN-
dOrsemeNT ThereOf. The appearaNCe Of adVerTisiNg iN
This puBLiCaTiON iNCLudiNg iNserTs aNd suppLemeNTs,
dOes NOT CONsTiTuTe eNdOrsemeNT Of The deparTmeNT
Of defeNse, The u.s. NaVy Or The sTar, Of The prOduCTs
Or serViCes adVerTised. eVeryThiNg adVerTised iN This
puBLiCaTiON shaLL Be made aVaiLaBLe fOr purChase, use
Or paTrONage wiThOuT regard TO raCe, COLOr, reLigiON,
sex, NaTiONaL OrigiN, age, mariTaL sTaTus, physiCaL
haNdiCap, pOLiTiCaL affiLiaTiON, Or aNy OTher NON-meriT
faCTOr Of The purChaser, use, Or paTrON. if a ViOLaTiON
Or rejeCTiON Of This equaL OppOrTuNiTy pOLiCy By aN ad-
VerTiser is CONfirmed, The puBLisher shaLL refuse TO
priNT adVerTisiNg frOm ThaT sOurCe uNTiL The ViOLaTiON
is COrreCTed. ediTOriaL CONTeNT is ediTed, prepared
aNd prOVided TO The puBLisher By The LOCaL iNsTaLLa-
TiON puBLiC affairs OffiCes uNder The auspiCes Of The
NaVaL Base VeNTura COuNTy puBLiC affairs OffiCe.
COmmaNdi Ng Offi Cer
Capt. LaRRY VaSQUEZ
Chi ef sTaff Offi Cer
Capt. SCott LoESChkE
COmmaNd masTer Chi ef
CMDCM pERCY tRENt
puBLi C affai rs Offi Cer
kIMBERLY GEaRhaRt
Li ghThOuse edi TOr
aNDREa howRY
lighthouse@navy.mil
805-989-5281
fi Nd us aT:
facebook.com/
NavalBaseVenturaCounty
puBLi sher
MaRGIE CoChRaNE
adVerTi si Ng deparTmeNT
437-033
N aVa L B a s e V e N T u r a C O u N T y
please submit your questions or comments to Lighthouse editor andrea howry at lighthouse@navy.mil
800-221-sTar (7827)
Ask the
Captain
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Question: Why aren’t the single-family homes at
Catalina Heights housing reserved for E7 and above
anymore? I believe this policy is contrary to the intent
behind the Navy’s fraternization policy, and it also
seems unfair that an E8, E9, O4 or O5 with a $2,500
to $3,000 BAH could be assigned a townhouse while
an E4 with an $1,800 BAH could be assigned a single-
family home. Thank you for your consideration.
Answer: Catalina Heights, managed by Lincoln
Military Housing as part of a public-private venture
(PPV), has always been an open community, accom-
modating all ranks of service members throughout
family housing in any home that is available. Homes
are filled as per Navy wait list policies and with
respect to the Navy/PPV operating agreement and
management plan.
Our PPV neighborhoods stay above 95 percent
capacity these days, and as we continue to grow — we
are set to gain 700 to 900 personnel over the next
seven years — this will continue to be the case. Hold-
ing single family homes open based on rank, rather
than filling homes with those who qualify as space is
available, is not feasible or recommended in such a
high-demand environment. It’s not how we take care of
our Sailors.
As for the Navy’s fraternization policy, living in
a neighborhood with Sailors junior to you does not
constitute fraternization. Fraternization is inappropri-
ate behavior and relationships between you and junior
Sailors; your own actions are what are judged, not
your street address. We are all part of the Navy family,
and living side-by-side helps remind us of that.
Do you have questions or suggestions? You can
submit them via this forum at lighthouse@navy.mil,
online using the CO’s Suggestion Box at http://cnic.
navy.mil/ventura/index.htm or at www.Facebook.com/
NavalBaseVenturaCounty. You can also follow NBVC
on Twitter at www.twitter.com/NBVCCalifornia and
keep up on the latest news and events.
Why can’t Catalina Heights single-family homes be allocated according to rank?w
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CommunityCalendar
TEEN JOB FAIR: 4:30
to 6:30 p.m., Hueneme
Youth Center. Job
opportunities in Child
and Youth Programs for 16- to
18-year-old dependents of active
duty and Department of Defense
civilians. Info: 805-982-4218.
23
FUNDRAISER: Jake’s
Wayback Burgers in
NEX Food Court will
donate 20 percent
of proceeds to NMCB 5’s Family
Readiness Group all day May 30
and 31. Must show flier that’s
available at restaurant. For more
information email NMCB5FRG@
gmail.com.
30
May
mUgU gAS STATION
clOSED: 7 a.m. to 5
p.m. for containment
testing.
29
lUNcHEON: Ventura
County Chapter of
Military Officers
of America, 11:30
a.m., Bard Mansion, NBVC Port
Hueneme. Speaker is Capt. Larry
Vasquez, base commanding
officer. Tickets $13 at the door.
Information: David Faul, 805-484-
3864.
5
cITIZENSHIP AND
ImmIgRATION
OUTREAcH: 10
a.m. to 12:30 p.m.,
second floor, Bldg. 1180, Region
Legal Service Office, NBVC Port
Hueneme. Sign-up required. Info:
805-982-4548.
19
June
PHOTO By cHUck kIRmAN / cOURTESy
VENTURA cOUNTy STAR
OS2 Bryon Simpson, left, of Range
Surveillance, and SW1 Jesse Hamblin,
a Seabee diver with the Ocean Facilities
Department of NAVFAC EXWC, celebrate
Naval Base Ventura County’s victory in the
tug-of-war competition.
Naval Base Ventura County (NBVC)
started out the 2014 Ventura Corporate
Games in first place in its division.
It never budged.
The base won the tug-of-war on May
10, the last day of the six-week competi-
tion, capping its first-place finish. Amgen,
which at one point had been three points
behind the base, closed in third place, with
the County of Ventura coming in sec-
ond.
NBVCplaced in 16 of the 23 Corporate
Games events, said Robert Bonner, who
has organized the base’s involvement in
the event for the last several years. Bonner
is an engineer with Naval Facilities Engi-
neering and Expeditionary Warfare Cen-
ter (NAVFAC EXWC).
The final tally was seven first-place gold
medals, five second-place silver medals
and four third-place bronze medals.
Bonner posted photos of the events to
https://www.facebook.com/pages/NBVC-
Corporate-Games/729146580451819.
NBVC wins
Corporate
Games 2014
PHOTO By cHUck kIRmAN / cOURTESy VENTURA cOUNTy STAR
CMC Elisia Correa, a Seabee diver and lead chief petty officer in the Ocean Facilities
Department of Naval Facilities Engineering and Expeditionary Warfare Center (EXWC), and
Lt. Cmdr. Daniel Wall of EXWC compete for Naval Base Ventura County in the tug-of-war
competition on the last day of the Corporate Games Saturday, May 10, at Harbor Cove
Beach in Ventura. NBVC won its division thanks to the outcome of the tug-of-war.
It all comes down to tug-of-war on last day of 6-week countywide competition
By Andrea Howry
Lighthouse
Charles Peters’ life was turned around
by a beautiful Beagle named Bailey.
In the depths of depression after his wife
of 62 years passed away last year, Peters,
at his daughter’s urging, went to the ani-
mal control shelter in Camarillo to look
for a companion.
But it was Bailey who chose the 86-year-
old Navy retiree — not the other way
around.
“She came right up to me and stayed
right by me,” Peters recalls. “I told my
daughter, ‘Mother’s still with us and look-
ing out for us.’”
So last month, when Bailey — spotting
some squirrels or birds or whatever it was
that caught her fancy — broke free from
her harness and took off, Peters was dev-
astated.
“We were down by 20th and Beach
Road,” recalled Peters, who enjoys bring-
ing Bailey to Naval Base Ventura County,
Point Mugu, where he finds it quieter and
safer than his Oxnard neighborhood. “She
was gone like a lightning bolt, and I went
to pieces. I had a total meltdown.”
Not knowing what else to do, he made
his way to the fire station.
Base personnel reunite best friends
PHOTO By ANDREA HOwRy / lIgHTHOUSE
Charles Peters, 86, holds tight to his therapy
dog, Bailey.
Man rescues dog, dog
rescues man, base helps
keep them together
See BASe, pAGe 23
RED cROSS BlOOD
DRIVE: 8 a.m. to 8:15
p.m., Bee Hive Gym,
NBVC Port Hueneme.
ID required. Info: 1-800-733-2767.
12

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By Andrea Howry
Lighthouse
Free makeovers and a fashion
showwere among the attractions
that drew more than 500 people
to the Military Spouse Apprecia-
tion event Thursday, May 8, at
the Bee Hive Gym at Naval Base
Ventura County (NBVC) Port
Hueneme.
Spouses, many with children in
tow, had their hair and makeup
done and took advantage of a
free photo booth during the
three-hour event put on by the
Fleet & Family Support Center.
A line had begun forming be-
fore the doors opened at 10
a.m.
“I came last year and it was
pretty fun,” Rebekah Sandridge
said as a stylist from Alejandro
Salon in Ventura curled her hair.
Sandridge’s spouse is Utilities-
man 3rd Class David Sandridge
with Naval Mobile Construction
Battalion (NMCB) 3.
A fashion show halfway
through the event featured spous-
es and base workers modeling
clothes from the Navy Ex-
change.
Free food was served.
Builder 2nd Class Nathan Dar-
nell of NMCB4 accompanied his
wife, Callie, and the two left with
a new coffeemaker, one of 45
prizes given away.
Callie said she was still making
newfriends after arriving on base
in September. She takes her 16-
month-old son, Henry, to a play
groupsponsoredby her husband’s
battalion, and that has helped her
meet more people.
Making new friends, finding a
new job — basically picking up
and starting over again every few
years —it’s all part of the reason
the FFSC put on the event, ex-
plained Corey Kendrick, the om-
budsman coordinator for FFSC
and one of the event organiz-
ers.
Amilitary spouse herself —her
husband is Chief Aviation Elec-
tronics Technician Mickey Ken-
drick with Carrier Airborne
Early Warning Squadron (VAW)
116 — Kendrick remembers an
especially painful move to Nor-
folk, Va.
“We were going to be there for
only eight months, and I knew
it,” she recalls. “It was hard to
meet people when you knew you
were going to be gone soon. Find-
ing work was hard. And he was
gone 50 percent of the time.”
Military Spouse Appreciation
events are designed to honor the
people who have to cope with is-
sues like this, she said.
“Isolation, being separated
from family, finding volunteer
work to pull you out of the house
— these are all challenges,” she
said. “We know military spous-
es face other unique challenges
as well, and that’s why we want
to take a moment to thank
them.”
Spotlight shines on spouses at annual appreciation event
Photos by AndreA howry / Lighthouse
Carlotta Pope, the spouse of CECN Sean Pope of Naval Mobile Construction Battalion 4, has moisturizer
applied to her face by Melodie Mendoza, the Estee Lauder counter manager at the Navy Exchange, Naval
Base Ventura County (NBVC) Port Hueneme, during a Military Spouse Appreciation event Thursday, May 8, in
the Bee Hive Gym at NBVC Port Hueneme.
Kasia Robinson, whose spouse, Michael, is taking classes at the Naval
Construction Training Center at Naval Base Ventura County (NBVC)
Port Hueneme, gets her hair curled by Becca Yates of Alejandro Salon
in Ventura as 4-month-old Michael Robinson III tags along. Free hair
stylings and five-minute makeovers were among the amenities offered
to spouses during the annual event.
Lian Fiore, a department manager
at the Navy Exchange at Naval
Base Ventura County (NBVC) Port
Hueneme, models fashions from
her store.
Rosie Flores of the Fleet & Family
Support Center at Naval Base
Ventura County (NBVC) Port
Hueneme models fashions from
the Navy Exchange at NBVC Port
Hueneme during the fashion show
segment of the Military Spouse
Appreciation event.
In less than a month, most local stu-
dents will be finishing their school year.
As exciting as summer is for students,
the significance of the end of the school
year should not be overlooked. With fi-
nals, graduations, parties and special field
trips, it is easy to forget some of the es-
sential items that should be considered at
this time of the year.
For many students, the end of the school
year means saying goodbye to friends and
teachers. Although some of those friends
may be able to reconnect the next school
year, some may not. Even if your family
is not moving this summer, your child’s
friend’s family might be. If your student
is transitioning to a higher level school
— moving from elementary school to
middle school, for example —some friends
may not be transitioning to the same
school. It is important to talk to your chil-
dren about goodbyes and ways to connect
with friends they may not see again in the
fall.
Parents can encourage their children to
talk about their friendships and saying
goodbye by asking them what they’ll re-
member about the school year and what
they’ll miss. If they’re old enough, ask
them to write about their school year.
Younger ones can talk about it and draw
pictures. It might also be nice to take pic-
tures of your child with some of his or her
favorite friends.
Another key person at your child’s
school who they will be saying goodbye
to is their teacher. Teachers spend every
day with the students and build strong
relationships with them. Unfortunately, in
these days of school budget cuts, there is
no guarantee that a child’s current teach-
er will be on campus next school year.
Make sure that your children are able to
say a proper goodbye to their teachers and
that they share their (and your) apprecia-
tion for a successful school year.
If your family happens to be one of the
many military families who will be moving
this summer, a few more tasks must be
considered. If you haven’t already done
so, please notify your child’s teacher and
school office that your child will not be
returning next school year. Schools staff
teachers according to the number of stu-
dents they expect to have the next school
year. It’s important that they knowif your
family will not returning.
Also, before the last day of school, make
sure you have the school’s contact infor-
mation and the name of the person that
should be contacted by the new school to
request your student’s records. You will
not be carrying your student’s file to the
next school. Once registered at the next
school, the new school will request files
from the previous school. It will be wise
to hold on to a copy of the final report
card and a copy of the most current In-
dividualized Education Plan (IEP) if your
student is receiving special education ser-
vices.
As the school year winds down, it is
important that parents with older children
check in to make sure their student is pro-
gressing to end the school year success-
fully. It is an unfortunate situation when
report cards arrive a few weeks into sum-
mer with disappointing grades. It is even
more disappointing when those poor
grades could have been prevented by com-
pleting missed assignments. Some teachers
will accept late work. Parents and students
should not be caught off guard, but in-
stead should be monitoring grades before
the school year ends.
Summer is exciting, and it is just around
the corner. Before we turn that corner, it’s
important to make sure all is taken care
of before leaving this school year be-
hind.
For any education-related information,
please visit http://navylifesw.com/ventura/
families/cyp/slo/.
— The Naval Base Ventura County school
liaison officer can be contacted at 805-989-
5211 or at NBVC_SLO@navy.mil for any K-12
education-related issues.
Things to do before another school year comes to an end
School
connection
with Monica
James

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EARN A C5U MBA
lnventura & Santa 8arbara Countles
805-250-03º5 http://ext.csuci.edu/mba
A busìness degree sìmpIy wasn't enough.
The MBA got to the nìtty-grìtty oí busìness,
what works and what doesn't."
Lindsay German, MBA '11 Alumna
TOGLTHLPWL GO FUPTHLP
"
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Seabee Chapel
Port Hueneme, Bldg. 1433
Phone: (805) 982-4358
Protestant
Sunday worship service: 9 a.m.
Choir rehearsal: Tuesday, 6:30 p.m.
Catholic Mass
Sunday: 11:15 a.m.
Confession by prior appt.: 10:45 a.m.
Wednesday: 11:30 a.m.
Confession by prior appt.: 11 a.m.
Women’s Bible Studies
Tuesday: 10 a.m., “Book of I Samuel.”
Wednesday: 9:30 a.m., “Esther: It’s
Tough Being a Woman.” Childcare
provided.
Men’s Bible Studies
Thursday: 11:30 a.m., “The Gospel of
Luke from the Inside Out.” Lunch
provided.
Soup Fellowship Study
Sunday: 5 p.m., “Foundations of
Apologetics.” Potluck.
Catholic Religious Education
Pre-K through high school
Tuesdays, 5:30 to 6:30 p.m.
Chaplains serving NBVC
Lt. Cmdr. Jeffrey Han
Command Chaplain
Lt. Lesa Welliver
Staff Chaplain
Father Antony Berchmanz
Catholic Priest
Volunteer opportunities
Casa Pacifica event
First shift 7:45 a.m. to noon, second
shift 11:45 a.m. to 3 p.m., May 29,
30, 31 setup, and June 2 breakdown,
CSU Channel Islands. Info: CM3
Angelica Kapsis, 516-655-8697.
Vacation Bible School
9 a.m. to noon, Monday through Friday,
July 14-18, Seabee Chapel. Info: (805)
982-4358.
Ventura County Stand Down
July 25-27. Donations needed for
homeless vets; drop off at chapel.
Info: SW1 Shawn Herr, 419-789-0293.
Worship schedule
I was blessed to receive an invite from
a friend and fellow baseball fan to hear
legendary Dodgers Coach Tommy Las-
orda speak at the Ronald Reagan Library
in Simi Valley.
As an added bonus, the library also
hosted a special exhibition of some of
the rarest items from the history of base-
ball. Among the many priceless items
there: Babe Ruth’s bat, a Hank Aaron
home run ball and other iconic artifacts
important to both our national pastime
as well as the history of our country.
It was an absolute pleasure to see old-
er men and women beaming like little
kids as they strolled down Memory Lane
to revisit ball players and teams from
their childhood. I also enjoyed seeing the
interaction between the younger and the
older generations. Though separated by
decades, they bonded through their com-
mon love of a favorite player or home
team.
One of the wisest men who ever lived
on the face of the Earth penned these
amazing words for living. It is from the
book Ecclesiastes, Chapter 3: “A time to
give birth and a time to die; A time to
plant and a time to uproot what is plant-
ed. A time to kill and a time to heal; A
time to tear down and a time to build up.
A time to weep and a time to laugh; A
time to mourn and a time to dance.”
There is an appropriate time and season
for everything in life. Because we serve
or support those who serve in uniform,
we’ve probably had more than our fair
share of tears and heartaches along the
way. There are many hidden sacrifices
military folks and their loved ones make
for our nation that most will never know
about. For that very reason alone we
should always make time to do something
that makes us giddy with laughter or joy
in our lives.
For me, that happens to be baseball.
For someone else, it may be taking your
kids to Comic-Con so they can meet their
childhood heroes like Captain America
or Superman in person. For the outdoors
type, you can always take your family on
a local deep sea fishing trip and catch
some nice fish to take home for supper.
Every time we deploy from our loved
ones, we in essence are putting our job
or mission ahead of them. There is a time
and a season for that. But when you are
back home from deployment, make sure
you put your family and loved ones right
back at the very top of your life’s prior-
ity list.
One of the ways you can show your
love and appreciation for them is by tak-
ing time to do something fun and joyous
for them. There is a time for work and
there is a time for play. May God bless
you and your loved ones greatly!
Hit one out of the park: Put family first
Chaplain’s
corner
with Lt. Cmdr.
JeffreyHan
Registration begins Monday, June
2, for Vacation Bible School.
Sporting a Western theme, this
year’s event will run 9 a.m. to noon
Monday through Friday, July 14-18,
at the Seabee Chapel, Naval Base Ven-
tura County (NBVC) Port Hueneme.
It’s for youngsters 5 to 12 years old;
older children and adults are invited
to volunteer to help run the pro-
gram.
“Put on yer boots, grab yer hat and
y’all get ready for this rip roarin’
roundup in the Wild West!” said Lt.
Lesa Welliver, staff chaplain.
Child care is being provided to vol-
unteers who have children too young
to attend the event.
Anyone interested in volunteering
is asked to call the Seabee Chapel at
982-4358.
Registration for Vacation Bible School begins June 2
Lectures, workshops and
the openings of a new gallery
and a new exhibit are among
the upcoming events planned
at the U.S. Navy Seabee Mu-
seum, located at Naval Base
Ventura County (NBVC) Port
Hueneme.
Here’s a look at what’s
coming up:
• Saturday, May 24: “The
Common Core: The Civil En-
gineer Corps Prior to World
War II” is the topic of a 1
p.m. talk by museum histo-
rian Dr. Frank Blazich. Look-
ing at the careers of five
Civil Engineering Corps of-
ficers, Blazich will discuss
how interpersonal relation-
ships and career opportuni-
ties shaped the development
of the corps over its first 100
years. It’s an accompanying
discussion for the museum’s
newest exhibit, “The Century
Before Seabees: The Bureau
of Yards and Docks, 1842-
1942.”
• Thursday, June 5: “Sea-
bees and Civil Engineer Corps
Officers: Overlooked Heroes
at the Invasion of Norman-
dy” is the topic of a 7 p.m.
presentation by museum di-
rector Dr. Lara Godbille.
• Friday, June 6: A new gal-
lery opens, titled “From Ci-
vilian to Seabee: Seabee
Training During World War
II” and “Seabees in the At-
lantic Theater in World War
II.”
• Saturday, July 19: A new
exhibit opens, titled “We Dive
the World Over: Underwater
Construction Teams.”
• Saturday, July 26: “Mili-
tary Uniforms and Keeping
the Seabee Can-Do Attitude”
is the topic of a 1 p.m. inter-
pretive workshop presented
by museum curator Kim
Crowell.
• Saturday, Sept. 13: “In-
troduction to Digital Preser-
vation” is the topic of a 1
p.m. archive workshop pre-
sented by museum archivist
Gina Nichols.
These events are free, as is
admission to the museum.
Base access is not required.
The museum is open from
9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday
through Saturday. It is closed
Sundays and federal holi-
days.
For more information, call
805-982-5167, or check the
web at www.usnavyseabeemu-
seum.com.
Seabee Museum plans talks, new exhibits, galleriesw
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By Lt. Theresa Donnelly
30th NCR
Nearly 40 medical, communi-
cation and support staff from
service commands across the
United States are joining the 30th
Naval Construction Regiment
(30th NCR), based at Naval Base
Ventura County, in support of
humanitarian mission Pacific
Partnership 2014 (PP14).
At the invitation of host na-
tions, PP14 unifies the efforts of
partner nation militaries, host na-
tion civilian agencies and non-
governmental organizations
(NGOs) to strengthen the collec-
tive ability of the international
community to operate as a team
in delivering foreign humanitar-
ian aid in times of natural disas-
ter or crisis.
In its ninth iteration, PP14 is
the largest annual multilateral
humanitarian assistance and di-
saster relief preparedness mission
conducted in Asia-Pacific re-
gion.
Seabees from 30th NCR left
recently for Indonesia and East
Timor to join up with teams of
medical and engineering person-
nel, veterinarians, logisticians,
military musicians, dental techni-
cians, electronic communication
specialists, U.S. Army civil affairs
representatives, partner nations
and NGOs in an effort to build
capacity, strengthen relationships,
improve interoperability and bet-
ter prepare teams to respond to
natural disasters or crisis.
“It is an incredible honor to
work with such a diverse group
of people,” said Capt. Rodney
Moore, commodore of 30th
NCR. “We’re all fortunate to em-
bark on a mission focused on
helping people in need while
working in close collaboration
with our partners. I am proud of
everyone we’re taking on this
project, and I look forward to
what work we’ll be able to accom-
plish as a joint, multinational
group.”
Moore said he was also looking
forward to “exchanging exper-
tise” with allies and partner na-
tions.
“Preparing and training in a
peacetime state gives us a unique
opportunity to leverage resourc-
es and work together to make
communities safer and increase
our ability to assist the local
populace should a natural disas-
ter of crisis arise,” Moore said.
In addition to leadership pro-
vided by 30th NCR, the team
includes a deputy phase com-
mander and military teams from
New Zealand and Australia.
Currently, an Indonesia ad-
vance team, with help from local
contractors and members of the
Indonesian National Armed
Forces, is making repairs to a
school roof, building a medical
facility and installing solar pumps
for two wells.
Building on the lessons learned
in prior missions, PP14 not only
enables new friendships and ce-
ments existing ones, but the ap-
proach this year is to work with
local providers toimprovetheir own
skills that they canthenimplement
locally. Thismoresustainable“train-
the-trainer” approach empowers
leaders to better serve the needs of
the people by giving them the
knowledge necessary to make a
positive difference intheir commu-
nities.
“I’ve never been on deployment
before, andthis is my first duty sta-
tion,” said Electronics Technician
Seaman Lyrissa Tuyin. “I volun-
teered for this mission because I
want to go overseas, see another
country and help other people. I
already doa lot of community ser-
vice volunteer work, so getting the
chancetodothis inanother country
is such a valuable opportunity.”
Pacific Partnership missions to
date have provided medical care to
approximately 250,000 patients,
veterinary services to more than
37,000animals, accomplishedmore
than 170 engineering projects, and
enabledcritical infrastructuredevel-
opment in Cambodia, Federated
States of Micronesia, Indonesia,
Kiribati, Palau, Papua NewGuin-
ea, Republic of the Philippines,
Republic of Marshall Islands, Sa-
moa, Solomon Islands, Timor-
Leste, Tonga, Vanuatu and Viet-
nam.
30th NCR taking part in annual humanitarian exercise
In Kupang, Indonesia, May 16, SW1 Bryan Long of Naval Mobile Construction Battalion 1
participates in a physical fitness session at a weekly boys and girls club meeting during
Pacific Partnership 2014 (PP14), the largest annual multilateral humanitarian assistance
and disaster relief preparedness mission conducted in the Asia-Pacific region.
In Rote, Indonesia, May 15, a member of the Indonesian National
Armed Forces teaches BU3 Charles Cummings words in Bahasa during
a break from work on a solar pump engineering project. Members of
the 30th Naval Construction Regiment are working with local partners
during Pacific Partnership 2014 (PP14).
Pacific Partnership
2014 brings nations
together to practice
disaster response
Photos by Lt. JuLianne hoLLand / u.s. navy
In Kupang, Indonesia, May 16, ITCS Charmain R. Mokiao signs school notebooks during
an advance party engagement with members of the 30th Naval Construction Regiment in
cooperation with local partners of Pacific Partnership 2014 (PP14).

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The Navy’s Voluntary
Education (VOLED) pro-
gram celebrates its 40th an-
niversarythis month.
Inrecognitionof thatmile-
stone, the Navy College at
Naval BaseVenturaCounty
(NBVC)heldanopenhouse
Thursday, May8, initshead-
quarters,knownastheWhite
House, at NBVCPort Hue-
neme.
“We consider it an honor
todowhat wedo,”saidBry-
an Burdick, education ser-
vicesspecialist andsitedirec-
tor for the Navy College at
NBVC.
Here are some statistics
about the VOLED pro-
gram:
•Since1974, theNavyTu-
itionAssistanceprogramhas
accounted for 4,951,730
courseenrollmentsandfund-
ed more than $1.4 billion to
help Sailors reach their edu-
cational goals.
• About 15 percent of
Navy personnel — 45,000
Sailors — are using the Tu-
ition Assistance program at
anygiventime.
• Since 1985, Sailors have
reportedearning132,130col-
legedegrees, and11,324Sail-
ors have earned their high
school/GEDdiploma.
• There are 33 Navy Col-
lege offices.
•Whenitlaunchedin1974,
the Navy Campus for
Achievement hadsevencol-
leges participating. In 1975,
thatnumbermorethandou-
bledto16. Today, 4,041edu-
cational institutions partici-
pate in a Navy VOLED
program.
• USS Midway (CV 41)
wasthefirstaircraftcarrierto
holdagraduationceremony.
The event occurred in 1975,
during which10 crewmem-
bers received their associate
degree fromChapman Col-
legethroughtheProgramfor
Afloat College Education.
By Andrea Howry
Lighthouse
It has taken 16 years — nearly half her
life —but Builder 2nd Class Marie Mataia
Tauai of Naval Construction Group
(NCG) 1 is finally getting her bachelor’s
degree.
On May 31, the Seabee’s family, friends
and mentors will celebrate at Duke’s Place
at Naval Base Ventura County (NBVC)
Port Hueneme, honoring a woman who
came to the United States from Western
Samoa in 1999, determined to go to col-
lege.
“I came for school — for college,” she
recalls. “And I tried, but I found out that
nothing is free over here.”
Today, at 35, Tauai has seven years of
military service under her belt. She’s been
deployed three times, including one 11-
month stint in Afghanistan, the longest
period when she wasn’t enrolled in a
class.
She also has a husband and a daughter
— and soon, a bachelor of science degree
in criminology from the University of La
Verne.
The degree wouldn’t have been possible,
she says, without the Navy College. She
knows because she’d tried.
Tauai estimates her degree cost $50,000
over the 16 years. The Navy’s Tuition As-
sistance programpaid $16,000 of that, and
the Navy College helped set her up in a
solid program that kept her on track. A
class or two at one community college, a
few more at another, some more at an on-
line school — all of that was replaced by
a focused curriculum leading to one goal:
a degree.
“Stories like hers make my job fulfill-
ing,” says Rochelle Goitia, an education
services specialist at the Navy College at
Naval Base Ventura County (NBVC) Port
Hueneme. “She faced so many challenges,
and her dreams were realized.”
Tauai is the eldest of eight siblings. She
didn’t learn English until the sixth grade
— British English — but she loved
school.
“When I came to the United States, it
was a real culture shock,” she recalls. “I
had a hard time writing papers. We’d be
assigned a five- or six-page paper, and I’d
go home, pour all my thoughts out in Sa-
moan, then wait two or three days and
start translating.
“I did that for a long time.”
Her first stop was Seattle, where he at-
tended community college. She took Eng-
Seabee earns her bachelor’s degree after 16-year effort
lishas a SecondLanguage classes andcrim-
inology. She alsoworkedfull-time for a cur-
rency exchange firm, which eventually of-
fered her a marketing position in
Philadelphia.
On the East Coast, she enrolled at the
University of Phoenix, located right across
the street fromwhere she workeddowntown.
She’d get off work at 4 p.m., cross the street
and go to class until 10 p.m.
In 2003, the company transferred her to
Atlanta, but shortlyafter she made the move,
she was laidoff. By then, she hadmet fellow
SamoanEsera Tauai, andthey marriedand
moved to Augusta. Marie was determined
tocontinue school, soin2007 she joinedthe
Navy, planning to stay for four years so she
could get the benefits of the G.I. Bill. She
came toNaval Base VenturaCountyin2008
as aSeabee withNaval Mobile Construction
Battalion (NMCB) 40, enrolled in the Uni-
versity of La Verne, then started deploying.
Okinawa, Japan; Afghanistan; Sasebo, Japan
— she stayed focused even through the
downtime, throughthe decommissioningof
NMCB 40, through the adoption of a
daughter and through a transfer to NCG
1.
“And here I am!”she says with pride.
More than100 people are expectedat the
May 31 celebration, including two siblings
who now live in the United States. Her
daughter, now 3, will be there, as will her
husband.
One special guest will be Dr. Michael
Webb, a University of La Verne professor
who taught three of her classes and whom
she considers a mentor. He’ll be speaking at
the celebration.
Alsoattendingwill be several womenfrom
a rehabilitation center where Tauai volun-
teers.
Tauai hopes her story will motivate other
Sailors to pursue a degree.
“It’s a challenge,” she said, “but I defi-
nitely recommend it.”
So after 16 years of classes, what are her
plans?
To start a 17th.
She’ll be taking online classes to pursue a
master’s degree incommunity organization,
planning and administration through the
University of SouthernCalifornia, focusing
on the reasons why young people get into
the juvenile justice system and what deter-
rence efforts work.
And she doesn’t plan to stop there. She
hopes toeventuallyearnadoctorate anduse
her educationtofight the humantrafficking
and drug abuse that plague her homeland.
Photo by AndreA howry / Lighthouse
BU2 Marie Tauai of Naval Construction Group 1 works with Rochelle Goitia, an education
services specialist at the Navy College, Naval Base Ventura County, Port Hueneme. Sixteen
years ago Tauai began taking classes toward a bachelor’s degree; she is finishing up this
month and will soon begin work on a master’s.
40 years of voluntary education in the Navy
Photo by AndreA howry /
Lighthouse
Bryan Burdick, education
services specialist and
site director of Navy
College at Naval Base
Ventura County (NBVC),
cuts a 40th anniversary
Navy College cake as
Rochelle Goitia, education
services specialist at the
Navy College, NBVC Port
Hueneme, looks on. The
Navy College held the open
house Thursday, May 8.
VCS1340705
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Despite temperatures in the 80s, about
30 runners and walkers took part in the
Spring Fling 5K Thursday, May 15, at
Naval Base Ventura County (NBVC) Port
Hueneme.
The free monthly lunchtime 3.1-mile run
put on by Morale, Welfare and Recreation
(MWR) included a special admonition by
Athletic Manager Kevin Ludwig for run-
ners to stay hydrated and slow down or
stop if they felt overheated.
Several minutes after the run began,
Ludwig drove the course to make sure no
one was falling victim to the heat.
Lt. Cmdr. Rob Allen, executive officer
of Navy Cargo Handling Battalion 14,
came in first with a time of 19 minutes, 37
seconds.
“It was a little warm,” he said as he
sipped water at the finish line.
The next lunchtime run is the June 19
June Gloom 5K at NBVC Point Mugu.
Registration starts at 11 a.m. and the run
starts at 11:30 a.m. at Family Beach.
80-degree day doesn’t stop 5K runners
Photos by AndreA howry / Lighthouse
Above, CWO4 Chris Lehner with the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory (NRL), left, helps
ND1 Aaron Scrimager, also of NRL, stay hydrated before the start of the Spring Fling 5K
Thursday, May 15, at Naval Base Ventura County (NBVC) Port Hueneme. Temperatures
were in the 80s during the lunchtime run. At left, runners take off after being admonished
to stay hydrated and to slow down or stop if they feel overheated. Lt. Cmdr. Rob Allen,
executive officer of Navy Cargo Handling Battalion 14, wearing bib number 245, would win
with a time of 19 minutes, 37 seconds.

Where planning
for life after the
military meets
¨I`m lciog Jcjlc,cJ
ocxt wcck."
©
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NavaI Base Ventura County 363 Whitehouse Way
(805) 816-1027
· lully accredited
· One-course-per-month format
· 28 campuses plus online programs
· Dedicated military and veterans affairs advisors
· Military tuition and scholarships
Learnmore at discover.nu.edu
APrivate Nonproft University Serving the Public Good"
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By MC1 John P. Curtis
NMCB 5
Naval Mobile Construction Battalion
(NMCB) 5 recently hosted Bernd Simon
to talk about his experiences as a survivor
of a concentration camp during World
War II.
National Holocaust Remembrance Day
was April 28, and more than 400 Seabees
filled the Bee Hive Gym at Naval Base
Ventura County (NBVC) Port Hueneme
that day to listen to Simon’s story and
message.
Legalman 1st Class Stacey Langford,
one of the organizers of the event, said
the battalion wanted to do something that
would have impact and also honor the
“remarkable man and what he had en-
dured.”
“We wanted to educate everyone about
what it was like during the Holocaust and
educate the members of the battalion
about what [Simon] went through during
the Holocaust and why we can’t let it hap-
pen again,” Langford said.
Simon, 93, was imprisoned at the
Dachau concentration camp in Germany
in the early 1940s. Simon said he was re-
leased after two years when his mother
provided forged documentation.
After his release, Simon escaped Nazi-
controlled Germany through Cuba and
came to the United States. He served in
the Army Air Corps, flying B-24 bombers
over Europe. After the war he went on
serving as a civilian, working in Army
intelligence as a Nazi hunter.
“He is a sweet, precious man,”said Con-
struction Electrician Constructionman
Lesly Herrerapelayo. “It was an honor to
speak to a Holocaust survivor and to learn
about those who have survived those
struggles from the past.”
After speaking to the crowd, Simon had
a final message before he saluted the crowd
of Seabees.
“It doesn’t matter what color your skin
or your religion, do right by everybody
and be fair to everyone,” said Simon.
“Love your country. It’s free.”
Holocaust survivor visits NMCB 5
Photos by MC1 John P. Curtis / nMCb 5
Bernd Simon answers a question from CECN Lesly Herrerapelayo of Naval Mobile
Construction Battalion (NMCB) 5 about his experiences as a Holocaust survivor in World
War II. Simon was invited to speak to the battalion April 28 in observation of National
Holocaust Remembrance Day.
EO3 Damion Canales of Naval Mobile
Construction Battalion 5 shakes the hand
of Bernd Simon near a display of Simon’s
history and life stories.w
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By CEC Terence Juergens
UCT 2
Fresh from the warm deep waters of
Guam, Seabee divers from Underwater
Construction Team (UCT) 2 arrived in
Chinhae, South Korea, last month to par-
ticipate in Exercise Foal Eagle 2014
(FE14).
Over a period of seven days, UCT2 and
South Korean Sea Salvage and Rescue
Unit (SSU) divers worked hand in hand
in support of harbor clearance and port
recovery scenarios, with emphasis on the
placement of underwater concrete.
UCT2’s knowledge of waterfront struc-
tures helped facilitate the first underwater
concrete placement in SSU history. From
the classroom to the field, both nations
worked long hours to complete construc-
tion of formwork and successfully place
more than 5 cubic meters of concrete un-
der water.
“The SSU divers are experts in salvage
—they dive the same rigs and use the same
dive manual as we do. What we’re trying
to do is provide them a taste of UCT ca-
pabilities,” said Construction Electrician
1st Class Daniel Luberto, the leading
petty officer (LPO) for Construction Div-
ing Detachment Charlie.
The SSU divers, he said, “have very
little underwater construction experience,
but their motivation to learn, and strong
work ethic helped us overcome many chal-
lenges to complete a successful training
evolution.”
Along with constructing training forms
to practice different techniques of under-
water concrete placement, UCT 2 devel-
oped a comprehensive training plan to
further the understanding of howconcrete
can be used to repair damaged sections
of piers.
Both teams worked together to use
wooden and steel formwork to encase a
steel pier pile in concrete to enhance struc-
tural integrity. Using a surface supplied
diving system and underwater hydraulic
tools, divers prepped the steel pile by
cleaning loose scale, rust and marine
growth. Once the pile was clean, the divers
took precise measurements to fabricate the
necessary forms.
“The biggest barrier with training was
language,” said Builder 2nd Class Joseph
Hophan, project supervisor. “But once we
got in the water and started working, ev-
erything fell into place and worked out
great. We were able to complete so much
in such a short time, and I couldn’t be
more happy how things unfolded.”
Once all formwork was complete and
lowered in the water, UCT 2 divers used
two topside forms to demonstrate the
proper procedures of howto place under-
water concrete.
“There’s a big difference to placing con-
crete on surface versus underwater,” said
Hophan. “The ability to rehearse and
show them topside was invaluable and
definitely set us up doing the same thing
underwater.”
While working in cold water with poor
visibility, safety was a main concern. UCT
divers instructed the SSU divers on the
proper use of personal protective equip-
ment while constructing forms.
The SSU divers “gained indispensible
insight of what the UCTs do on a daily
basis,” said Luberto. “They realized the
great importance of waterfront construc-
tion while using ingenuity and teamwork
to get the job done.”
UCT 2 teaches
concrete skills
to S. Koreans
Photos by Eo1 ManuEl tErrEro / uCt 2
Seabee divers from Underwater Construction Team (UCT) 2 and South Korean Navy divers conduct a joint underwater concrete placement
— a first for the South Koreans — as part of Exercise Foal Eagle 2014.
BU2 Joseph Hophan of Underwater Construction Team (UCT) 2 describes how to place
underwater formwork before conducting underwater concrete placement with South
Korean Navy divers.
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By Lt. j.g. Tim Steiner
VAW-117
The Wallbangers of Carrier Airborne
Early Warning Squadron (VAW) 117 ex-
ecuted a change of command May 1 in
Hangar 553 at Naval Base Ventura Coun-
ty (NBVC) Point Mugu.
Cmdr. Richard W. Carnicky relieved
Cmdr. William R. Reed as commanding
officer of the squadron. Carnicky becomes
the 32nd commander to take charge of
the Wallbangers.
From December 2012 until his change
of command, Reed led the Wallbangers
with the command philosophy of “Fam-
ily, Integrity, Excellence.” While in com-
mand, his Wallbangers completed a de-
ployment of more than eight months,
earning the Battle “E” Award as well as
Carrier Air Wing 11’s Golden Wrench
Award.
The Wallbangers were also honored
with the coveted Rear Adm. Frank Aker’s
award, given to the top carrier airborne
early warning squadron in the fleet.
Reed’s last words as the Wallbangers’
commanding officer centered on thanking
his family, the community and the squad-
ron. At the end of his speech, he passed
his charge to Carnicky: “When in doubt,
serve — serve the carrier strike group,
serve Carrier Air Wing 11, but most im-
portantly, serve the incredible men and
women of VAW-117.”
As the new commanding officer of the
Wallbangers, Carnicky addressed the
squadron, emphasizing “Family, Pride and
Professionalism.”
“We treat each other with dignity and
respect, compassion and tolerance,” he
said. “We celebrate our differences and
capitalize on those aspects which make
each one of us unique.”
He stressed the importance of striving
to be better each day.
“We show pride in our work, in our ac-
complishments, and in ourselves,”he said.
“What we do is important, and we mat-
ter.”
Carnicky welcomed the new executive
officer, Cmdr. Randy Cruz, to the Wall-
banger family and said he looked forward
to the work ahead.
The guest speaker for the ceremony was
Capt. Kevin Mannix, commanding officer
of Carrier Air Wing 11.
Change of command at VAW-117
Cmdr. William R. Reed addresses the Wallbangers one last time as their commander.
Photos by Lt. j.g. tim steiner / VAW-117
With guest speaker Capt. Kevin Mannix looking on, Cmdr. WilliamR. Reed, left, congratulates
Cmdr. Richard W. Carnicky on becoming the 32nd commanding officer of Carrier Airborne
Early Warning Squadron (VAW) 117.
In the shadow of an
E-2C aircraft, guests,
family and friends
are welcomed to
the Carrier Airborne
Early Warning
Squadron (VAW) 117
change of command
ceremony May 1 in
Hawkeye Country’s
cavernous hangar at
Naval Base Ventura
County (NBVC) Point
Mugu.w
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By Theresa Goldstrand
NAWCWD Public Affairs
Navy officers and identical
twin sisters Lt. Allie Cameron
and Lt. Jess Cameron were the
guest speakers at last month’s
Administrative Professionals’
Day luncheonat the BardMan-
sion, Naval Base Ventura
County (NBVC) Port Huen-
eme.
First to speak was Allie, who
is assigned to the Air Test and
Evaluation Squadron (VX) 30
“Bloodhounds,”where she is an
instructor pilot, aircraft com-
mander and mission com-
mander on the P-3 aircraft.
She was followed by Jess,
who is a weapons and tactics
instructor on the E-2C Hawk-
eye at NBVCPoint Mugu. Jess
instructs and trains all Hawk-
eye squadrons on the West
Coast and Japan.
Allie admitted that when she
took over collateral duties as
VX-30’s administrative division
officer and public affairs offi-
cer, she gained a new apprecia-
tion for those administrative
professionals who keep the
squadrons running.
“You have made our lives
easier, much more organized
and efficient, with the support
we’ve been provided through-
out our Navy careers,” Allie
said.
She then shared howshe and
her twin came to be naval of-
ficers. They were raised in a
non-military family in Middle-
boro, Mass. Their father was a
high school mathematics teach-
er and their mother taught high
school German and Latin.
Their older brother, Erik, was
their mentor and eventually
became a chemical engineer.
When they were in high
school, they said, their parents
encouraged them to look into
ROTC as they considered pro-
spective colleges.
“We were a little unsure
about committing to the ROTC
at first,” Allie said. “But then
we decided, why not? Why not
get out of our comfort zone
and challenge ourselves to be
more than we thought we could
be? We thought we’d give it a
try.
“Our parents always encour-
aged us to follow our interests.
They never told us we couldn’t
do something. I would regret
not trying and always wonder-
ing if I could have done it,
rather than attempting it and
realizing it didn’t work out.
“We both applied to flight
school and got in.”
The Cameron sisters gradu-
ated fromBoston University in
2007 with bachelor’s degrees in
biology. They were commis-
sioned as ensigns on USS Con-
stitution in Boston, the world’s
oldest commissioned naval ves-
sel afloat. Initial flight school
training began in Pensacola,
Fla., where they learned to fly
a Cessna 172 and Piper Toma-
hawk. That screening was fol-
lowed by aviation preflight
indoctrination.
Their paths veered after flight
school when Allie transferred
to Enid, Oklahoma, for pri-
mary flight training on the T-6
Texan II, a two-seater ejection
seat propeller aircraft. She then
completed advanced training
on the T-44 Pegasus in Corpus
Christi, Texas, earned her
“wings of gold” as a naval
aviator and was promoted to
the rank of lieutenant junior
grade.
Jess remained in Pensacola
for primary flight training in
the T-6 Texan II and took in-
termediate training in the T-1
Jayhawk. She completed ad-
vanced training in her fleet
aircraft, the E-2C Hawkeye,
with Carrier Airborne Early
Warning Squadron (VAW) 120
Fleet Replacement Squadron
at Naval Base Norfolk, Vir-
ginia. She earned her “wings
of gold”as a naval flight officer
and was promoted to the rank
of lieutenant junior grade.
The Camerons have been de-
ployed and stationed all over
the world. Jess was stationed at
Naval Air Facility Atsugi, Ja-
pan, and routinely flewaround
Mount Fuji and looked down
upon “Fujisan” the stratovol-
cano (12,389 feet) that she had
also climbed. She stood on top
of Mount Suribachi on Iwo To
for fellow officer promotions
and military re-enlistments.
Allie was deployed to Italy
and happened to be in Sicily
when Mount Etna, Europe’s
tallest active stratovolcano
(10,922 feet) blew up.
There are no statistics on
how many twins grow up to
become naval aviators. but as
identical twin sisters, the Cam-
erons are unique. They realized
they would always be a minor-
ity in a male-dominated field,
but that has not deterred them
from advancing and becoming
experts and leaders at a young
age. Allie has flown more than
1,200 hours in six different air-
craft and has collectively logged
more than 1,600 airborne
hours. Jess has flown more than
1,100 hours in the E-2CHawk-
eye and has logged more than
250 hours as mission com-
mander. At 28 years old, both
Camerons manage significant
responsibilities and roles in the
squadrons they support.
The twins are currently pur-
suing their master’s degrees in
global leadership through the
University of SanDiegoSchool
of Business Administration.
The April 24 luncheon was
hosted by the Naval Air War-
fare Center Weapons Division
(NAWCWD) Corporate Sup-
port Board, Point Mugu Chap-
ter.
Identical twin Navy officers share their story
Photo by theresa Goldstrand / naWCWd
Naval officers and identical twin sisters Lt. Allie Cameron and Lt. Jess Cameron share their experiences
with about 100 Naval Air Warfare Center Weapons Division employees at the 2014 Administrative
Professionals’ Day luncheon at the Bard Mansion.
Because of the Memorial Day holi-
day, the Navy-Marine Corps Relief
Society office in the Naval Base Ven-
tura County (NBVC) Port Hueneme
Welcome Center will be closed Monday,
May 26, and will have reduced hours
of 9 a.m. to noon Friday, May 23.
Regular office hours are 9 a.m. to 3
p.m. Monday through Friday.
NMCRS closes for
Memorial Day holiday
With only 31 players in the field, the
Naval Base Ventura County (NBVC)
Golf Championship event was held
Saturday, April 26, at the Seabee Golf
Course, NBVC Port Hueneme.
Severe wind with gusts up to 45 mph
took a toll on scores; nobody shot low-
er than 80.
The overall lowgross winner and Base
Champion for 2014 ended up being
John Amaki, who works in information
technology for Naval Surface Warfare
Center, Port Hueneme Division. Ama-
ki, who scored an 80, has played on base
for more than three decades and is an
eight-time winner of the Seabee Men’s
Club Championship.
The event was organized by Efren
Bautista of Morale, Welfare and Rec-
reation (MWR).
Wind plagues base
golf tournament
Photo Courtesy MWr
John Amaki shows the trophy he received
for winning the Naval Base Ventura County
Championship Golf Tournament Saturday,
April 26.
14
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By Theresa Goldstrand
NAWCWD Public Affairs
Naval Air Warfare Center Weapons Di-
vision (NAWCWD) teamed with Califor-
nia State University Channel Islands (CI)
in Camarillo to bring the Great Inventors
Programto Hueneme High School in Ox-
nard.
NAWCWDvolunteer Kimberly Schrock
supervised CI mentors at the high school
laboratory to teach Mathematics, Engi-
neering and Science Academy (MESA)
students during an eight-week period end-
ing May 2.
The students learned 3-D design and
printing in a hands-on, project-oriented
learning environment. The program was
designed in fall 2013, and the pilot pro-
gramwas implemented at Hueneme High
over the spring 2014 semester.
MESA students are sophomores who
have completed basic programming course
work.
CI’s Great Inventors 3-D printing pro-
gram was made available through a grant
from Achieving a Cooperative College
Education through Science, Technology,
Engineering and Mathematics (STEM)
Opportunities (ACCESO).
CI students developed two different
projects for the MESA students: One
group created a catapult, and the other
experimented with an egg drop capsule.
Dr. Cindy Wyels, a mathematics faculty
member who’s currently CI’s director of
Project ACCESO, and Sandra Birming-
ham, STEM pipeline outreach coordina-
tor, worked closely with Trish Gresham,
NAWCWD’s former education outreach
coordinator, to bring the Great Inventors
program to the school.
NAWCWD supports STEM activities
throughout Kern and Ventura counties
during the school year and actively recruits
the talents of NAWCWD employees and
Engineer and Scientist Development Pro-
gram (ESDP) volunteers to spend time
with youngsters to stimulate their interest
in STEM careers.
“With the help of the NAWCWD engi-
neers, our outreach programs have been
incredibly successful and impactful on the
students we serve,” said Birmingham.
She had special praise for Schrock.
“Schrock played the crucial role of the
STEMexpert to mentor the CI volunteers,
going over the daily goals for each group,
ensuring that they are on-task and follow-
ing the steps of the engineering design
process and considering critical design
questions,” she said.
Schrock coordinated with Birmingham
and CI mentors who are majoring in
STEM fields.
“The first few meetings we had with CI
in the fall covered the engineering design
process,” Schrock said. “We then worked
with the students using a basic solid mod-
eling programcalled “Cubify”in conjunc-
tion with their 3-D printer. The students
started using “Scratch,” a website that
introduces users to basic coding concepts.
There was a module about each of these
elements. Then they completed a module
on designing something.
“This is simply a framework,” Schrock
added. “The program design is what we
worked on this semester.”
NAWCWD volunteer supervises
university mentors at high school lab
Photo by Martin Wright / naWCWD
Kimberly Schrock, right, a mechanical engineer at Naval Air Warfare Center Weapons
Division (NAWCWD) at Naval Base Ventura County, Point Mugu, confers with California
State University Channel Islands mentors for the Great Inventors program at Hueneme
High School in Oxnard. Schrock volunteered to assist the mentors as they guided the
Hueneme students in the after-school program. The Great Inventors program teaches
students engineering basics through competitive construction projects like building a
small catapult.
U.S. Third Fleet Public Affairs
Twenty-three nations, 47 ships, six
submarines, more than 200 aircraft and
25,000 personnel will participate in the
biennial Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC)
exercise scheduled June 26 to Aug. 1 in
and around the Hawaiian Islands.
From Naval Base Ventura County
(NBVC) Point Mugu, Carrier Airborne
Early Warning Squadron (VAW) 113,
“The World Famous Black Eagles,” will
be taking part.
The world’s largest international mar-
itime exercise, RIMPAC provides a
unique training opportunity that helps
participants foster and sustain the co-
operative relationships that are critical
to ensuring the safety of sea lanes and
security on the world’s oceans. RIMPAC
2014 is the 24th exercise in the series that
began in 1971.
Hosted by U.S. Pacific Fleet, RIMPAC
2014 will be led by U.S. Vice Adm. Ken-
neth Floyd, commander of the U.S.
Third Fleet (C3F), who will serve as the
Combined Task Force (CTF) command-
er.
Royal Australian Navy Rear Adm.
Simon Cullen will serve as deputy com-
mander of the CTF, with Japan Mari-
time Self Defense Force Rear Adm.
Yasuki Nakahata serving as the vice
commander.
Other key leaders of the multination-
al force will include Rear Adm. Gilles
Couturier of the Royal Canadian Navy,
who will command the maritime com-
ponent; Air Commodore Chris West-
wood of the Royal Australian Air Force,
who will command the air component;
and Marine Corps Maj. Gen. Richard
Simcock, who will lead the land compo-
nent.
RIMPAC 2014 will also include for
the first time a special operations com-
ponent, to be led by U.S. Navy Capt.
William Stevens.
Two nations, Brunei and the People’s
Republic of China, will participate in
RIMPAC for the first time in 2014.
Also for the first time at RIMPAC this
year, two hospital ships, USNS Mercy
and PLA (N) Peace Ark, will participate
in the exercise.
The theme of RIMPAC 2014 is “Ca-
pable, Adaptive, Partners.”
The participating nations and forces
will exercise a wide range of capabilities
and demonstrate the inherent flexibility
of maritime forces. These capabilities
range from disaster relief and maritime
security operations to sea control and
complex warfighting. The relevant, re-
alistic training syllabus includes am-
phibious operations, gunnery, missile,
anti-submarine and air defense exer-
cises as well as counter-piracy, mine
clearance operations, explosive ordnance
disposal and diving and salvage opera-
tions.
This year’s exercise includes forces
from Australia, Brunei, Canada, Chile,
Colombia, France, India, Indonesia,
Japan, Malaysia, Mexico, Netherlands,
New Zealand, Norway, People’s Repub-
lic of China, Peru, the Republic of Ko-
rea, the Republic of the Philippines,
Singapore, Thailand, Tonga, the United
Kingdom and the United States.
VAW-113 will head to Hawaii for RIMPAC exercise
25,000 personnel from
23 nations plan to
participate in monthlong
maritime exercise this
summer
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By Ensign Elizabeth Olokode
CECOS Public Affairs
Rear Adm. Katherine Grego-
ry, Commander Naval Facilities
Engineering Command (NAV-
FAC) and chief of civil engi-
neers, addressed 66 graduates
and their friends, families, men-
tors and coworkers from the
Civil Engineer Corps Officers
School (CECOS) during a cer-
emony May 9 at Naval Base Ven-
tura County (NBVC) Port Hue-
neme.
Gregory talked about the im-
portance of the military in the
changing global environment,
noting that the members of CE-
COS Basic Class 256 “are part
of the greatest military the world
has ever known.”
“I will try and embody the
‘Can Do’ spirit of the Seabees as
I manage construction projects
at Camp Lejeune,”said graduate
Ensign Bradform Garrigues. “I
suspect I’ll continue to lean heav-
ily on my fellow junior offi-
cers.”
The new graduates were as-
signed to NAVFAC positions in
the U.S. and abroad, Naval Mo-
bile Construction Battalions
(NMCBs) at NBVC Port Huen-
eme and in Gulfport, Miss., and
Amphibious Construction Bat-
talions in Little Creek, Virginia,
and Coronado.
“I will remember the field
training exercise (FTX) the
most,” said graduate Ensign
MatthewKarny. “It was great to
get out of the classroomand ap-
ply the skills that we were learn-
ing. We also had great advisers.
Their willingness to help and the
real world experiences that they
brought to the exercise were very
valuable. The class had some
funny moments as well — an
overall great experience.”
The FTXis strategically placed
within the CECOS curriculum
to give newly commissioned
CEC officers and lateral trans-
fers the chance to perform and
execute skills learned in the
classroom, such as establishing
camp, conducting patrols, lead-
ing convoys, operating the com-
bat operations center and mis-
sion planning to execute engineer
reconnaissance operations.
When asked what advice he
would give to incoming students
for the next CECOS Basic Class,
Ensign Chanhan Lee said, “I
would advise themto be open to
ideas. Everyone they are about
to meet comes from different
walks of life, and all of the ma-
terials they are about to learn are
actually useful when they reach
their ultimate duty stations. But
at the same time, don’t be too
caught up with classes. Get out
and meet everyone in the class
and get to know your advisers
as well, because knowing them
now will help you out in the fu-
ture.”
Garrigues advised incoming
junior CEC officers to do some-
thing memorable.
“Take a trip to Las Vegas, see
a concert at the Majestic Ven-
tura Theater, eat at a food truck
and swim in the Pacific Ocean,”
he said. “I’ll always remember
hiking in the mountains above
Santa Barbara while the East
Coast endured a polar vortex.”
Chief of civil engineers addresses 66 CECOS graduates
Photo by EddiE Pribnow / CECoS
Rear Adm. Katherine Gregory, Commander Naval Facilities Engineering
Command (NAVFAC) and chief of civil engineers, and Capt. Kevin Brown,
commanding officer of the Center for Seabees and Facilities Engineering,
congratulate Ensign Shona Mosites on her May 9 graduation with honors
from Civil Engineer Corps Officers School Basic Class 256.
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By MC1 Charles Panter
NMCB 4
FORT HUNTER LIGGETT — Pop!
Pop! Pop! The sound of small arms fire
erupts all around. Bang! Bang! Explosions
from simulated mortar rounds send every-
one in the camp running for cover. Hearts
race as the adrenaline rush puts everyone
on edge. This is it, the finale, the last “hoo-
rah” that marks the end of Naval Mobile
Construction Battalion (NMCB) 4’s field
training exercise (FTX).
The FTX was a two-week event that
started April 12 and evaluated the building
skills and tactical proficiency of the Seabees
of NMCB 4.
“The actual purpose of a field training
exercise is to assess deployment capabili-
ties,” said Senior Chief Builder Alec Ca-
ligagan, the battalion’s operations chief and
veteran of more than 30 FTXs on both the
battalion side and evaluator side. “It dem-
onstrates that the battalion is ready for
operations in a given theater and lets the
higher echelon grade us.
“It’s the equivalent to all the battle sta-
tions and work-ups that ships do before
they are deemed deployable and mission
ready,” he added.
NMCB 4 is deploying to the Pacific the-
ater of operations later this year, and this
FTX tested skills in areas that the battalion
will use during the deployment. Skills such
as convoy security, erecting structures and
repairing roads have been taught and per-
fected over the last eight months of the
homeport period.
For the construction part of the exercise,
NMCB 4 built a forward operating base,
SWA (Southwest Asia) huts simultane-
ously at multiple locations and a bunker.
The Seabees repaired roads and de-launched
a medium girder bridge that was erected
by NMCB 17, the accompanying reserve
battalion. They also performed multiple
convoys, all while being aggressed by role
players assigned by Naval Construction
Group (NCG) 1.
Other graded events during FTX in-
cluded a mass casualty exercise, a CBR
(chemical, biological and radiological) ex-
ercise, various aggressions on the forward
operating base and the ability of NMCB
4’s Air Detachment to deploy and operate
independently of the main battalion.
“Does everybody understand that we are
finishing FTX a day and a half early?”
Cmdr. Jeff Kilian, the commanding officer
of NMCB 4, asked the Seabees during an
address to the battalion at the conclusion
of the exercise. “Every event [NCG 1] has
thrown at us you guys knocked out of the
park. You have done a fantastic job, and I
could not be happier or prouder of what
you have accomplished. This battalion was
magnificent.”
Caligagan said that while there is always
something to work on, “we have built a
new baseline for what is a perfect/good
FTX.”
Caligagan said good communication was
the key.
“The Sailors were well informed,” he
said. “From the skipper on down to the
most junior troop, everybody communi-
cated well, which I believe is what made
this a very successful and relatively stress-
free FTX. But the motivation of the troops
is something that you can’t force on them.
It just goes show how motivated, energized
and well-trained the Sailors of NMCB 4
are.”
Kilian told the Seabees they should walk
away from this FTX with a sense of satis-
faction.
“You’ve earned it,” he said.
NMCB 4 completes FTX, deemed ready for deployment
BUCN Jennifer Casey, left, and BUCN Brandon James, both from Naval Mobile Construction Battalion
(NMCB) 4, dress out in Joint Service Light Weight Integrated Suit Technology chemical suits and man
an L-type machine gun pit during a simulated chemical, biological, radiological attack, part of the
battalion’s field training exercise last month.
BU3 Sterling Williamson, attached to Naval Mobile Construction Battalion (NMCB) 4, conducts a ground security brief
to ensure the safety of all personnel while dismounted from their vehicles during the battalion’s field training exercise
last month.
Seabees from Naval Mobile Construction Battalion (NMCB) 4 build an SWA hut as part of graded training evolution to
show the battalion’s capabilities during a field training exercise at Fort Hunter Liggett last month.
PHOTOS BY MC1 CHARLES PANTER / NMCB 4
Capt. Dean Tufts, left, the commodore of Naval Construction Group 1, speaks with CM3 Nicholas Stockwell about his range card for his pits position
during last month’s field training exercise at Fort Hunter Liggett. NMCB 4 will be deploying to the Pacific theater later this year. w
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BU3 Sterling Williamson, attached to Naval Mobile Construction Battalion (NMCB) 4, conducts a ground security brief
to ensure the safety of all personnel while dismounted from their vehicles during the battalion’s field training exercise
last month.
Seabees from Naval Mobile Construction Battalion (NMCB) 4 stand guard over wounded aggressors
to ensure the security of the battalion’s forward operating base during last month’s field training
exercise (FTX) at Fort Hunter Liggett. The FTX is the final qualification that a battalion needs to be
ready for deployment.
Seabees from Naval Mobile Construction Battalion (NMCB) 4 build an SWA hut as part of graded training evolution to
show the battalion’s capabilities during a field training exercise at Fort Hunter Liggett last month.
PHOTOS BY MC1 CHARLES PANTER / NMCB 4
BU3 Rachel Eddleman of Naval Mobile Construction Battalion (NMCB) 4 patrols the lines outside
the battalion’s forward operating base to ensure the enemy does not have easy access during last
month’s field training exercise.
You have done a fantastic job, and I could
not be happier or prouder of what you
have accomplished. This battalion was
magnificent.
— Cmdr. Jeff Kilian
Commanding officer, NMCB 4
WE'LL PROTECT YOUR STUFF
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80S-98S-7770 702 N. Ventura Rd., Oxnard
SS to Jolnl
May 27-28

18
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Naval Base Ventura County (NBVC)
is home to rattlesnakes. If you see one
in the occupied areas, call 911. If you
are out in natural areas and see one,
leave it alone and go a safe distance
around it. You can also call NBVC En-
vironmental at 805-989-3803 to report
it.
Though uncommon, rattlesnake bites
do occur. The first thing to do if bitten
is to stay calm. Generally, the most se-
rious effect of a rattlesnake bite to an
adult is local tissue damage that needs
to be treated.
Get to a doctor as soon as possible,
but stay calm. Frenetic, high-speed
driving places the victim at greater risk
of an accident and increased heart rate.
If the doctor is more than 30 minutes
away, elevate the bite and then try to
get to the doctor as quickly as possi-
ble.
If someone you’re with is bitten by a
poisonous snake, take off constricting
items on the victim, such as rings or
other jewelry, which could cut off blood
flow if the bite area swells. Immobilize
the bitten area and get the victim to a
hospital as quickly as possible. If it will
take several hours before you can trans-
port the victim, you may do the follow-
ing procedures:
Gently rinse the bitten area with soap
and water and pat or air dry. If the bite
is on an extremity, wrap a wide constric-
tion bandage — not a tourniquet — two
to four inches upstream of the bitten
area so long as the pressure is not too
tight; one or two fingers should be able
to slide under the band. The goal is to
slow surface blood flow, not stop arte-
rial blood flow. Stopping blood flow to
a limb will result in the loss of the
limb.
Cutting and suctioning the bite area
or use of a venom extractor should
never be used. A 2004 study of mock
venom extraction using a suction device
questioned the validity of venom ex-
tractors and suggested that their use is
unlikely to be effective.
Ice or cooling packs should never be
applied to the area as these may result
in greater harm. Do not use alcohol.
Alcohol may deaden the pain, but it
also makes the local blood vessels big-
ger, which can increase venom absorp-
tion.
Most importantly, any victim of a
venomous snake bite should be evalu-
ated in an emergency medical care facil-
ity as soon as possible.
And remember: The only good snake
is one that is alive and well. Snakes,
even rattlesnakes, provide humans with
a tremendous service: They eat rodents,
other reptiles and insects and are in
turn eaten by other predators.
— This information was provided by Valerie
Vartanian, natural resources manager for the
Public Works Environmental Division, and Dan
Jaquez, site safety manager for the Public
Works Safety Office. Some information was
provided by the Department of Fish & Game.
Rattlesnakes are out: What to do if one bites
• Myth: Baby rattlesnakes are dead-
lier than the adults.
• Fact: Baby rattlesnake venom has
the same concentration and formula-
tion as the venomin adults. The truth
is it doesn’t take very much venom to
create a full reaction in an adult hu-
man. So even the smaller amount
injected by a young rattlesnake will
cause a full reaction, giving people
the impression they must be more
deadly.
• Myth: Rattlesnakes can control
the amount of venom they inject.
• Fact: Rattlesnakes have a complex
system for injecting venom. It is
shown that when they strike a prey
species for food, more venom is in-
jected than when they strike in de-
fense. There are some studies that
show the position of the fangs (fully
extended or partially retracted) play
a role in the flow of venom. The
muscles that surround the venom
gland will force venomout, but it does
not appear to be the case that the
rattlesnake makes a conscious, pre-
meditated decision as to the amount
it plans on injecting.
• Myth: Rattlesnakes can jump.
• Fact: Rattlesnakes, when fully
coiled (like a hose) can strike half the
total length of their body. For ex-
ample, a striking distance for a 3-foot
rattlesnake (the most common size
seen in this area, regardless of the
“big fish” stories) can only strike 1.5
feet away. The lower half of the body
will propel the upper half forward in
a full strike. However, the lower half
of the body never leaves the ground.
Myths and facts
about rattlesnakes Get to a doctor right
away, remove whatever
can cut off blood flow,
don’t use tourniquet or
venom extractorw
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Help when you need it.
The Fleet & Family
Support Center
If you have some free time on your
hands and would like to give a little
“something back,” feel free to come on
over to the Fleet & Family Support Cen-
ter (FFSC) and see about becoming one
of our valued Retired Activities Office
(RAO) volunteers.
This is a great opportunity to work in
the heart of the primary support center
for Naval Base Ventura County (NBVC)
personnel and their families.
The RAO is fully staffed by an all-
volunteer team of retired military per-
sonnel who still have more to offer their
fellow patriots. With a dedicated team
of volunteers, we have established a
critical component for assisting local
retirees and their spouses — sometimes
during their most sensitive times. You
might be surprised how much of an im-
pact you could have on someone who
might be at their most vulnerable.
Once you decide to take the next step,
come on over and fill out the paperwork.
After a basic background check and an
interview with the center director, you
can start your training process. Once you
have a couple of meetings with the RAO
manager under your belt and you have
gone over office procedures and policies,
you’ll be ready to sign up for the “watch
bill.” The great thing is that you get to
select your times and days. It is obvi-
ously a first come, first served type of
thing, and you can donate as much or
as little time as you wish.
If you were fortunate to be a part of
the March 29 NBVC Retiree Town Hall
event, you witnessed the sheer energy
felt by all of the attendees, as well as the
numerous vendors. The feedback was
overwhelmingly positive, and people
were extremely grateful for the festive
event.
If you decide to become a part of the
RAO team, you could play a critical part
in planning next year’s gala! If you have
any questions on how to proceed with
volunteering, or if you have any ques-
tions about services offered by the RAO,
please call 805-982-1023. We look for-
ward to hearing from you and welcom-
ing you to the team!
— Jim Ramey recently retired as the Work
and Family Life supervisor at the Fleet &
Family Support Center, Naval Base Ventura
County. He plans to volunteer at the RAO later
this summer.
Got time? Retired Activities Office could use your help
Retired
Activities
Office
with Jim
Ramey
Toll-free appointment scheduling ser-
vice: 1-866-923-6478, call 24 hours a day,
seven days a week. Confidential clinical
counseling, relocation assistance, resume
assistance, financial consultations, deploy-
ment support, newparent support, career
services and many other support services
are available at the Fleet and Family Sup-
port Center. NBVC Point Mugu, Bldg.
225 next to the chapel, 989-8146; NBVC
Port Hueneme, Bldg. 1169 behind NEX,
982-5037.
All classes at Port Hueneme unless oth-
erwise noted. Call 982-5037 for more in-
formation. Child care option available
with prior registration.
Career Support and Retention
• Transition Assistance Program —
Mondays-Fridays, 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m.
daily. XGPS for retirees E7 and above is
June 2-6; GPS is June 9-13 and June 16-20.
Register via Command Career Counsel-
or.
• Capstone Workshop/Individual Tran-
sition Plan Review: For those who have
completed Transition GPS to ensure Ca-
reer Readiness Standards have been met.
Tues., May 27, noon to 3 p.m. No walk-
ins. Register with command career coun-
selor.
• VARep Office: Assistance with claims
and medical records at the FFSC office;
walk-ins welcome. 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Tues-
days. Information: 424-901-9006.
• VA Paperwork Assistance: Hands on
assistance in filing, reopening or appealing
your VA claim. Active duty, veterans,
widows, walk-ins welcome! Call for sched-
ule at 805-982-5037.
• Interview Skills: Prepare for your job
interview, learn about the interview pro-
cess, conduct a mock interviewand more.
Thurs., May 22, 9 to 11 a.m.
• Excel Intermediate: Learn advanced
shortcuts, formulas, charts, referencing
and more using Microsoft Office Excel
2007. Wed., May 28, 9 to 11:30 a.m.
• Excel Basics: Learn how to use Mi-
crosoft Office Excel 2007 software for
both personal and professional use. Wed.,
June 4, 2 to 4:30 p.m., FFSC Point
Mugu.
• Writing the Perfect Resume & Cover
Letter: Learn cutting-edge resume and
cover letter techniques to successfully
present your skills. Wed,, June 4, 2 to 4
p.m.; Thurs., June 19, 3:30 to 5:30 p.m.
• Are you LinkedIn?: Create a LinkedIn
account and learn how to use LinkedIn
to network and find employment. Thurs.,
June 5, 1 to 2:30 p.m.; Tues., June 17, 1
to 2:30 p.m.
• Advancement Exam Prep: Do you
need help preparing for the enlisted ad-
vancement exam? We teach you test-tak-
ing tips and study skills to improve your
chances of success. Wed., June 11, 9 to 10
a.m.; Wed., June 18, 9 to 10 a.m.; FFSC
Point Mugu.
• Power Point Tips &Tricks: Learn how
to create basic presentations using Micro-
soft Office PowerPoint 2007. Wed., June
18, 1 to 2 p.m.
• Federal Employment & Resume:
Learn about federal resumes, relevant
websites and the application process for
federal jobs. Tues., June 24, 2 to 4 p.m.
Disaster Preparedness
• Surviving the First 72 Hours: Informa-
tion on sheltering in place after a disaster.
Thurs., May 22, noon to 1 p.m., FFSC
Point Mugu.
• Disaster Preparedness: Be informed,
have a plan, and make a kit! Information
and activities to help you prepare for di-
sasters. Thurs., May 29, noon to 1 p.m.
Relocation Assistance
• General information: 982-3726.
• Sponsor Training: Ensure that desig-
nated command personnel have the neces-
sary training to fulfill their role as com-
mand sponsors. Thurs., May 22, 9 to 10
a.m., FFSCPoint Mugu. Thurs., June 19,
9 to 10 a.m.
• Stressless PCS: Make your PCS move
easy, simple, smooth. Learn about your
entitlements fromthe experts. Wed., June
25, 1 to 3:30 p.m.
Life Skills
• General information: 982-3102.
• Stress Management 101: Learn to
tackle stress and build your stress stamina.
Develop the skills and tools to more ef-
fectively manage your response to stress-
ors. Thurs., June 26, 1 to 2 p.m.
Deployment
• Individual Augmentee (IA) Family
Connection: Whether this is your first or
21st experience in IAs, join other family
members and meet with spouses of de-
ployed service members. Share your
knowledge of how to thrive during this
experience. Mon., June 2, noon to 1 p.m.,
FFSC Point Mugu.
• Deployment Homecoming: Your
spouse is coming home! Learn what to
expect and how to help both of you make
this a rewarding reunion. Tues., June 17,
2 to 3 p.m.
Parenting
• Teen Parenting, Howto Survive Your
Teen: 2-part Monday series. Do you like
feel like the more you try the less effective
COntinueD On 20
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Help when you need it.
The Fleet & Family
Support Center
Are you and your partner fighting about
how to discipline your child? This is ex-
tremely common.
Even at birth, children can reduce mar-
ital satisfaction. As children grow up,
parents face new challenges that can im-
pact even the strongest of couples. Differ-
ences in parenting styles can lead one
parent to view the other as “harsh,” and
this can result in the other parent becom-
ing too lenient.
Some individuals parent this way out
of a desire to be “liked”or to avoid upset-
ting their children. Unfortunately, this can
lead to a wide gap in the parenting system
and family conflict.
The conflict worsens when children
learn whom they can turn to in order to
get their way — a technique called “split-
ting.” A common example of this is the
child who asks one parent for a cookie
before dinner. The parent says no, so the
child asks the other parent, who says yes.
This not only undermines the authority
of the first parent who is trying to set a
firm limit, but it can also lead to future
misbehavior on the child’s part.
Here are some ways to avoid this:
• Have open and ongoing communica-
tion with your partner. Discuss and prob-
lem-solve areas of ongoing conflict before
they arise again. Talk about the goals you
want for your children, and revisit them
often. This will help both parents stay on
track towards the bigger picture.
• Be clear about your expectations, and
communicate them with your children.
Posting rules can limit conflict. For ex-
ample, if a rule is “No dessert before din-
ner,” consistently follow it, and help the
child learn compliance.
• Maintain a united parental front, and
support one another. Tell your children
that you need to talk something over with
the other parent first before making deci-
sions.
• Never disagree on parenting matters
in front of the child. This can undermine
parental authority.
Employing these simple tips can help
keep harmony in the home and reduce
later childhood misbehavior.
— Alicia Vilanova is a licensed marriage
and family therapist. The Fleet & Family
Support Center offers counseling in parenting
challenges; for more information, call 805-
982-5037.
Parents must remain united when disciplining a child
Raising
families
with Alicia
Vilanova
A sensory-friendly showing of the
movie “Rio 2” is set for 2 p.m. Satur-
day, May 31, at the NeedhamTheater,
Naval Base Ventura County (NBVC)
Port Hueneme.
The showing is all-inclusive for chil-
dren with sensory and behavioral is-
sues. The lights will remain on, the
volume will be lowered, nothing will
be projected prior to the film, families
will be allowed to bring their own
snacks and, best of all, nobody will be
told to sit or stay quiet.
For more information, call 805-982-
2646.
Sensory-friendly
‘Rio 2’ is May 31
you are? Come learn how to deal with
your teen’s abusive or obnoxious behav-
iors. June 2 and 9, 3 to 5 p.m.
• Co-Parenting for Divorced or Sepa-
rated Parents: 5-part Tuesday series. Par-
enting techniques for divorced or sepa-
rated parents. June 3 through July 1, 4 to
5:30 p.m. Must attend first session.
Financial Management
• One-on-one financial counseling avail-
able. Topics include money management,
home buying, car buying, retirement plan-
ning and financial planning for deploy-
ment. Call 989-8844 for appointment.
• Saving & Investing: Learning the dif-
ference between the two and howto make
your money work for you. Thurs, June 5,
11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., FFSC Point
Mugu.
• TSP Roth: Learn the difference be-
tween the traditional and Roth options
within the thrift savings plan. Thurs., June
19, 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., FFSC Point
Mugu.
New Parent Support
• In-home visitations available for chil-
dren ages 0-36 months. Please call 805-
982-5037 for more details.
• Mamas Circle: Free baby-friendly sup
port group for new others and mothers-
to-be. Mamas Circle will help you better
navigate this complex, exciting and emo-
tionally charged part of your life. Wednes-
days, 11:30 to 1 p.m., FFSC Port Huen-
eme, Bldg. 1169.
• Infant/Baby Massage: Tues., June 10,
1 to 2:30 p.m.
• Boot Camp for New Dads: Get real
answers to real concerns fromother dads.
Thurs., June 12, 6 to 8:30 p.m.
Exceptional Family Member
Program (EFMP)
• EFM Overview: Serves military fam-
ilies with special needs, including medical
dental, mental health, developmentally or
educational requirements. The program
ensures families are assigned to areas
where they can access necessary resourc-
es. Mon., June 9, 10 a.m. to noon. FFSC
Point Mugu.
• EFMP POC: Assists each command
in developing mission readiness for Sailors
who support a loved one with special
needs. Mon., June 10, 10 a.m. to noon,
FFSC Point Mugu.
• EFM Support Network: Get together
with other EFMP members to share in-
formation and support. Wed., June 11,
10 a.m. to noon.
Sexual Assault Prevention
and Response (SAPR)
• Contact the Sexual Assault Response
Coordinator at 805-982-6139 for the 2013
SAPR Training Schedule or for more in-
formation about the SAPR Program. If
you are in need of assistance, please call
the 24-Hour DoDSafe Helpline at 1-877-
995-5247.
Command Liaison
The Fleet & Family Support Center is
available to provide services at your loca-
tion. Call the FFSC command liaison at
989-8146 or email Sandra.Lyle@navy.mil.
Now located at FFSC Point Mugu.
Domestic Abuse Victim
Advocate (DAVA) Services
• General information: 982-4117.
• Advocates can conduct safety plan-
ning, assist with obtaining emergency
shelter, assist in obtaining protective or-
ders, provide information on reporting
options, divorce or custody and transi-
tional compensation and referrals to com-
munity agencies. Call 805-982-4117 to
speak to an advocate.
Free Food Distribution
• Saturdays, May 24, June 21, 9 a.m. to
2 p.m. Food is distributed at Bldg. 19,
near the Pleasant Valley Gate on NBVC
Port Hueneme behind Print Shop on the
loading dock. Bring a laundry basket to
carry your items. Food items vary from
month to month. One issue per family.
Bring LES; income guideline statement
available at distribution site. Eligibility:
Active duty E-7 and below with two or
more dependents may qualify.
CoNtiNuED FRoM 19w
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By CE3 Jessica J. Pettit
NCG 1
Sailors from Naval Base Ventura
County (NBVC) volunteered to par-
ticipate in Mud Crazy’s annual 5K and
10K runs at Mission Oaks Park in Ca-
marillo to support runners’ safety and
strengthen fatigued spirits with en-
couragement Saturday, May 10.
The 23 volunteers were spread
throughout the course passing out wa-
ter, ensuring obstacle safety and direct-
ing participants where to go while
cheering them on.
“I’ve been volunteering for awhile
now to be a part of the community, to
give back and to have fun,” said Steel-
worker 2nd Class Troy Franklin of
Naval Construction Group (NCG) 1.
“I’m pretty impressed with the turnout
of volunteers when we have anywhere
from 20 to 30 Seabees. Some events we
have up to 100 people volunteering.”
Franklin gave out water during the
event.
“Volunteering for the mud run is
definitely a fun experience, so maybe
next year we can get more people to
come,” he said.
“I’m enjoying this event and hon-
estly wished I could’ve participated in
the run,” said Yeoman 2nd Class Sher-
ri Batson of NBVC. “I feel like it’s
important for the Navy to volunteer
for things like this where physical fit-
ness is being encouraged.”
Batson shouted words of encourage-
ment by the mud pit obstacle, where
runners had to low-crawl through the
thick mud after running two and a half
miles. Other Seabee volunteers refilled
the mud pit with water for runner
safety.
“They were absolutely fantastic,” Jim
Passantino, Mud Crazy organizer, said
of the Seabees. “I can only hope that
they can help us out every year. You
don’t really have to elaborate to a Sea-
bee on what gets done. You tell them
one thing, they understand and make
sure it gets done the right way. They
are the perfect volunteers.”
Mud Crazy was created five years
ago as a way to get people out of the
house and spend time with others while
improving their physical fitness.
The growing organization also ben-
efits the Thousand Oaks Teen Center
and supports youth scholarship pro-
grams.
23 Sailors volunteer to help at Mud Crazy event in Camarillo
Photo by CE3 JEssiCa J. PEttit / NCG 1
Constructionman Emanuel Herrara of the Naval Construction Training Center at Naval Base
Ventura County (NMCB) Port Hueneme stands by to encourage Mud Crazy’s 5K and 10K
participants and ensure overall safety of the Saturday, May 10, event in Camarillo.
By Darrell Waller
NAVFAC EXWC
The Naval Facilities Engineering
and Expeditionary Warfare Center
(NAVFAC EXWC) shipped a Super
Energy Efficient Containerized Living
Unit (SuperCLU) to Anderson Air
Force Base, Guam, April 30.
SuperCLU is an advanced portable
shelter designed to be configured as
needed to support a wide variety of
field operations. This unit will be part
of the annual Transformative Reduc-
tions in Operational Energy Con-
sumption (TROPEC) exercise coordi-
nated by the Navy, Army and Air
Force.
“The SuperCLU and the advanced
technology it utilizes are vital to pro-
viding direct support to our warfight-
ers in all theaters and climate condi-
tions worldwide,” said Capt. Mark K.
Edelson, NAVFAC EXWC command-
ing officer. “During this deployment,
the unit will be field tested under
tropical conditions, achieving energy
savings to the fleet while providing
basic shelter and mobile command
facilities to our armed forces.”
The unit was originally designed to
support energy and sustainability
work at Camp Lemonnier, Djibouti.
Modified environmental control units
within existing CLUs were a signifi-
cant part of that effort.
The Super CLUs save thousands in
energy usage, increase living space
and privacy for individuals, reduce
noise and allow more personnel to be
comfortably housed in a given unit
than current CLU configurations.
The deployed unit will be utilized
as a control center and tested for long-
term interior climate control and en-
ergy efficiency in hot, humid loca-
tions. It will be outfitted with a meter
to record interior conditions (tem-
perature, relative humidity and carbon
dioxide) and a second meter to record
total energy used.
The joint services will test a variety
of shelters, lighting and environmen-
tal control units for improved energy
efficiency during the exercise, which
runs through August.
NAVFAC EXWC is at Naval Base
Ventura County (NBVC) Port Huen-
eme.
EXWC ships energy-efficient portable shelter to tropical Guam
Photo CourtEsy u.s. Navy
David Chavez, an engineer with Naval Facilities Engineering and Expeditionary Warfare
Center (EXWC), checks a fully assembled Super Energy Efficient Containerized Living Unit
(SuperCLU) outside Building 1100 at Naval Base Ventura County (NBVC) Port Hueneme. A
SuperCLU was recently shipped to Guam.
22
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is May 28,” said Kevin Ludwig, athletics
manager for Morale, Welfare and Recre-
ation (MWR). “There is no online regis-
tration this year.”
The Admiral’s Cup starts at 8 a.m. Sat-
urday, May 31, at Family Beach at NBVC
Point Mugu. It will be followed at 10 a.m.
by the Armed Forces Triathlon Champi-
onship (AFTC), in which the best male
and female triathletes in the Army, Marine
Corps, Air Force and combined Navy and
Coast Guard compete.
The Admiral’s Cup is open only to those
with base access. It is a sprint triathlon,
with a 400-meter (quarter-mile) ocean
swim, a 20-kilometer (12.4-mile) bike ride
in which drafting is illegal, and a 5-km
(3.1-mile) run. Relay teams are allowed.
Cost is $30 for active duty military per-
sonnel, their dependents and retirees; $40
for Department of Defense civilians and
contractors; and $50 for guests.
Photo IDs will be checked the day of
the race.
Prizes will be given in the following age
categories: 18 to 29, 30 to 39, 40 to 49, 50
to 59, and 60 and older.
The AFTCis an Olympic triathlon with
a 1,500-meter (nearly one-mile) ocean
swim, 40-km (24.8-mile) draft-legal bike
ride and a 10-km (6.2-mile) run.
This year’s rosters list some familiar
names, including last year’s first-place
finishers, Army Capt. Nick Sterghos and
Air Force 2nd Lt. Samantha Morrison.
Army Capt. Nick Vandam, who edged out
Sterghos the year before and did not race
last year because he was deployed, is
scheduled to compete again this year.
This is the 15th year the base has host-
ed the AFTC.
“This is a beautiful place to have a tri,”
Ludwig said. “It’s in a protected sea and
wildlife area, so there are lots of seals,
dolphins and sea lions the participants
may get to see.”
continued from 1
triathlon registration must be made by may 28; event is may 31
Over Da Hill, made up of retirees, con-
tractors and Department of Defense civil-
ians, is the Naval Base Ventura County
(NBVC) Point Mugu Intramural Basket-
ball League Championship team for
2014.
Over Da Hill had one loss in the regular
season and was undefeated in the playoffs
until the championship game. They played
in the “If ” game Thursday, May 15, to
reclaim their victory with a score of 30-
29.
The Most Valuable Player of the win-
ning game was Patrick Robinson with 10
points.
“The season went well,”said Annabelle
Ferrer of the Morale, Welfare and Recre-
ation Fitness Department. “There were a
total of 13 teams from both bases. All the
teams were very competitive.”
over da Hill wins mugu
basketball championship
Photo by AnnAbelle Ferrer / MWr
The 2014 Point Mugu Basketball Championship team, Over Da Hill, is made up of, top row
from left, Lamont Hollins, Jeffrey Sourwine, Diego Rivera, Patrick Robinson, David Mitchell,
Willie Cooper and Alain Deleon, and, bottom row from left, Masato Taniguchi, Cedric Parks
and Rey Jordan. Not pictured is Teo Vasquez.
By YNC Ryan Arnoldussen
NOSC Ventura County
Navy Counselor 1st Class Stanita Bur-
ton has been named Sailor of the Year
(SOY) by Navy Operational Support Cen-
ter (NOSC) Ventura County.
“This is well-deserved recognition for
an outstanding performer,” said Capt.
Ronald Oswald, commanding officer,
NOSCVentura County. “Her passion and
dedication for helping Sailors manage
their careers is evident in everything she
does. I commend her on personal com-
mitment and complete dedication to our
mission. Her personal excellence in the
execution of her duties and responsibilities
in career development is what separated
her from an extremely keen and competi-
tive field.”
Burton called the recognition “a great
honor.”
“I cannot truly claim this great accom-
plishment without acknowledging the as-
sistance from my assistant career coun-
selor, Aviation Electronics Technician 1st
Class Christina Tan, my fellowfirst class-
es, chief’s mess and all of my wonderful
unit career counselors,” Burton said. “I
feel a personal responsibility to them, my-
self and the command to hold myself to
even higher standards.”
She also acknowledged her husband,
Larry Burton Jr., and children, Zaria,
Jasmine and DeAshawn, “for always sup-
porting and being there for me regardless
of whether or not mommy is having a ‘bad
day.’ I genuinely thank and appreciate
them,” Burton said.
NOSC Ventura County Command
Master Chief Tom Lintz views the Sailor
of the Year as a success story.
“When I hear Sailor of the Year I think
professionalism,”said Lintz. “A Sailor of
the Year is the model for others to emu-
late.”
He said a career counselor provides
guidance and the tools to succeed.
“What separates Navy Counselor 1st
Class Burton from most other NCs is her
passion to put Sailors first and help guide
them in their careers,” he said. “She fo-
cuses on the career needs of every Sailor.
She understands the major responsibility
she has impacting not just Sailors and
their careers, but also the effect it has on
their families.”
NOSC Ventura County, located at Na-
val Base Ventura County (NBVC) Port
Hueneme, conducts training, administra-
tion and execution of Navy Reserve pol-
icy for approximately 1,200 Selected Re-
serve Sailors in 39 administratively
assigned Reserve Units.
nc1 named SoY for noSc
NC1 Stanita Burton has been named Sailor
of the Year (SOY) by Navy Operational
Support Center (NOSC) Ventura County.w
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“They were really comforting,” he said.
“They called the base police. All I could
do was bawl.”
It wasn’t long before base security found
Bailey and brought her to the fire sta-
tion.
“The police came in carrying that
squirming little bundle and all I could do
was cry more,” he said. “It was an unbe-
lievable feeling.”
Peters thought about buying everyone
pies from Coco’s as a way to show his
appreciation, but he decided that writing
a letter to The Lighthouse was a better
idea.
“I figured we’re all trying to watch our
weight,” he said with a chuckle.
So he sat down at his keyboard and
wrote a note, closing with, “I just want
to say to both the Mugu Fire Personnel
and Base Police THANK YOU, I am so
very grateful.”
Bailey is actually Peters’ therapy dog,
prescribed by his psychiatrist, whom he
sees along with a psychologist.
“I’m still having a difficult time,” he
explained.
His late wife, Freida, had been a con-
stant companion for the past two decades.
They were making up for all the time lost
earlier, when Peters was busy with a 20-
year career in the Navy, then worked on
aircraft carriers in aviation supply.
“I was gone a lot,” he recalls. “My wife
raised our four girls and our son. Having
lost a daughter she went through a lot.”
After another 18 years working for the
city of Ventura, Peters finally retired, and
he and Freida began traveling together.
At first, they took off across the United
States, driving during the day, staying in
hotels at night. They did that for two
months, going all the way to Canada and
the North Atlantic coast.
Then they got more adventurous. They
traveled to Germany and Sweden, then
China and Hong Kong. They went to
Mexico. Their favorite was Australia.
“We were blessed to have seen much of
the world,” Peters says.
And then Freida got sick. Peters cared
for her for more than a year, helpless as
she withered down to 75 pounds. When
she died, part of Peters went with her.
Bailey brought some of that back.
“She’s been so good for me,” he said as
he scratched the pup’s ears. “She’s really
a dear. I don’t feel so alone.”
Bailey has coaxed Peters out of his
home, out on walks, into town. They of-
ten have coffee at a downtown Ventura
café, where Peters has made some
friends.
“That’s very, very good,” he admits.
He enjoys visiting the base and meeting
today’s Sailors.
“They’re very nice chaps and ladies,”
he says. “They’re very polite, they open
doors for you — and in my generation,
that was important. Their parents can be
proud.”
He recently met Cheryl Cumming, a
friend of his daughter’s, and she comes
by a few times a week to cook and help
him clean.
He visits a friend in Camarillo, a man
who became disabled in World War II and
has used a wheelchair ever since. Peters
puts the wheelchair in the back of his
truck and they go to breakfast, sometimes
lunch.
He has another friend who’s 90 and
whose wife has Alzheimer’s.
All that helps him keep his perspec-
tive.
“I feel good that I’mup and about, that
I can get up and make my bed,” he says.
“And it helps when I can do something
for somebody else.”
Including Bailey.
“She gives me something to get up for
and take care of,”he explained. “My fam-
ily asks me, ‘Who rescued whom?’ I think
that’s very sweet.”
continued from 3
Base personnel find therapy dog, reunite her with 86-year-old owner
after the grand reopening.
“It looks awesome,” he said. “This
will get more people to hang out here,
and it provides a real sense of commu-
nity for the base.”
At the ribbon-cutting, Vasquez ac-
knowledged the different teams that
made the project possible.
“My only regret is that I’m not
dressed in golfing attire,” he said. “I’m
anxious to get inside and have a bite to
eat and maybe have a cup of coffee.”
The renovation included tearing out
a dining room partition. The wall be-
tween the dining area and the pro shop
was decorated with rockwork, and an
80-inch TV screen now hangs there,
above a faux fireplace. Easy chairs are
set up around small coffee tables that
match the rockwork decor.
The bar area has been divided into a
small serving area with four beers on
tap and another bar seating area that
can accommodate up to 12 people.
All counters are now granite style, the
floors are porcelain tile and the walls
have been retextured and repainted.
The ATM machine has been moved
to a less conspicuous spot — it used to
be the first thing people saw when they
walked in — and a wooden trophy case
has been built into a wall in the entry-
way.
Total cost of the renovation was
$150,000, MWR officials said.
Golfers having lunch the first day the
clubhouse reopened said they were
pleased and impressed with the chang-
es.
“I think it looks great,” said Rick
Schnapka of Thousand Oaks, who’s
been using the Seabee Golf Course for
about two years. “The food selection is
10 times better than before.”
He and his dining companions, Rog-
er Marcum of Port Hueneme and Bob
Gaffuri of Camarillo, agreed the reno-
vations would be a big draw for the
course — if golfers could get on base.
“I’ve got a friend in Simi Valley who
wants to come play here, but he’s given
up,” Gaffuri said. “He’s been waiting
more than five months for a pass to get
on base.”
The clubhouse is open daily from
dawn to dusk, with food served every
day from 6 a.m. to 4 p.m.
For more information on food ser-
vices, call the 19th Hole Grill at 805-
982-5293.
Photo by AndreA howry / Lighthouse
The 19th Hole Grill inside the clubhouse has an expanded menu and a new decor.
clubhouse gets high praise
continued from 1
Civilians who want to golf at Naval Base
Ventura County (NBVC) Port Hueneme’s
Seabee Golf Course need to obtain a Ci-
vilian Golf Pass before they can come on
base.
To obtain a pass request, call the Pro
Shop at 805-982-2620.
The pass requires a background clear-
ance check initiated by the Navy’s Force
Protection agency. The personnel who
conduct these checks also perform back-
ground checks on every civilian requesting
base access for any event on 10 facilities
in the Southwest Region, including youth
baseball games, retirement dinners, wed-
dings and bowling leagues.
“Depending on howbusy they are, there
can be a wait,” said Efren Bautista, golf
shop assistant. “But it is for everyone’s
safety.”
He stressed that the wait is worth it: A
three-hour round is typical, it’s a flat
course that many like to walk, and there’s
a country club-like feel to the facilities,
given that special access is required.
Around of golf costs $9 to $35 depend-
ing on the day of the week, military status
and specials being offered.
Want to play the Seabee Golf course? Here’s how
24
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Ney Award goes to Point Mugu galley for the first time
Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus an-
nounced the 2014 winners of the Navy
Capt. Edward F. Ney Memorial Awards
for outstanding food service April 29.
NBVC Point Mugu took first place in the
Small General Mess category. The runner-
up was Naval Air Station Oceana in Vir-
ginia.
This is the first time the Point Mugu gal-
ley has won the Ney Award; it was a run-
ner-up in 1998. The galley at NBVC Port
Hueneme won in 2011.
Chief Culinary Specialist Elizabeth
Scott, the leading chief petty officer of the
galley, credited the hard work and dedica-
tion of the 22 military personnel and 13
civilians who work at the galley, serving
250 to 300 people each day.
“I’m so thankful it happened under my
watch,” she said.
Chief Warrant Officer 4 Rodel Rosales
said the departmental leading chief petty
officer, Senior Chief Culinary Specialist
Napoleon Miranda, and the rest of the
military’s food services team pulled to-
gether to win the award.
“We did put together all our experi-
ences and used it to our advantage in
preparation for this inspection,” he said.
“We also would like to credit our civilian
counterparts, all the food service contract
personnel and some of our barrack mili-
tary personnel from both Port Hueneme
and Mugu who volunteered extra hours
to help clean the entire galley area for sev-
eral days prior tothe inspection. The Mugu
galley personnel worked extra hard due to
the fact that they continued to prepare and
serve the food the entire day to around 250
to 300 personnel and continued to clean
in between meal hours.”
The crewin the Point Mugu galley rang-
es fromthe Navy’s newest culinary special-
ists to civilians with decades of experience.
Bev Ragan has worked at the Point Mugu
galley since Thanksgiving Day 1971, when
she helped serve 789 meals, the busiest day
she ever worked.
While many items are popular, Scott
said, the galley is known for its soups and
desserts.
“It depends on the season,” she said,
“but those two categories always get a lot
of compliments.”
The Chicken and Sausage Gumbo is
especially popular.
When asked if there was anything that
didn’t work, she answered immediately.
“Egg Drop Soup,”she replied. “We took
that off the menu a long time ago. It didn’t
do anything it was supposed to do.”
She said the key to a good galley is mak-
ing sure Sailors — many of whom are far
from home — have plenty of comfort
food.
“We try to make them feel like this is
home,” she said.
Scott’s favorite meal isn’t something
that’s served by the galley. Anative of Ha-
waii, she’s partial to a pig that’s been
cooked in the ground and poi, cooked taro
root.
“Poi with eggs is the best,”she said. “But
I’ve got to go all the way to West Covina
to get it — either that or bring it home
from Hawaii.”
So instead she settles for her second fa-
vorite: the turkey meal — roasted turkey,
mashed potatoes, green beans and all the
sides.
“Whenever we make that, everyone
knows it needs to be perfect because Chief
is going to eat it,” she said with a laugh.
Judging for the Ney Award began at the
first of the year. Inspectors visited the gal-
ley and looked at everything from sanita-
tion to color schemes in the dining room.
“The temperature of the food, financial
records, service, landscaping —they looked
at everything,” Scott said.
She called it a “roof to tile” inspection.
Scott had plenty of practice to help pre-
pare her crewfor the big inspection. In her
15 years in the Navy, she’s worked both
ends of the Navy galley spectrum — from
the seven galleys on an aircraft carrier that
feed 5,000 people each day to the flag mess
that serves admirals and visiting dignitaries
— and she learned from both.
She’s found that her work on an aircraft
carrier and her East Coast assignments
have come in handy on what she feels is a
“more relaxed and calm” West Coast.
“I think when you’ve been on the East
Coast, you get pushy,” she said. “You like
to get things done. You’re always on the
go, go, go, and everyone says, ‘Slowdown,
it’s OK.’ But I’mnot gonna change. That’s
the way I operate.”
Her work in the flag mess did teach her
to harness some of that speed and take the
time to add some personal flair.
“Working a flag mess, you become very
competitive,” she said. “You want to do
things on a higher scale. You really focus
on enhancement and garnishment, seeing
what you can do to make yours look better
than everyone else’s. You put your talent
out there.”
She took those lessons and applied them
to the Mugu galley, motivating her team
and helping them push harder. It paid
off.
“These guys busted their butts for some-
thing prestigious,”she said. “We needed to
strive for excellence, and we achieved it.”
coNtiNued froM 1
Photos by AndreA howry / Lighthouse
CS2 Shielamarie Cabunoc gets freshly baked cookies ready for the lunch line at the Point
Mugu galley.
Bev Ragan pulls items out of the refrigerator
for the salad bar. Her first day at the Point
Mugu galley was Thanksgiving Day 1971,
when she helped serve 789 meals, her
busiest day ever.
The culinary specialists at Naval
Base Ventura County are showing off
their skills Thursday, May 22, with a
special Memorial Day meal.
Members of the military and their
dependents are welcome. The meal is
not open to civilians.
The galley will be serving crab legs
and prime rib, New England clam
chowder, corn on the cob, baked po-
tato, rice pilaf, grilled asparagus,
mushrooms and onions, rolls and as-
sorted desserts.
Lunch will be served from 11 a.m.
to 12:45 p.m. at both the NBVC Port
Hueneme and NBVC Point Mugu
galleys. Cost is $4.65.
Special menu May 22w
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N E E D H A M T H E A T E R S T A T I O N T H E A T E R
NBVC POI NT MUGU
Friday, May 23
7pm: Pompeii PG13
Saturday, May 24
2pm: Endless Love PG13
4pm: Robocop PG13
7pm: That Awkward Moment R
Sunday, May 25
2pm: The LEGO Movie PG
4pm: 3 Days to Kill PG13
Friday, May 30
7pm: Robocop PG13
Saturday, May 31
2pm: The LEGO Movie PG
4pm: Labor Day PG13
7pm: About Last Night R
Sunday, June 1
2pm: The LEGO Movie PG
4pm: Winter’s Tale PG13
All base movies are FREE. Authorized patrons include active duty and dependents, reservists, retirees, and DoD civilians.
Listings are subject to change without notice. For up-to-date movie listings, please call the MWR Movie Line at (805) 982-5002.
May 22 - June 1, 2014
Thursday, May 22
7pm: Captain America: The Winter Soldier PG13
Friday, May 23
7pm: Rio 2 G
9pm: The Grand Budapest Hotel R
Saturday, May 24
2pm: Rio 2 G
5pm: Captain America: The Winter Soldier PG13
8pm: The Grand Budapest Hotel R
Sunday, May 25
2pm: Rio 2 G
5pm: Divergent PG13
Thursday, May 29
7pm: Transcendence PG13
Friday, May 30
7pm: Draft Day PG13
9pm: Oculus R
Saturday, May 31
2pm: Rio 2 Sensory Friendly Viewing G
5pm: Draft Day PG13
8pm: Oculus R
Sunday, June 1
2pm: Rio 2 G
5pm: Transcendence PG13
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LOST burgundy wallet
nr Rite Aid Camarillo,
REWARD 805-484-9349
VCS348344
LOST MALE CAT
“SPOOKY” on May 9th,
Northam area Newbury
Park, black & tan Bengle
tabby. Family devestated.
Call Dawn 805-657-0590
VCS348532
REWARD LOST Nikon
telephoto camera lens,
805-642-6246 VCS347617
DONATIONS
WANTED
Your used books, cd’s,
dvd’s, vhs, books on tape,
& other media items.
Call the
Arc Foundation Thrift Store
to schedule pick up.
800-228-1413
All donations tax
deductable, 100% of the
proceeds raised stays in
Vta Co. to support those
with intellectual &
developmental disabilities.
VCS348281
TAX
DEDUCTABLE
DONATIONS
NEEDED
Clothing, housewares,
electronics, books,
accessories, etc.
Help improve the lives
of individuals with
developmental disabilities.
Call The Arc Foundation
Thrift Stores to
schedule a pick-up
800-228-1413
Also ask us about our estate
services and vehicle
donation program.
VCS348282
DODGER TICKETS
Reserved section, 4 tickets
$120. Call 805-754-8612
VCS348273
ALL CASH
BUYING
All U.S. Silver, Gold
and Copper Coins,
Large & Small Collections.
Foreign Coins. Medals -
Tokens. Gold Jewelry
Broken or unwanted Gold
Jewelry. Scrap Gold
& Silver. Dental Gold.
Sterling Flatware
Watches
1211 Maricopa, Ojai
40 Years Buying
805-646-4904
VCS348286
BUYER of OLD COINS
Coin Collections
Silver & Gold Coins
TOP $$$ PAID
I BUY TOY TRAINS
Old BB CARDS, Old TOYS.
Jeff 805-302-7104 VCS348223
BUYING
Coins 1964 & Older
Dimes - $1.25
Quarters - $3.12
Halfs - $6.25
Dollars - $20.00 & up
C.C. $$ - cased $135
Coin Collections
Gold Coins - Call
Gold Scrap
Mexico Wanted
Sterling Pieces
Pocket Watches
Indian Baskets
Free Appraisals
805-646-2631
VCS347489
I BUY GUNS-Antiques,
black powder, also knives,
hunting, military or
pocket, 1 or a collection
also, pre-64
American silver coins.
805-646-2168
VCS348423
NEED CASH?
BUYING GOLD
Paying $18.00 per gram for
14 carat. 805-646-2631
VCS347488
WANTED: Swords, Japanese
& Civil War, German
daggers, antique weapons,
military. CASH. All Asian
Antiques Chinese/Japanese.
818-259-6276 VCS348441
ALL MAJOR APPL
*Save Money & Time*
FREE Service Call w/repair
in Ventura Co.
FREE Appliance Pickup.
Save on repairs and sales
during the economy crisis.
Washers, Dryers, Heaters,
Refrigerators, Ovens Gas
& Electric, Microwaves
35 Years Exp. Vta Co.
Victor 805-302-1866
VCS347964
From
$99.00
Repair &
Sales
Ad Refrigeration
** FREE ESTIMATES **
Refrigerators, walk-in
coolers, ice machines, etc
Will Pick Up Dead Refrig,
and All Appliances!
805.816.7169
VCS348547
Hester’s
Appliance
We Pick up &
Pay Top $$$
For Old Washers &
Dryers, Stoves,
Refrigerators
For Sale Used
Appliances
$99 & up
Over 40yr Exp.
805-487-8833 or
805-487-1060
VCS348524
CAMARILLO
Conejo Mountain
Niche for sale.
Conejo Mountain, Garden
Mausoleum Companion
Niche #40-B for sale.
Great buy $1,800 OBO
call 623-218-6628 or cell
480-290-9628 VCS348267
Conejo Mountain
Memorial Park
Plot in “sold out” section
Santa Cruz II (plot 355-F)
Under large tree, close to
mortuary facility. $4,450
+ endowment care fee.
Contact Jim 770-733-1222
VCS347692
Ivy Lawn Memorial Park
Ventura-Single plot in a very
good location Section J 173 9
or 10 $3,500 805-657-4547
VCS348575
VALLEY OAKS
WESTLAKE VILLAGE
prime lot, grave B, plot 470.
appraised at $7,295. Call with
your best offer. 760-536-9231
VCS347333
PALLET RACK SALE
Upright $49+ Beam $12+
SHELVING Steel & Wood
2’x4’x 6, 8 or 10’ $69+
WHSE LADDERS $89+
805-532-1103 VCS347506
COMMERCIAL GYM
EQUIPMENT
805-798-5528 VCS348685
TREADMILL-TROTTER
540 Supertrainer, 9 pgrms.
9 levels, costs $3,100.
Sell $400. Works great.
805-499-9328 VCS347584
Affordable
Sectionals & Sofas
Custom Sized
Pottery Barn inspired styles
and more, local mfr
showroom factory direct
sectionals sized by the inch
with your measurements.
Hard to fit spaces our
specialty. Best prices,
quality & selection.
Sectionals from $799.
805-302-2138 VCS348627
MATTRESS
WAREHOUSE
**************
Liquidation
Sale!
**************
Open 3 days a week
All month long!
Open Friday from
2-7 and Sat. and
Sun. 11-4
**************
Twin Sets Starting at $99,
Full Pillowtop Sets
Starting at $139, Queen
Pillowtop Sets Starting at
$149, King Pillowtop Sets
Starting at $259! Queen
Memory Foam Sets
starting at $319, King
Memory Foam Sets at
$399 Delivery/Financing
Available! Located
off 101 and Central Ave.
Behind Quality Inn
hotel at 330 Wood Rd Suite
K, (on backside of
building), Camarillo 93010.
**************
805-285-3248
VCS347479
Boxes for moving
only 75¢ each
250. Used. 805-487-2796
www.riteboxinc.com
VCS348014
Medical Scooter, poker table
see on May 17 only 8am-1pm
50 Catalina, Cam. VCS348509
MARTIN GUITAR D-35-S
w/case. 40 Years old near
mint cond. $1,600 obo
805-646-1930 Robb
VCS347375
CONFERENCE
TABLE
(10ft) & DESK-Solid
maple, cherry finish.
Leather chairs & couch
etc. All excellent condition.
For appointment call:
805-497-3035 VCS348373
SPA/HOT TUB
DELUXE 2014 MODEL.
Neck jets, therapy seat,
warranty, never used,
can deliver, worth $5950,
will sell $1950. Call
818-785-9043 VCS348495
ALL
JUNK
CARS
$350
& Up
Delivered
Running or Not
Must be Complete
With Proper Paperwork
Call
Pick The Part, Inc.
(805)
933-5557
936 Mission Rock Road,
Santa Paula, Ca 93060
VCS347362
Announcements
100-170
To our advertisers:
Please check your ad the frst
day and report any issues
promptly. Classifed ads are
charged using an agate line
measurement. Visible lines are
larger for readability and add
enhancement, hence billable
lines may be more than what is
visible to the reader.
105
Found/Lost
150
Special Notices
Tickets-
Sale/Wanted
Merchandise
200-297
204
Antiques And
Collectibles
207
Appliances
207
Appliances
219
Cemetery Lots
221
Commercial
Equipment
227
Exercise Equipment
227
Exercise Equipment
233
Furniture/
Household Goods
233
Furniture/
Household Goods
275
Miscellaneous
For Sale
277
Musical Instruments
279
Office Furniture/
Equipment
281
Pool/Spa Supplies
297
Wanted To Buy
Browse
a directory of regional new housing
communities. Visit VCSHOMES.com
Find a home.
vcshomes.com
Boat?
vcstar.com/ads
800-221-STAR(7827)
BUYIT.
SELLIT.
FINDIT.
ßuiIdacar.
Findusedcars.
FindadeaIer.
PLACE A
CLASSIFIED
AD FOR
FREE!
The Lighthouse offers
free classifed ads for
property and personal
items offered by active
duty and retired military,
civil service and dependent
personnel within Naval
Base Ventura County.
All free ads are 20 WORD MAXIMUM.
Paid classified advertising available for remaining
categories and non-eligible personnel.
Submissions:
Submit your 20 WORD MAXIMUM free or paid classified
advertisements with your contact information including
phone and email via one of the following:
Fax: (805) 437-0466
Email: classifieds@vcstar.com
Tel: (800) 221-7827 (M-F 8 a.m.–5 p.m.)
Mail: The Lighthouse Classifieds
P.O. Box 6006, Camarillo, CA 93011
Deadline:
All classified ads must be received by 5 p.m.
Wednesday a week prior to publication.
• Motorcycles
• Merchandise
• Miscellaneous Wanted
FREE ads for the following categories:
• Pets – Free to good home
• Roommate Wanted
• Lost & Found
• Automobiles & Trucks
classifieds
Lighthouse

newcars,
usedcarsand
deaIers.
Y0U'RE A||
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for fa|| access.
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FRY’S ELECTRONICS,
a leader in Retail Electronics, is looking for high quality people
to join our team! Comprehensive Benefits for
Full-Time positions.
* Full-Time & Part-Time Now Available *
CAR ELECTRONICS - RETAIL SALES/LABOR
Car Stereo/Mobile Electronics Sales with Commission
Only Sales. Earn as much as $15/hr.
Car Stereo/Mobile Electronics Installation. Earn $8+
commission for both Parts/Installation Sales and Labor performed.
Apply in person at any of the following store locations in the
Los Angeles Metro Market:
• 3600 Sepulveda Blvd, Manhattan Beach, CA 90266
• 10800 Kalama River Ave, Fountain Valley, CA 92708
• 6100 Canoga Ave, Woodland Hills, CA 91367
• 3370 E. La Palma Ave, Anaheim, CA 92806
• 2311 N. Hollywood Way, Burbank, CA 91505
• 13401 Crossroads Pkwy, City of Industry, CA 91746
• 1901 E. Ventura Blvd, Oxnard, CA 93036
Mon-Fri: 9am-9pm Sat: 10am-9pm Sun: 10am-8pm
EOE VCS348533

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For more info or to apply
0ALL 0od|e at
805-642-0239 V
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n0M£ n£ALTn
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l|ex|b|e work soheou|e,
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v|s|t|ng Nurse 4ssoo|at|on
VCS1339481
F0lI0£ 0FFI0£8 [68k8I F080£0)
(LateraI or Academy Trained, 2 positions)
ANNUAL SALARY
$46,425.60 - $56,430.40
+ 1,119.32/mo. Cafeteria Benefit
EmpIoyee Benefits Package: The City
offers an excellent benefits package that
includes a Cafeteria in the amount of
$1,119.32 per month.
QuaIifications:
Minimum 21 years of age, high school graduate
or G.E.D. Lateral or Academy Trained must
possess a P.O.S.T. Level 1 Basic Certificate or
be P.O.S.T. Approved academy trained within
the last 36 months. Must live within 40 road
miles of the Santa Paula Police Station at the
time of appointment.
LICENSE OR CERTIFICATE - Possession
of a valid Class "C¨ California driver's
license.
City appIication required. Apply at City of
Santa Paula, 970 Ventura St, Santa Paula
(805) 933-4207 or visit our website @
www.ci.santa-paula.ca.us for application
and info. DeadIine 4:30 p.m. Monday,
June 2nd, 2014.
FOR MORE INFORMATION PLEASEVISIT
OUR CITYWEBSITE: www.spcity.org
Now Hiring in Oxnard!
Regional Safety Manager (RSM)
$45K-$50K + bonus
Reports directly to Select Staffing’s corporate office in
Santa Barbara. Full-time position with up to 50 % travel
in Santa Maria, Santa Barbara, Oxnard, and Ventura
County. Responsible for region’s safety training, accident
investigations, regulatory compliance, and posting com-
pliance, as well as work-site audits/inspections.
Requirements:
•1-3 years of experience in the field or in related area.
Loss Prevention & Safety
•OSHA related Courses 10 Hour
•PC Knowledge ~Microsoft office outlook, word, Excel,
•Familiar with a variety of the safety field’s concepts,
•Must possess a Risk Management/Worker’s
Compensation background and be detail-oriented,
confident leaders capable of taking on the challenge of
making sure our Associates are in a safe, hazard-free
work environment.
•Ideal candidate bilingual (English/Spanish)
Select Staffing offers a very competitive salary and
benefits package. Email your resume to:
John.McCown@selectfamily.com
EOE VCS348071
NOWHIRING - Accountant
$28.64-$38.63/hr
City of Camarillo more info visit
www.cityofcamarillo.org Submit City app.
and supp (req’d) by 5 p.m., 5/30/14,
601 Carmen Drive, Camarillo, CA. 93010.
(805) 383-5618 No fax/postmarks. EEO.
VCS347554
$ $ $ $ $ $
WE BUY CARS
PAID FOR
OR NOT
Licensed & Bonded
Dealer.
No smog required.
WWW.
TRADEINSDIRECT.COM.
Up To $100k
Free Auto
Broker Service
(805)496-2967
VCS348142
BOXER GORGEOUS AKC
pure breed 13 Weeks old.
3 available tails and
declawed complete.
call 805-290-8999
VCS348572
Cat’s & Kittens Sat & Sun
11-5 @ PetCo/Vta & Cam.
4160 Market & Donlon
805-485-8811 VCS348541
DACHSHUND MINI PUPS
1st shots 2 Male 1 Female
Ready to go! $450 & $500
SIBERIAN HUSKY
3 Female 2 Males, $750.
Avail 1st wk of June
Call 805-312-5649 VCS347959
DACHSHUNDS AKC $600
661-769-8807 or 661-333-4697
www.aaapuppydogs.com
VCS348221
FOUR PAWS
VETERINARY
CLINIC
Dr. Hector DVM Rivera has
moved and is no longer
practicing veterinary
medicine in Oxnard! Come
visit Dr. Rivera at his
new clinic, Four Paws
Veterinary Clinic, in
Santa Paula! We open from
8:30am-6:00pm
Monday-Friday and from
9:00am-2:00pm on Saturdays
Call to book your
appointment today
805-921-1000. Mention this
add & receive $10.00 off your
visit. Visit our Website for
more information on our
Clinic and Staff:
http://4pawsvet.vetstreet.com
VCS347949
Golden Retriever Puppies
AKC, w/papers, shots
dewormed, beautiful
805-499-1979 661-609-5355
VCS347882
GOLDEN RETRIEVER
PUPS - AKC, shots &
dewormed, parents on site.
$750.
805-208-0995 VCS348677
HAVANESE Really cute and
fun puppies. Male & Female.
www.myplayfulpuppy.com
805-320-1246 VCS348546
JACK RUSSELL
TERRIER
Looking for a loving home
for our Jack Russell
Terrier. Male. Neutered.
2 yrs. old. Very intelligent,
kind-natured dog with lots
of energy. Please call
805-794-9579
for more information.
VCS348328
PUG PUPPY AKC
Apricot Female Pug
Puppy, looking for loving
home. 4 months old. Has
1st shots. $750 firm
805-822-3671 VCS348321
PURE WHITE AKC
English Creme Golden
Retriever 1 1/2 yr old female
from champ lines. Sweet
calm with children. Agoura
818-304-4249 VCS348168
Queensland puppies 8wks,
males & females $250.00
Pure bred 805-896-1644
805-566-4906 VCS348232
SHELTIE puppy AKC 10wks
old sable & white, shots
current, fully socialized
w/ dogs & kids. partially
potty trained, loves to play
charming & adorable $1500
805-797-4075 VCS348329
Volunteers Needed
With Retail Experience.
Cats Cradle Rescue Thrift
Shop. Wed thru Sun 11a-5p
805-642-4228 VCS347540
YORKIE PUPPIES
11 wks old, 2 females,
3 males, $1,000 805-889-5962
VCS347745
Construction
PROJECT ENGINEER
Commercial/TI Exp. req.
747-888-5050
FAX 747-888-5001
employment@
spcinc.com
VCS348485
Construction
Project Manager/
Estimator,Commercial
Construction/
Tenant Improvement/
A Must. 5 yrs+ Exp.+
High Rise. Microsoft
Project Exp.
FAX 818-225-1062
employment@
spcinc.com
VCS348486
Construction
SUPERINTENDENT
Commercial T.I.
5 yrs Exp. + High Rise
Microsoft Project Exp.
747-888-5050
FAX 747-888-5001
employment@
spcinc.com
VCS348484
HELP WANTED!!
DENTAL/PERIODONTAL FRONT
OFFICE/INSURANCE
PROCESSING in WLV/TO.
Front Office ins. exp. or
RDA/DA preferred.
Xlnt benefits, superior
office & wonderful stable staff
for over 20 yrs. Please send
resume by email or fax & call
for interview.
(805)373-6665phone
(805)373-1887fax
dcarlton1@gmail.com
VCS347566
Large Cabinet
Subcontractor seeking
Local Cabinet
Installers
Exp. min. 3 yrs, 5+ yrs
Preferred. If Interested
please Fax resume to
951-279-4544
or Email to
AmberLukes@
excelcabinetsinc.com
VCS348381
NOW
HIRING
Full-Time Positions
• Class A or B Drivers
• Diesel Mechanics
• Laborer
Local work, paid weekly,
Medical, Dental and Life
Insurance, 401k, paid
holidays and paid vacations.
Hollidayrock.com
Fax resume or application to
909.652.9018
or apply in person at:
5438 N. Ventura Ave.,
Ventura, Ca. 93001
VCS348675
SHOP HELPER: Full-Time
Must have aptitude to build
drivelines. Vta Cty. Fax/Email
resume to 805-658-2762 or
coastdriveline@sbcglobal.net
VCS348097
DENTAL ASSISTANT
Full-Time. Must have X-ray
license. Ventura office.
Email Resume to:
admin@endologic.com or
Call 818-242-8955
VCS348340
297
Wanted To Buy
Pets &Supplies
300-315
310
Cats/Dogs
Supplies/Services
310
Cats/Dogs
Supplies/Services
Employment
500-585
540
Help Wanted
Find a home.
Buy it. Sell it. Find it.
vcstar.com/ads
540
Help Wanted
540
Help Wanted
540
Help Wanted
Call 800-221-STAR(7827)
540
Help Wanted
540
Help Wanted
540
Help Wanted
Driver/Warehouse
Person
Clean DMV, Xlnt benefits
/wages, profit sharing+
401K, sales counter expr
helpful. Apply at:
996 E Thompson Blvd
Ventura or fax resume to
805-652-0600
VCS348045
SeIectyouroptions.
Searchbymake
ormodeI.
LocateIocaI deaIers.
T
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professional services To advert|se (805) 437-0000
....NOTICE....
“California law requires that
contractors taking jobs that
total $499 or more (labor and
materials) be licensed. State
law also requires that contrac-
tors include their license num-
bers on all advertising. Check
out your licensed contractor by
calling the Contractors State
License Board at:
1-800-321-2752”
Acoustic Ceilings
Removals•Respray•Paint
www.keysacoustic.com
Mike 805-208-6281
Accept Visa/Mastercard
lic# 416345 VCS348125
Air Conditioning/
Heating
AIRE COMFORT INC.
Residential HVAC
Service/Repair/Installation
BBB A+ Accredited Bus
www.trustlink.com member.
Serving Vta Co for 8 years
Free Inst Est./ $65 Svc Call
bonded & liability Insured
** 805-797-9968 **Lic #877321
VCS348400
Cabinets
Cabinet Refacing
Highest quality workmanship
& materials. 35 years exp.
Call now for free estimate +
a great job at a great price!
805-527-2631
Lic#341411 VCS347934
Carpet Repair
Search
through hundreds of homes for sale
using local MLS. Visit VCSHOMES.com
CARPET REPAIR,
CLEANING &
REINSTALLATION
• Stretching • Patches
• Carpet to Tile
Carpet Rescue
805-483-0899
(Lic #787080) VCS347508
Computer
Services
On-Site Computer Repair
Service for home and
businesses. Apple and PC.
Repairs, Service, Virus
and Spyware removal,
New PC Setups, iPhones
etc. 15 yrs exp.
Local, call for appt:
805-443-0900 VCS348017
Concrete Work
CLARK & SONS
CONCRETE
•Driveway/RV Pad•Patios
•Pool Decks •Sidewalks
No Job Too Small
805-583-0480
LIC#408242 VCS348179
Escobar Concrete
Reasonable rates,
No job too small.
patios, block/retaining
walls, brick, stucco, pavers
tile, driveways stamp,
foundations, sea walls.
Robert 805-890-2198
Lic #819035 VCS347284
JLS MASONRY
& CONCRETE
Block Walls, Retaining Walls
Stone, Veneer & Brick Work
Regular & Stamped Concrete
BBQ & Concrete Benches
Pavers, & Bobcat Service
No Job Too Small;Free Est.
joseslandscapingservices
ventura.com
Jose 805-443-3817 or
805-483-5699
Lic # 798198 VCS348539
Doors
Access
stories and features about new housing
communities. Visit VCSHOMES.com
THE
DOORMAN
Door Installations & Repairs,
New Windows, Moldings,
Stairs Cabinets, Handyman
Serv. 34 yrs exp. Camarillo
thedoormanca.com
805-890-9493
VCS348630
Electrical
Contractor
AROUND TOWN
ELECTRIC
BEST VALUE!
Since 1981
Experienced Contractor
Greg & Steve Mendonca
Specializing in Residential
Jobs & Repairs at
Reasonable Rates.
No Job Too Small
805-988-0636
Lic #407590 VCS348470
Conejo Valley
Electric
Lighting Specialist
Recessed & Landscape
Anything Electrical!
Family Owned
* FREE Estimates *
SERVICE CALL $50
Cool off whole house, Attic &
Gable Fan Specialists.
Supply a ceiling fan & we
will install it for you. $149
We install ALL
Wall Mount, Flat Screen
TV’s, Speakers & Network
Systems.
Will Beat Anyone’s Price!
805-497-7711
818-259-4055
www.conejoelectric.com
Lic#922260 VCS348331
Fencing
JOSE’S
FENCES
Wood Fences & Gates. New
or Repairs Vinyl Fencing &
Wrought Iron. Chainlink.
Block Walls. Best Prices.
Prof Installation
Free Est/Senior Discounts
805-443-3817 or
805-483-5699
Ins/Lic#798198 VCS348540
Utilize
loan calculator to project monthly
payments. Visit VCSHOMES.com
SYV FENCING
All types of wood fencing,
gates and repairs.
Ken 805-944-8047
Free Estimates!
Lic. & Bonded Lic. 864603
syvfencing@hotmail.com
VCS347357
Gardening
Alonso’s Gardening Service
• Yard Maintenance
• Planter Work • Hauling
• Sod • Clean-up & more
• Trim small trees
Free Estimates!
RUBEN ALONSO
805-901-1292
L#0762471 VCS345594
VCS347526
PERMAGREEN
Intensive Lawn Care
Complete landscape.
Mow & Edge
Specials!
Sprinkler/Lawn install.
Tree Removal & Pruning
or Planting. Demo & Haul.
Stamped Concrete,Driveway
FREE ESTIMATES!
805-630-9252
Lic# 842019 VCS347779
Handypersons
A WOMAN
IN TRADE
Home Repairs
Complete Kitchen Bath
Remodeling Custom
Cabinets & Refacing
Wood Work/Molding
Tile, Paint, Drywall
Plumbing, Electric,
Lighting Reasonable/Clean
Lynn 805-487-7709
Lic#285372 VCS348138
CHUCK STOUT
HANDYMAN
All Trades:
Plumbing, Tile, Electric,
Drywall, Painting, Windows,
Framing & Carpentry.
30 + years in Conejo Valley
FREE Estimates
805-499-2860
Lic# 771801 VCS348230
EXPERIENCED
AUSTRALIAN
HANDYMAN
Carpentry, Plumbing,
Electrical, Construction
& Remodeling.
Automotive & odd jobs.
805-216-4919
VCS348288
HANDYMAN
Stucco, Fencing, Drywall,
Doors, Paint Texture,
Plumbing, Tile, Roof
Repair, Carpentry,
Windows, Concrete.
All Work Guaranteed
805-491-8330
St lic/bond 905329 VCS348279
Handypersons
PARAMOUNT
Heating,Plumbing,Electrical
Painting, Drywall, Stucco,
Carpentry, Windows, Doors,
Landscaping & Hauling.
FREE Est & Sr. Discounts
No Job Too Small!
Richard 805-815-8745
Lic#086358 VCS347233
Hauling
CJ HAULING
* Real Estate Clean Up
* Jacuzzi Removal
* Yard & Garage Clean Up
* Fence Removal
* Concrete, Demolition
Debris & More
FREE Estimate Anytime!
805-252-3836
VCS347844
Eddie’s
Hauling &
Gardening Svc
Garage & Yard Cleanups,
Dirt & Concrete Removal,
Tree Trimming Removal
Spa Removal
Stump Removal
* Senior Discounts
FREE Estimates!
805-758-8920
VCS348220
TITO’S HAULING,
FENCES &
LANDSCAPING
TREE REMOVAL
GREAT PRICES!
• Any Demolition
• Garage/Yard Clean Ups
• Concrete Work
• Wood Fences
• Jacuzzi Removal
• New Lawn Sprinklers
SENIOR DISCOUNTS
Cell (805)890-3239
VCS348365
House Cleaning
HOUSE CLEANING
AND/OR
ORGANIZING
By detail oriented
European lady.
Satisfaction Guaranteed!
Call for a free quote
805-628-3724 VCS347966
Buy it. Sell it. Find it.
vcstar.com/ads
House Cleaning
HOUSECLEANING over 20
years exp. Excellent, fast
efficient & thorough work
at modest prices, and...
“I DO WINDOWS”
and gutters. I also love
to help the elderly as needed.
Have xlnt references.
805-201-8585 VCS348549
Landscaping
FIRE
CLEARANCE!!
Property cleared to Fire
Department specifications!
GUARANTEED
TO PASS!
FREE Estimates!
Lic’d, Bonded & Insured
DAVE
805-584-3930
Lic#817027 VCS347841
LANDSCAPE
WEST
All phases of landscaping.
Concrete, masonry, sod,
sprinklers, tree removal,
artificial turf,
demo & hauling.
Call John: 805-341-7150
Lic 735001 VCS348204
Paint Contractor
DONE RIGHT
PAINTING
Quality Since 1989
Contractor.....
does his own work.
Lots of Referrals!
• All work guaranteed
• Residential
• Full Preparation
* FREE ESTIMATES *
805-522-1698
Lic/Ins #575354 VCS347358
GRAND ILLUSIONS
PROFESSIONAL
PAINTING
Interior• Exterior•Custom
Drywall•Stucco•Wood
Repair•Professional Quality
Work All Work Guaranteed
Neat, Clean & Reliable.
Senior Discounts • for Free
Est. call Tim 805-910-5833
lic# 957454 VCS348632
TONY’S
PAINTING
Commercial/Residential
Intr/ExtPressure Wash
Stucco RepairGood Prep
Free EstimatesLow cost
805-388-7014
805-816-0645
Insured/Lic777200 VCS347790
Paint Contractor
WELL DONE PAINTING
•Residential & Commercial
•Acoustic Ceiling Removal
•Drywall Texture
•Complete Handyman Serv
•Free Estimates Lic 766936
805-302-7946
15% Off w/AD VCS348275
Painting
EXCELLENZ PAINTING
Attention - Home
Owners, Renters, Realtors
Wallpaper, Acoustic Ceiling
Removal, Bathtub.
Handyman Services Avail.
Bonded and Insured
Pedro 805-223-9384
Lic #877-858 VCS347385
Plumbing
Clogged Drains?
$50 DOLLAR
ROOTER MAN
Any drain or sewer line
unclogged only $50! 24 hr/ 7
805-758-9420
Insurd/lic#B13894 VCS348518
Roofing
JLG ROOFING
DBA Gils Roofing Co.
New Roof, Re-Roof,
Flat Roof, Woodwork
Owner on every job!
Free Estimates!
All Work Guaranteed!
www.JLGRoofing.com
805-816-9414
Lic #885763
Insured/Workers Comp.
Accepting Visa/MC/Discover
VCS348227
Screens
Call 800-221-STAR(7827)
SCREEN
MACHINE
*** FREE Estimates ***
Mobile -We come to you!
Window Screens
Retractable Doors Special
Sliding Screen Doors
Pet Screen/Pet Grilles
805-530-0333 or 818-744-0184
VCS348338
Sprinklers
BOBLETT’S
SPRINKLER SVC
* Repairs * Timers
* Trouble Shooting
* System Tune-Up
* Upgrades
805-804-7785
VCS348483
BOBLETT’S
SPRINKLER SVC
* Repairs * Timers
* Trouble Shooting
* System Tune-Up
* Upgrades
805-804-7785
VCS347212
Tile Contractors
PETERSON Tile
Setting tile for 2
generations.
Full serv., new tile install.
Full service.
805-649-9451
Lic #412832 VCS348280
Tree Services
AFFORDABLE TREE
SERVICE
•Trimming•Removal
•Stumps •Firewood
Free Estimates, Payment
Options Avail. 20 Yrs Exp.
24 Hr Emergency Service
805-532-1710
licd & insured VCS348631
LOW COST
TREE REMOVAL
• Expert Trimming
• Stump Grinding
• Free Estimates
JOHN APPEL
ANGEL FERREIRA
(805)649-4759
VCS347707
Yourkeyto
findingyour
nextcar.
VCSHomes.com
Every Sunday in The Star
Homes, new homes,
apartments, rentals
and agents.
PositiveIy appeaIing.
Positivelyfor you.
News of the Weird-
Every Friday inTime Out
PositiveIypecuIiar.
Positivelyfor you.
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Colonial House Apartments
PRONTO ABRIREMOS EN OXNARD
705 N. Oxnard Blvd., Oxnard, CA 93030
Departamentos de 1,2,3 y 4 recamaras
Exclusivo para Trabajadores del Campo
Construccion de Energia Eficiente,
Lavadora de trastes, Triturador de basura,
refrigerador, Esfufa, Calefaccion,
Patio/Balcon privado y area de almacen
adicional Administracion y Personal de
Mantenimiento en la propiedad, Sala de
Reuniones, Area de Computo, Area de
Juegos, Area de Picnic, contamos con
estacionamiento dentro de la propiedad.
Para mas informacion llamenos hoy mismo
(805)377-3529
TDD CA Relay Service (800) 735-2929
This Institution is an equal opportunity provider and employer
VCS348446
OPENING SOON!
Colonial House Apartments
705 N. Oxnard Blvd., Oxnard, CA 93030
1,2,3 and 4 Bedroom Apartments
Farm Labor Housing
Energy efficient Construction and design,
Dishwasher/Garbage disposal, Refrigerator,
Stove, Heating, Private Balcony or Patio,
Extra Storage, On Site Management and
maintenance, Community room, Computer
Lab, Laundry Facility, Play Ground and
Picnic area, Onsite parking.
Spaces are limited, obtain your application!
Call today (805)377-3529
Email: cidervillage@buckinghampm.com
TDD CA Relay Service (800) 735-2929
HABLAMOS ESPANOL
This Institution is an equal opportunity provider and employer
VCS348448
540
Help Wanted
NOW HIRING!!
DELIVERY DRIVER
working out of our Oxnard fa-
cility. Must have a valid Class
B DL w/ a clean DMV, xlnt
communication & cust. svc
skills. Ability to work indepen-
dently & lift up to 70 lbs regu-
larly req’d.
Newport Meat Company offers
an xlnt benefits package
which includes medical, den-
tal, vision, 401k w/ a co.
match & a defined benefit
pension plan.
For immediate
consideration, please Fax your
resume, DMV print out & sala-
ry history to 949-474-5041 or
Email to
jobs@newportmeat.com
VCS348585
Ventura County
Shuttle & Airporter
Has Immediate
F/T & P/T positions for
• DRIVERS •
Class C & A /B w/ pass.
endorse, Medical card req.,
benefits, OT & tips.
Must be 25 years or older
Phone Interview 9am-4pm
805.650.6600
VCS348087
Search
through hundreds of homes for sale
using local MLS. Visit VCSHOMES.com
540
Help Wanted
VCStar.com/garagesales
Online garage sale map.
Every Friday P.M.
Air Quality
Specialist I/II/III
$4,416 - $6,655/Month
SBC Air Pollution Control
District is seeking applicants
for entry, experienced or
advanced-level Air Quality
Specialist. For complete
announcement & application
materials go to
www.sbcapcd.org/apcd/
emp.htm
FFD: 5/23/14 EEO
Drug Free Workplace
VCS347423
Nitin Nanda, M.D., A
Professional Corp. in
Agoura Hills, CA 91301 is
seeking Software Engi-
neer Applications. Req: -
The candidate for this po-
sition must be able to de-
velop, create, & modify
gen. computer applica-
tions software, special-
ized utility programs &
must have an ability to
analyze user needs & de-
velop software solutions,
Information Security, HI-
PAA, Video Technology
and LAN/WAN manage-
ment; must also have
exp. w/ Healthcare IT.
Education: Bachelor’s
Degree in Computer Sci-
ence or equivalent w/
min. of (2) yrs of exp.
Email resume & cover
letter to: career@asa-
natm.com VCS348072
540
Help Wanted
Principal Physical Design
Engineer sought by Alta-
Sens for its Westlake Vil-
lage, CA loc. BS in Elec
Engrg, Cmptng Sci, Phys
Sci, Math or rltd + 5 yrs
exp in phys dsgn, or MS in
Elec Engrg, Cmptng Sci,
Phys Sci, Math or rltd + 3
yrs exp in phys dsgn. Reqs
solid know of Magma Talus
dsgn tool, TCL scrptng &
Verilog RTL dsgn tools;
Verilog RTL dsgn exp; exp
in intgrtng 3rd party IPs; &
exp w/ digtl smln, synthesis
& timing sign-off tools.
Reqs perm US wrk auth.
Aply @ www.jobposting
today.com ref #1866.
VCS347599
540
Help Wanted
Financial Analyst
Financial Analyst (FA-
CA) in Thousand Oaks,
CA - Update Access da-
tabase on a weekly basis
with US and EMEA
bookings, billings, and
backlog data. Reqs.
MS+0 or BS+2. Mail
resume to Nexsan
Technology, 1445
Lawrence Drive,
Thousand Oaks, CA
91320; Attn: S. Wiesen/
FA-CA VCS348305
IS NOW HIRING A
Consumer Loan Officer
Join one of the best fi-
nancial institutions in
Ventura. Immediate
opening for F/T experi-
enced Consumer Loan
Officer. No weekends.
Bilingual a +. Experi-
ence from loan appli-
cation to analysis,
approval, & processing
a +. Must be bondable
& able to pass back-
ground check. Please
send resumes to:
ellen@csfcu.org
VCS348090
540
Help Wanted
BOOKKEEPER - F/T
The perfect candidate
should have strong Excel
QuickBooks & Accounting
skills.Please send resume
and salary history to:
socalaccountant@hotmail.com
Moorpark, CA. VCS348443
Utilize
loan calculator to project monthly
payments. Visit VCSHOMES.com
Find new&used cars.
540
Help Wanted
Health Economics
Health Economics
Manager sought by
Amgen. Reqs: Master’s
plus 1 year exp & 1 yr of
wrkng exp in hlth econ
& outcomes rsrch w/
payer & provider.
Training in econ, stats,
& demography.Exp con-
ducting cmptr prgrmng
incl. comorbidity
softwares for risk
assessment & sophisti-
cated mdlng sklls incl.
empirical mdls &
regional mdls. Exp using
SAS/SQL in PC/UNIX,
SPSS, Stata, &
Mathematica. Exp w/
econ anly & evaluations,
policy anly, advncd
statstcl mdlng, & hlth
srvc rsrch. Job Site:
Thousand Oaks, CA.
Send resume referencing
#99PVD6 to: Global
Mobility, Amgen, Inc.,
One Amgen Center
Drive, Mailstop B36-2-C,
Thousand Oaks, CA
91320. No phone calls or
e-mails please. Must be
legally authorized to
work in the U.S. w/o
sponsorship. EOE.
VCS348611
Occupational Therapist
sought by C Street Health
Assoc. LLC for their Glen-
wood Care Center facility in
Oxnard, CA. Will supervise
and plan rehab programs.
Send resumes:
cpodesta@ensigngroup.net
VCS347917
Program Admin
Assistant
SVS, an innovative day
program that serves adults
with intellectual and
developmental disabilities
wishes to hire an individual to
provide office support to their
program located in Simi
Valley. To learn more about
our agency please visit:
http//www.socialvocational
services.org
Send Resume to:
chebert@svsinc.org
Must obtain and maintain
DOJ/FBI fingerprint
clearance, have a good DMV
driving record and pass a job
related physical.
VCS348655
Access
stories and features about new housing
communities. Visit VCSHOMES.com
CALL
800-221-STAR(7827)
540
Help Wanted
Driver Needed
for small manual trans-
mission flat bed truck
Local deliveries
Please apply in person
4747 McGrath St.
Ventura, Ca 93003
VCS348058
Transportation?
vcstar.com/ads
800-221-STAR(7827)
BUYIT.
SELLIT.
FINDIT.
540
Help Wanted
Marketing and KAM (Key
Account Management)
Regional Manager sought by
Amgen Inc. Reqs: Master’s
& 1 yr exp; & exp w/ fore-
casting, market research, &
business analytics exp in
biopharmaceutical or other
healthcare industries;
demonstrate analytical skills
combined with client service
orientation; work collabora-
tively in a team based
environment; good under-
standing of the latest devel-
opments in the
biopharmaceutical industry
& unmet medical needs &
opportunities in the
assigned therapeutic area;
exp within the Oncology,
Bone Health, or Inflamma-
tion therapeutic area; & exp
working in an affiliate office
that interacts with regional
and global teams. Job site:
Thousand Oaks, CA.
Reference # 97HQ5T &
submit resume to Amgen
Inc. One Amgen Center
Drive, B36-2-C, Thousand
Oaks, CA 91320. No phone
calls or e-mails. Must be
legally authorized to work in
the U.S. w/o sponsorship.
EOE. VCS348424
609
Apartments
Unfurnished
540
Help Wanted
Browse
a directory of regional new housing
communities. Visit VCSHOMES.com
Regulatory Affairs
Amgen seeks Regulatory
Affairs Manager. Reqs:
MS + 2 yrs exp & exp
w/Knwldg of regulations
& guidelines pertaining
to CMC [Chemistry,
Manufacturing and
Controls] dvlp’t of
pharmaceuticals on a
global basis; Knwldg of
drug dvlp’t process &
s c i e nt i f i c /t e c hni c a l
aspects of CMC dvlp’t of
bi ophar maceut i cal s;
Ability to interpret
pharmaceutical guide-
lines & regulations;
Expertise in specialized
SW systms used for the
preparation & submis-
sion of regulatory
dossiers & for regulatory
c o mp l i a nc e / c ha ng e
control such as Liquent
Insight, TrackWise, &
Documentum. Job Site:
Thousand Oaks, CA.
Send resume referencing
#92Q399 to: Global
Mobility, Amgen, Inc.,
One Amgen Center
Drive, Mailstop B36-2-C,
Thousand Oaks, CA
91320. No phone calls
or e-mails please. Must
be legally authorized to
work in the U.S. w/o
sponsorship. EOE.
VCS347689
540
Help Wanted
FSS COORDINATOR -
HOUSING SPECIALIST
Full job description and
application available at:
www.hacityventura.org
Filing deadline 5/28/14 @
4pm, EOE VCS348304
609
Apartments
Unfurnished
540
Help Wanted
in Westlake Village is
seeking a
PORTFOLIO
MANAGER - F/T
2+ years direct experience
We are a busy fast-paced but
friendly office looking for
the right candidate to join
our team. Astute attention
to detail. TOPS a plus.
Salary plus Benefits.
Please email resume to:
assistant@integrity
hoamgt.com
VCS348496
540
Help Wanted
Find new&used cars.
Inside Sales Rep
Needed
Simi Valley Based Retail
Supply Co seeks
Bi-lingual Eng/Span A+
F/T, M-F, $12/hr +bnfts
jobs@shopperinc.com
VCS348688
Poly-Tainer leading
manufacturer in plastic
containers is seeking the
following for our
Simi Valley Plant.
•ROTATING SHIFT•
SUPERVISOR
•MAINTENANCE•
TECHNICIANS
•BLOW MOLDING•
TECHNICIANS - ALL SHIFTS
Plastics experience required.
Submit resumes to
polyhr@polytainer.com
VCS348481
609
Apartments
Unfurnished
540
Help Wanted
ADMINISTRATIVE
COORDINATOR - F/T
Private Boarding School
in Ojai seeking energetic
individual w/exceptional
organizational skills.
Must have strong
interpersonal skills and
the ability to multi-task in
a fast paced environment.
Please send resumes to:
enrollment@weiltennis.com
or call 805-640-3403 with
questions. VCS348452
NOW HIRING
OWNER OPERATORS
1.800.289.1639
www.yctinc.com
VCS348487
Rentals
600-683
609
Apartments
Unfurnished
FILLMORE Adult 55+ 1br,
a/c, all utils pd, except elec.
From $795. HUD/Pet OK.
805-524-4124 or 805-642-9527
VCS348536
Oxnard Beach
Channel Island
Village Apts
Studio $925
1+1 $1,075
2+1 $1,275
Spacious floor plans,
heated indoor pool & spa
tennis ct & gym.
Only $500 dep!!
No Application Fees
3650 Ketch Ave
(805)984-5880
VCS348283
THOUSAND OAKS
BRAND NEW 2+2,10 UNITS.
90 Oakview Dr.
$2,250/mo. Conveniently
located, small-pet friendly.
All appliances included, with
washer & dryer in each unit.
www.OakviewDrive.com
or call Tiffany 818-903-2230
VCS347493
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\0S!AR.00M/0U!000RS

VCS
Outdoors
\EN!URA00UN!Y
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A !EAMdI!H A MISSI0N.
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A POCUSLD TOP|C PPOM THL
(írcrleíl, lac| rcW) Brell Iclrscr, Oleri Oarlscr, Arlere Marliret ar1 Sleµlarie Sr¡1er
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609
Apartments
Unfurnished
T.O.- GRANADA GARDENS
APRIL SPECIAL
1/2 off first full months rent.
• 2+2, $1,545-$1,595/mo+dep
Sorry No Pets. Avail Now!
Good Credit Required.
805-492-2113 VCS347765
VENTURA
2+1 on Birch St.
New carpet & paint, balcony,
shared garage, laundry
room, no smoking. 1,295/mo
+$1,295 deposit, lease
required. Call 805-644-2684
VCS348556
VTA 2 Bedroom Apts
$1,500-$1,600/mo utils incl’d.
Walk to Downtown Ventura.
805-653-0809 VCS347838
VTA
Harbor View Villas
Luxury Apt. Homes
• Fabulous Ocean Views
• FREE Cable!
333 N. Kalorama St.
805-648-1760
www.gardnercompany.com
Harborview apts/gardner
management VCS348460
VTA
HUGE 1 BR
Includes Garage
$1,300 - $1,350/mo
Pinehurst 805-647-4648
VCS347113 VCS348561
617
Condos/Townhomes
Unfurnished
Bella Vista Condos
in Ventura
55 & older community
2bed/2bath + large den
2 car tandem garage
$2,300/month.
Contact Michele
805.639.3214 or
805.766.0269
VCS348211
CAMARILLO
Lake Side Village 3+2.5
On the lake, 1670 Dockside.
2 story Condo, just
remodeled w/new flrs, crpts,
fixtures, bathrooms and
window treatments. Living
rm opens to patio/deck on the
lake. Attached 2 car gar,
community pool, club house
& tennis court. $2,400/mo,
1 yr lease, $1,000 dep., N/S,
no pets. Avail now.
805-484-3791
VCS348642
PORT HUENEME
Walk to Beach. Lovely Gated
Port Hueneme Townhome.
3 bedrooms & 2 Bathrooms.
Large two care attached
garage with direct access.
New carpet & paint
throughout. $1,850 per month
+ Sec. Deposit. Available
now. Contact June at
805-432-2667 VCS348205
SV. EAST 3+2.5 outstanding
Fwy, schools, shopping. 2 car
garage. $2,200/month/1yr no
pets/smoking 805.377.3100
VCS347954
WESTLAKE VILLAGE
New Kit, BA & Floors. 2BR,
1BA, attached gar. W/D
hookup. $2,000/mo. Incl.
water/cbl. N/P 818-518-5620
VCS347595
VCStar.com/garagesales
Online garage sale map.
Every Friday P.M.
621
Duplexes
Unfurnished
THOUSAND OAKS,
very private 1+1 for 1 person
semi furn., $1000+ util
Avail July 1, 805-778-0773
VCS348647
625
Houses Furnished
VENTURA EAST:
In need of 2 to 5 Mo
temporary rental for vac.,
place to stay and check out
the area or between
moves-This might be it!
Nice fully furn. 2+2 w/pool.
Inculds all util. pool serv.
& gardener. N/S/P/D
$1,800/mo + sec.
Oak Street Property Shoppe
805-643-1288 VCS347801
627
Houses Unfurnished
NBP 4+2, dining rm, long
two car gar, granite f/p,
hrdwd flrs, fenced bk yd,
on cul-de-sac. Avail Now.
3459 Michael Dr. $2,295/mo.+
$2,500 sec. 310-471-5868
VCS347347
OXNARD Picture Perfect
Home 3+2 BIG family room,
fireplace, fridge, stove, wash
& dry, french doors, pavers,
new blinds, carpet & paint,
custom tile, yard, garage
w/workshop. $2,000 mo.
Broker 805-910-5081
VCS348413
PT Hue nice, clean newer
home 3br 2.5ba 2 sty nr
beach, park & Base N/S/P.
$1950 + dep 805-216-0982
VCS348268
VTA 4+3 Exec Custm Home
entertainers dream,
on cul-de-sac, 1/2 acre, $3195
805-552-7135 VCS348415
VTA 4+3, newer, nr govt
center, lots of upgrades,
prvt deck off mstr bdrm
$2895 805-552-7135
VCS348416
677
Rooms For Rent
Cam: Furn, Mstr bdrm $425
by wkly, prvt entry/ba. room
two $325 bi-wkly in room TV,
micro & frige, $650 moves
in. Near Sandt Rosa Stores
n/s/d 805.857.0310 VCS347379
OXN EL RIO Bedroom in
large shared home w/Wi-Fi.
No smoking, pets or drugs.
$540/mo+dep. 805-485-1240
VCS348245
PORT HUENEME
All house privileges, W/D,
hot tub, near Navy Base &
Cal State. $600/mo & $500 sec.
all util. incl, avail 6/1 call
805-824-2800
VCS348426
PORT HUENEME BAY
Senior complex. Bedroom
and bath with own
entrance, house privileges,
no smoking, must like cats.
Available June 1st $600
805-985-1962. VCS348535
PORT HUENEME
Close to the beach, share
bath, no house privileges,
includes utilities & cable
$475 per month
818-292-3399
VCS347342
SIMI VALLEY Nice Rooms,
New Carpet, Wi-Fi, $515/mo
1/3 util. 805-433-5624
VCS348667
677
Rooms For Rent
VENTURA: 1 Private BR,
$600 near gov’t ctr, own
ba/shower 805-647-9622
VCS348167
VENTURA EAST
$510/mo $510 dep., includes
utils, except Internet &
phone, nr Victoria & Ralston,
No Smoking, No drugs no
pets. 805-794-5334 VCS348499
MobileHomes
692-699
694
Mobile Homes
For Sale
OXNARD 2+1
SENIOR PARK
$30,000 Renovated, Must
See! 805-253-4126
after 5pm. VCS348500
Real Estate
700-874
701
Business For Sale/
Real Estate
BARBER SHOP
FOR
Sale/Rent/Lease
Established 25 Years
Retiring. Located
Thousand Oaks Blvd.
805-495-1907
VCS348620
Commercial
Real Estate
875-893
885
Commercial
Industrial Rent
Call 800-221-STAR(7827)
CAMARILLO
COMMERCIAL BAY
1,200 - 2,400 sq ft
$0.90 sq foot/divisible
roll up doors
Dawson & Pleasant Valley
OFFICE SPACE
approx 600 - 830 sq ft
2nd floor offices
Dawson & Pleasant Valley
$400 - $550 per month
Crossroads Investments
805-485-4040
crossroads-investments.net
VCS348024
885
Commercial
Industrial Rent
CAMARILLO Warehouse
with Offices 675sq ft to
2,240 sq ft. Great
Freeway close location
805-649-4857
VCS347885
SIMI INDUSTRIAL
800sf - 5000sf, with office &
warehouse, roll up door,
terrific location, great
terms and pricing.
Mid Valley Properties
805-527-9632 Ext: 1
VCS348459
VENTURA WAREHOUSE
Retail or Shop 2500 sq ft /
$1250 & 3500 sq ft / $1700
4264 N. Ventura Ave.
Punam 805-886-5295
VCS347795
VTA INDUSTRIAL SPACE
960sf - 2,125sf, with office &
warehouse, roll up door,
terrific location, great
terms and pricing.
Mid Valley Properties
805-527-9632 Ext:1
VCS348456
887
Stores/Offices
Rent/Lease
Beautiful VTA
Office Space Now
Available! Units from
600 to 6400 sf. Built out and
ready to go - or build to
suit. Also, 800-4750sf
Medical offices located
next to CMH. Flexible
terms and great pricing!
805-500-6575
SJNDEN@gmail.com
vcs347829
CAMARILLO RETAIL
Santa Rosa Plaza,
650sf. David Press
(310)553-6512 VCS347426
SIMI OFFICE SPACE
700sf - 1,000sf. Available.
Excellent terms & pricing.
Mid Valley Properties
805-527-9632 Ext: 1
VCS348458
vcstar.com/ads
800-221-STAR(7827)
BUYIT.
SELLIT.
FINDIT.
Musical
instruments?
Stores/Offices
Rent/Lease
800 to 6,300 sqft.
Please Call:
805-500-6575
SJNDEN@gmail.com
VCS347828
VTA OFFICE SPACE
Beautiful units from
540sf - 4,500sf. Great terms
& pricing. Now Available!
Mid Valley Properties
805-527-9632 Ext: 1
VCS348457
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VCS1339555
Visit Us Online At www.crowndodge.com

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Crown Dodge Chrysler Jeep Rum oF Venturu
Militury Sules Speciulist
Open Bvery Duy 9um - 9pm º Suturduy Service
80S-918-S424 80S-839-8289
Crown Service Hotline
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All advertised prices exclude government fees and taxes, any finance charges, any dealer document preparation charge, and any emission testing charge. Prices good through Sunday. All items subject to credit approval and prior sale. Sale prices exclude leases.
N0W 2014 8zM 1500 P|cä0p
kIr, kuIo, Fw, FL,
8Iarao MF8
8kLL FßI6L..................$Z4999
ßL8kTL ........................ $1000
6hßY8LLß 6kFITkL...........$600
MILITkßY 8ühü8..............$600
ßkM 6k 8ühü8.............. $1000
6k 6ühûüL8T................ $1000
ßkM TûM ....................... $1000
25 MP0
8NfII
EPA Estimate
$
19,999
hLT 6ü8T
$
6I01
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VÌN# 246574, 246576,153241 3 zl lk|s Pt|c0
0rown 0odge 0hrys|er Jeep and 8AN wou|d ||ke to thank Samantha for her recent
purchase of a 2014 Jeep Patr|ot Latt|tude 4w0.
Samantha has been |n the havy 080s for 2 1/2 years. She came to 0a||forn|a from
hew York where her fam||y st||| res|des. Her parents, 3 8rothers and 2 S|sters.
She sa|d her brother |s |n the Army, so she wanted to fo||ow |n h|s footsteps and en-
||sted |n the havy. Samantha |oves her Patr|ot and |n her spare t|me ||kes to go h|k|ng.
0ongratu|at|ons on your new purchase! we want to a|so thank you for your cont|nued
ded|cat|on and support to our 0ountry.
â|| N0W 2014 l00p 0k0t0ä00
kuIo, kl6, F·wInl
Lork, TIII 6ruIsa,
8Iarao MF8l8aI
8kLL FßI6L......... $Z8499
ßL8kTL ................. $600
6k 8ühü8 6k8h...... $600
6k 6ühûüL8T........ $1000
6hLßükLL 8ühü8... $1000
MILITkßY 8ühü8..... $600
$
19,999
hLT 6ü8T
VÌN# 181349, 222226, 168852, 188714, 204480 5zl lk|s Pt|c0
EPA Estimate
31 MP0 8NfII
ßctive 0uty
davy 080s
0eastructiea
8attaIiea
Recreation
900-945
909
Boats
SEARAY ‘91
Green/White combo, 18 ft.
V6 bowrider, fish/ski, lots
of extras, all year fun!
8 seater, LOW mi. with
Trailrite trailer. $8,700/obo
Current reg. (9013ND)
805-526-7409 VCS348114
918
Campers/Trailers
PROWLER LITE 5th
Wheel 2001, 25.5 foot, slide
out, 1/2 ton towable, incl
hitch, xlnt cond. $5,800/obo
805-642-1935 VCS348242
933
Motorcycles And
Equipment
HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘10
FLHTCUTG
Tri Glide Ultra Classic,
Trike, black, low miles,
extended warranty, $11,200
hansen74m@netscape.com
VCS348174
Online Classifeds. Buy or Sell.
vcstar.com/ads
933
Motorcycles And
Equipment
HD FLHTCUI ULTRA
ELECTRIC GLIDE CLASSIC
‘02 Included King Tour Pak,
extra seat, battery charger,
helmets, leather gloves.
Maintained by Harley
Dealer. 48,500 miles. Black
w/red pinstripe. $8,500 firm
ALSO 2002 V Star 650
Yamaha custom work,
lowered. extra seat, saddle
bags, new tubes tires. 11,000
miles $3,500 805-659-2290
VCS347774
936
Motorhomes/RV
Northwood Nash 245N 2000
Fifth Wheel, 1 slide out,
sleeps four, $9500
805-444-3952 VCS348219
PROWLER ‘01 40 ft.
2 bedrooms, 2 pop-outs.
Never used. Will trade for
smaller trailer.#5824252
805-217-3901 VCS347929
VCStar.com/garagesales
Online garage sale map.
Every Friday P.M.
Transportation
950-998
977
Auto For Sale
CLUB CAR CARRY ALL I
2001 Neighborhood Electric
Vehicle. Four passenger
48 volt electric Club Car
with a back seat that flips
down to become a Utility
Box and a two passenger
vehicle. Vehicle has a
5hp electric motor. Vehicle
comes with a custom made
Dubonnet Tweed cover.
Side panels and rear panel
zips to open or close. Vehicle
is currently licensed with
the California Department of
Motor Vehicles as a NEV.
(4rvl832 )$2,000 805-525-2066
VCS348309
985
Sport Utility Vehicles
CHEVROLET TAHOE ‘08
3,400 miles,
black, leather 4x4, DVD,
navigation, 3rd row,
excellent condition, 10,900,
sema@netscape.com
VCS348497
FORD
EXPLORER ‘97
V8, awd, good tires, runs
drives, needs some work
(3uah436) $1,200
805-583-2757 VCS348584
Local online classifeds.
vcstar.com/ads
LEXUS RX350 2010
AWD, black/black leather,
43k miles, warranty,
clear title, $11,500
eugene75@netscape.com
VCS347608
995
Wanted Vehicles
CASH FOR YOUR
VEHICLE RV/Boat
o/b-running/not,
vehicle ‘95-up, RV
‘80-up. 1-800-613-5410
VCS347804
WANTED Old Race Cars,
Classics, Motorcycles:
Harley, Ducati, Porsche,
Jaguar, Austin Healy,
Ferrari, Corvette, Mustang
Camaro barracuda old
toys, auto memorabilia one
item to entire collection.
Come to you, pay in cash.
800-299-3114 or 805-495-7445
hadaparts@aol.com
VCS347427
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º E1tcalicral Resctrces
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IN PRIN! | 0N|INE | M0BI|E | !AB|E!:
º Sclccl Bcar1 Meelirç !rac|er
º Slar cí lle Ree|
º li\ Otr Sclccls
º Besl cí Niçl Sclccl Ictrralisr
AN0PEN-000R|00US.
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ar1 Wcr|irç lc lrirç ¡ct SONOOl RA!ON. Ocrµrise1 cí irºesliçaliºe slcries, ºi1ecs, lesl sccres, raµs, reíererce
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PU!!IN0Y0URd0R|0INY0URHAN0S.
(lrcr leíl lc riçll) (Bac| rcW): lcrer le1ir, Mi|e Ocreat\
(Mi11le rcW): Arllcr¡ |lascercia, Rer1¡ letrç, Kallleer Rilscr, Rliarrcr |cl|e¡
(lrcrl rcW) Ker Mar¡ars|i, Slacie Oalarç, Sleµlarie Sr¡1er, Iear OcW1er Mccre
vcstar.com/
garagesales
Online
garagesalemap
everyFridayp.m.
Greatbuys
arecloserthan
youthink.
THANK YOU FOR YOUR SERVICE!
* SgecIaI MIIItary grIcIng and HnancIng *
7he /orgest se/ectlon of 8rlJo/ 1ewe/ry &Loose ÐlomonJs ln the 0.5. ot the /owest µrlcesl
VCSSP2233
The excíu:íve TACOßI 3howroom ín Ven|uru Coun|y!
1 YEAH !MTEHEET FHEE F!MAMC!MG!
MILI1AÞY DI5CCON1!
Men`s Tungsten Band with
engagement ring purchase!

»- ~·~~c ´r~~-
VCS1338208
32
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