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VALLEY
Penn State’s Life and Style Magazine











Research Report written by: Magdalena Krawczyk, Kristin Reed, Paulina Jones, and Mike Young


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TABLE OF CONTENTS

- E x e c u t i v e S u mma r y … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … 3
- Fo und a t i o n/ Si t ua t i o n Ana l ys i s …………………………………………… 5
- M e t h o d o l o g y … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … 9
- R e s u l t s … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … . 1 2
- I mp l i c a t i o n s / Re c o mme n d a t i o n s ………………………………………… 1 7
- Di s c u s s i o n / C o n c l u s i o n … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … 2 0
- A p p e n d i c e s … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … . . 2 2












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Executive Summary
Valley Magazine’s first issue was published in April 2008; this was the first
organization/publication of its kind at the University Park campus. The foundation of our
research was aimed at determining the circumstances that affect Penn State readership of the
magazine. We targeted the Penn State student body ages 18-24. Core issues that were evaluated
were past readership habits, advertising methodology, viewpoints of and reactions to the
publication, knowledge of Valley Magazine, along with demographics. Since this is a fairly new
publication, we wanted to figure out what would be the best possible ways to publicize the
magazine, amplify its success, and increase its readership.
To do so, we wanted to find out what factors influenced student’s inclination to read
Valley Magazine and what communicational methods were most valuable in promotion. Also, we
evaluated demographic factors to find out what audience the magazine should aim its marketing
efforts more heavily upon. To gather this information we conducted a focus group with Penn
State female students and then used our findings to generate a questionnaire. Via the
questionnaire, we surveyed 161 students. To find correlations, we examined the questionnaire
results with PASW Statistics 17.
Our extensive research allowed us to discover a few significant relationships and negate
relationships that weren’t significant. Our study enabled us to determine that marketing efforts
should be more directed toward promoting the printed version of the magazine rather than the
online content because 95% of students would rather read Valley Magazine in print rather than
online.
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Furthermore, our results showed that Valley Magazine would benefit from more intensive
social networking efforts. Respondents who follow one of Valley Magazine’s social media
outlets are more inclined to follow the publication through multiple outlets like Facebook,
Twitter, and Hercampus.com. In addition, we discovered that respondents who follow Valley
Magazine’s Facebook page are more predisposed to attend its events. This fact is important
because Valley Magazine does most of its marketing for the publication’s release, fashion show,
and events through Facebook.
Our line of investigation indicates mainly that Valley Magazine’s readership is heavily
dependent upon knowledge of the magazine’s existence, the availability of the magazine, and the
marketing efforts of the promotional team. It is our hope that these findings, analysis, and
recommendations are advantageous to the Valley Magazine organization.


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Foundation/ Situational Analysis
Valley Magazine is a non-profit organization, student-run publication, funded by
University Park Allocation Committee (UPAC). Valley is a life and style publication catered to
the female populations at Penn State's University Park. Valley is two years old and was launched
spring 2008. Valley is committed to recognizing students for their academic and extra-curricular
accomplishments, while covering trends in culture, style, entertainment and beauty in the
University Park and State College area. Valley is named after Happy Valley and was founded in
September 2007 by former Penn State students Nicole Gallo, Meredith Ryan, Katie Zuccolo and
Kathryn Tomaselli. The magazine was created to be a resource for female undergraduate
students to learn about life and style on and around the University Park campus. After tons of
hard work, the first issue of Valley was published in April 2008.
The Valley Magazine organization is divided into two sectors, the editorial and business
Division. Both are crucial to the success of the magazine. The Editorial Division of Valley is
responsible for putting the entire magazine together; from pitching ideas and writing stories to
editing and designing the pages. Writers are an integral part of this process. They are primarily
responsible for coming up with unique, interesting article ideas, doing the research, and writing
the stories. The Business Division is responsible for advertising sales, advertising creative, event
management and the promotions and marketing of Valley.
The market size is its total readership, which since the fall 2009 issue is 7,056, and the
organization predicts it to be in between 7,500 - 7,800 for the spring 2010 issue.
The market growth rate from Spring 08- Fall 08: 37.5% increase, Fall 08- Spring 09: 7.27%
increase, Spring 09- Fall 09: 22.18 - so in the past two years, there has been a 68% increase (47.5%
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in the 1st year, and 13.89 in the 2nd year). Valley is a free publication, so its profits are made
through advertisements from various campus and downtown State College businesses.
Valley’s main distribution channel is the print edition of the magazine, but it also has an
online interactive version of the magazine. The organization distributes the magazine through
mailboxes, academic buildings, classrooms, and the East, Pollock, Redifer, North, and West
commons.
Valley’s main marketing channels are posters and flyers handed out in the HUB. The
organization also markets through the stall publications, 'The Toilet Paper,’ which is a weekly,
full-color publication in all of the rest rooms located in the HUB-Robeson Center. It features
news and happenings in and around the Penn State Community for the upcoming week. Other
marketing channels are online via its website, Hercampus.com, Facebook and Twitter, as well as
various Penn State related blogs and Web sites such as onwardstate.com, pennstatelive.com and
fashionfille.com.
Since Valley was previously the only magazine of its type in the market, the organization
had no problems here. On the contrary, the organization would say that their only change in the
market is their new competitors, M.O.O.D magazine and FLY magazine, which are online life
and style magazine for women at Penn State as well. M.O.O.D has recently launched their first
issue and FLY did so about a year ago, so these are their new threats. Their business division is
currently coming up with ways to overcome these issues so they can make Valley into successful
organization and not just another campus publication.
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Valley’s key success factor is that it’s currently dominant in its market because its
readership is still increasing. Also, with new media outlets it’s also able to put the full content of
the magazine online and therefore available to everyone.
Valley Magazine isn’t currently reaching a large amount of the student body. Even
though it has an increasing readership rate, the numbers aren’t that impressive when compared to
the number of female students at Penn State. The issues that our research sets out to evaluate and
resolve is Valley’s position with Penn State students through social media and online content.
We believe that doing so will allow Valley to effectively market their magazine, thus vastly
increasing their readership rate.
At the present time, Valley Magazine has a Facebook page, but it only has approximately
730 fans. The publication also has a Facebook group, but it only has approximately 300 people in
the group. The Valley Magazine website appears well-organized, but it doesn’t have a sufficient
amount of hits/visits or comments. This means that not enough people are visiting the website
and next to none are commenting. This is important because a lot of time is spent maintaining the
website. The Valley Magazine twitter is also underrepresented because it only has approximately
100 followers. Lastly, the Valley Magazine blog has only 5 followers. Its readership rates
fluctuate and there isn’t a steady increase. Our research aspires to imply ways to efficiently reach
more Penn State students and increase knowledge of the publication.
The research project will aid Valley Magazine in communicating with its target audience.
This is a lifestyle magazine that can be of use to most of the female student body and that
message has to be perpetuated through more efficient marketing plans. This project can also
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facilitate communication between what the organization is trying to transmit to the public and
what the public is expecting from the publication.
The most important type of information is how successful the marketing efforts are. The
business division of Valley is responsible for sustaining the online content of the magazine. Our
research is trying to determine if the business division should effectively seek out new members
of its social media outlets and website. This will allow Valley to decide where to exert their
promotional hard work.
Important information that needs to be collected via our primary collection method is
determining what the primary audience is and if they are being reached. Also, through use of the
survey we created our research aims to find out if Valley should adhere to promoting their online
content in addition to its printed material. Also, we would like to determine how inclined readers
are to follow Valley’s social media outlets and in turn read the magazine.
The information collected can relate to the suggestions we present to Valley Magazine
because the goal of the publication is to increase readership that can result in increased
advertisements and funding from the UPAC.





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Methodology
Data Collection
Sampling Strategy: We used a Convenience sampling method in order to obtain our results.
Sampling Plan: We decided to send out our questionnaire through Facebook. We believed that
this would allow us to reach the greatest amount of people and obtain the greatest amount of
results. The survey was accessible for participants to complete within a week and a half. Due to
our group member’s participation in varied organizations and clubs, we attempted to achieve a
representative sample of participants from different colleges and of different ages.
Respondents:
We collected data from 161 Penn State University females. The participants represented diverse
individuals. They differed in age (college students ages 18-22) and area of studies. The
distribution consisted of the following:
Freshmen- 12 7%
Sophomores- 14 9%
Juniors- 83 52%
Seniors- 47 29%
Graduate Students- 5 3%





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Communications -32 20%
Liberal Arts -25 16%
Education -16 10%
Engineering- 3 2%
Science -15 9%
Business-25 16%
Arts and Architecture -4 2%
Health and Human Development- 39 24%
Earth and Mineral Sciences- 2 1%
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Strengths and Weaknesses: After we conducted our research and gathered data from our
questionnaire results, we have discovered both strengths and weaknesses among our
methodology.


• Strengths
• Strong representation of respondents from varied Colleges.
• Received a great amount of participants in order to make conclusions about our
notions and hypothesis.

• Weaknesses
• Lack of representation among freshmen and sophomores.
• Underclassmen were a likely group to be under-represented in our study in our
convenience sample. Most of the participants, who we sent the survey to, were our
classmates and friends who are juniors and seniors.


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Results
Q1.
1. Do PSU female students who pay close attention to Stall Stories and The Toilet Paper
read Valley Magazine?
2. I.V.: amount of attention given (Scale) Q5
3. D.V.: whether magazine is read (Nominal) Q6
4. Logistic Regression
5. This will identify if Valley’s ads in these particular publications help to attract readers.
Results:
Number of females who read Valley (n= 42)

This difference was not statistically significant (p= .869). Therefore, we cannot assume that
female students who pay close attention to “The Toilet Paper” and “Stall Stories” read Valley
Magazine.

Q2.

1. Does a student’s college affect their likelihood of reading Valley Magazine?
2. I.V.: college (Nominal) Q19
3. D.V.: whether or not read Valley (Nominal) Q6
4. Chi-Square
5. This will help to determine if one college has a greater number of Valley readers.
Results:
Communications Liberal
Arts
Education Engineering Science Business Arts &
Architecture
HHD
Earth/Miner-
al Sciences
10 5 3 0 3 7 2 10 2
This table shows the amount of Valley readers by college in the sample.
Chi- Square results were not significant (p= .293). Therefore, it cannot be assumed that students
from one college have a greater number of Valley readers than students from another college.

Q3.
1. Does class standing affect the likelihood of reading Valley Magazine?
2. I.V.: class standing (Nominal) Q18
3. D.V.: whether or not read Valley (Nominal) Q6
4. Chi-Square
5. This will help Valley Magazine better target their ads and promotions.
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Results:
Freshman Sophomore Junior Senior Graduate
2 2 18 18 2
This table shows the number of Valley readers by class standing in the sample.
Chi- Square results were not significant (p= .163). Therefore, it cannot be assumed that one class
has more Valley readers than another class.

Q4.
1. Does a student’s preference of print or online format affect if they read Valley Magazine
or not?
2. I.V.: format preference (Nominal) Q16
3. D.V.: whether or not read Valley (Nominal) Q6
4. Chi-Square
5. This will help to determine if it is better for Valley to have a larger print or online
presence.
Print Online
40 2
This table shows how many Valley readers prefer the magazine in print and online format.
Chi-Square results were significant (p= .020). Therefore, it can be assumed that Valley Magazine
is more popular among readers in the print format since an overwhelming majority answered that
they preferred the print format.

Q5.
1. Would those who were likely to follow Valley on its blog, Twitter, and Hercampus.com
be likely to follow Valley on Facebook?
2. I.V.: likelihood of following Valley on blog, Twitter, Hercampus.com respectively (Scale)
Q 11, 12, 14
3. D.V.: likelihood of following Valley on Facebook (Scale) Q13
4. Correlation
5. This will help to determine if it would be useful to embed the link to Valley’s Facebook
on the other aforementioned social networking sites.
Results:
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Correlation results were significant in all cases (p= 0.00 for all three tests). The correlation for
following Valley on its blog and Facebook was .392, the correlation for following Valley on
Twitter and Facebook was .406, and the correlation for following Valley on Hercampus.com and
Facebook was .364. Therefore, it can be assumed that those who are likely to follow Valley on
these three social media sites are also likely to follow Valley on Facebook.

Q6.
1. Are students who are likely to follow Valley on Facebook also likely to attend a Valley
event publicized on Facebook?
2. I.V.: likelihood of following Valley on Facebook (Scale) Q13
3. D.V.: likelihood of attending a Valley event publicized on Facebook (Scale) Q15
4. Correlation
5. This will help to determine if it is worthwhile to publicize Valley events on Facebook or
if people will just ignore them or lose them in all the other noise on their profile.
Results:
Correlation results were significant (p= 0.00). The strength of the correlation was .589. Therefore,
it can be assumed that those who are likely to follow Valley on Facebook would also be likely to
attend a Facebook event advertised by the magazine.

Q7.
1. Does a student’s favorite section in Valley Magazine affect how represented they feel by
the magazine’s content?
2. I.V.: favorite Section (Nominal) Q8
3. D.V.: how represented (Scale) Q7
4. One Way ANOVA
5. This will help to determine if students who have one favorite section of Valley feel more
represented by the content than students who have another favorite section.
Results:
ANOVA results were not significant (p= .556). Therefore, it cannot be assumed that students feel
more represented by one favorite section of Valley than another.


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Q8.
1. Does a student’s class standing affect how much they can relate to the content in Valley
Magazine?
2. I.V.: class standing (Nominal) Q18
3. D.V.: how much you relate to Valley (Scale) Q7
4. One Way ANOVA
5. This will help to determine if students of different class standings feel more or less
represented by Valley Magazine.
Results:
Freshman n= 3
Sophomores n= 1
Juniors n= 27
Seniors n= 10

ANOVA results were not significant (p= .726). Therefore, it cannot be assumed that students of a
particular class standing can relate better to Valley’s content than students from another class
standing. It is important to note that even with a high number of juniors in the sample; the results
weren’t skewed to favor the junior class.

Q9
1. Do students of different class standings prefer to see different types of content in Valley
Magazine?
2. I.V.: class standing (Nominal) Q18
3. D.V.: type of content (Nominal) Q17a-17f
4. Chi- Square
5. This will help us to determine if the Valley readership prefers certain content as a whole
or if different classes would like to see different topics.
Results:
Class Health
&
Beauty
Self
Improvement
Entertainment Cultures &
Diversity
Fashion Student
Profiles
Freshman 10 10 5 3 5 5
Sophomore 9 8 8 5 8 4
Junior 62 46 48 27 46 33
Senior 31 20 22 19 26 21
Graduate 2 3 2 3 1 3
This table shows how many students would like to see the following types of content in Valley
Magazine by class standing.


Health &
Beauty
Self
Improvement
Entertainment Cultures &
Diversity
Fashion Student
Profiles
p-values
.327 .145 .635 .608 .527 .743
This table shows the respective p-values for all the Chi-Square tests run.
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Chi-Square results for all tests were not significant (refer to table above). Therefore it can be
assumed that students of different class standings do not prefer different types of content in
Valley Magazine.

Q10
1. Are Valley readers more inclined to pick up copies of other campus publications in
distribution racks and read them?
2. I.V.: whether read or not (Nominal)
3. D.V.: how likely to pick up magazine on rack (Scale)
4. Independent t Test
5. This test will help to determine if Valley readers are finding the magazine on distribution
racks or if they are getting it by some other means.
Results:
N= 42 (those who read)
N= 119 (those who don’t read)

Independent t-Test results were not significant (p= .068). Therefore, it cannot be assumed that
students who are more inclined to pick up copies of campus publications on distribution racks
read Valley Magazine.

Q11
1. Do students of different class standings who read Valley Magazine have different favorite
sections?
2. I.V.: class standing (Nominal)
3. D.V.: favorite section (Nominal
4. Chi-Square
5. This test will help to determine if current Valley readers of different class standings like
different types of content.
Results:
Class
Standing
Health &
Beauty
Self
Improvement
Entertainment Fashion None
Freshman 1 0 0 0 0
Sophomore 0 0 1 0 0
Junior 5 1 1 1 0
Senior 7 2 0 2 1
Graduate 1 0 0 1 0
This table shows students’ favorite sections in Valley by class standing.
Chi-Square results were not significant (p= .464). Therefore, it cannot be assumed that students
of different class standings have different favorite sections in Valley Magazine. This test was
performed only for those who currently read Valley.

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Implications/Recommendations
After conducting our research and examining our results we have developed a few
recommendations for Valley magazine. These recommendations relate primarily to marketing
and distribution strategies. Based on the insight gathered through meeting with a small focus
group comprised of female Penn State students majoring in Advertising and Public Relations we
have a few suggestions. The group members who we questioned unanimously expressed an
interest in the magazine, yet felt that the magazine was both not promoted and distributed well
enough. Girls who were interested in reading the magazine had not been able to get a copy when
it came out, or had no idea that it was being distributed or where to find the magazine. Based on
this information, we suggest that the business division and promotional staff of Valley start
hyping the magazine more aggressively before the week of distribution. Although the week
where Valley is passed out, called Valley Week, is well promoted among Valley staff and the
Communications College, the majority of Penn State females have no idea that it is going on
until they pass through the HUB during the promotional week. Since not every student passes
through the HUB on a regular basis, we suggest that promotional materials be distributed among
other areas of campus prior to the event. This would help ensure that various students would
know about the release date prior to the actual date, and students who would pick up Valley
would already have prior interest.
Members of our focus group mentioned that they often feel that publications or
promotional materials randomly distributed by students to passerby’s are often dismissed.
Students often think that magazines or pamphlets are advertising or promotional materials for
products or other services, not a student-run publication. A large amount of these materials are
disposed of before they are even looked at. We see this as a problem for Valley and suggest again
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that they promote more aggressively with less expensive materials rather than the magazine itself
as a promotional vehicle for other Valley events. Using the magazine as a way to promote events
is costly and not very effective at all. Members of the focus group mentioned that they had
previously thrown away Valley without knowing what it was. They were not even aware that it
was a student publication, and just thought it was an advertising brochure for a program named
Valley. Based on this, we strongly recommend that Valley spend more time and effort doing
promotions and marketing prior to Valley week. We recommend developing a set of messages to
distribute to students prior to Valley week.
Our questionnaire results mirrored similar findings. We found that all students that
responded, regardless of their college or class ranking, said they felt equally represented by
Valley’s content. Based on this, we know that Valley can continue to approach the student body
as a whole, and that it does not need to segment the magazine or provide specialized content for
differing class standings or colleges.
We noticed a lack of freshmen and sophomore respondents though, and we hope that
Valley can make some changes and reach out to the underclassmen more. Again, we suggest
incorporating more locations into their distribution areas, to make sure that not just students that
go through the HUB receive the magazine. If they go to other areas, such as East, West, North,
or South dorm areas, they could reach more students, particularly younger ones. Older students
often receive notifications through their college of organization openings, or job opportunities.
We suggest that students enrolled in the Division of Undergraduate Studies, or DUS, also be
marketed to.
Girls involved with the magazine often approach students of their own age when using
facebook, simply because most of their friends are of the same age as well. Since we found that
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using facebook can reach the most potential students online, we recommend that Valley look into
techniques to reach more freshmen and sophomores. Juniors and seniors are pretty aware of the
magazine, and well marketed to, so we suggest focusing more on freshmen and sophomores.
Since Valley already uses facebook to market its events and has links embedded in its twitter,
and website to its facebook, we think that their web presence is strong, but we want it to be better
known. We suggest that they do a promotion where students will receive certain perks, such as
discounts for local salons or stores, for actions such as “liking” Valley magazine’s facebook page.
They could also promote that members of Valley’s facebook group would get the first news
about when the magazine comes out, exclusive sneak peeks of content, and special alerts of sales
downtown or fun events on campus. By doing this, Valley would attract more people to flaunt its
page on their own facebook profiles, and therefore increase their facebook presence, which is the
most effective online tool.
We found that respondents appreciate having online content available to them, but that
they still prefer print. Based on this, we suggest that Valley maintain its strong online presence,
continue to post to their blog, but focus primarily on print materials, since students appreciate
those the most. What we feel could be a strong addition, and attractive to print readers, could
again be offering sneak peeks online to make sure that students know that when the magazine
comes out, and get excited for it. This will also help to make students more aware of Valley
happenings online and off.

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Discussion/Conclusion
In the sample, 42 students out of 161 total read Valley Magazine, which translated to 35%.
A majority of these respondents reported they were most likely to pick up publications such as
Valley in the HUB and classroom buildings. After analyzing the sample, it was discovered that
Valley readers do not differ by class standing or college. Also, Valley readers of different class
standings did not feel more or less represented by the content, nor was there a difference of
which type of content was preferred by class standing.
Valley reported to the group that it advertised in “The Toilet Paper” and “Stall Stories.”
Therefore, a test was run to see if those who pay close attention to these publications are more
likely to read Valley. Significance was not found in this instance; however, these publications are
still a viable marketing tool. It was also discovered that those who pick up publications in
distribution racks are not more likely to read Valley. However, the p-value for this test was .068.
With a larger sample, this relationship could very likely change, especially since 95% of
respondents preferred Valley in the print format as opposed to being online.
Questions about social media were a major component in the survey. It was discovered
that most students would be willing to follow Valley on its Facebook page. There was strong
opposition to following Valley on Twitter and Hercampus.com. Hercampus.com is a new site at
Penn State and its name hasn’t had a chance to spread. Since a majority of Valley readers
preferred following Valley on Facebook, a test was run to see if these readers would be likely to
attend a Valley Facebook event. Significance was found in this instance, therefore proving that
Valley marketing efforts over Facebook wouldn’t get lost in all the other noise on people’s
profiles. Finally, an unexpected discovery was that those who were more likely to follow Valley
on Facebook were also more likely to follow Valley on its blog, Twitter, and Hercampus.com.
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Therefore, these other social media sties shouldn’t be completely ignored by the Valley
marketing staff.
Although many of the relationships that were tested for could not be proven, useful
pieces of information were still discovered for the magazine. These discoveries will be discussed
further in the implications section of this report.

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Appendices
Focus Group Questions
1. What is your opinion on representatives passing out publications such as the
Collegian, Phollegian, Phroth, Valley Magazine, etc. in the HUB and other public
buildings?

2. Where are you most inclined to pick up a newspaper/magazine that you are interested
in reading? (Dorms, downtown, class buildings, HUB, etc.)

3. When you see other magazines/publications besides the Collegian in distribution
racks in campus buildings, how inclined are you to get a copy and check it out? OR
Are you more inclined to pass by it without even noticing?

4. If you were to read a Collegian feature about another campus publication, would you
be more inclined to pick up a copy of the other publication and read it?

5. Where else do you find out information about cultural events or alternative activities
that are happening on campus?

6. Have you checked out Hercampus.com?(if not, tell them to look at it now) If so,
could you give us an opinion about the content on this site? What do you think about
advertising a publication like Valley Magazine here?

7. How closely do you pay attention to “The Toilet Paper”, PSU’s flyer that is put in
bathroom stalls and contains information about different events and activities on
campus?

8. If you currently read Valley, what do you dislike about it or what would you change?
If you do not currently read Valley is there a reason for this?

9. How do you identify, if at all, with the content in Valley Magazine?

10. What kind of topics and issues are you most interested in reading about in a
publication? (Health, Beauty, Style, Sports, etc.)

11. After answering the above question, what type of content would you like to see most
in Valley Magazine?

12. Do you think there should be some content added to the publication that would attract
more readers?

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13. When looking at Valley Magazine, do you skip over articles or are you interested in
reading the whole publication? If you skip articles, which ones are you most likely
not to read?

14. Do you feel like Valley Magazine concentrates too much on one specific area/topic,
and could gain a wider range of viewers if another element was added to the
publication? If so, what should be added or taken away?

15. What is your opinion on Valley Magazine’s overall image?

16. Valley Magazine now has a more interactive website. What is your opinion about the
online blog articles? How do you feel about having the entire publication available
online? (have other group go online and check out site)

17. Are you more likely to read print publications or get your information from an online
version of the publication?

18. Would you be inclined to go in and comment on online content on Valley’s website?

19. What other sites online do you feel would be a good place to post the link to Valley
Magazine’s site?

20. What other events or places do you frequently attend that would be fitting for Valley
Magazine issues to be distributed/available?

21. In your opinion, how much does Valley Magazine emulate the Penn State community?

22. How represented do you feel when you read Valley Magazine?


Survey Questions
1. What is your opinion about representatives passing out campus publications in places
such as the HUB and dining commons? * Such as The Collegian, Phroth, Fly, Kalliope, Valley,
or MOOD?

1 2 3 4 5

Inconvenient

Convenient

2. Where do you typically pick up a campus newspaper/magazine that you are interested in
reading? Check all that apply. *
• Dorm Buildings
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• Classroom Buildings
• Dining Commons
• Hub Student Union Building
• Downtown Stores
• Other:

3. When you see other magazines/publications besides the Collegian in distribution racks on
campus, how likely are you to get a copy and check it out?

1 2 3 4 5

Not Inclined

Very Inclined

4. If you were to read a Collegian feature about another campus publication, how inclined
would you be to pick up a copy of the other publication and read it? *

1 2 3 4 5

Not Inclined

Very Inclined

5. How close do you pay attention to “The Toilet Paper” and “Stall Stories” (PSU’s flyers that
are put in bathroom stalls and give information about campus events)? *

1 2 3 4 5

No Attention

Close Attention

6. Do you currently read Valley Magazine? * Valley Magazine is a student-run publication
who's mission is for students to recognize other students for their academic and extra-
curricular accomplishments, and to feature local style, entertainment and lifestyle trends.
You can view older issues of the magazine at http://www.Valleymagpsu.com
• Yes
• No
7. How well do you feel the content in Valley Magazine relates to you?

1 2 3 4 5

Not Relatable

Very Relatable

8. What is your favorite section in the magazine? *
• Health & Beauty
!%(#

• Self-Improvement
• Entertainment
• Cultures & Diversity
• Fashion
• None

9. Do you have any suggestions for what Valley could do to make their content more
relatable to you?

10. How did you first find out about Valley Magazine?
• Website (Valleymagpsu.com)
• Facebook
• Twitter
• Friend/Classmate
• CommAdvisor Email
• Other Organization
• Professor/Advisor
• Valley Event
• Picked up a copy of the magazine
• Collegian/Onward State
• Other:
• How Inclined would you be to follow Valley magazine through these
websites?

• 11. Valley Website/Blog * http://www.Valleymagpsu.com

1 2 3 4 5

Not Inclined

Very Inclined

• 12. Twitter * http://twitter.com/Valleymag

1 2 3 4 5

Not Inclined

Very Inclined
!%)#


13. Facebook * http://www.facebook.com/#!/pages/VALLEY-
Magazine/222827315412?v=info&ref=ts

1 2 3 4 5

Not Inclined

Very Inclined


14. Hercampus.com * http://www.hercampus.com

1 2 3 4 5

Not Inclined

Very Inclined

15. How inclined would you be to attend a Valley Magazine event marketed on Facebook? *

1 2 3 4 5

Not Inclined

Inclined

16. What format do you prefer to read a campus magazine in? *
• Online
• Print

17. What type of content would you like to see most in Valley Magazine? * Check all that
you would like to see.
• Health & Beauty
• Self-Improvement
• Entertainment
• Cultures & Diversity
• Fashion
• Student Profiles
• Other:

What is your class standing? *
• Freshman
• Sophomore
• Junior
!%*#

• Senior
• Graduate Student

What college is your major apart of? *
• Communications
• Liberal Arts
• Education
• Engineering
• Science
• Business
• Arts and Architecture
• Health and Human Development
• Earth and Mineral Sciences
• IST




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