NEED A CONDO?

TWO MORE DEVELOPERS SUBMIT PLANS/PAGE 3
Friday, May 23, 2014 u One dollar
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Claremont
claremont-courier.com
LETTERS/ PAGE 7
CALENDAR/ PAGE 18
Who isn’t having a fundraiser this month?
Find out at claremont-courier.com
POLICE BLOTTER/ PAGE 4
SPORTS/ PAGE 16
t
t
Birders rejoice! Things just got
wild on Foothill Boulevard/
COURIER photos/Steven Felschundneff
Lillian Barrett-O’Keefe celebrates after receiving her diploma on Saturday during commencement at Pitzer College. It was a special graduation for Pitzer, as they were
celebrating the 50th anniversary of the college. Below, Claremont McKenna College students await the calling of the graduates.
PAGE 8
t
A commencement extravaganza/ PAGE 34
Moving up,
moving on
Crossing paths
[Editor’s note: The following letter was
forwarded by Marcus Dowd on behalf of
the author, his wife Elin Dowd, in the
hopes that it might inspire a bit of kind-
ness in Claremont. —KD]
Dear Editor:
Hug. Last night, I set out for my run. I
use “run” in the very loosest of terms, as it
was really a fast walk, not even a jog. As
usual, I started by heading over the
Thompson Creek Bridge. As I came past
the bushes, at the entry, I could see a
woman and her 3-year-oldish daughter
crossing the bridge, so I held back to make
sure there was enough room.
As soon as the little brown-haired-with
huge-brown-eyes girl saw me she started
yelling, “Hug!” and came running towards
me, wrapping her arms around my leg.
I was caught a little off-guard with
iPhone in hand, and unexpectedly patted
her back with my left arm. It was a mea-
ger attempt at a hug with a little stranger.
As we parted, the mom said softly,
“Sorry.” However, I thanked her for giv-
ing my run such a nice start. As I turned
around to depart, I heard very loud and
clear, “Another hug!” This time I was
ready I turned around, squatted down and
opened both arms to embrace this little
girl. Satisfied, we both parted ways and
continued on our journeys. I’m pretty sure
as I left them I heard her mom starting the
“We don’t hug strangers” discussion.
What a great moment. Why don’t we
spontaneously ask for hugs from strangers
when we really need them? I may never
see this family again but, if I do, I will in-
troduce myself, as to never be considered
a stranger again and to always be ready for
the genuine warmth and friendly greeting
that came from this adorable toddler.
Elin Dowd
Claremont
READERS’ COMMENTS
Claremont COURIER/Friday, May 23, 2014 2
The Claremont Courier (United States Postal Service 115-180) is published once weekly by the Courier Graphics Corporation at 1420 N. Claremont
Blvd., Suite 205B, Claremont, California 91711-5003. The Courier is a newspaper of general circulation as defined by the political code of the state of
California, entered as periodicals matter September 17, 1908 at the post office at Claremont, California under the act of March 3, 1879. Periodicals postage
is paid at Claremont, California 91711-5003. Single copy: One dollar. Annual subscription: $52.00. Send all remittances and correspondence about sub-
scriptions, undelivered copies and changes of address to the Courier, 1420 N. Claremont Blvd., Suite 205B, Claremont, California 91711-5003. Tele-
phone: 909-621-4761. Copyright © 2014 Claremont Courier
one hundred and sixth year, number 20
1420 N. Claremont Blvd., Ste. 205B
Claremont, CA 91711
(909) 621-4761
Office hours: Monday-Friday
9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Owner
Janis Weinberger
Publisher and Owner
Peter Weinberger
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Editor
Kathryn Dunn
editor@claremont-courier.com
Newsroom
City Reporter
Angela Bailey
news@claremont-courier.com
Education Reporter/Obituaries
Sarah Torribio
storribio@claremont-courier.com
Sports Reporter
Alex Forbess
sports@claremont-courier.com
Photo Editor/Staff Photographer
Steven Felschundneff
steven@claremont-courier.com
Reporter At Large
Pat Yarborough
Calendar Editor
Jenelle Rensch
calendar@claremont-courier.com
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Sammy
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Production
Ad Design
Jenelle Rensch
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Kathryn Dunn, Jenelle Rensch
Website
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Legal Notices
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legalads@claremont-courier.com
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Agendas for city meetings are avail-
able at www.ci.claremont.ca.us
GOVERNING
OURSELVES
Tuesday, May 27
City Council
Council Chamber, 6:30 p.m.
Wednesday, May 28
Architectural Commission
Council Chamber, 7 p.m.
ADVENTURES
I N HAI KU
Rose sun this morning
Pink orange red sky omen
Earth bows obeisance
—Michael Bever
Haiku submissions should reflect upon life
or events in Claremont. Please email entries
to editor@claremont-courier.com.
CORRECTION
In the Friday, May 16 edition of the
COURIER, it was mistakenly reported
in the Police Blotter that the wife of
Phillip Hagen had called police after
he allegedly attempted to hit her with a
car and kicked two kittens. The call to
police was actually made by Mr.
Hagen’s ex-wife, the reporting victim.
We apologize for the error.
City, schools closed Monday for Memorial Day
In celebration of Memorial Day, city
hall and services, as well as all public
schools, will be closed Monday, May 26.
Residents are invited by American Le-
gion Keith Powell Post 78 to Memorial
Day services on Monday at 11 a.m. at Oak
Park Cemetery.
Additionally, the Costanoan/Ohlone
Rumsen Carmel Tribe will host a benefit
concert for homeless veterans on Sunday
May 25 at the Fox Theater in Pomona.
Doors open at 6 p.m., the show starts at 7
p.m. The concert will be headlined by
Grammy award-winner Micki Free, who
will be joined by other Native American
artists Redbone, Angela Lazon and come-
dian Jim Ruel and also Hank Linderman.
Actor Saginaw Grant, most recently from
“The Lone Ranger” and actress Mariana
Tosca are masters of ceremony.
Tickets for the concert are $25 for gen-
eral admission, $50 for orchestra seating,
and $75 for VIP/loge seating. Tickets
may be purchased online at www.fox
pomona.com. Call (909) 623-7889 for
more information.
Claremont COURIER/Friday, May 23, 2014 3
CITY NEWS
T
uesday night’s meeting
of the Planning Com-
mission brought forward
two new development propos-
als, one on south Mills Avenue
and a second mixed-use plan on
Foothill Boulevard and Monte
Vista Avenue.
Brandywine Homes may have pulled
its plans for a development at the former
La Puerta site on Forbes Avenue, but the
Orange County-based builder hasn’t
given up on construction in Claremont.
The city and planning commission are
currently reviewing plans for a proposed
residential development on a 1.86-acre
site currently owned by City Blessings
Church, located at 735 S. Mills Ave., abut-
ting the 10-freeway. Brandywine’s pro-
posed project includes 20 two-story,
detached residential homes.
While the Mills Avenue deal is still in
its infancy, Brandywine is further along
on a second project on Auto Center Drive.
Plans for housing on 11.5 acres in south
Claremont have not yet been submitted,
but Director of Community Development
Brian Desatnik said he expects to receive
them within the next week or two.
“Brandywine is working with Toyota
to sell a portion of [of the land] to Roger
Hogan for his dealership,” Mr. Desatnik
explained. “Toyota could move into the
old Ford building and we’re expecting a
Volkswagen dealership to move to the
current Toyota location.”
The architectural commission will meet
Wednesday, May 28 to further discuss
Brandywine’s plans on Mills Avenue,
with a review of the Auto Center Drive
plans anticipated in the coming months.
Claremont Commons
The proposed development at Foothill
and Monte Vista, dubbed Claremont
Commons, would include 25 single-fam-
ily detached homes, 68 townhomes and
5,600 square feet of retail space with
amenities like public art and parks.
According to the planning commission
agenda report, the owner of the 9.7-acre
parcel has been working with the city to
develop on that land since the 1980s. The
site was purchased in 1984 with hopes of
building a supermarket-anchored shop-
ping center, but nothing panned out.
The Arco gas station opened its pumps
in 1997, with Armstrong Garden Center
following in 1999. The remaining acres
have remained undeveloped, but it has
long been a site of interest, with discus-
sion of everything from the energy com-
pany Technip considering a move from
First Street to the possibility of a Target
store. None of these projects materialized
as developers cited difficulties building on
the oddly-shaped lot and financial con-
straints.
In September of 2012, the property
owner, Clare Properties LLC, decided on
a mixed-use project to include residential,
retail and open space. The parcel is di-
vided between Claremont and Upland,
thereby spanning two counties—Los An-
geles and San Bernardino. The owners
and city officials began talks with the city
of Upland to try to move the city of Clare-
mont’s boundary east to Monte Vista.
Nothing has been decided at this point,
but the possibility of a border move re-
mains.
“We’ve had some preliminary talks
with Upland and we’ll be following up
soon,” Mr. Desatnik said. “[Upland] is
open to the idea but it depends on whether
the timing will work with the developer.”
Handing over valuable square footage
without some kind of beneficial trade-off
would be unlikely for any city, so Clare-
mont officials are looking at other parcels
within city boundaries that Upland may
be coveting. The undeveloped land be-
tween Claremont Boulevard and Monte
Vista Avenue, going several miles north
of Foothill, has created an awkward diag-
onal line running between the two cities.
“It creates odd shapes that aren’t con-
ducive to development in any city,” Mr.
Desatnik said. “We’ve got some parcels
they may want to get in their sphere—
possibly up on Base Line. It’s all in talks
right now. There’s no deal or anything.”
Zoning provides another hurdle for the
developer, Walbern Developments. The
Foothill/Monte Vista plot is zoned com-
mercial and although there is a small com-
mercial aspect, the project overall is
primarily residential and includes a pre-
carious 3.5-acre “no-build” zone running
through the middle.
The no-build zone, a 150-foot by 1000-
foot space, was handed down from the
Federal Aviation Administration as a re-
sult of the position of Cable Airport and
flight takeoff patterns, according to Plan-
ning Commission Chair Jeff Hammill.
“It’s not anywhere near ready to go to
council yet. There are several things that
need to be worked out in terms of juris-
diction,” Mr. Hammill said.
The commission is supportive of the
project in concept, Mr. Hammill ex-
plained, but concerns remain regarding
the no-build zone and the county/city line
issue. Given all the constraints, Mr. Ham-
mill noted that it appears to be “a pretty
creative project.”
Even with support for the project from
both city staff and the commission, Wal-
bern still has a long road ahead of them.
“I’m going to have them do another
preliminary before they go to architectural
commission,” Mr. Desatnik said. “Then
we’ll do an environmental review on it. It
could be six months before it gets back to
the planning commission.”
Preliminary plans are on file with the
community development department at
city hall, 207 Harvard Ave., and are avail-
able for review between the hours of 7
a.m. and 6 p.m., Monday through Thurs-
day.
—Kathryn Dunn
editor@claremont-courier.com
Homebuilding flurry continues with two additional proposals
Rendering provided by Walbern Developments
This rendering of a proposed mixed-use development, Claremont Commons,
shows the view from Foothill and Monte Vista, including a fountain with public art
and three-story townhomes in the rear that include a viewing deck on the roof.
T
he man accused of assault with a deadly weapon against a
Claremont police officer who shot him appeared in court on
May 15 and entered a plea of not guilty. Marcelo Herrera
was arraigned in Pomona Superior Court on three felony counts, in-
cluding assault on a police officer, unlawful driving or taking of a
vehicle and possession of a controlled substance, methampheta-
mine.
Judge Jack P. Hunt set a preliminary hearing date of June 10, at
which time the 24-year-old will also be arraigned on two charges of
probation violation and a misdemeanor charge of resisting, delaying
or obstructing an officer from an unrelated incident. Bail was set at
$85,000. If convicted of all charges, Mr. Herrera faces up to six
years and four months in prison.
* * * *
Arraignment of a Coachella Valley date farmer accused of raping
a 12-year-old Claremont girl on March 21 has been continued from
May 14 to June 9. Joseph Chandler Davall, 34, faces seven felony
counts in Los Angeles County, including two counts of aggravated
sexual assault of a child; one count each of forcible rape; sexual
penetration by foreign object; and assault to commit a felony during
the commission of first-degree burglaries. Mr. Davall was arrested
on April 18 in Yucca Valley and remains in custody in lieu of $5
million bail.
—Angela Bailey
news@claremont-courier.com
Tuesday, May 13
Delinquents damaged the statuesque
letter that made up a portion of the West
Hall signage at Pitzer College. Campus
safety notified police on Tuesday that
sometime between 2 p.m. on Friday, May
9 and 6 p.m. on Monday, May 12 vandals
managed to kick down the letter “A” in
the word “Hall” just above the second
floor of West Hall. The damaged is esti-
mated at $1,200. There are no suspects.
* * * *
An open bedroom window on the 900
block of Arrow Highway was seen as an
opportunity for a thief to commit bur-
glary. As the victim slept, an unknown
suspect allegedly reached through the
open window and stole a $500 iPhone
and $600 laptop on a desk near the win-
dow. The suspect fled the scene unde-
tected, and the items have not been
recovered.
Wednesday, May 14
The serene resting place for many of
Claremont’s loved ones fell victim to
grand theft after an unknown suspect
stole a grave marker at Oak Park Ceme-
tery. The thief unearthed a 12-by-24-inch
brass plaque from a granite base during
an unknown time period. The missing
marker is said to be valued at $1,500 and
is the first to be reported stolen from the
cemetery.
* * * *
A Claremont resident wasn’t too smart
when he started an unauthorized bonfire
surrounded by people with warrants,
drugs and drug paraphernalia. At 1:40
p.m., police responded to the 900 block
of Alamosa Drive where they discovered
the resident and his companions around
a backyard blaze. Officers cited and re-
leased the 61-year-old man for violating
the municipal code of having a fire with-
out permission. His friends, however,
weren’t as fortunate. Rebecca Wechter,
31, was arrested for an outstanding war-
rant and possession of methamphetamine
and a hypodermic needle. Azusa resident
Michael Chacon, 47, was also arrested
for an outstanding warrant and posses-
sion of a pipe.
* * * *
The future amenities available to
Claremont Manor residents took a big hit
last week when thieves stole 35 flat-
screen televisions, still in the original
packaging. According to Lieutenant
Mike Ciszek, the suspects forced open a
window and entered the facility some-
time between 1 p.m. on May 12 and 2:30
p.m. on May 14. The televisions stored
at the location were property of the
Claremont Manor and valued at $24,500.
Thursday, May 15
An Ontario man was arrested for rob-
bery after stealing two CDs from Rhino
Records and fleeing the scene. At ap-
proximately 4:53 p.m., Bradley Pack ac-
tivated the store’s anti-theft alarm when
leaving through the front door with
$40.31 worth of property. A witness at-
tempted to detain the 49-year-old, to
which Mr. Pack replied, “I’m a danger-
ous person, stay back!” The suspect then
fled in a vehicle and was stopped by po-
lice several blocks from the scene. Mr.
Pack was identified as the thief and ad-
mitted making the statement to the wit-
ness. He was arrested for the theft in
addition to two warrants out of San
Diego County for robbery. He was cur-
rently on probation for grand theft.
Friday, May 16
A Bermuda Dunes woman was ar-
rested around 5 a.m. outside of a Clare-
mont McDonald’s for being drunk and
disorderly in public. Anabel Garcia was
initially spotted stumbling and vomiting
in a Pomona street when a Good Samar-
itan attempted to transport the 26-year-
old to a local hospital for assistance.
When Ms. Garcia refused to exit the ve-
hicle, the do-gooder contacted police.
According to Lieutenant Mike Ciszek,
Ms. Garcia exhibited signs of intoxica-
tion including slow speech, bloodshot
eyes and was swaying side-to-side while
emitting a strong odor of alcohol. She
was arrested for public intoxication and
taken to jail.
Saturday, May 17
Officers were called to the 300 block
of South Mills Avenue after a resident
discovered her garage and the vehicle in-
side had been broken into. The victim
told police that her purse had been in the
car when unknown suspects broke the
passenger window and made off with the
handbag, including her driver’s license
and credit cards. Also missing from the
garage was a security light and digital
camera system. The suspect later used
one of the credit cards at a Mobil gas sta-
tion in Pomona and remains at-large.
* * * *
A 60-year-old bicyclist was trans-
ported to a local hospital after being
struck by a motorist on Towne Avenue.
The driver and cyclist were both travel-
ing north on Towne when the vehicle al-
legedly attempted to make a right-hand
turn onto Richmond Drive. The car col-
lided with the bicycle, sending its rider
to the ground. Complaining of hip pain
and dizziness, the bicyclist was taken to
Pomona Valley Hospital for evaluation.
Sunday, May 18
The Claremont Pooch Park was filled
with all kinds of barking last weekend
and it wasn’t coming from the dogs.
Claremont resident Katherine Hatcher,
47, was put under a private person’s ar-
rest and issued a citation for battery after
a verbal confrontation turned physical at
College Park. It all began when the al-
leged victim was exchanging personal
information with a witness, whose pit
bull had attacked a terrier at the park.
That’s when Ms. Hatcher allegedly ap-
proached the parties and began arguing
with the owner of the terrier that was at-
tacked. The situation escalated and Ms.
Hatcher allegedly threw a Starbucks
paper cup containing a small amount of
coffee at the pet owner, who moved
quickly and was able to avoid the cup.
Officers arrived on scene, placed Ms.
Hatcher under a private person’s arrest
and issued her a citation per the victim’s
request. No one was injured and the ter-
rier was treated at a local animal hospital.
—Angela Bailey
Claremont COURIER/Friday, May 23, 2014 4
POLICE BLOTTER
CITY NEWS
Judicial process moves forward
for two Claremont suspects
Photo courtesy of Pitzer
The brand-new sign at Pitzer College’s West Hall was damaged by an unknown
vandal sometime between Friday, May 9 and Monday, May 12.
Photo courtesy of Doug Sturgis
An unidentified bicyclist is treated after being hit by a car while riding north on Towne Avenue
on Saturday, May 17. After citing hip pain and dizziness, she was taken to Pomona Valley Hop-
sital for evaluation.
EDUCATION
Claremont COURIER/Friday, May 23, 2014 5
San Antonio to go solar, build unity with new student store
H
ow do you begin a
revolution? Some-
times the best way is
to start small.
At last Thursday’s school board
meeting, San Antonio
High School student
representative Mindy
Hansen—whose job is to report on the
doings of several Claremont schools—
shared that the local continuation
school is going green in a big way.
San Antonio High School (SAHS),
she said, is in the midst of creating a
solar-powered student store. Thanks to
a three-by-four-foot panel to be in-
stalled on its roof, the structure will be
illuminated entirely via sunlight.
The store will measure roughly 13
feet by 10 feet and have two windows
where students will be able to buy
snacks and San Antonio High School
merchandise. Proceeds will help fund
the school’s student government.
The 35 students in Bruce Pardee’s
two ROP construction classes are con-
structing it. The teens are doing it all,
from designing to framing to finishing.
The $2,000 budget for the project, half
of which was used to purchase the solar
panel, comes courtesy of a Lefler Grant
SAHS obtained with the help of Clare-
mont Rotary.
“The proposal we wrote was con-
struction of the future as opposed to
construction of the past,” San Antonio
Principal Sean Delgado said, adding
that special thanks go to Rotary mem-
ber Chuck Carpenter for reaching out to
the school.
Mr. Delgado, who said the store is
about 75 percent completed, is excited
about the many learning opportunities
the project provides.
The students building the store are
learning to work with green technology
along with mastering construction tech-
niques. The students who staff the store
will learn crucial workplace skills like
using a cash register and tallying the
daily take.
Mr. Delgado loves the prospect of
having school-themed merchandise
such as San Antonio apparel for sale.
He has made a point of trying to foster
a strong sense of school spirit since his
arrival at the school last year, reviving
ASB and encouraging the students to
select a new mascot. This year, the 26
members of the SAHS student govern-
ment took the initiative to create T-
shirts and sweatshirts.
“It’s amazing to look across your
campus and see everyone wearing
school merchandise with your logo on
it,” Mr. Delgado said. “They wear it
with pride.”
The plan is to create more such items
so that each of the school’s 110 students
can let everyone know that they are
happy to be San Antonio Lions. Mer-
chandise touting the school’s various
clubs or a graduating class may also be
provided.
“Whatever builds that sense of iden-
tity for the kids, I want to encourage
that,” Mr. Delgado emphasized.
He calls the project a win-win for
everyone.
“The students get a student store at
minimal cost. And the construction stu-
dents have a meaningful project they
can build to contribute to the school as
a whole,” Mr. Delgado said.
The students have been fascinated
with the solar aspect of the construc-
tion, Mr. Delgado said.
“I remember watching the kids tak-
ing the panel out of its packaging and
putting it in the sun to see how much
energy it absorbed,” he said. “Then
they stood in front of it and cast a
shadow to see how much that amount
went down.”
As the student store—another tool to
unify SAHS students into a pride of
Lions—prepares to open, it is likely
that the school’s 33 graduating seniors
are feeling that traditional mix of
school spirit and “senioritis.” They will
join Claremont High School students
for upcoming graduation, set for June
12 on the CHS football field.
—Sarah Torribio
storribio@claremont-courier.com
Photo courtesy of Sean Delgado
San Antonio High School will incorporate solar panels into its newly-constructed
student store, where students can purchase snacks and SAHS merchandise.
A
proud contingent of kids and
staffers from Vista del Valle took a
bow at last Thursday’s gathering of
the Claremont Unified School District
Board of Education.
The board honored the local elementary school for a
remarkable disappearing act. The Vista
community has reduced the amount of
waste produced at the school by 95 per-
cent, going from nearly 1,000 bags of trash per year to
less than 100.
The environmentally friendly feat earned the school
grand prize in Grades of Green’s third annual Trash
Free Lunch Challenge, a kudos that comes with a
$1,000 reward.
Twenty-four K-12 schools in Los Angeles County
participated in the challenge, with Vista sharing top
honors with Parras Middle School in Redondo Beach.
Competitors were judged on their ability over the
course of the year to: create and implement a trash free
lunch program that diverts the most trash bags from
landfills per day, educate the most students and adults
within their campus community and establish the sus-
tainability of the program for years to come.
Vista’s effort was spearheaded by first grade teacher
Juliana Mittino-Smith and enthusiastically embraced
by students and staffers. Members of the school’s Green
Team are urged to eat all of their food and then sort their
own trash, with recyclable items going into the proper
receptacle.
They toss anything suitable for composting, like or-
ange rinds, apple cores and banana peels, into a can
whose contents will be oured into the school’s compost
pile. Once it decomposes, the finished compost is used
to nourish the soil of Vista’s thriving garden, which is
overseen with the help of CUSD garden coordinator
Dessa D’Aquila.
Students who bring their own lunch make an effort to
keep it trash-free, avoiding pre-packaged items in favor
of food tucked into reusable containers.
You can see these conscientious kids in action in a
YouTube video titled “Imagine Green: Vista del Valle’s
Trash-free Challenge.” The video features a customized
version of John Lennon’s “Imagine,” with Vista students
asking viewers to “Imagine there’s no trash. It’s easy if
you try. Imagine all the people sorting all the trash.”
Making such a scenario easy to imagine was the seven
enthusiastic students who stood, along with Vista Princi-
pal Dave Stewart, to take an honorary photo with district
luminaries. All wore shirts in red or blue proclaiming,
“Once a Vista Student, Always a Vista Student.” One
kindergartner who darted up to join the photo-op com-
pleted his ensemble with light-up tennis shoes.
Vista’s efforts were judged by a panel of environ-
mental experts hailing from groups like Surfrider, 350
Climate Action Group, Algalita Marine Research Insti-
tute and Grades of Green Youth Corps as well as the
Sanitation District of Los Angeles County.
The school was presented with their award at an
April 29 ceremony, attended by Grades of Green rep-
resentatives. The $1,000 prize will be added to a grant
from the city to help fund an outdoor kitchen and shade
structure for the Vista garden.
For more information on Grades of Green, a non-
profit dedicated to helping students form habits that will
protect the environment for years to come, visit
www.gradesofgreen.org.
—Sarah Torribio
storribio@claremont-courier.com
Vista given good grades by green nonprofit, school board
SCHOOL
BOARD
SCHOOL
BOARD
Photo courtesy of Charlie Beck/Grades of Green
Vista del Valle student Harjot Sanghera turns compost
at the school. Harjot said, “I love teaching kids how to
sort their lunch waste into recycling and composting
so the environment is not unhealthy.”
S
outh India can be hot. Heat makes me
limp and itchy and I want my air con-
ditioning. I move more slowly. I
know this. The British knew this, too.
While they were in India, the British established
“British Towns” in the hilly areas all over India. In the
south of India, Munnar is one of the hill towns where tea
plantations were established and now cover the area in
the most glorious shades of green, rolling over hills, up
and down mountains around boulders and under trees.
I knew I had to visit this area for a few days, and my
friend Barbara and I planned to go up there towards the
end of our month’s visit to India. The heat was well-es-
tablished and we had endured enough of it for a while. In
sharing a breakfast with a pleasant English couple in
Pondicherry, they told us of a place they had stayed and
had liked a lot. Pondicherry is on the east coast of south
India and Munnar, which is in the state of Kerala, is on
the west coast. We had planned to visit Kerala and stay
in Fort Cochin for a number of days, and hoped to go up
to Munnar from there. The hotel, Royal Mist, offered
three nights, a driver and car for the days there plus pick-
up in Fort Cochin and return to the airport for a single
low price. We called and made the arrangements about
two weeks before we left Pondicherry. It was a great
choice.
We were picked up by our driver (he was with us the
whole time and was kind and patient and also a good and
slow driver). The drive to Munnar goes through small
villages, spice farms and, as one ascends, forests. The
farms change from rice to plantations of pineapples to
cardamom and different fruit trees. The winding roads
were full of potholes so there was a great deal of repair
work going on. But the driver drove carefully, as we
bounced up and down with the bumps.
Our guest house was just at the edge of the tea planta-
tions and looked over the vast valley spread before us.
The owners, Anil and Jeeva, were extremely kind.
Breakfast was included in the rate, but we also ate din-
ner there as there wasn’t a restaurant close by. After a day
out sightseeing, we didn’t feel like going into town again
for a meal anyway. Our hosts asked us what we wanted
to eat or taste and would create meals around our choices.
It was the same with breakfasts—eggs and toast and
fresh juices and then some Indian delicacy and fruit. We
never starved.
After a day out, we returned to an invitation of coffee
or tea and cookies in their home and long chats filled
with laughter. On our last evening, Anil and his daugh-
ter took us for a walk through a tea plantation to exam-
ine the plants and learn about tea growing. Most of the
tea plants, which were short, twisted and gnarled, were
over 100 years old and are related to the camellia plant.
When we saw the tea flower, I could see the family re-
semblance. As we strolled along the path, the sun began
to set and we kept taking photos and enjoying the chang-
ing colors spread out before us.
Our guest house had three rooms that were all occu-
pied the first night. When the others left, we were gener-
ously given our own rooms at no extra charge. Every
evening, we sat out on the upstairs porch with a view of
the valley down below. We chatted, worked on our iPads
and visited with the owners until night closed in. It was
cool enough the entire three days and I understood what
a blessing it must have been for the British families dur-
ing the hot months.
On our first full day in Munnar, we drove out to the tea
museum and it was my first view of the rolling hills cov-
ered in shades of bright green. Each view was new and I
kept shouting, “Stop, I want to take a photo of this hill or
that valley.” The driver was so patient with me, stopping
as soon as it was safe. But there was always a better view
and photo op around the next bend.
Our driver told us that Munnar has wild elephants that
roam the hills, but not in the tea plantations as there is
nothing for them to eat among the tea trees. I kept dream-
ing of coming across a wild elephant but he said it was
not really the right season. However, one has hope.
At the tea museum, we saw a film about the estab-
lishment of tea in the region, drank some milky massala
spiced tea and looked at the machinery and old photos.
We then drove out to a special school where disabled
people are trained in traditional cloth-dying methods, the
making of paper and paper products and making straw-
berry jam. It was a wonderful place with beautifully kept
gardens full of roses in bloom and people working hard
to keep everything clear and healthy. Barbara went to the
paper room and I rushed off to the fabric-dying room.
They use only natural vegetable dyes collected locally
and beautifully-carved stamps to print the cloth. The stu-
dents were happy to demonstrate the techniques. Barbara
and I met up in the gift shop filled with wonderful
choices.
On the way back, it was so nice to see the patterns that
the tea plants formed. Some looked like squares form-
ing a reptile skin texture and, in other places, large, black
pointed boulders shot up amongst the shorter green
plants, neither one wanting to give way to the other. We
also watched women in straw hats picking tea with large
shears and filling bags with the snipped tea leaves. All at
once, we saw crowds of people running at the side of the
road, shouting and pushing one another. Our driver
pulled over immediately shouting, “Elephant!” and I fell
out of the car with my camera, running and pushing
along with the others. Yes, I did get to see him—a male
with huge tusks rushing into a farm—but was not fast
enough for a photo. It was really exciting and, even bet-
ter, unexpected.
For our second day out, we went to a small village
where they make jaggery, a dark brown sugar created by
boiling the sugar cane. This is the only place one can buy
it. The drive was through a sandalwood forest and we
saw lots of monkeys along the road. We also saw an elu-
sive and rare Indian squirrel, a large black animal that
sleeps on tree branches with its long tail hanging down.
Nearby were two spotted deer. Of course, the driver saw
them all first and showed them to us.
It was a lovely three days. It was cool and the weather
was clear. The views never failed to make me excited
and each view was better than the one before it. The drive
up and down through farms and spice plantations and
forests was lovely. We felt that we were visiting friends
and staying in their home, eating good homemade food
and trying new tastes. I drank mango lassis, a delicious
yogurt drink, and fresh pineapple juice and we happily
drank good tea. It was a perfect ending to a wonderful
month of traveling in southern India.
On the way to the airport, the three of us sat in a hotel
restaurant dining room and ordered food and yogurt las-
sis. When the lassis arrived, the waiter managed to drop
one all over me and my new outfit, which I had saved
for the trip home. I was covered all over by the wet drink,
down to my toes. I tried to blot and wash off as much as
possible but eventually it dried, making my clothes stiff
like glued paper. And this was how I traveled home,
wearing India as a souvenir.
Claremont COURIER/Friday, May 23, 2014 6
The hills are alive, cloaked in green
By Jan Wheatcroft
“So many things to
worry about when I
don’t have anything to
worry about.”
Trees and chemicals
Dear Editor:
The long careful work of city staff and
Claremont residents to maintain tree poli-
cies supporting our traditional full-street
tree canopy—bringing small town beauty,
safety and higher property values to all
Claremont neighborhoods—is exemplary
and we thank all those responsible.
While much has been accomplished,
we and the Tree Action Group (TAG)
hope the city council will eliminate ex-
panded use of toxic chemicals in our tree
management—toxic chemicals that risk
the health of trees, people, insect pollina-
tors and the air, soil and water.
As we now know, these chemicals do
damage and often cost more in the long
run. On May 8, the council voted to spend
$800,000 to clean polluntants out of our
water runoff. Why then would the city
want to increase chemicals in the runoff?
Particularly when there are cleaner, faster
and cheaper options for clean-up of seed-
pods, fruit and leaf litter.
Moreover, the city has yet to study po-
tential water quality and health impacts
associated with the increased use of toxic
chemicals in tree management, claiming
the proposed changes to tree policies
could not lead to significant effects on the
environment. However, a revised policy
would allow expanded use of tree grow
regulators and pesticides. If the city wants
to allow expanded use, it may, but only
after studying whether these chemicals
will pollute our water and air, and dis-
closing the results to the public.
The California Environmental Quality
Act is specifically intended to require
study, disclosure and mitigation of such
impacts so the city and public can assess
the entire price tag of a new policy or proj-
ect before the impacts are experienced.
Ray and Barbara Fowler
Claremont
Claremont Museum of Art
Dear Editor:
We at the Claremont Museum of Art
(CMA) are very pleased about the out-
come of the recent city council meeting, in
which the council instructed the Commu-
nity and Human Services Commission to
revisit its funding recommendations for
Community-Based Opportunity (CBO)
grants.
We remain hopeful that funding for
CMA’s project ARTstART can be in-
cluded in this “reboot.” Community fund-
ing is vital to keeping ARTstART alive and
serving our students.
As a nonprofit, the CBO grant is just
one of many sources CMA turns to for
support of its programs. ARTstART is
thankful to have also received partial fund-
ing from the Los Angeles Board of Su-
pervisors through the Los Angeles County
Arts Commission, the Flourish Founda-
tion, Rotary Club of Claremont and the
ongoing generosity of our membership. It
does, indeed, “take a village” to fund a
nonprofit program.
What does ARTstART do with the
money it raises? CMA’s ARTstART trains
Claremont High School students, working
with college student mentors, to provide
exhibit-based art lessons for elementary
students at three CUSD school sites. All
art supplies, teaching materials and trans-
portation to area cultural institutions is
covered. The program brings high-quality
student-led classes and activities to the
city’s school system to inspire, promote
understanding of art and highlight Clare-
mont’s rich artistic history.
This year, the ARTstART team of 45
students served 482 students from Oak-
mont, Sycamore and Vista del Valle ele-
mentary schools, as well as El Roble In-
termediate, where CMA’s comic
art-themed, ARToon program, is based.
Next year, we hope to extend our pro-
gram to Mountain View, as well.
Ask any of the Claremont students in-
volved in this program, or their parents, if
ARTstART is a worthwhile investment
for a funder and you’ll receive a resound-
ing, “yes,” as was heard loud and clear at
last week’s council meeting. Still doubt-
ful? We invite you to attend the year-end
student exhibition, StART It Up: ART-
stART Year Three, on Saturday, May 31,
Sunday, June 1 and Wednesday, June 4
from noon to 4 p.m. in the Ginger Elliott
Exhibition Center in Memorial Park, 840
N. Indian Hill Blvd.
Curated and installed by ARTstART
high school students, the exhibition fea-
tures work by 4th-6th grade students from
Oakmont, Sycamore and Vista. Which
brings us back to Angela Bailey’s article.
The “new” Claremont Museum of Art
may lack walls, but it doesn’t lack a
proven track record of engaging programs.
In addition to our arts education pro-
grams, CMA hosts a full slate of exhibi-
tions held at different venues, including
the Artful Evening series, our family art
booth at community festivals and the
hugely popular Padua Hills Art Fiesta.
Our biannual event, OpenART Studio
Tour, kicks off on Saturday, June 7 at
10:30 a.m. and will feature 21 artists’ stu-
dios. For tickets, email info@claremont-
museum.org or call (909) 621-3200.
We’ll look forward to welcoming you
and your family at the StART It Up exhi-
bition or one of our other upcoming CMA
events! (www.claremontmuseum.org)
Rich Deely
Project Director, ARTstART
Police shooting
Dear Editor:
There are some citizens who believe
anything done by police is legitimate. I
would call their attention to the shooting
of two women delivering newspapers
early one morning. The officers were poor
shots and the women were only wounded.
Very few citizens will defend that outra-
geous abuse of police power.
Some 15 years ago in Claremont, there
was an early-morning shooting of a young
black man by two Claremont officers. The
police stated that the man, Irvin Landrum,
had fired at them. But when sheriff’s in-
vestigated, they discovered that the Lan-
drum weapon had not been fired. If police
lied about one thing, would it not be likely
that they would lie about other things?
Most recently, there was a police shoot-
ing of a man who was allegedly backing
his car in an attempt to injure or kill the
officer. The Claremont police officer fired
and injured the driver of the car. If the of-
ficer was halfway nimble, couldn’t he
have jumped out of the way of the car? I
know that my car does not go very fast in
reverse. Having avoided the backing car,
wouldn’t it be better for all concerened to
shoot out the man’s tire? As a practical
matter, we taxpayers will pay for the al-
leged assailant’s hospital bills following
his non-fatal gunshot wound.
These three incidents of police shoot-
ings vary from the terrible shooting in Los
Angeles to the shocking Landrum shoot-
ing to the questionable Claremont shoot-
ing this month. What do the shootings
have in common? It appears to this 49-
year resident of Claremont that police in
many jurisidications, including Clare-
mont, are much too quick to shoot. Per-
haps this is due to our cowboy past, or the
influence of western movies.
Whatever the cause, public respect for
police officers will rise if they use restraint
with their firearms. Sometimes it appears
that police feel they can act with impunity.
Perhaps more oversight is needed.
Hal Durian
Claremont
Claremont COURIER/Friday, May 23, 2014 7
READERS’ COMMENTS
Claremont COURIER/Friday, May 23, 2014 8
B
irds of a feather flock together, and
that’s just what the owners of Wild
Birds Unlimited are counting on
from the avian-minded in Claremont.
After nearly two years in the making, Chris and
Angie Verma will be opening their doors for the first
time this Saturday and offering bird-lovers a sneak
peek before their official grand opening on June 14.
As the name implies, Wild Birds Unlimited (WBU)
caters to backyard birds and the nature enthusiasts
who love them. With an endless selection of feeders,
food and wild bird accessories, it’s not hard to see why
WBU is so popular among birders. For as little as $15,
you can purchase the Flying Start Combo, an all-in-
one feeder with three tiers of food that should attract
every bird in your area.
Mr. Verma, who has been birding much of his life,
began seriously chasing rare species in 2012 as evi-
denced by a family trip to Northern Peru to observe
the long-whiskered owlet. What started as their hobby
has now become their business and he’s looking for-
ward to sharing their knowledge of wild birds with
customers.
“One of my jobs is for someone to come in and de-
scribe a bird to me,” explains Mr. Verma. “If they say,
‘I have a little yellow bird with a black cap,’ I would
tell them that’s an American goldfinch and I’d set
them up with a nyjer feeder. Nyjer is a little thistle
seed and that’s what they love. Then we’ll show them
tricks to getting the birds to come to the feeder, like
tying a yellow bow at the top so it gets their attention.”
Bird feeders of every shape and size are in abun-
dance at WBU and come with a lifetime guarantee.
The Dinner Bell, a multifunctional domed feeder, fea-
tures an antimicrobial tray with patented technology
that inhibits the surface growth of damaging bacteria,
mold and other microbes.
“It’s our all-time best feeder because of its versatil-
ity,” Mr. Verma. says.
The bell-shaped feeder can be loaded with seed or
cylinder and the dome can be raised or lowered for
weather or for controlling larger birds from eating all
the food.
“A lot of people complain about the Scrub-Jays eat-
ing everything. You can lower the dome down enough
where he can’t get in there, but your little birds will,”
explains Mr. Verma.
Also offered at WBU is a unique pole system that
can be designed to deter squirrels and attract birds of
every species into your garden. “It’s just like a big
erector set,” Mr. Verma says with a smile. “You can
accessorize it with perches, pole guards, different
dishes for mealworms or different kinds of foods. It’s
really cool!”
Selecting the proper food is just as important as
choosing the right feeder and the folks at WBU are
dedicated to offering fresh, top-quality bird food and
nectar. “Typical food from a lot of stores, half of it is
filler,” Mr. Verma says. “Red Milo seed…Nobody is
going to eat that and it gets kicked to the ground and
sprouts. That’s why I suggest a food like No Mess.
There are no shells.”
Bird lovers wanting to entice their winged friends to
stay and play after a meal will be thrilled with the se-
lection of birdhouses and birdbaths beginning at
around $20. “Moving water is an attractant for birds,
they can hear it for miles and they will come to it.”
Other options include a solar-powered fountain and
beautiful glass bowls with pedestals that can be used
indoors or out.
Peppered throughout the shop are gorgeous gift
items for that someone special. Jewelry, garden
plaques, doormats, hand-tuned wind chimes and fruit
seed figurines are all reasonably priced and would put
a smile on the face of anyone receiving it. The kids
might also get a kick out of the comically packaged
‘Condor Poop’ chocolates offered by the register.
Birdwatchers of every level will be thrilled with the
available resources at Wild Birds Unlimited. From
binoculars to basic books on how to feed birds to more
advanced field guides, there is something to delight
every birder on their journey.
In the near future, the owners plan to spread their
wings and offer nature seminars as well as bird walks
in the City of Trees.
The company’s motto, “We Bring People and Na-
ture Together” is the very heart of WBU’s retail con-
cept and a mission Mr. and Ms. Verma look forward to
embarking on with customers of all ages.
“Nature is huge deal to me. It gave me a chance to
combine two things I think are really important, con-
servation and kids. If we don’t get kids involved in the
outdoors, get their faces out of their computers, out of
their phones and out of the video games, we’re going
to lose all of this because nobody is paying attention.”
Tomorrow, Saturday, May 24, Wild Birds Unlimited
will be offering COURIER readers a free tube feeder
and a two-pound bag of food with coupon. Be sure to
check page 21 of this week’s edition for your free
offer. See coupon for details.
Wild Birds Unlimited is located at 911 W. Foothill
Blvd. in Claremont. Hours are Monday through Satur-
day 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. and Sunday from 11 a.m. to 4
p.m.
—Angela Bailey
news@claremont-courier.com
Sweet sounds of chirping grace new Claremont shop
COURIER photo/Steven Felschundneff
Chris Verma has been a lifelong fan of wild birds and has recently taken up what he calls “serious birding.”
As a result of his love of birds, he is opening a Wild Bird Unlimited franchise in Claremont, which he hopes
will help spread interest in birding as a hobby.
Tastings and jazz char-
ity event to benefit art
and public education
The annual Mi Casa Es Su Casa
wine, spirits and craft beer tasting char-
ity event is coming to Hotel Casa 425
on Sunday, June 1 from 5 to 8 p.m.
This annual sold out event offeres a
delightful evening of fine wine, select
spirits and craft beer tastings with sa-
vory culinary fare provided by local
Claremont restaurants and other area
favorites. Spirits and craft beer tastings
at the event will add a little twist to the
impressive list of wines and vintners.
Since this event sells out every year,
reservations are a must. Tickets may be
purchased online at www.claremont
educationalfoundation.org or by con-
tacting the Claremont Community
Foundation at (909) 398-1060. Tickets
are $75 per person and are tax-de-
ductible to the extent permitted by law.
Proceeds from this event support the
work of both the Claremont Commu-
nity Foundation (CCF) and the Clare-
mont Educational Foundation (CEF).
“The Mi Casa Es Su Casa event
gives us a great opportunity to raise the
profile of CEF in the community, CEF
Board President Richard Chute said.
“We look forward to this event every
year and the opportunity it provides to
connect Claremont’s community lead-
ers and education leaders with two or-
ganizations that strive to improve the
quality of life in Claremont.”
Casa 425 is located at 425 First St. in
Claremont’s Village West.
For more information about Mi Casa
Es Su Casa, visit the CEF website at
www.claremonteducationalfoundation.
org or call the CCF at (909) 398-1060.
May is mental health
month
Mental illness affects us all and it
strikes everywhere. Preventable losses
add up for suffering individuals, fami-
lies, organizations and communities.
Despite this fact, many in our commu-
nity remain confused about mental ill-
ness, including how to best respond.
The month of May is the perfect time
to increase the community’s knowledge
and improve its response. NAMI
Pomona Valley has speakers available
to give mental health awareness presen-
tations to your organization or group.
Organizations can coordinate mental
health first aid training or become in-
volved in advocacy with NAMI.
Wearing a green ribbon can be a
great first step in showing support for
those battling mental illness and start-
ing conversations about mental health.
Be sure to visit NAMI Pomona Valley
online and check out the calendar of
local mental health events courtesy of
Tri-City Mental Health Services.  
NAMI encourages and supports ef-
forts to increase awareness and reduce
the stigma of mental illness. For infor-
mation, call (909) 399-0305 or visit the
NAMI website at www.namipomona
valley.org.
SCIL to host grand re-
opening, open house
Service Center for Independent Life
(SCIL) will host a grand reopening cel-
ebration and open house on Wednes-
day, May 28 from 5 to 7 p.m.
SCIL was founded in 1979 by par-
ents of persons with disabilities from
the Claremont area. Last year, SCIL
suddenly lost its Executive Director
Lee Nattress. Since then, Larry Grable
has been appointed as the new execu-
tive director tasked with taking SCIL to
next level of service to the community.
SCIL is one of only 28 independent
living centers in California. Funded
through state and federal grants, which
continue to shrink, SCIL continues to
advocate, provide benefits counseling,
teach independent living skills, among
other services to persons with disabili-
ties at no charge to the consumer.
The community is invited to visit
SCIL’s facility, 107 Spring St., in Clare-
mont, on May 28.
Claremont COURIER/Friday, May 23, 2014 9
The fountain at the front entrance of
San Antonio Community Hospital
(SACH) has stood as an icon of the hos-
pital for decades. While thousands of pa-
tients, visitors and employees have
gathered around the fountain for peace
and relaxation, many may not know
about its rich history.
Bob Clark, an Orange County land-
scape architect, has worked with the hos-
pital since the 1960s. Mr. Clark, who was
involved in the original fountain design,
was fortunate to study under some of the
most noteworthy architectural designers
in southern California in the 1960s, in-
cluding Frank Lloyd Wright and John
Folis, who led the design work of
SACH’s original fountain.
Mr. Clark brought these influences
into his renderings for a new fountain to
replace the original that was decon-
structed to make way for the expansion
project in progress at the hospital.
Mr. Clark understands the importance
of capturing the rich history and culture
of the surrounding community as well as
the hospital. A number of stones were re-
tained from the original fountain and a
number will be moved into the fountains
that will be scattered throughout the hos-
pital grounds.
“This design pays homage to the orig-
inal inhabitants of this area—the Ameri-
can Indian culture that was here,”
explains Mr. Clark.
The stones, both in the original and in
the new fountain, were placed in a circle
formation, which he also explains is rich
in Native American symbolism.
“The ring of stones was used by Indi-
ans to give thanks,” he said. “They
would go into the center of the ring and
give thanks for the sun coming up, the
sky, the rain and for their children. They
had so much compassion.”
The water in the fountain depicts life,
from birth to death. “Water represents
life because it renews itself over and over
again,” Mr. Clark said. “It developed our
plant life on earth, which is what devel-
oped growth.”
The completion of the SACH fountain
and front entrance is scheduled for the
fall of 2014.
OUR TOWN
COURIER photo/Peter Weinberger
San Antonio Community Hospital marketing specialists Wendy Polley, right, and
Maitri Farikh photograph the new fountain that will sit outside the new main en-
trance of the hospital. Completion of the project is scheduled for this fall.
Iconic SACH fountain has rich
history and symbolism
Claremont COURIER/Friday, May 23, 2014 10
MIKE F. O’BRIEN
Attorney at Law
212 Yale Avenue
Claremont, CA 91711
(909) 626-9999
www.mikefobrien.com
Specialist in personal injury and
wrongful death cases.
Se habla español
BUXBAUM & CHAKMAK
A Law Corporation
414 Yale Avenue, Suite K
Claremont, CA 91711
(909) 621-4707
41 years experience in: Business Law,
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architect
WHEELER & WHEELER
A.I.A. Architects, Inc.
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Corina L. Christiansen, CPA
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Specialize in small business accounting
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accounting
Kendall & Gkikas LLP
Attorneys at Law
134 Harvard Avenue, 2nd Floor
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since 1994: Divorce, Custody, Visitation
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D. PROFFITT, EA
Claremont, CA 91711
Phone: (909) 445-1379
dee@dproffittea.com
Visit my website at
www.dproffittea.com
Income Tax Specialist since 1981
Payroll Service • Accounting
SRS GENERAL
CONTRACTOR, INC.
909-621-1559
www.srsgeneralcontractor.com
Practical design, tastefully executed.
• Residential Remodel
• Restoration of Unique & Vintage
homes • Room additions.
design/build
PETER T. IGLER, D.D.S.
D. INGRID ROJAS, D.D.S.
Cosmetic & General Dentistry
615 W. Foothill Blvd.
Claremont, CA 91711
(909) 624-6815
1 Hour In-Office Bleaching, Veneers,
White Fillings, Dental Implants, Dentures.
LIGHTFOOT • RALLS
& LIGHTFOOT LLP
Certified Public Accountants
675 W. Foothill Blvd., Suite 300
Claremont, CA 91711
(909) 626-2623
Tax Planning & Preparation • Accounting
c.p.a.
financial consultants
SUZANNE H. CHRISTIAN
CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER®
Professional Securities offered through
LPL Financial
Member of FINRA/SIPC
419 Yale Ave. Claremont
(909) 625-1052
“Your financial security is my priority”
Ann M. Johannsen, O.D.
Brad A. Baggarly, O.D.
OPTOMETRY
695 W. Foothill Blvd.
Established 1972
(909) 625-7861
www.claremontoptometry.com
Eyemed - VSP - MES - Medicare
chiropractor
DR. MARTIN S. McLEOD
411 N. Indian Hill Blvd.
Claremont, CA 91711
(909) 621-1208
• Joint & Muscle Pain • Headache
• Sciatica • Pinched nerve
• Most Insurance accepted
• Personal injury
optometry
dentist
NEW CAR GUIDE
SERVICE DIRECTORY
Don McDonald, Pharmacist
Health insurance
333 N. Indian Hill Blvd., Claremont
(909) 635-8933
RXDonald@gmail.com
New to the Golden Age? New to the area?
Leaving your employer or union coverage?
Need extra help paying for prescriptions?
We focus on your health and your healthcare
healthcare
Donald “Don” Stalwick of Claremont
died on May 7, 2014. He was 83.
He was born on August 19, 1930 in
Aberdeen, Washington to Opal and Bill
Stalwick and grew up in the small min-
ing town of Wallace, Idaho. He very
nearly didn’t grow up because at age 5,
he was buried in an avalanche in the
nearby town of Burke and barely sur-
vived. Living through this near-miss typ-
ifies the kind of luck that, combined with
talent and hard work, would lead to a
memorable athletic career.
When he was 4, the elder Mr. Stal-
wick had immigrated with his family to
Minnesota from a region of Germany
that is now part of Poland. At 6’2”,
Don’s dad was unusually tall for a man of
his generation. He was also notably burly,
having engaged his entire working life in
physical labor, from farming to millwork.
While in Wallace, his job was installing
timbers in the silver and zinc mines.
Opal had been legally blind from birth.
Despite her limited vision, she helped
support the family with work as a do-
mestic and later with a job at the local
hospital. She was a woman with a strong
personality and an enduring faith, and
saw to it that her son accompanied her to
various evangelical churches. Don, who
was gifted with a fine voice, enjoyed the
musical aspect of the services and sang in
a men’s quartet for a time as a teen.
Mr. Stalwick graduated from Wallace
High School in 1949. Despite coming
from such a small school, with only 37
students in his graduating class, he
achieved statewide recognition in foot-
ball, basketball and track. He delivered a
particularly standout performance in the
state championship football game at
Boise in 1949, which was serendipitously
attended by legendary head UCLA foot-
ball coach Henry “Red” Sanders. He re-
cruited Don on the spot to play for the
Bruins. Mr. Stalwick’s initial response,
“I’ll have to call my mom,” is a favorite
family anecdote.
Mr. Stalwick had never traveled be-
yond Idaho and Washington, but he flew
to Los Angeles and spent a thrilling week
seeing the sights and seeking admission
to UCLA. He found that he needed to
take a foreign language course to be ad-
mitted, but he did not return to Idaho.
The coaching staff called his parents,
asked them to send his trunk and
arranged for him to enroll at Chaffey
College where he could play single-wing
football like Sanders coached at UCLA.
While he was at Chaffey, the school’s
football boosters arranged for him to live
in the basement of the Sycamore Inn in
Rancho Cucamonga. Mr. Stalwick had an
outstanding season and transferred for
second semester to UCLA, where he
played football as a starting running back
for four years.
Mr. Stalwick played both offense and
defense as one of the “gutty little Bruins”
who recorded only three conference
losses in the 1951-53 seasons. He let-
tered three years in both football and
rugby and was a member of the 1953
conference championship team that
played in the 1954 Rose Bowl.
Upon graduation from UCLA, Mr.
Stalwick was offered a professional foot-
ball contract by the San Francisco 49ers,
but was unable to sign with them be-
cause he was required to report to the US
Navy for active duty. He was a member
of the US Navy ROTC at UCLA and
was commissioned as an officer upon
graduation. While in the Navy, he played
football on the COMPHIBPAC team in
San Diego, which won the 11th Naval
District Championship in 1954.
Following his service in the Navy, Mr.
Stalwick attended graduate school at
UCLA and coached the freshman foot-
ball team and the ski team. He next
served as head coach at Hart High School
in Newhall, leading his young athletes to
a league championship in 1957.
He was hired at the University of Utah
in 1958 to coach the defensive secondary
and recruit southern California athletes.
In his first year at Utah, the team went to
the Aloha Bowl in Honolulu. In 1963, he
was hired by the University of Colorado
to coach the defensive secondary and re-
cruit southern California athletes. He
stayed in Boulder until 1965, when he
moved to Claremont to become the head
football coach and professor of physical
education at Claremont McKenna Col-
lege, then known as Claremont Men’s
College.
After three years at CMC, he and sev-
eral partners started a taco stand in Cov-
ina, Don Taco. He soon decided to return
to education and coaching and was hired
by the Chaffey Joint Union High School
District in 1969. He taught and coun-
seled at Upland, Alta Loma and Chaffey
high schools and then returned to Upland
High as an administrator, where he stayed
for 20 years. During his time at Upland,
he turned a good athletic program into a
powerhouse and was well known in the
Chaffey and Upland districts as the
skilled creator of master schedules that
provided classes to meet all students’
needs and interests.
Mr. Stalwick was awarded member-
ship in the athletic halls of fame of Chaf-
fey College, Upland High School and
Wallace High School. He was a member
of Phi Gamma Delta fraternity at UCLA.
Mr. Stalwick married Doreen Davis
in 1952. While teaching and coaching,
they raised three children, Dawn, Kim-
berly and Kent. All were outstanding stu-
dents at Claremont High School. Dawn
and Kimberly were members of the Pep
Squad, and Kent won an athletic schol-
arship for football at Stanford Univer-
sity.
Mr. Stalwick coached Kent in Little
League and later enjoyed watching his
grandsons participate in athletics. Of
course, he delighted in having his kids ac-
company him to UCLA Bruin games.
The family enjoyed many vacations to-
gether, including skiing trips to winter re-
sorts and stays at scenic spots like Lake
Mead and the Colorado River.
In 1982, Mr. Stalwick married Natalie
Bowen. After retirement from Upland
High School, he enjoyed attending home
and away UCLA Bruin football games
and completing home improvement proj-
ects. He also became passionate about
travel in the United States and the world,
visiting nearly every country in western
and eastern Europe before and after the
fall of the Iron Curtain. His myriad des-
tinations included Russia and the former
USSR, China, Japan, Hong Kong, Aus-
tralia, New Zealand, Tanzania, French
Polynesia, Panama, Costa Rica, Chile,
Argentina and Brazil. He and Natalie
made several trips every year to the Big
Island and Maui in Hawaii. His last trip
was to celebrate Christmas 2013 in Maui.
Mr. Stalwick was a charter member
of The Claremont Club and continued to
play tennis there until February of this
year. He played golf and was an avid
snow skier and water skier. For 30 years,
he camped at Lake Powell with a close-
knit group of Claremont families that in-
cluded Ted and Carolyn Ducey and
Clifton and Jane MacLeod.
Mr. Stalwick was preceded in death by
his daughter, Kimberly Stalwick. He is
survived by his wife Natalie of Clare-
mont, by his daughter and son-in-law,
Dawn and Joe Rametta of Park City,
Utah, and by his son and daughter-in-
law, Kent and Diane Stalwick of Clare-
mont. He also leaves his grandsons,
Trevor (Julia) Rametta and Justin (Liis)
Rametta, both of Park City, Utah, Jake
and Kyle Stalwick, both of Claremont,
Michael (Ryann) Stalwick of Austin,
Texas, Brad Stalwick of Rancho Cuca-
monga and Patrick Stalwick of San Luis
Obispo as well as his great-grandson,
Oskar Rametta, of Park City, Utah, and
his great-granddaughter, Kylee, of
Austin, Texas.
A memorial service will be held on
Monday, June 23 at 2 p.m. at Claremont
United Church of Christ Congregational,
233 Harrison Ave. in Claremont. A re-
ception will follow.
In lieu of flowers, the family requests
that memorial donations be sent to the
Alzheimer’s Association, the American
Cancer Society or a charity of your
choice.
Claremont COURIER/Friday, May 23, 2014 11
Donald Wallace Stalwick
School administrator, football coach, loving husband and father
OBITUARIES
Claremont COURIER/Friday, May 23, 2014 12
Claremont Young Mu-
sicians Orchestra turns
a quarter century
The Claremont Young Musicians Or-
chestra (CYMO) and the Intermezzo
Orchestra, both conducted by Roger
Samuel, will present a 25th anniversary
concert celebration on Sunday, May 25,
at 7:30 p.m. at Bridges Hall of Music,
150 E. Fourth St. in Claremont.
The celebration begins with a 2:30
p.m. concert given by the Intermezzo
Orchestra, a 75-member preparatory
group for the CYMO. The Intermezzo
Orchestra program will include music
by Verdi, Bizet, Mendelssohn, Sibelius,
and the “Bugler’s Holiday” by Leroy
Anderson, featuring E.J. Miranda,
Emma Breen and Abby Diaz, trumpets.
The evening program, which begins
at 7:30 p.m., will be given by the 90-
member Claremont Young Musicians
Orchestra and will include Rosamunde
Overture by Schubert, Symphony No. 5
by Shostakovich, 1812 Overture by
Tchaikovsky.
The soloists will be CYMO concerto
competition winners Tiffany Wee, play-
ing the Mendelssohn Violin Concerto,
and Ramakrishnan Kumaran, perform-
ing the Piccolo Concerto by Lieber-
mann.
Claremont residents participating in
the CYMO anniversary concert are
Kamron Curlin, Kaveri Curlin, Charlie
Davis, Shane Jung, Sarah Kuriyama,
Naomi Lin, Sophia Lin, Benjamin
Nadon, Maggie O’Leary, Vera Wang,
Jerema Wright, Jack Xiao, William Yen
and Stephanie You.
Admission is free for both concerts.
Doors open at 2 p.m. for the Inter-
mezzo concert and at 7 p.m. for the
Claremont Young Musicians Orchestra
concert. For information call (909)
624-3614.
Anne Turner named
city’s interim human
service director
City Manager Tony Ramos an-
nounced the appointment of Anne K.
Turner as the interim human services
director. Ms. Turner began working in
this capacity on Monday, May 12.
Ms. Turner holds a doctorate and a
master’s degree in public administration
from the University of La Verne, where
she is also an adjunct professor. She is a
longtime Claremont resident and has
been involved with community organiza-
tions, including the Claremont Museum
of Art and League of Women Voters.
Ms. Turner was instrumental in draft-
ing the City’s Youth and Family Master
Plan and served two terms on the Com-
munity and Human Services Commis-
sion. As the human services director,
she will oversee the city’s recreation
programs, parks, senior services and
youth and family support services, as
well as special projects and community
partnerships.
Prior to accepting the position, Ms.
Turner was the executive director for
THINK Together, a nonprofit organiza-
tion providing out-of-school programs
that support K-12 education. While
with THINK Together, she secured cor-
porate and private funding and imple-
mented the organization’s long-range
development strategy for Los Angeles
County. Ms. Turner also served as the
executive director of the Rio Hondo
Colleges Foundation, managing grants
and fundraising events.
The city began recruiting for a per-
manent director of the Human Services
Department in March of 2014.
CHS class of 2015 to
host brunch, fashion
show fundraiser
The Claremont High School Class of
2015 invites the community to a brunch
and fashion show on Sunday, June 1
from 2 to 4:30 p.m. at the Hargrave
home, 828 Alamosa, Claremont.
Students from the class of 2015 will
act as both food servers and models, as
they walk the “runway” in clothing do-
nated from local merchants.
There is a $40 donation with all pro-
ceeds benefitting the Class of 2015.
The event also features a silent auction.
For information and for tickets, contact
Julie Pedroza at jewelzpedroza@
verizon.net or (909) 621-0615.
OUR TOWN
Claremont COURIER/Summer Opportunities 2014 13
One-on-one One-on-one ART LESSONS ART LESSONS
for junior high and high school for junior high and high school
students students! ! Call Call 626-224-7915, 626-224-7915,
626-963-4238 or visit 626-963-4238 or visit
THE COLONY AT LOFT 204 THE COLONY AT LOFT 204, ,
532 W. First St. #204, upstairs in 532 W. First St. #204, upstairs in
the Claremont Packing House. the Claremont Packing House.
SPORTS • EDUCATION • ART • COOKING • SWIMMING • THEATER • CAMP
Claremont COURIER/Summer Opportunities 2014 14
Claremont COURIER/Summer Opportunities 2014 15
C
laremont High School will send its
two remaining athletes to partici-
pate in CIF finals in tennis and
track and field.
Sophomore Andrew Leahy will compete in CIF Ten-
nis Individuals May 29 at the University of Redlands.
Last year, he was knocked out the first round after los-
ing in the Sierra League tournament to his brother, Alan
Leahy, who eventually became League Champion.
However, he hopes things will be different next
Thursday.
“I’ve grown a lot from last year and I expect to go
deeper,” Leahy said.
Leahy also won resoundingly in the Sierra League fi-
nals with a 6-2 and 6-0 set.
CHS freshman Annie Boos will compete in the 800-
meter race on Saturday, at the CIF Track and Field Fi-
nals at Cerritos College in Norwalk. The running
events will start at 11 a.m.
Head Distance Coach Rob Lander said Boos’s run-
ning is excellent and continues to improve by beating
her own school records. Last Saturday, she finished the
800-meters in 2:13.78 at CIF prelims, which occurred
at Moorpark High School.
The week before, Boos ran a 2:13.98 in League fi-
nals at Claremont High School.
CHS swim team ends season with
strong performances
Claremont High School’s swim team sent sopho-
more Samantha Duran, freshman Katrina Strash and its
200-yard medley and 400-yard freestyle relay team to
compete in CIF prelims and finals, which occurred
May 16 and May 17 at Riverside Community College.
While neither relay teams qualified to swim in the fi-
nals—the 200-yard medley finished 25th, 1:57.26; and
the 400-yard freestyle finished 19th, 3:45.33, in pre-
lims—Duran and Strash swam strong as CIF finalists.
According to Head Coach Courtney Eads, Duran fin-
ished 13th in the 200 IM at 2:11.59, and 11th in the
100-yard fly at 58.58. Strash finished seventh in the 50-
yard freestyle, 24.40, and the 100-yard freestyle, 53.22.
Golf team competes against stiff CIF competition
Claremont High’s boys golf team surprised many
after competing in the Team CIF Eastern Champi-
onship, May 19, at Jurupa Hills Country Club in River-
side.
The team finished ninth overall out of 22 teams in
the 18-hole tournament and seniors Ben Whitham,
Caleb Chodosh and junior Jonathon Yoo shot a 78 on
the 72-par course, according to head coach Terrance
Lynch.
Coach Lynch also said Whitham and Chodosh May
12, as members of the first All-Sierra League team at
Skylinks Country Club in Long Beach. They vied
against 124 of the top golfers in the CIF Southern Sec-
tion.
Chodosh missed the cut to enter the state tournament
by one stroke, with a 79. Whitham shot an 84.
Only 20 golfers from the CIF Southern Section
moved on to the state tournament. Senior Nathan Clark,
from Damien High, was the only athlete from the
Sierra League who will compete. He shot a 76.
—Alex Forbess
sports@claremont-courier.com
SPORTS
Claremont COURIER/Friday, May 23, 2014 16
CHS tennis and
track duo head to
CIF play
COURIER photo/
Steven Felschundneff
Sophomore Andrew
Leahy was the top ten-
nis player for Clare-
mont High School all
season and will com-
pete in the CIF tourna-
ment next week at the
University of Redlands.
L
ongtime Claremont resident Flo-
rence Gordon Webster celebrated
her 100th birthday Saturday, May
17 at the Claremont Manor, where she
currently resides.
Friends and family of the centenarion traveled from
as far as Texas, Washington and Oregon to join in her
birthday celebration. It was an event not to be missed.
The birthday brunch was an elegant affair for an
equally elegant woman. Hosted by her children, Eliz-
abeth Webster Haberman and husband, Paul, of Bend,
Oregon; Lawrence Webster and partner, Caren White-
side of Claremont; Gerald Webster and wife Sharie of
Brea; and daughter-in-law, Judy Webster (wife of
Gordon who died in 2003), of Tucson, Arizona.
Gorgeous flower arrangements and picture frames
filled with vintage photos of Ms. Webster greeted 115
guests as they entered the beautifully decorated
Manor Hall. As friends and family dined together on
eggs, carved ham and birthday cake, they sipped mi-
mosas and shared stories with one another about Ms.
Webster’s life. A recent letter from the Today show’s
Willard Scott, addressed to the “The Centenarian,”
was a highlight of many discussions.
Reverend George Silides, Priest-in-Charge at St.
Ambrose Episcopal Church in Claremont, offered a
prayer in honor of the longtime parishioner and in cel-
ebration of an extraordinary life.
Ms. Webster, a second generation Californian, was
born in San Rafael in 1914, but did most of her grow-
ing up in San Diego with her parents and sister Helen.
She met her husband, Ralph, following graduation
from San Diego State College, where she studied
teaching. Mr. Webster, director of materials for Gen-
eral Dynamics in Pomona, moved the family to Clare-
mont in 1953. He died in 1975.
Prior to moving to Claremont Manor in 2006, Ms.
Webster lived in her house on Tenth Street, just west
of Memorial Park. She was very active in civic activi-
ties, as a member of the Board of the American Red
Cross, Claremont High School parent volunteers, St.
Ambrose Episcopal Church and the PEO Sisterhood.
She has been an avid participant in the arts as a potter,
painter, knitter and writer. She recently self-published
a book of short stories and poems she’d composed
over the past 75 years, a keepsake to be cherished for
generations to come.
Wearing a colorful sweater and bright smile, Ms.
Webster was visibly thrilled to be in the company of
her seven grandchildren and five great-grandchildren.
When asked to what she attributes her longevity,
Ms. Webster says she has so many people she loves
and that they all love one another.
Her children jokingly say that it’s Ms. Webster’s in-
nate ability to procrastinate that keeps her from mov-
ing on.
A very happy 100th birthday to you, Ms. Webster.
—Angela Bailey
news@claremont-courier.com
Claremont COURIER/Friday, May 23, 2014 17
Friends and family honor life of 100-year-old Claremonter
COURIER photo/Angela Bailey
Florence Gordon Webster poses with four of her
great grandchildren during a 100th birthday celebra-
tion on Saturday at Claremont Manor. Friends and
family traveled from as far at Texas to join in her cel-
ebration which included brunch and stories of Ms.
Webster’s life.
www.claremont-courier.com
C
our er i
Claremont
claremont-courier.com
Every Friday in print.
Every day online.
CALENDAR
Theater
Claremont High School Theatre
presents “Shrek: The Musical.”
Page 21
Friday, May 23 through Saturday, May 31
Claremont COURIER/Friday, May 23, 2014 18
FRIDAY NIGHTS LIVE Stroll
through the Village and listen to free,
live music from 6 to 9 p.m. This week’s
concerts include Claremont Voodoo
Society (blues) at the Public Plaza and
Amanda Castro Band (blues/swing) at
the chamber.
FARM VOLUNTEER HOURS All
ages and skill levels are welcome to
assist at the Pomona College Organic
Farm. Staff will be on hand to di-
rect a work project, and volunteers
are welcome to take home produce.
10 a.m. to noon. Pomona College
Organic Farm, 130 Amherst Ave.,
Claremont. Contact (909) 607-8341
or farm@pomona.edu or visit
farm.pomona.edu.
POETRY READING Rick Smith
plays harmonica for The
Mescal Sheiks; he is a
lyricist, a poet and a clin-
ical psychologist. His recent books in-
clude The Wren Notebook (2000) and
Hard Landing (2010), both of which
trace the myth and legacy of the wren.
In 2014, Lummox Press published
Whispering in a Mad Dog’s Ear. Mr.
Smith will be reading from his various
books and will play some blues as well.
James Meetze is the author of I Have
Designed This for You and Dayglo,
which was selected by Terrance Hayes
as winner of the 2010 Sawtooth Poetry
Prize and published by Ahsahta Press.
He is editor, with Simon Pettet, of
Other Flowers: Uncollected Poems
by James Schuyler and is winner of the
2001 Poet Laureate Award from the
University of California. Mr. Meetze’s
poems have recently appeared in sev-
eral publications. He is assistant profes-
sor of English at Ashford University
and lives in San Diego. His recent book,
Dark Art I-XII, was published in De-
cember and his forthcoming book,
Phantom Hour from Ahsahta Press,
will be published January 2016. Clare-
mont Library, 208 N. Harvard Ave.,
Claremont. Visit claremontlibrary.org.
LIVE JAZZ performance by Silver
Fox Band on the Blue Fin patio at 2
p.m. 665 E. Foothill Blvd., Claremont.
CLAREMONT YOUNG MUSI-
CIANS Intermezzo Orchestra in con-
cert conducted by Roger Samuel.
2:30 p.m. Admission is free. Bridges
Hall of Music, 150 E. Fourth St.,
Claremont. (909) 624-3614.
CONCERT Claremont Young Musi-
cians Orchestra’s 25th Anniversary
Concert conducted by Roger Samuel.
The concert features 2014 Concerto
Competition winners Tiffany Wee (vi-
olin) and Ramakrishnan Kumaran
(piccolo). 7:30 p.m. Free tickets will
be given out beginning at 6:30 p.m.
For information, call (909) 624-3614.
MEMORIAL DAY Claremont Amer-
ican Legion Keith Powell Post 78 will
host a Memorial Day Service at 11 a.m.
at Claremont Oak Park Cemetery. The
service will include the posting of col-
ors, speakers, floral tributes and a Scot-
tish Lament presented by a bagpiper.
Seating will be provided for 350-400
people. The music prelude and National
Anthem will be presented by the Clare-
mont High School Concert Band. Post
78 has invited Congresswoman Judy
Chu, Claremont Mayor Joe Lyons and
the Claremont City Council. The
keynote speaker will be Lt. Col. Evan
H. Wollen, who served in the United
States Army and is professor of military
science at Claremont McKenna Col-
lege. Oak Park Cemetery is located at
410 S. Sycamore Ave., Claremont.
THEOLOGICAL EDUCATIONDr.
Kah-Jin Jeffrey Kuan, president of the
Claremont School of Theology, will
discuss interreligious theological edu-
cation for a multi-faith world. Buffet
YOUR WEEK IN 9 DAYS
9-DAY CALENDAR
continues on the next page
Hot Tip
May
Friday 23
May
Saturday 24
May
Sunday 25
May
Monday 26
May
Tuesday 27
Nightlife
Berlin to appear for signing and
performance at Rhino Records.
Page 23
lunch at 11:30 a.m. for $13 or dessert
and coffee for $6. The University Club
meets Tuesdays at the Hughes Com-
munity Center, 1700 Danbury Rd.,
Claremont.
COMPUTER CLUB “Ask the Gurus
Night” with session coordinator Tom
Deno. The Claremont Senior Com-
puter Club meets on Tuesday evenings
at the Hughes Community Center at
1700 Danbury Rd. Meetings begin at
7:30 p.m. cscclub.org.
BLUE STAR MUSEUM DAYS Free
admission for active military person-
nel, their family members (military ID
holder and up to five immediate family
members) and veterans (admission fees
apply to accompanying family mem-
bers). Memorial Day through Labor
Day. Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Gar-
den, 1500 N. College Ave., Claremont.
(909) 625-8767.
COOKING DEMO with Chef Charly
from Eighteen48 gourmet events and
catering. The event will include a demo
and tasting of Mediterranean spring
melon salad with aged balsamic vinai-
grette and a cheesecake crepe with or-
ange whipped cream and macerated
strawberry. There will also be a selec-
tion of beverages including wine for
guests over 21 and light appetizers. 7
to 9 p.m. $35 per person. Vom Fass,
101 N. Indian Hill Blvd. Suite C2-100.
(909) 399-0256.
DOCUMENTARY SCREENING
Claremont Heritage sponsors Dead
Man Rockin’, a documentary about
John Harrelson’s life in music. Admis-
sion is $10. Claremont School of Theol-
ogy’s Mudd Theater, 1325 N. College,
Claremont. Visit claremontheritage.org.
FRIDAY NIGHTS LIVE Stroll
through the Village and listen to free, live
music from 6 to 9 p.m. This week’s con-
certs include Hound Dog Dave & the
Mel Tones (blues/jazz) at the Public
Plaza and Amanda Ray MacNamara
(steel drums) at the chamber.
CLAREMONT FOLK FESTIVAL
headlined by Ben
Harper and his mother
Ellen, among other per-
formers. The event includes work-
shops, activities, plus art and food
vendors. 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. Tickets
range from $40 to $125; children 12
and under attend for free. Rancho
Santa Ana Botanic Garden, 1500 N.
College Ave., Claremont. Visit folkmu
siccenter.com/folk-festival.
FARM VOLUNTEER HOURS All
ages and skill levels are welcome to as-
sist at the Pomona College Organic
Farm. Staff will be on hand to direct a
work project, and volunteers are wel-
come to take home produce. 10 a.m. to
noon. Pomona College Organic Farm,
130 Amherst Ave., Claremont. Contact
(909) 607-8341 or farm@pomona.edu
or visit farm.pomona.edu.
BERLIN PERFORMANCE &
SIGNING Berlin will
perform live and do an
in-store signing at 1
p.m. at Rhino Records, 235 Yale Ave.,
Claremont. See story on page 23.
COOKING CLASS Vom Fass Clare-
mont presents “Mediter-
ranean Delights Cooking
Class” at Claremont
Chef’s Academy highlighting oils and
vinegars from Vom Fass. Learn to
make Greek-style lamb salad with
feta lemon dressing, crispy potato
pancakes with Mediterranean veggie
relish and strawberry lime meringue
pie. 6 to 8 p.m. $45 per person. Clare-
mont Chef’s Academy, 514 W. First
St., Claremont. Call (909) 625-7505
or visit claremontchefsacademy.com.
Hot Tip
Claremont COURIER/Friday, May 23, 2014 19
Hot Tip
Hot Tip
9-DAY CALENDAR
continued from the previous page
May
Thursday 29
May
Wednesday 28
May
Friday 30
May
Saturday 31
Jenelle Rensch covers the calendar, arts and entertainment. Deadline: Thursday at 5 p.m., one
week before publication. Include date, time, address, a contact phone number and fee for ad-
mission (if applicable). Email: calendar@claremont-courier.com. Phone: 621-4761. Fax: 621-
4072. Address: 1420 N. Claremont Blvd., Suite 205-B, Claremont, 91711. There is NO guarantee
that items submitted will be published.
Claremont COURIER/Friday, May 23, 2014 20
BUDDHAMOUSE EMPORIUM:
134 Yale Ave., Claremont. Open daily
from 10:30 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. bud-
dhamouse.com. (909) 626-3322.
—Through May 31: Cindy Rinne’s
“Mapless,” mixed-media textile art.
BUNNY GUNNER GALLERY: 254
W. Bonita Ave., Claremont. Tuesday
through Friday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Sat-
urday, noon to 6 p.m. (909) 624-7238.
—Through May 31: “Masquerade” by
Cheryl Bookout and “Drawings” by
Meme Ortega are featured for the
month of May.
CLAREMONT COMMUNITY
FOUNDATION ART GALLERY:
205 Yale Ave., Claremont Chamber of
Commerce. Monday through Friday, 9
a.m. to 4 p.m. (909) 398-1060.
—Through May 31: Sixth annual Clare-
mont High School Student Art Show.
CLAREMONT FORUM GALLERY:
586 W. First St. in the Packing House.
Tuesday through Thursday, noon to 7
p.m.; Friday and Saturday, noon to 9
p.m.; and Sunday, noon to 7 p.m. (909)
626-3066.
—Through May 31: “Relative Expres-
sions: a Lighthearted Exhibit,” featur-
ing the works of Elizabeth Blackford
Preston and Michael Blackford.
CLAREMONT MUSEUM OF
ART: claremont museum.org.
—Through July 13: The Claremont
Museum of Art presents “Steve
Comba Arboretum” in the gallery at
Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Garden,
1500 N. College Ave., Claremont,
daily 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Garden admis-
sion is $8 for general admission, $6
for seniors and students, $4 for chil-
dren and free for CMA and RSABG
members. For more information, go
to claremontmuseum.org. The Clare-
mont Museum of Art exhibition fea-
tures Mr. Comba’s drawings, sketches,
photographs and paintings that relate to
and culminated in the eight-foot paint-
ing “Arboretum.” In 2011, the artist de-
voted eight months to create the painting
using photos, sketches and studies from
1984 to the present day. It is both an au-
tobiographical journey through his own
work in landscape as well as a treatise
on the artificial nature of painting and
the objective beauty of nature.
THE COLONY AT LOFT 204: 532
W. First St., #204, Claremont Packing
House. Open Tuesday through Satur-
day, 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. Extended hours
on the first Friday of the month for
Claremont Art Walk until 9 p.m., with
live music at 8 p.m. Visit loft204.com.
Email info@loft204.com for informa-
tion about purchasing monthly wall
space for artwork display or to inquire
about event rental of gallery space. Call
Vicki at (626) 224-7915 or (626) 963-
4238 for one-on-one art instruction for
junior high and high school age students.
—Through May 31: “Abandoned Fab-
ric: Our Life,” an exhibition by Sumi
Foley. As a child, Ms. Foley would
spend hours at her grandmother’s house
looking through boxes of kimono
scraps, gazing at the textures and colors.
Seeing her passion for fabric, her grand-
mother taught young Sumi the art of
sewing. Years later, her grandmother
decided to throw away a bundle of old
kimono fabric. Not able to bear the
thought of the beautiful fabric being
discarded, Ms. Foley decided to trans-
form the abandoned fabrics, full of
beautiful designs and colors; and turn
them into something new and beautiful.
PETTERSON MUSEUM OF IN-
TERCULTURAL ART: 730 Ply-
mouth Rd., Pilgrim Place. Friday,
Saturday and Sunday, 2 to 4 p.m. Con-
tains collections of international fine
art, folk art and material culture from
10,000 BCE to the present, contributed
by Pilgrim Place residents and commu-
nity friends, covering every continent.
(909) 399-5544.
—Through August 24: “Lifestyles of
the Rich and Famous: Chinese Luxury
Goods of the Ming and Qing Dynas-
ties.” Drawing on the Petterson Mu-
seum’s extensive collection of Chinese
art and artifacts, they will highlight
prestige items used by the nobility and
wealthy civil servants during China’s
last two dynasties, spanning the years
between 1368-1912. The exhibit will
include silk robes, jewelry and costume
accessories, paintings, ivory, ceramic,
lacquer and metal artifacts once used
by the ruling elite of China.
SQUARE i GALLERY: 110 Har-
vard Ave., Claremont. Tuesday
through Saturday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.,
or by appointment. Square i is an
annex of the Artist Trait Gallery. Ex-
hibits rotate approximately every six
weeks. Call (909) 621-9091 or email
info@squareigallery.com.
—Through May 31: “All About Clare-
mont,” watercolors by Patrick Dooley.
This show features new works focus-
ing on the college campuses in this
quaint California town. Mr. Dooley has
a large following for his depictions of
these now-famous colleges and their
tree-covered campuses.
GALLERIES
Claremont COURIER/Friday, May 23, 2014 21
W
hat’s green and taking the
world of theater by storm?
Shrek: The Musical, which
the CHS Theatre Department will pres-
ent next weekend at Bridges Auditorium.
Based on the 2001 Dreamworks movie Shrek and
William Steig’s book of the same name, the produc-
tion was performed nearly 500 times on Broadway.
With performing rights now widely available,
schools everywhere are putting on this family-
friendly show, which sends up the world of fairytales
while promoting self-acceptance.
Fans of the film will be familiar with the story.
Shrek, a surly green ogre, is living happily in self-
imposed exile when his privacy is interrupted. Fairy-
tale creatures, from Pinocchio to The Three Little
Pigs, descend on his swamp after being banished
from the Kingdom of Duloc by a vain nobleman
named Lord Farquaad. Shrek sets out to confront Far-
quaad and regain his solitude.
While on his adventure, he finds friendship in the
form of a talkative Donkey and romance with
Princess Fiona, a beautiful young woman with a se-
cret curse. With Lord Farquaad set on marrying the
princess, it’s up to Shrek and his newfound friends
to save Fiona from the nasty nobleman and a fire-
breathing dragon. He also must undertake the even
more daunting task of letting down his guard in the
name of love.
Each year, the CHS Theatre season culminates in
a musical performed at the majestic 2,400-seat
Bridges Auditorium. Pulling off a song-and-dance
extravaganza is made more difficult by the fact that
the students must nail their lines and moves while
preparing for finals.
With 65 student performers, 27 set changes and
hundreds of costumes, Shrek is even more intricate
than the usual end-of-year fare. The students are de-
lighted with the show, however, and are throwing
themselves into their respective roles.
Shrek is being played by veteran CHS thespian
David Cumpston, who gets to lighten up after re-
cently starring as a school shooter in the thought-
provoking one-act “Bang Bang You’re Dead.” RJ
Bivens is using the comedic timing he has honed
during his participation in the school’s ComedyS-
portz Team to embody the indomitable Donkey.
Emerson Dauwalter is playing Lord Farquaad,
walking on his knees throughout the show to mimic
the nobleman’s squat stature. And accomplished
singer Emmalyn Spruce is taking on the part of
Princess Fiona, whose dual human/ogre nature calls
for her to be a quick-change artist.
CHS Music Director Joel Wilson, who says that
the musical’s songs have a pop-rock feel, likes that
Shrek offers plenty of fun for kids while serving up
as adult humor that will keep the grownups laughing.
Theater Director Krista Carson Elhai also appreci-
ates the show’s wide appeal.
“I think my favorite thing about Shrek is what I
liked about Beauty and the Beast. It’s a musical for
age 3 through grandparents,” she said. “It’s definitely
a family show.”
Performances of Shrek are set for Friday, May 30
at 7:30 p.m. and Saturday, May 31 at 2 p.m. and 7:30
p.m. Tickets are $15 general admission, $10 for stu-
dents and seniors and $8 for children.
For more information, contact (909) 624-9053 ext.
30463. To buy tickets, which are only available
through the Claremont High School ASB store, visit
chstheatre.cusd.claremont.edu.
—Sarah Torribio
storribio@claremont-courier.com
It’s not easy being green, but CHS Theatre is making ‘Shrek’ its own
Claremont COURIER/Friday, May 23, 2014 22
COURIER CROSSWORD
Across
1. Kind of statement
6. Flat bread
9. Snippy
13. "Yippee!"
14. Intention
16. Not many
17. Negatively charged ion
18. Dollar portion
19. Bit
20. CHS boy's baseball head coach
23. Ash vessel
24. Deadeye's forte
25. Christmas warmer
27. Climbing garden plant
32. Respectively
33. Portray
34. Pakistani language
36. Not neat
40. Acid related to gout
41. Causes anguish
43. Muse of history
44. Greek sandwiches
46. Treasure-trove
47. Dancer's skirt
48. Catcher in the __
50. Numbers specialist
52. Common speeding speed
56. Habit
57. All-___
58. President of the Claremont
Faculty Association, Dave ____
64. As a result, in Latin
66. Where to get off
67. Mountain transport
68. "Tiger" or "dragon," e.g.
69. Chinese staple
70. Bullion unit
71. Kind of diagram
72. Dispirited
73. "The Good, the Bad and the
Ugly" director
Down
1. Illicitly gained goods
2. Wind down
3. Toledo's state
4. Good vantage point
5. Like some yogurt
6. Like the U.S. legislature
7. Middle-east port
8. Tiny poker stake
9. Goes with chi
10. In conflict with, with "of"
11. Back in?
12. Guitar sound
15. Chowed down
21. Tear to shreds
22. The first matter, according
to scientists
26. Builds a skyscraper
27. Wallop
28. Lean and mean
29. Islamic nobility title
30. "One more time!"
31. "Bye" in Barcelona
35. Accepted
37. Floozy
38. Archaeological research
location
39. BYOB part
42. Rationality
45. Match up
49. Upper regions of space
51. Rodent for a pet?
52. Done for
53. Bug
54. Fashion
55. Geometric vertical
59. Popular insulator
60. Crescent-shaped
61. Transport for the Golden Fleece
62. Press
63. Perceive
65. Four quarters
Crossword by Myles
Mellor. Puzzle #264
Answers to last weekʼs puzzle #263
CASA DE SALSA: 415 W. Foothill Blvd. This is a
restaurant that offers weekly live entertainment. (909)
445-1200.
—Thursdays: Michael Ryan and Friends. 6 to 9 p.m.
—Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays: Romantic gui-
tarist Vicente Victoria. 5 p.m.
—Sundays: Mariachi San Pedro. Brunch. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
EUREKA CLAREMONT: 580 W. First St., Clare-
mont. Open from 11 a.m. to midnight Sunday through
Thursday; closes at 1 a.m. Friday and Saturday.
“Hoppy” Hour daily from 2 to 6 p.m. (909) 445-8875.
—Mondays: Local Mondays featuring $3 Dale Bros.
Brewery pints.
—Tuesdays: 50 percent off all wines by the glass.
—Wednesdays: Steal-the-Glass craft beer of the week.
Meet the brewer first Wednesday of every month.
—Thursday, May 29: All Tito’s Vodka drinks $2 off and
Eureka Thursday Night Music with David Chapman.
THE FOLK MUSIC CENTER: 220 Yale Ave.,
Claremont Village.
—Open mic night, the last Sunday of every month.
Sign-up begins at 6 p.m.; performances run from 6:30
to 9 p.m. Admission is $1. Call (909) 624-2928 or visit
folkmusiccenter.com.
FLAPPERS COMEDY: 540 W. First St., Claremont
Packing House. 18+. Show times: Friday at 8 and 10
p.m., Saturday at 7 and 9:30 p.m. and Sunday at 7 p.m.
Tickets can be purchased online or at the door.
—Friday, May 23: Grant Cotter from MTV. 7 and
9:30 p.m.
—Saturday, May 24: Grant Cotter from MTV. 7 and
9:30 p.m.
—Sunday, May 25: Two Milk Minimum at 4:30 p.m.
and First Timer Funnies with William Randolph at 7 p.m.
—Thursday, May 29: First Timer Funnies with Noe
Gonzalez. 8 p.m.
—Friday, May 30: Jeff Richards from Saturday
Night Live. 7 and 9:30 p.m.
—Saturday, May 31: Jeff Richards from Saturday
Night Live. 7 and 9:30 p.m.
FOX THEATER POMONA: 301 S. Garey Ave.,
Pomona. foxpomona.com.
—Friday, June 6: Saosin. 9 p.m. $30-$32.50
GELENCSER HOUSE CONCERTS: gelencser-
houseconcerts.com. Directions given upon reserva-
tion, (909) 596-1266 or singfolk@yahoo.com.
—Saturday, June 21: John York. $15. 7:30 p.m.
—Thursday, June 26: Trippin the Sixties featuring
Barry McGuirre and John York. $20. 7:30 p.m.
HIP KITTY JAZZ & FONDUE: 502 W. First St.,
Claremont Packing House. Tuesday through Sun-
day, 5:30 p.m. to 2 a.m. Live jazz every night. Ad-
mission: Two-drink minimum. Info: (909)
447-6700 or hipkittyjazz.com.
—Friday, May 23: Griff Hamlin and the Circle City
Horns (blues). 8 p.m. $5 cover charge.
—Saturday, May 24: Lil “A” and the Allnighters
(blues). 8 p.m. $5 cover charge.
—Sunday, May 25: Amanda Castro (jazz). 7 p.m.
—Tuesday, May 27: Innerphase and Jetpacks and
Laser Guns (electronic). 9 p.m.
—Wednesday, May 28: Open Jam with The Lounge
Trio (jazz). 8 p.m.
—Thursday, May 29: Sand Storm (world). 7 p.m.
—Friday, May 30: Ginger & the Hoosier Daddys
(swing). 8 p.m. $5 cover charge.
—Saturday, May 31: Gino Saputo & the George
Kahn Band (jazz). 8 p.m. $5 cover charge.
THE PRESS RESTAURANT: 129 Harvard Ave.,
Claremont Village. Thursday through Saturday until
2 a.m. Live DJ every Thursday at 11 p.m. 21 and over
after 9 p.m. Standing room only after 9:30 p.m. No
cover. (909) 625-4808.
—Saturday, May 24: Desperation Squad (rock/punk).
10 p.m.
—Sunday, May 25: Piano Sunday with Patrick Vargas and
Cinema Sundays featuring Urgh! A Music War (1981).
—Tuesday, May 27: King Trivia Night. 9:30 p.m.
—Wednesday, May 28: Wine Wednesday with music
by Joe Atman at 9:30 p.m.
—Thursday, May 29: Baldy Mountain Jazz Band
(jazz) at 8:30 p.m. and DJ Sebastian Karim
(dance/electro/soul/hip hop) at 11 p.m.
—Friday, May 30: Technicolor Hearts (electro) and
Gina Roode (acoustic). 10 p.m.
—Saturday, May 31: Blues Highway (blues/rock).
10 p.m.
PIANO PIANO: 555 W. Foothill Blvd., Claremont.
Live dueling piano show times: Wednesday and
Thursday, 9 p.m. to 1 a.m.; Friday and Saturday, 8
p.m. to 1 a.m. 21 and over. $5 cover charge on Fridays
and Saturdays after 8 p.m. (no cover charge with stu-
dent ID). (909) 547-4266.
—Tuesdays: Taco Tuesday with $1 tacos, $2 Coronas
and $3 margaritas. Rock the mic or jam with the band.
—Wednesdays: “Rockstar Karaoke.” Rock the mic or
jam with the band. $2 Bud Lights and $4 Vodka Rock-
stars. 9 p.m.
RANCHO SANTA ANA BOTANIC GARDEN:
1500 N. College Ave., Claremont in the California
Courtyard. Tickets: $6 for adult members, $3 for sen-
iors, students and children 3 to 12 years. Non-member
prices are $10 for adults, $5 for seniors, students and
children. Call 625-8767 or visit rsabg.org. Gates open
at 6 p.m., performances begin at 7 p.m.
—Saturday, May 31: Ben and Ellen Harper headline
the 2014 Claremont Folk Festival. Various folk musi-
cians perform at the festival; art and food vendors will
also be present. Tickets are $40 to $125; children 12
and under may attend for free. 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. Visit
folkmusiccenter.com/folk-festival for more informa-
tion and ticket purchases.
NIGHTLIFE
Image courtesy of Jetpacks and Laser Guns
Jetpacks and Laser Guns perform with Innerphase at
Hip Kitty Jazz and Fondue on Tuesday, May 27 at 9 p.m.
Claremont COURIER/Friday, May 23, 2014 23
W
ith a wide array of musical ven-
ues and the annual Folk Music
Festival coming up next week-
end, Claremont is known as a cultural
oasis. It’s not every day, however, that the
town plays host to a New Wave legend.
The band Berlin will be giving a free perform-
ance at Rhino Records on Saturday, May 30 at 1
p.m. The synth electro-pop quartet is appearing in
support of their latest album, “Animal,” which they
released this past September, some 27 years after
“Take My Breath Away” graced the “Top Gun”
soundtrack and topped the charts.
The COURIER recently caught up with Berlin
frontwoman Terri Nunn. Still luminous at 52, she
talked about her band’s staying power, changes in
the music world and striving for ongoing relevance.
“I re-inspire myself by listening to new music
continuously,” she said. “To keep playing the same
thing over and over gets really boring. It’s about
having that infusion of new sounds with the old—
people want to hear that.”
The digital age has leveled the playing field,
making it possible for musicians to craft a hit with-
out leaving their home office or breaking the bank.
Sites like YouTube have simultaneously created a
platform for emerging artists to gain widespread
exposure.
“The downside is that music is free, and that’s
hurt a lot of people. It’s hurt me in some ways but,
because I love doing concerts—that’s what I get off
on—it’s worked out.”
Fans still turn out in droves for live shows where
they can sing along with Berlin’s classics. (Many a
fan of alternative rock has belted out “Metro”—“I
remember hating you for loving me”—when the
song hits the airwaves.)
Continuing to love Berlin is not an exercise in
nostalgia.
“One of the fortunate things about Berlin is that
electronic music is still going. Not only is it still
going, but a lot of bands that play today are using
the same sounds we started with,” Ms. Nunn said.
Berlin has continued to produce new music over
the years, releasing seven studio albums. When
performing, Ms. Nunn is careful to strike a graceful
balance between fresh material and old favorites
like “No More Words” and “Masquerade.”
“It’s tricky. It’s like a puzzle for me, putting a set
together,” she said. “People will listen to new
songs, but they came to hear the songs they love.
I’m the same way. I want to hear the songs I know
and love. That’s why I bought the ticket.”
Ms. Nunn broke into the music scene with a song
called “Sex (I’m A…)” and has continued to push
the envelop by singing about the pull of pleasure.
It’s a subject that matters, she said, and with which
she’s comfortable.
“First of all, when we started out, I was 19 and the
majority of us were in our 20s, so that’s all we
thought about—getting laid, trying to get laid, not
getting laid,” she said. “That’s the way it is being 20.”
The sexual frankness she has displayed since
Berlin’s 1978 founding can also be attributed to
Ms. Nunn’s upbringing.
“I grew up in a household where sexuality was
okay and not something that you hid under the
rug,” she said. “My father painted nude women and
those paintings were displayed in the house. My
parents were very okay with human sexuality and
its role in our lives.”
She’s still okay with talking and singing about sex
as the years pass. In fact, the title track of the album,
“Animal,” is about a vigorous bedroom romp.
“Now, I not only have it as part of my life, I’m in
a really good marriage,” she said. “It’s an active
part of our marriage and I’m grateful for that.”
In a time when singer Miley Cyrus can proclaim
to interviewer Matt Lauer that people “don’t have
sex anymore” after they turn 40, Ms. Nunn feels
it’s important to emphasize that sex not only
doesn’t disappear with age, it can improve.
“It changes. It’s different,” she said. “I wouldn’t
go back for a day to when I was in my 20s. That
was good and this is another good.”
Ms. Nunn has no plan to step off stage anytime
soon. Some people like to mock the idea of the
aging rock star. By contrast, Ms. Nunn, whose lat-
est album was produced by electro-music pioneers
the Dust Brothers, thinks it’s wonderful.
Canoodling with the other women musicians who
emerged in her era—such as Pat Benatar and Joan
Jett, both of whom she will perform with in Laugh-
lin this Sunday—is “a huge thrill.”
In fact, Ms. Nunn confesses that she is more than a
little star-struck by Blondie frontwoman Deborah
Harry, with whom she has recently become friendly.
“She came into my dressing room,” Ms. Nunn
said. “She had no makeup on and was wearing a
cap and orange high tops and it’s like, ‘She’s Deb-
bie f*@#ing Harry! She doesn’t need to impress
anyone.’ What a wonderful, still-inspiring icon for
me, and now a friend.”
After a talk in which they compared notes on life
as a lead singer, Ms. Harry took to the stage.
“She’s amazing, like 66 years old, wearing
miniskirts and looking hot and loving it,” Ms. Nunn
said. “She’s doing what I always hoped people
would do with rock music. I had always hoped that
the artists I loved would continue making music.”
—Sarah Torribio
storribio@claremont-courier.com
Singer Terri Nunn discusses Berlin, prepares for Rhino appearance
Image courtesy of Rhino Records
BRIDGES AUDITORIUM: 450 N. College Way,
Pomona College. Box-office hours are Monday
through Friday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. (909) 607-1139.
Purchase tickets online; choose seats at
pomona.edu/bridges. For disabled access and to drop
off patrons at Bridges Auditorium, drive north on Co-
lumbia Avenue from First Street to Fourth Street.
—Friday and Saturday, May 30 and 31: Claremont
High School Theatre presents Shrek The Musical.
Join our unlikely hero and his loyal steed Donkey
as they embark on a quest to rescue the beautiful
(if slightly temperamental) Princess Fiona from a
fire-breathing, lovesick dragon. Add the diminutive
Lord Farquaad, a gang of fairytale misfits and a bis-
cuit with attitude, and you’ve got the biggest,
brightest musical comedy around. Show times are
May 30 at 7:30 p.m. and May 31 at 2 and 7:30 p.m.
Tickets are $8 for children, $10 for students/seniors
and $15 for general admission. For more informa-
tion, contact (909) 624-9053 ext. 30463. Tickets are
available only through Claremont High School
ASB store. Visit chstheatre.cusd.claremont.edu.
CANDLELIGHT PAVILION: 455 W. Foothill
Blvd., Claremont. Thursday, Friday and Saturday
evening shows: dinner at 6 p.m., performance at 8:15
p.m.; Sunday evening shows: dinner at 5 p.m., per-
formance at 7:15 p.m.; Saturday and Sunday mati-
nees: lunch at 11 a.m., performance at 12:45 p.m.
(909) 626-1254, ext.1 or candlelightpavilion.com.
—June 6 though July 13: Bye Bye Birdie.
LEWIS FAMILY PLAYHOUSE: 12505 Cultural
Center Drive, Rancho Cucamonga. Call (909) 477-
2752 or visit lewisfamilyplayhouse.com.
—Saturday, May 31: Steppin’ Out with Ben Vereen.
$65. 8 p.m.
SEAVER THEATRE COMPLEX: Pomona Col-
lege, 300 E. Bonita Ave., Claremont. The box office
is available Monday through Friday from 11 a.m. to
4 p.m. and one hour prior to curtain times. Call (909)
607-4375 or e-mail seaverboxoffice@pomona.edu.
—Through June 1: Ophelia’s Jump presents Eury-
dice by Sarah Ruhl. Under the affectionate tutelage
of her father, Eurydice regains her memories of
earthly love. But when Orpheus channels down to re-
trieve her, after firing off a barrage of love letters from
above, she has to choose between her husband and
her father. Showtimes are Fridays at 8 p.m., Saturdays
at 3 and 8 p.m. and Sundays at 4 p.m. General admis-
sion is $25 or $22 for students/seniors. Group dis-
counts are also available. Tickets are available at
opheliasjump.org. For more information, email
info@opheliasjump.org or call (909) 624-1464.
PERFORMING ARTS
RESTAURANT ROW
CALL MARY TODAY: 621-4761
W
ith the coming of Memorial
Day, I’m reminded of my fa-
ther, Lawrence Wesley Grady,
a man who deserves to be remembered.
As a child, I remember him driving our
car as I sat behind him in the back seat.
From there I could lean forward and touch
with fascination the two dime-size scars
on his neck, one on each side. I had a
vague idea what had caused them, but it
would be years later, as an adult, before I
would fully realize the pain and sacrifice
his scars actually represented.
My father was 26 when he was drafted. He served
with an infantry unit in the Philippines during World
War II. He had been in combat for five weeks on the
island of Mindanao when on May 26, 1945, his unit
was advancing through a coconut plantation. They
failed to see a well-concealed “spider hole” contain-
ing a single Japanese sniper.
The sniper waited until my father and the others
had passed by before he took aim at my father and
fired. But an instant before he pulled the trigger, my
father suddenly raised his head to look at something.
The bullet, instead of striking him in the head, struck
him in the neck, passing clear through and damaging
his spine.
He awoke days later on a hospital ship where he had
undergone surgery. He had no feeling in his legs and
was told he would never walk again. He did not, how-
ever, accept this diagnosis, and he made up his mind to
beat the odds. Months of therapy followed, and he
never gave up. Then little by little, he improved. Fi-
nally he prevailed, his battle won, and he could walk.
My father’s is an American story of sacrifice for his
country. Born in Waterloo, Iowa in 1918, he traveled
to California, initially to visit his aunt and uncle,
Sadie and Fred Miller, owners of Miller’s Cleaners on
Indian Hill Boulevard in Claremont.
My father liked it here so much that he soon left
Iowa for good, ultimately settling in Claremont in
1944 with his wife, Shirley, and me, Sandra, not yet a
year old at the time. We lived in a small house behind
Miller’s Cleaners, a house that now is home to a vio-
lin repair business. My brother, Charles, was born a
few months later, just before our father went to war.
Following the war and my father’s painful recovery,
he became a master carpenter and cabinet maker, and
his fine work can be seen in homes and businesses all
over Claremont and surrounding communities.
He even found time to pursue some hobbies—gold
mining near Quartzite, Arizona and restoring old cars
and John Deere tractors. But I remember him often
rubbing his neck, having never fully recovered from
the war, in pain every day of his life.
Despite his pain, however, my father lived a good
and fruitful life, loved and respected by all who knew
him. In 1998, at the age of 79, he passed away in
Claremont, melanoma having accomplished what the
sniper’s bullet had failed to do 53 years earlier. He
was buried beneath a magnificent sycamore tree in
Oak Park Cemetery. Besides my mother, brother and
me, he left behind five grandchildren, nine great-
grandchildren and enough fond memories to last us
all a lifetime.
We, as Americans, need to remember our heroes,
and my father was one of them.
Claremont COURIER/Friday, May 23, 2014 24
Former Claremont resident Lawrence Wesley Grady
was wounded while serving his country in the Pa-
cific Theater of World War II. Mr. Grady made his
home here in Claremont, raising children in a small
home behind Millers Cleaner’s, which is now the vi-
olin-maker’s shop.
One more American hero by Sandra Grady
I
n 1918, World War I raged into its
fourth year. The Allied Powers were
reeling before the power of the Hun.
Young Americans were being told it was
up to them to stop the Germans. It was up
to them to win the war that would end all
wars.
One of these young Americans, a lad named
Charles Keith Powell, answered his country’s call.
After graduating from Claremont High School, he
followed his two older brothers, Myron and Warren,
into the war. His folks placed a small flag with three
blue stars in the window of their home on College Av-
enue. We have a postcard that Keith mailed his
mother saying he had arrived safely in France. We
know that his outfit was the American Third Division,
38th Regiment, Company G.
I appreciate that it is difficult for you folks to get a
feel for the world at that time. Perhaps I can help. I
grew up in the Sand Hills of Nebraska in the 1920s
and 1930s. Memories of World War I were still fresh
and tragically painful. Several young men from our
area had gone away to that war. Not all of them came
home.
On the ranch just east of ours, one of the hired cow-
boys, Mr. Lewis, was a one-armed old man who was
said to be a veteran from the war in France. Anytime I
tried to question Mr. Lewis, he’d answer with a
wracking cough, spit downwind, then touch a spur to
his cowpony to move away from the questions. Mr.
Lewis, who appeared much older than his years, was
actually a boy like Keith Powell when he lost his
lungs, his youth and his right arm in that war. I regret
never really getting to know Mr. Lewis. He, very
likely, died without his story being told.
In the forested hill country of northern France, dark
green hills flank the Marne River. It was there some
95 years ago that Keith Powell fought in the second
battle of Marne. Almost the same battles were fought
in this same area some three decades later. There is
perhaps a veteran or two here who know well of the
battles fought in that area during World War II, the
war that Keith was told would not happen.
As we search for Keith Powell, we walk out from a
small French village with an unpronouncable name.
On the verdant slope before us, there seems to rest an
early bloom of heather. Coming nearer that soft white
bloom is more clearly seen to be thousands of white
crosses. That field of white on green is surrounded by
stout, vine-covered walls. We enter the massive gate
posts. Black cast-iron letters in English advise that are
entering the American Military Cemetery of Oise-
Asine.
The flag of France does not fly over this field. A
giant American flag flies from a pole on a far rise.
The 6,012 Americans who lie here and the people of
France have made this field American soil. We walk
through the white crosses up to plot B, row 39, grave
1. The name on a white grave marker is Charles Keith
Powell.
As we look upon the simple white cross, our feel-
ings are too complex to voice easily. The quiet
prayers that we say seem inadequate. When we fall
silent, we realize the silence, which is a strongly-felt
presence on this field, is what best honors the mem-
ory of this fallen young American and his comrades.
His family, which includes all of us, wish that he
could be resting in Claremont’s Oak Park Cemetery.
We understand, however, it is most appropriate that
he be with his comrades near where he fell.
One fateful morning, this young American got on a
train to go far away. The loving home that he left was
in a tiny village where sweet-smelling lemon groves
surrounded his high school and the small college that
he hoped to attend.
Most of us here, in our own younger days, faced a
similar morning when we were required to get on a
bus or train to go far away. The fact that we remain
together in Claremont widely separates us from Keith
Powell and the host of brave Americans like him.
This acknowledged separation creates an obligation
on the part of those of us who made it home safely.
All of the special young people who did not come
home from the war are our comrades. Some of them
were our good friends. All of them, like Keith Powell,
served their comrades first, then their country, by ac-
cepting the loss of their most previous possession—
their lives.
Chuck Farritor is active with the American Legion,
Keith Powell Post 78 in Claremont.
The search for Private Powell by Chuck Farritor
VIEWPOINT
Memorial Day tributes to two Claremont servicemen
RENTALS
Condo For Rent
ONE bedroom furnished or
unfurnished. Garden, creeks,
pool, spa, tennis, garage,
gated. Near Village, Colleges.
$1150. 951-741-5032.
For Lease
NORTH Upland home. Red-
hill area. Four bedroom, 2.5
bathrooms. 2100 sq. ft. Good
sized yard. $2500 monthly.
909-969-1914. Agent Josee.
House For Rent
CLAREMONT newly built
homes for rent. Two-story,
four bedrooms, three bath-
rooms, two-car garage,
fenced and gated private
yards, everything new. Call
562-355-1715 for details.
Room for Rent
AMAZINGClaremont Packing
House loft space. Experience
loft living at less than half the
cost! This unique, artistic and
open floor plan features a sec-
ond level bedroom with closet
space and room for private liv-
ing area. $1,000 per month in-
cludes wifi, water, gas, electric
and trash utilities plus shared
kitchen, bathroom and com-
mon area. Female applicants
preferred. Call 626-388-6248.
Townhome For Rent
TOWNHOUSE in Club area.
Three bedrooms, 2.5 bath-
rooms, two-car garage. Excel-
lent condition and location.
$1950 monthly. 909-455-5831.
REAL ESTATE
Land For Sale
316 +/- ACRE White River Ranch
auction, Calico Rock, Arizona.
Minimum bid $800,000. Sealed
bids due by May 27. Atlas Real
Estate Firm, #2276. Five per-
cent BP. 501-840-7029. atlas
realestatefirm.com. (Cal-SCAN)
EMPLOYMENT
Internship
MARKETING intern needed for
edgy Claremont art gallery/store.
Must be familiar with social
media and advertising. Position
will help with press releases and
event planning—plenty of great
opportunities for résumé. Per-
fect for students looking for col-
lege credit. Call 626-388-6248.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
ATTENTION drivers! New
Kenworth Trucks. Earn up to
50 CPM. Full benefits plus
rider and pet programs. Ori-
entation sign-on bonus! CDL-
A required. 877-258-8782.
Ad-drivers.com. (Cal-SCAN)
DRIVERS: Prime, Inc. Com-
pany drivers and independent
contractors for refrigerated,
tanker and flatbed needed!
Plenty of freight and great pay!
Start with Prime today! Call 800-
277-0212 or apply online at dri-
veforprime.com. (Cal-SCAN)
DRIVERS: A-CDL train and
work for us! Professional and
focused training for your Class
A-CDL. You choose between
Company Driver, Owner Oper-
ator, Lease Operator or Lease
Trainer. 877-369-7091. Central
truckdrivingjobs.com. (Cal-SCAN)
EARN $500 a day. Insurance
agents needed. Leads, no cold
calls. Commissions paid daily.
Lifetime renewals. Complete
training. Health/dental insur-
ance. Life insurance license re-
quired. Call, 1-888-713-6020.
(Cal-SCAN)
TRUCK drivers, obtain Class A-
CDL in two-and-a-half weeks.
Company sponsored training.
Also hiring recent truck school
graduates, experienced drivers.
Must be 21 or older. Call 866-
275-2349. (Cal-SCAN)
MARKETPLACE
Announcements
DID you know 144 million US
adults read a newspaper print
copy each week? Discover
the power of newspaper ad-
vertising. For a free brochure
call 916-288-6011 or email
cecelia@cnpa.com. (Cal-SCAN)
DID you know that not only
does newspaper media reach
a huge audience, they also
reach an engaged audience?
Discover the power of news-
paper advertising. For a free
brochure call 916-288-6011
or email cecelia@cnpa.com.
(Cal-SCAN)
DID you know seven in 10
Americans or 158 million US
adults read content from news-
paper media each week? Dis-
cover the power of newspaper
advertising. For a free brochure
call 916-288-6011 or email
cecelia@cnpa.com. (Cal-SCAN)
AUTO accident attorney. In-
jured in an auto accident?
Call InjuryFone for a free
case evaluation. Never a cost
to you. Don’t wait, call now. 1-
800-958-5341. (Cal-SCAN)
MARKETPLACE
Announcements
DID you know newspaper-gen-
erated content is so valuable it’s
taken and repeated, condensed,
broadcast, tweeted, discussed,
posted, copied, edited and
emailed countless times through-
out the day by others? Discover
the power of newspaper ad-
vertising. For a free brochure
call 916-288-6011 or email
cecelia@cnpa.com. (Cal-SCAN)
Antiques
A BARN and house full of an-
tiques, furniture and smalls. Re-
finishing too! 909-593-1846. La
Verne. Kensoldenoddities.com.
AMERICAN and European an-
tiques, furnishings, home and
garden decor. New shipment
weekly! The Ivy House. 214 W.
Foothill Blvd. 909-621-6628.
Donations
DONATE your car. Fast, free
towing, 24-hour response.
Tax deduction. United Breast
Cancer Foundation. Provid-
ing free mammograms and
breast cancer information.
888-792-1675. (Cal-SCAN)
Estate Sales
MEMORIAL weekend estate
sale. Saturday and Sunday, May
24and 25, 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. 3607
Leicester Ct., north Claremont.
Financial
ARE you in big trouble with the
IRS? Stop wage and bank
levies, liens and audits, unfiled
tax returns, payroll issues and
resolve tax debt fast. Seen on
CNN. A BBB. Call 1-800-761-
5395. (Cal-SCAN)
IS your identity protected? It is
our promise to provide the
most comprehensive identity
theft prevention and response
products available! Call today
for a 30-day free trial, 1-800-
908-5194. (Cal-SCAN)
DO you owe over $10,000 to the
IRS or State in back taxes? Get
tax relief now! Call BlueTax, the
nation’s full service tax solution
firm. 800-393-6403. (Cal-SCAN)
REDUCE your past tax bill by as
much as 75 percent. Stop levies,
liens and wage garnishments.
Call The Tax Dr. now to see if
you qualify. 1-800-498-1067.
For Sale
FOR sale: Yamaha DGX-200
keyboard, stand, sustain
pedal, power cord, stool. Ex-
cellent condition. $225. 909-
624-5145.
MARKETPLACE
For Sale
SAWMILLS from only $4897.
Make and save money with
your own bandmill. Cut lumber
any dimension. In stock ready
to ship. Free information/DVD.
Norwoodsawmills.com. 1-800-
578-1363, ext.300N. (Cal-SCAN)
Garage Sales
GUY stuff moving sale. 3822
Williams Ave., Claremont. May
24. Sunset sale, 5 to 8 p.m.
May 25, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Troy-
built Bronco Tiller, Weber BBQ,
tools, wheelbarrow, garden
carts, hover carpet cleaner,
luggage, elliptical exerciser,
exercise equipment and more.
Yard Sale
BLOCK-WIDE yard sale. Practi-
cally everything going out. 8 a.m.
3323 Lynoak Drive, Claremont.
BULLETINS
Business
ONE call, does it all! Fast and
reliable handyman services.
Call ServiceLive and get re-
ferred to a pro today: Call
800-958-8267. (Cal-SCAN)
DIRECTV two year savings
event! Over 140 channels only
$29.99 a month. Only DirectTV
gives you two years of savings
and a free Genie upgrade! Call
1-800-291-0350. (Cal-SCAN)
REDUCE your cable bill! Get a
whole-home satellite system in-
stalled at no cost and program-
ming starting at $19.99 monthly.
Free HD/DVR. Upgrade to new
callers, so call now, 1-866-982-
9562. (Cal-SCAN)
DISH TV retailer. Starting at
$19.99 a month for 12 months
and high speed internet starting
at $14.95 a month (where avail-
able). Save! Ask about same
day installation! Call now! 1-888-
806-7317. (Cal-SCAN)
BULLETINS
Found
FEMALE Terrier mix. Beige and
red coloring. Wearing a collar.
Found on Mountain Ave. half way
between Arrow Hwy. and San
Jose on May 20. 909-519-2002.
Health
PELVIC/TRASVAGINAL Mesh?
Did you undergo transvaginal
placement of mesh for pelvic
organ prolapse or stress urinary
incontinence between 2005 and
the present? If the mesh caused
complications, you may be enti-
tled to compensation. Call
Charles H. Johnson Law and
speak with female staff members
1-800-535-5727. (Cal-SCAN)
VIAGRA 100mg and CIALIS
20mg! 50 tabs plus 10 free all for
$99 with free shipping! Discreet,
fast shipping. 888-836-0780 or
premiummeds.net. (Cal-SCAN)
SAFE Step Walk-In Tub alert for
seniors. Bathroom falls can be
fatal. Approved by Arthritis
Foundation. Therapeutic jets.
Less than four-inch step-in.
Wide door. Anti-slip floors.
American made. Installation in-
cluded. Call 800-799-4811 for
$750 off. (Cal-SCAN)
MEN’S lifestyle medicine. Viagra,
Cialis, Levitra. USA pharmacies.
Telemedicine physicians.
Overnight shipping available.
Trusted since 1998. 800-951-
6337. VIAMEDIC.com. Save five
percent using code: CAL14,
coupon expires December 31,
2014. (Cal-SCAN)
KEEP your pet happy, healthy
and protected. Call 800-675-
7476 now and get a free pet in-
surance quote for your dog or
cat. Choose up to 90 percent re-
imbursement. Get special mul-
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Personals
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rentals..............25
services...........28
legals..............26
real estate.......31
CLASSIFIEDS
Friday 05-23-14
909.621.4761
CONTACT US
1420 N Claremont Blvd. Suite 205B Claremont, CA 91711
Ph: 909.621.4761 • Fax: 909.621.4072
classified@claremont-courier.com
Business Hours: Monday-Friday 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Claremont COURIER Classifieds 25
AUTO
Yellow 1992 Fire Bird T-Top. 70,200 miles.
$8000. Call (909) 984-6485.
Claremont COURIER Classifieds/Friday, May 23, 2014 26
County of Los Angeles
Department of the Treasurer
and Tax Collector
Notice of Divided Publication
Pursuant to Sections 3702, 3381, and 3382, Revenue
and Taxation Code, the Notice of Sale of Tax De-
faulted Property Subject to the Power of Sale in and
for the County of Los Angeles, State of California has
been divided and distributed to various newspapers
of general circulation published in said County for
publication of a portion thereof, in each of the said
newspapers.
Public Auction Notice (R&TC 3702) of Sale Of
Tax-Defaulted Property Subject To The Power
Of Sale (Sale No. 2014B)
Whereas, on April 1, 2014, I, MARK J. SALADINO,
Treasurer and Tax Collector, was directed by the
Board of Supervisors of Los Angeles County, State
of California, to sell at online auction certain tax-de-
faulted properties, which are Subject to the Power of
Sale. Public notice is hereby given that unless said
properties are redeemed prior thereto, I will, begin-
ning on May 28, 2014, at the hour of 10:00 a.m. (Pa-
cific Time), offer for sale and sell said properties at an
online auction to the highest bidder for cashier's
check, bank-issued money order, or wire transfer in
lawful money of the United States for not less than
the minimum bid. The sale will run continuously
through May 30, 2014, 12:00 noon (Pacific Time) via
the Internet at www.bid4assets.com/losangeles.
Parcels that receive no bid will not be re-offered for
a reduced minimum price.
The minimum bid for each parcel will be
$1,125.00, as authorized by Revenue and Taxation
Code Section 3698.5(c).
Prospective bidders should obtain detailed infor-
mation of this sale and registration via the Internet
at www.bid4assets.com/losangeles. Bidders will
be required to submit a refundable deposit of
$5,000 and is accepted electronically at
www.bid4assets.com/losangeles. Only cashier's
check, bank issued money order, or wire transfer are
required at the time of registration. Registration will
begin at 8:00 a.m. (Pacific Time) Monday, May 5,
2014, and will end at 5:00 p.m. (Pacific Time) on
Wednesday, May 21, 2014. To participate in the
auction by mail or fax call Bid4Assets at 1-877-
427-7387, registration must be completed by May
15, 2014. No personal checks, two-party checks,
business checks, or credit cards will be accepted
for registration.
Pursuant to Revenue and Taxation Code Section
3692.3, all property is sold as is and the County and
its employees are not liable for the failure of any elec-
tronic equipment that may prevent a person from par-
ticipating in the sale.
If the property is sold, parties of interest, as defined by
Section 4675 of the Revenue and Taxation Code,
have a right to file a claim with the County for any
proceeds from the sale, which are in excess of the
liens and costs required to be paid from the proceeds.
If excess proceeds result from the sale, notice will be
given to parties of interest, pursuant to law.
All information concerning redemption, provided the
right to redeem has not previously been terminated,
will upon request be furnished by MARK J. SAL-
ADINO, Treasurer and Tax Collector.
If redemption of the property is not made according
to the law before 5:00 p.m. (Pacific Time) on Tues-
day, May 27, 2014, which is the last business day
prior to the first day of the auction, the right of re-
demption will cease.
The Assessor's Identification Number (AIN) in this
publication refers to the Assessor's Map Book, the
Map Page, and the individual Parcel Number on the
Map Page. If a change in the AIN occurred, both
prior and current AINs are shown. An explanation of
the parcel numbering system and the maps referred to
are available at the Office of the Assessor located at
500 West Temple Street, Room 225, Los Angeles,
California 90012.
Alist explaining the abbreviations used in this publi-
cation is on file in the Office of the Treasurer and Tax
Collector, 225 North Hill Street, Room 130, Los An-
geles, California 90012, or telephone (213) 974-2045.
I certify under penalty of perjury that the foregoing is
true and correct. Executed at Los Angeles, California,
on April 22, 2014.
MARK J. SALADINO
Los Angeles County
Treasurer and Tax Collector
State of California
The real property that is subject to this notice is situ-
ated in the County of Los Angeles, State of Califor-
nia, and is described as follows:
PUBLIC AUCTION NOTICE OF SALE OF TAX-
DEFAULTED PROPERTY SUBJECT TO THE
POWER OF SALE(SALE NO. 2014B)
2501 AIN 8669-010-013 T S C C INC LOCATION
COUNTYOF LOS ANGELES $1,125.00
2506 AIN 8673-004-003 LINAN,VICTOR AND
LUCYLOCATION COUNTYOF LOS ANGELES
$1,125.00
2507 AIN 8673-004-016 CAMERON,CHESTER A
LOCATION COUNTY OF LOS ANGELES
$1,125.00
2508 AIN 8673-005-009 COHEN,BECKIE LOCA-
TION COUNTYOF LOS ANGELES $1,125.00
2510 AIN 8673-017-001 DE SAW,DONALD J ET
AL DE SAW,DONNA LOCATION COUNTY OF
LOS ANGELES $1,125.00
2511AIN8673-017-011BAUTISTA,LATONYALO-
CATION COUNTYOF LOS ANGELES $1,125.00
2512 AIN 8675-018-004 SARAVIA,ELBAM LO-
CATION COUNTYOF LOS ANGELES $1,125.00
2515 AIN 8675-018-013 FARM AND MER-
CHANTS TRUST CO TR FRED MUNOZ DECD
TRUSTLOCATION COUNTYOF LOS ANGELES
$1,125.00
2518 AIN 8678-030-007 HOPE,BEVERLYTR ET
ALHOPE FAMILYTRUSTAND BABBITT,BRICE
LOCATION CITY-SAN DIMAS $1,125.00
CN898190
Publish: 5/9/14, 5/16/14, 5/23/14
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
File No. 2014101967
The following person is doing business as DOGGY
STYLES MOBILE PET GROOMING, 2105
Foothill Blvd., #B126, La Verne, CA91750. Mark
David Vartanian, 2105 Foothill Blvd., #B126, La
Verne, CA91750.
This business is conducted by an Individual.
Registrant has not yet commenced to transact busi-
ness under the fictitious business name or names
listed herein.
/s/ Mark D. Vartanian Title: Owner
This statement was filed with the Registrar-
Recorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles County in
04/15/14.
NOTICE-This fictitious business name statement ex-
pires five (5) years from the date it was filed in the of-
fice of the county clerk. Anew statement must be filed
before that time. The filing of this statement does not
of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious
business name in violation of the rights of another
under federal, state, or common law (see Section
14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code)
PUBLISH: May 9, 16, 23 and 30, 2014.
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
File No. 2014 106326
The following person is doing business as
DRAGON MUSIC COMPANY, 28908 Grayfox
St., Malibu, CA 90265. Richard Henn (Trustee),
28908 Grayfox St., Malibu, CA 90265, James
Biava (Trustee), 22526 Pacific Coast Highway,
Malibu, CA90265, Ellen O’Connor (Trustee), 274
Autumnwood St., Thousand Oaks, CA91360.
This business is conducted by a trust.
Registrant commenced to transact business under the
fictitious business name or names listed herein on
April 26, 1984.
/s/ Richard Henn Title: Trustee
This statement was filed with the Registrar-
Recorder/CountyClerkofLosAngelesCountyin04/21/14.
NOTICE-This fictitious business name statement ex-
pires five (5) years from the date it was filed in the of-
fice of the county clerk. A new statement must be
filed before that time. The filing of this statement does
not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious
business name in violation of the rights of another
under federal, state, or common law (see Section
14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code)
PUBLISH: May 2, 9, 16 and 23, 2014.
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
File No. 2014090354
The following person is doing business as CAS-
SIDY’S BOUTIQUE 2 YOU, CASSIDY’S
TRENDS, 5925 Birdie Dr., La Verne, CA91750. Au-
drey Sapien, 5925 Birdie Dr., La Verne, CA91750.
This business is conducted by an individual.
Registrant has not yet commenced to transact
business under the fictitious business name or
names listed herein.
/s/ Audrey Sapien Title: Owner
This statement was filed with the Registrar-
Recorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles County in
04/04/14.
NOTICE-This fictitious business name statement
expires five (5) years from the date it was filed in
the office of the county clerk. A new statement
must be filed before that time. The filing of this
statement does not of itself authorize the use in this
state of a fictitious business name in violation of
the rights of another under federal, state, or com-
mon law (see Section 14411 et seq., Business and
Professions Code)
PUBLISH: May 2, 9, 16 and 23, 2014.
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
File No. 2014 108088
The following person is doing business as HER-
RERA DESIGNS, 2438 Eighth St., La Verne, CA
91750. Kimberly Kay Holder, 2438 Eighth St., La
Verne, CA 91750. Daniel J. Herrera, 2438 Eighth
St., La Verne, CA91750.
This business is conducted by a married couple.
Registrant commenced to transact business under
the fictitious business name or names listed herein
on July 22, 2005.
/s/ Kimberly Kay Holder Title: Owner
This statement was filed with the Registrar-
Recorder/CountyClerkofLosAngelesCountyin04/22/14.
NOTICE-This fictitious business name statement
expires five (5) years from the date it was filed in
the office of the county clerk. A new statement
must be filed before that time. The filing of this
statement does not of itself authorize the use in this
state of a fictitious business name in violation of
the rights of another under federal, state, or com-
mon law (see Section 14411 et seq., Business and
Professions Code)
PUBLISH: May 2, 9, 16 and 23, 2014.
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
File No. 2014 111377
The following person is doing business as AC-
CENSUS, ACCENSUS L.E.D., 1007 Cascade
Place, Claremont, CA91711. Brandon G. Jagielo,
24662 Brighton Dr., Unit B, Valencia, CA91355.
This business is conducted by an individual.
Registrant commenced to transact business under
the fictitious business name or names listed herein
on April 14, 2014.
/s/ Brandon G. Jagielo Title: Owner
This statement was filed with the Registrar-
Recorder/CountyClerkofLosAngelesCountyin04/24/14.
NOTICE-This fictitious business name statement
expires five (5) years from the date it was filed in
the office of the county clerk. A new statement
must be filed before that time. The filing of this
statement does not of itself authorize the use in this
state of a fictitious business name in violation of
the rights of another under federal, state, or com-
mon law (see Section 14411 et seq., Business and
Professions Code)
PUBLISH: May 2, 9, 16 and 23, 2014.
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
File No. 2014 119959
The following person is doing business as RED
RAVEN, 415 W. Foothill Blvd. Ste. 121, Claremont,
CA91711-2782. Terra-Petra, Inc., 415 W. Foothill Blvd.
Ste. 121, Claremont, CA91711-2782.
This business is conducted by a corporation.
Registrant commenced to transact business under the
fictitious business name or names listed herein on
02/28/2014.
/s/ Hugh Avery Title: President
This statement was filed with the Registrar-
Recorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles County in
05/02/14.
NOTICE-This fictitious business name statement ex-
pires five (5) years from the date it was filed in the office
of the county clerk. Anew statement must be filed be-
fore that time. The filing of this statement does not of it-
self authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business
name in violation of the rights of another under federal,
state, or common law (see Section 14411 et seq., Busi-
ness and Professions Code)
PUBLISH: May 9, 16, 23 and 30, 2014.
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
File No. 2014115953
The following person is doing business as VICTO-
RIOUS GALLERY, VICTORIOUS GALLERY
TATTOOS, 1420 N. Claremont Blvd., Suite 102B,
Claremont, CA91711. Hector J. Paramo, 6709 Mango
St., Rancho Cucamonga, CA91701.
This business is conducted by an individual.
Registrant has not yet commenced to transact business
under the fictitious business name or names listed herein.
/s/ Hector J. Paramo Title: Owner
This statement was filed with the Registrar-
Recorder/CountyClerkofLosAngelesCountyin04/29/14.
NOTICE-This fictitious business name statement ex-
pires five (5) years from the date it was filed in the of-
fice of the county clerk. Anew statement must be filed
before that time. The filing of this statement does not
of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious
business name in violation of the rights of another
under federal, state, or common law (see Section
14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code)
PUBLISH: May 9, 16, 23 and 30, 2014.
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
File No. 2014 106125
The following person is doing business as SALON
BLOOM’S LASH ATTIC, THE LASH ATTIC,
915 W. Foothill Blvd., Unit J, Claremont, CA
91711. Judith Ann Olmstead, 1320 Saint Tropez
St., Upland, CA91784. Kristin Marshall, 1504 Via
Corona, La Verne, CA91750.
This business is conducted by copartners.
Registrant has not yet commenced to transact busi-
ness under the fictitious business name or names
listed herein.
/s/ Judy Olmstead Title: Co-Owner
This statement was filed with the Registrar-
Recorder/CountyClerkofLosAngelesCountyin04/18/14.
NOTICE-This fictitious business name statement ex-
pires five (5) years from the date it was filed in the of-
fice of the county clerk. Anew statement must be filed
before that time. The filing of this statement does not
of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious
business name in violation of the rights of another
under federal, state, or common law (see Section 14411
et seq., Business and Professions Code)
PUBLISH: May 9, 16, 23 and 30, 2014.
NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER
ESTATE OF CHARLES E. HUNTER
CASE NO. BP150731
To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent cred-
itors, and persons who may otherwise be interested
in the will or estate, or both, of CHARLES E.
HUNTER,
A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by
ELEANOR ARIZMENDI in the Superior Court of
California, County of Los Angeles.
THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests that
ELEANOR ARIZMENDI be appointed as personal
representative to administer the estate of the decedent.
The PETITION requests authority to administer the
estate under the Independent Administration of Es-
tates Act. (This authority will allow the personal rep-
resentative to take many actions without obtaining
court approval. Before taking certain very important
actions, however, the personal representative will be
required to give notice to interested persons unless
they have waived notice or consented to the proposed
action.) The independent administration authority will
be granted unless an interested person files an objec-
tion to the petition and shows good cause why the
court should not grant the authority.
AHEARING ON THE PETITION WILLBE HELD
IN THIS COURT AS FOLLOWS: Date: June 6,
2014 at Time: 8:30 A.M. in Dept. 29 located at:
Superior Court Of California, County Of Los Angeles,
111 North Hill Street
Los Angeles, CA 90012
Central District
IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you
should appear at the hearing and state your objections
or file written objections with the court before the
hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by
your attorney.
IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a CONTINGENT
CREDITOR OF THE DECEDENT, you must file
your claim with the court and mail a copy to the per-
sonal representative appointed by the court within the
later of either (1) four months from the date of first
issuance of letters to a general personal representa-
tive, as defined in section 58 (b) of the California Pro-
bate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or
personal delivery to you of a notice under section
9052 of the California Probate Code.
Other California statutes and legal authority may
affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to
consult with an attorney knowledgeable in Cali-
fornia law.
YOU MAYEXAMINE THE FILE KEPT BYTHE
COURT. If you are a person interested in the estate,
you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice
(form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and ap-
praisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as
provided in Probate Code section 1250. ARequest for
Special Notice form is available from the court clerk.
Petitioner:
Eleanor Arizmendi, In Pro Per
3303 South Archibald Ave., #19
Ontario, CA91761
626-862-1351
Publish: May 16, 23 & 30, 2014
Trustee Sale No. 14-000798 CXE Title
Order No. 8398612 APN 8281-002-047 NO-
TICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE YOU ARE IN
DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST
DATED 02/07/07. UNLESS YOU TAKE
ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROP-
ERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC
SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION
OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEED-
INGS AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD
CONTACT A LAWYER. On 06/05/14 at
9:00 A.M., Aztec Foreclosure Corporation as
the duly appointed Trustee under and pur-
suant to the power of sale contained in that
certain Deed of Trust executed by Ariel
Chavez, a single man, as Trustor(s), in favor
of Mortgage Electronic Registration Sys-
tems, Inc., solely as Nominee for Country-
wide Home Loans, Inc., as Beneficiary,
Recorded on 02/16/07 in Instrument No.
20070339167 of official records in the Of-
fice of the county recorder of LOS ANGE-
LES County, California; DEUTSCHE
BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY,
AS TRUSTEE FOR HOLDERS OF THE
GSAA HOME EQUITY TRUST 2007-5
ASSET-BACKED CERTIFICATES SERIES
2007-5, as the current Beneficiary, WILL
SELL AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO THE
HIGHEST BIDDER FOR CASH (payable at
time of sale in lawful money of the United
States, by cash, a cashier’s check drawn by a
state or national bank, a check drawn by a
state of federal credit union, or a check
drawn by a state or federal savings and loan
association, savings association, or savings
bank specified in section 5102 of the Finan-
cial Code and authorized to do business in
this state), Doubletree Hotel (Vineyard Ball-
room) Los Angeles-Norwalk, 13111
Sycamore Drive, Norwalk, CA 90650, all
right, title and interest conveyed to and now
held by it under said Deed of Trust in the
property situated in said County, California
described as: 24337 VISTA BUENA
DRIVE, DIAMOND BAR, CA 91765 The
property heretofore described is being sold
“as is”. The undersigned Trustee disclaims
any liability for any incorrectness of the
street address and other common designa-
tion, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be
made, but without covenant or warranty, ex-
pressed or implied, regarding title, posses-
sion, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining
principal sum of the note(s) secured by said
Deed of Trust, with interest thereon, as pro-
vided in said note(s), advances, if any, under
the terms of the Deed of Trust, estimated
fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee
and of the trusts created by said Deed of
Trust, to-wit: $632,566.64 (Estimated) Ac-
crued interest and additional advances, if
any, will increase this figure prior to sale.
The undersigned caused said Notice of De-
fault and Election to Sell to be recorded in
the county where the real property is located
and more than three months have elapsed
since such recordation. DATE: May 13, 2014
Robbie Weaver Assistant Secretary & Assis-
tant Vice President Aztec Foreclosure Cor-
poration 3636 N. Central Ave., Suite #400
Phoenix, AZ 85012 Phone: (877) 257-0717
or (602) 638-5700 Fax: (602) 638-5748
www.aztectrustee.com NOTICE TO PO-
TENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are consider-
ing bidding on this property lien, you should
understand that there are risks involved in
bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bid-
ding on a lien, not on the property itself.
Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction
does not automatically entitle you to free and
clear ownership of the property. You should
also be aware that the lien being auctioned
off may be a junior lien. If you are the high-
est bidder at the auction, you are or may be
responsible for paying off all liens senior to
the lien being auctioned off, before you can
receive clear title to the property. You are en-
couraged to investigate the existence, prior-
ity, and size of outstanding liens that may
exist on this property by contacting the
county recorder’s office or a title insurance
company, either of which may charge you a
fee for this information. If you consult either
of these resources, you should be aware that
the same lender may hold more than one
mortgage or deed of trust on the property.
NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The
sale date shown on this notice of sale may be
postponed one or more times by the mort-
gagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant
to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code.
The law requires that information about trustee
sale postponements be made available to you
and to the public, as a courtesy to those not pres-
ent at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your
sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable,
the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this
property, you may call or visit the Internet Web
site, using the file number assigned to this case
14-000798. Information about postponements
that are very short in duration or that occur close
in time to the scheduled sale may not imme-
diately be reflected in the telephone infor-
mation or on the Internet Web site. The best
way to verify postponement information is
to attend the scheduled sale. www.Auc-
tion.com or call (800) 280-2832 Or Aztec
Foreclosure Corporation (877) 257-0717
www.aztectrustee.com P1094315 5/16, 5/23,
05/30/2014
NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE File No.
7037.105217 Title Order No. NXCA-0130908 MIN
No. APN 8313-003-043 YOU ARE IN DEFAULT
UNDER A DEED OF TRUST, DATED 10/05/06.
UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT
YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A
PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANA-
TION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING
AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A
LAWYER. Apublic auction sale to the highest bidder
for cash, cashier’s check drawn on a state or national
bank, check drawn by state or federal credit union, or
a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan
association, or savings association, or savings bank
specified in §5102 to the Financial code and author-
ized to do business in this state, will be held by duly ap-
pointed trustee. The sale will be made, but without
covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding
title, possession, or encumbrances, to satisfy the obli-
gation secured by said Deed of Trust. The undersigned
Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of
the property address or other common designation, if
any, shown herein. Trustor(s): MARY LOUISE
CLASS, A MARRIED WOMAN AS HER SOLE
AND SEPARATE PROPERTYRecorded: 10/12/06,
as Instrument No. 06 2268241,of Official Records
of LOS ANGELES County, California. Date of
Sale: 06/05/14 at 1:00 PM Place of Sale: In the
main dining room of the Pomona Masonic Tem-
ple, located at 395 South Thomas Street, Pomona,
CA The purported property address is: 147 MARY-
WOOD AVENUE, CLAREMONT, CA91711 As-
sessors Parcel No. 8313-003-043 The total amount of
the unpaid balance of the obligation secured by the
property to be sold and reasonable estimated costs,
expenses and advances at the time of the initial publi-
cation of the Notice of Sale is $188,848.43. If the sale
is set aside for any reason, the purchaser at the sale shall
be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid, plus
interest. The purchaser shall have no further re-
course against the beneficiary, the Trustor or the
trustee. NOTICE TO POTENTIALBIDDERS: If you
are considering bidding on this property lien, you
should understand that there are risks involved in bid-
ding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien,
not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a
trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to
free and clear ownership of the property. You should
also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be
a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auc-
tion, you are or may be responsible for paying off all
liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you
can receive clear title to the property. You are en-
couraged to investigate the existence, priority and size
of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by
contacting the county recorder’s office or a title insur-
ance company, either of which may charge you a fee
for this information. If you consult either of these re-
sources, you should be aware that the same lender may
hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the
property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The
sale date shown on this notice of sale may be post-
poned one or more times by the mortgagee, benefici-
ary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of
the California Civil Code. The law requires that in-
formation about trustee sale postponements be made
available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to
those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn
whether your sale date has been postponed, and if ap-
plicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of
this property, you may call 877-484-9942 or 800-280-
2832 or visit this Internet Web site www.USA-Fore-
closure.com or www.Auction.com using the file
number assigned to this case 7037.105217. Informa-
tion about postponements that are very short in dura-
tion or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale
may not immediately be reflected in the telephone in-
formation or on the Internet Web site. The best way to
verify postponement information is to attend the
scheduled sale. Date: May 7, 2014 NORTHWEST
TRUSTEE SERVICES, INC., as Trustee Bonita
Salazar, Authorized Signatory 1241 E. Dyer Road,
Suite 250, Santa Ana, CA92705 866-387-6987 Sale
Info website: www.USA-Foreclosure.com or
www.Auction.com Automated Sales Line: 877-484-
9942 or 800-280-2832 Reinstatement and Pay-Off Re-
quests: 866-387-NWTS THIS OFFICE IS
ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT ADEBT AND ANY
INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED
FOR THAT PURPOSE ORDER # 7037.105217:
05/16/2014,05/23/2014,05/30/2014
NOTICE TO CREDITORS OF BULK SALE
(Division 6 of the Commercial Code)
Escrow No. 34841-LS
(1) Notice is hereby given to creditors of the within
named Seller(s) that a bulk sale is about to be made on
the personal property hereinafter described.
(2) The name and business addresses of the seller are:
PEIPEI LI, 4237 CAMPUS DR, STE B159, IRVINE,
CA92612
(3) The location in California of the chief executive of-
fice of the Seller is: 1403 MEADOW GLEN RD, DI-
AMOND BAR, CA91765
(4) The names and business address of the Buyer(s) are:
MURIEL CRONIDAS AND CHANTAL CAS-
TONGUAY, 350W. LINDENDR, ORANGE, CA92865
(5) The location and general description of the assets to
be sold are: FURNITURE, FIXTURES AND EQUIP-
MENT of that certain business located at: 4237 CAM-
PUS DR, STE B159, IRVINE, CA92612
(6) The business name used by the seller(s) at said lo-
cation is: WHITE ROSE SPA
(7) The anticipated date of the bulk sale is JUNE 11,
2014 at the office of: ADVANTAGE ONE ESCROW,
7777 CENTER AVE #350 HUNTINGTON BEACH,
CA92647, ESCROW NO. 34841-LS, Escrow Offi-
cer: LAURIE J. SHORB
(8) Claims may be filed with: ADVANTAGE ONE
ESCROW, 7777 CENTER AVE #350 HUNTING-
TON BEACH, CA92647, ESCROW NO. 34841-LS,
Escrow Officer: LAURIE J. SHORB
(9) The last day for filing claims is: JUNE 10, 2014.
(10) The bulk sale is subject to Section 6106.2 of the
Uniform Commercial Code.
(11) As listed by the seller, all other business names
and addresses used by the Seller within three years be-
fore the date such list was sent or delivered to the Buyer
are: WHITE ROSE SPA, LLC.
Dated: MAY14, 2014
Seller: PEIPEI LI
Buyer: MURIEL CRONIDAS AND CHANTAL
CASTONGUAY
LA1418444 CLAREMONT COURIER 5/23/14
legalads@claremont-courier.com 909.621.4761
LEGAL TENDER
Claremont COURIER Classifieds/Friday, May 23, 2014 27
NOTICE OF DIVIDED
PUBLICATION
Made pursuant to Section
3381, Revenue and
Taxation Code
Pursuant to Sections 3381 through 3385, Revenue
and Taxation Code, the Notice of Power to Sell
Tax-Defaulted Property in and for Los Angeles
County, State of California, has been divided and
distributed to various newspapers of general circu-
lation published in the County. Aportion of the list
appears in each of such newspapers.
NOTICE OFIMPENDING POWER TO SELL
TAX-DEFAULTED PROPERTY
Made pursuant to Section 3361,
Revenue and Taxation Code
Notice is hereby given that real property taxes and
assessments on the parcels described below will
have been defaulted five or more years, or, in the
case of nonresidential commercial property, prop-
erty on which a nuisance abatement lien has been
recorded or that can serve the public benefit by pro-
viding housing or services directly related to low-
income persons when three or more years have
elapsed and a request has been made by a city,
county, city and county, or nonprofit organization
that property will become subject to the Tax Col-
lector's power to sell.
The parcels listed will become subject to the Tax Col-
lector's power to sell on July 1, 2014, at 12:01 a.m.,
by operation of law. The Tax Collector's power to
sell will arise unless the property is either redeemed
or made subject to an installment plan of redemption
initiated as provided by law prior to 5:00 p.m., on
June 30, 2014. The right to an installment plan ter-
minates on June 30, 2014, and after that date the en-
tire balance due must be paid in full to prevent sale
of the property at public auction.
The right of redemption survives the property be-
coming subject to the power to sell, but it termi-
nates at 5:00 p.m. on the last business day before
actual sale of the property by the Tax Collector.
All information concerning redemption or the ini-
tiation of an installment plan of redemption will be
furnished, upon request, by Mark J. Saladino, Los
Angeles County Treasurer and Tax Collector, 225
North Hill Street, First Floor, Los Angeles, Cali-
fornia 90012.
The amount to redeem, in dollars and cents, is set
forth opposite its parcel number. This amount in-
cludes all defaulted taxes, penalties, and fees that
have accrued from the date of tax-default to the
date of June 30, 2014.
I certify, under penalty of perjury, that the forego-
ing is true and correct. Dated this 18th day of
April, 2014.
MARK J. SALADINO
TREASURER AND TAX COLLECTOR
COUNTY OF LOS ANGELES
STATE OF CALIFORNIA
PARCELNUMBERINGSYSTEMEXPLANATION
The Assessor's Identification Number (AIN), when
used to describe property in this list, refers to the As-
sessor's map book, the map page, the block on the
map, if applicable, and the individual parcel on the
map page or in the block. The Assessor's maps and
further explanation of the parcel numbering system
are available in the Assessor's Office, 500 West Tem-
ple Street, Room 225, Los Angeles, California 90012.
The real property that is the subject of this notice is
situated in the County of Los Angeles, State of Cali-
fornia, and is described as follows:
PROPERTY TAX DEFAULTED IN YEAR 2011
FOR TAXES, ASSESSMENT, AND OTHER
CHARGES FOR FISCAL YEAR 2010-2011
5575 $1,925.48
HSBC BANK USATR DEUTSCHE ALT A 2006
AR3 C/O C/O AMERICAS SERVICING COMPA
AIN: 8302-021-065
5576 $7,718.73
OMEGA INVESTMENT GROUP C/O TESFAI
GOITOM AIN: 8303-013-032
5577 $4,725.51
SANDBLOSSOM LLC C/O C/O ALFONCINA
SANDOVALCOOK SITUS:1978 N INDIAN HILL
BLVD CLAREMONT CA91711-2765 AIN: 8306-
001-046
5858 $4,265.23
PLUMLEY,JEFF D AND EILEAN N AIN: 8664-
010-032
5859 $285.24
KAPLAN,MICHAEL M AND JANET L AIN:
8664-010-037
5862 $232.81
KURWA,NARGIS AIN: 8666-059-008
5863 $3,030.10
RANDOM PROPERTIES ACQUISITION CORP
III C/O C/O ONEWEST BANK AIN: 8669-013-015
5864 $1,246.21
HANNA,CARTER AND VIRGINIAAAIN: 8671-
025-052
5866 $671.15
CALIRI,JOHN S AND ELVIRAAAIN: 8673-004-010
5867 $167.72
ZIEVE,LORRAINE TR TESSIE ZIEVE DECD
TRUST AIN: 8673-005-007
5868 $353.19
ALATORRE,SERGIO AIN: 8673-010-017
5869 $407.61
ALATORRE,SERGIO AIN: 8673-010-018
5870 $407.61
ALATORRE,SERGIO AIN: 8673-010-019
5871 $406.94
ALATORRE,SERGIO AIN: 8673-013-001
5872 $406.94
ALATORRE,SERGIO AIN: 8673-013-002
5873 $698.44
ROCKFELLOW,JOHN AAIN: 8673-014-007
5874 $11,928.76
MENJIVAR,OSCAR E AND RUBALCAVA,SAL
AIN: 8678-030-024
PROPERTY TAX DEFAULTED IN YEAR 2009
FOR TAXES, ASSESSMENT, AND OTHER
CHARGES FOR FISCAL YEAR 2008-2009
5654 $1,132.33
RUNNELLS,JUDI AND
KIRCHNER,CHRISTOPER SITUS:2334 7TH ST
LAVERNE CA91750-4529 AIN: 8375-028-008
5655 $2,356.67
CANALES,AMERICA SITUS:2374 LOMELI LN
LAVERNE CA91750-3642 AIN: 8375-034-023
5657 $11,727.46
RIVAS,CLEMENTE AND JUSTINA B AND
SITUS:1728 2ND ST LAVERNE CA91750-5313
AIN: 8381-032-008
5664 $14,188.06
OLVERA,EDWARD F SITUS:2249 DAMIEN AVE
LAVERNE CA91750-5117 AIN: 8391-024-031
5665 $7,844.47
MALLORY,LOU A SITUS:915 QUEENSBURY
AVE LAVERNE CA91750-5158 AIN: 8391-024-042
5865 $3,280.71
MILLER,DENNIS F SITUS:5505 PALMER
CANYON RD CLAREMONT CA 91711-1490
AIN: 8673-003-023
5875 $1,668.23
GEDIGIAN,DAVID AND TAMARA SITUS:6865
STARLINE ST LAVERNE CA 91750-2367 AIN:
8678-062-011
CN898445
Publish: 5/16/14, 5/23/14
CLAREMONT UNIFIED SCHOOLDISTRICT
RESOLUTION #17-2014
ARESOLUTION OFTHE BOARD OF
EDUCATION OFTHE CLAREMONT
UNIFIED SCHOOLDISTRICT DECLARING
ITS INTENTION TO LEVYAND COLLECT
ASSESSMENTS WITHIN THE CLAREMONT
UNIFIED SCHOOLDISTRICT
RECREATION ASSESSMENT DISTRICT
FOR FISCALYEAR 2014-2015 PURSUANT
TO THE LANDSCAPIING AND LIGHTING
ACT OF1972, PART 2 OFDIVISION 15 OF
THE CALIFORNIASTREETS AND
HIGHWAYS CODE AND ARTICLE XIIID
OFTHE CALIFORNIACONSTITUTION,
AND APPOINTING ATIME AND PLACE
FOR HEARING OBJECTIONS THERETO
On a motion by Ms. LaConte seconded by Ms.
Treser Osgood the following resolution is adopted:
THE BOARD OF EDUCATION (“BOARD”)
OF THE CLAREMONT UNIFIED SCHOOL
DISTRICT (“DISTRICT”) DOES HEREBY
FIND, DETERMINE, RESOLVE, AND ORDER
AS FOLLOWS:
Section 1. By previous resolutions, the Board ini-
tiated proceedings pursuant to the Landscaping and
Lighting Act of 1972, Part 2 of Division 15 of the
California Streets and Highways Code, commencing
with Section 22500 and Article XIIID of the Califor-
nia Constitution (the “Act”), for the levy and collec-
tion of assessments on the assessable lots and parcels
of land within the Claremont Unified School District
Recreation Assessment District for the 2014-2015 fis-
cal year and ordered the Engineer, SCI Consulting
Group, to prepare and file a written report in accor-
dance with Article 4 of Chapter 1 of the Act, and ap-
proved such Engineer’s Report as filed.
Section 2. The District owns school buildings,
places, structures, areas, facilities, playgrounds, play-
ing fields, courts, swimming pools, and outdoor
meeting places at the following locations:
Claremont High School, 1601 North Indian Hill
Blvd., Claremont, California
San Antonio High School/Community Day School.,
125 West San Jose Avenue, Claremont, California
El Roble Intermediate School, 665 North Mountain
Avenue, Claremont, California
Chaparral Elementary School, 451 Chaparral Drive,
Claremont, California
Condit Elementary School, 1750 N. Mountain Av-
enue, Claremont, California
Danbury School, 1745 Lynoak, Claremont, California
Mountain View Elementary School, 851 Santa Clara
Avenue, Claremont, California
Oakmont Elementary School, 120 W. Green Street,
Claremont, California
Sumner Elementary School, 1770 Sumner Avenue,
Claremont, California
Sycamore Elementary School, 255 W. 8th Street,
Claremont, California
Vista del Valle Elementary School, 550 Vista Drive,
Claremont, California
The Board, by previous resolution, designated the
foregoing as recreation centers.
Section 3. The Board hereby finds that it is in the
best interest of the District and declares its intention
to levy and collect assessments on the assessable lots
and parcels of land within the existing assessment
district designated as the “Claremont Unified School
District Recreation Assessment District” (the As-
sessment District”) for the fiscal year commencing
July 1, 2014, and ending June 30, 2015, to pay the
costs and expenses of the improvements described in
Section 5 hereof. Assessments shall be levied and col-
lected to pay for only that portion of the costs and ex-
penses which is attributable to public availability and
use of the improvements; the portion of the costs re-
lated to school use will be funded by the District’s
General Fund.
Section 4. The assessments to be levied and col-
lected against the assessable lots and parcels of land
within the Assessment District for the fiscal year
2014-2015 are not proposed to increase from the as-
sessments levied and collected for the fiscal year
2013-2014.
Section 5. The existing improvements may be
briefly described as follows: the installation, mainte-
nance, and servicing of recreational improvements at
the school buildings (public restrooms only), places,
structures, areas, facilities, playgrounds, playing fields,
courts, swimming pools, and outdoor meeting places
described in Section 2 above, including the installa-
tion, maintenance, and servicing of landscaping, turf,
playgrounds, playground equipment conforming to
safety standards and the Americans with Disabilities
Act, irrigation systems, parking lots, play surfaces,
lights, signage, gates, fences, playcourts, and tracks,
and the maintenance and servicing of athletic fields,
including two softball fields and one baseball field, lo-
cated at Cahuilla Park, which is located just north of
Claremont High School on the west side of Indian Hill
Boulevard, and which is owned by the City of Clare-
mont. For fiscal year 2014-2015, the proposed im-
provements will not include the installation,
maintenance or servicing of recreational improvements
at the La Puerta school site.
Section 6. The boundaries of the Assessment Dis-
trict shall be the same as those of the Claremont Uni-
fied School District. Such boundaries are shown on a
map of the Assessment District on file in the office of
the Secretary to the Board of Education and open to
public inspection.
Section 7. Reference is hereby made to the Engi-
neer’s Report on file in the office of the Secretary to
the Board of Education and open to public inspection
for a full and detailed description of the improve-
ments, the boundaries of the Assessment District, and
any zones therein, and the proposed assessments
upon assessable lots and parcels of land within the
Assessment District. The office of the Secretary to
the Board of Education is located at 170 W. San Jose
Avenue, Claremont, California 91711-2697.
Section 8. NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN that the
Board appoints Thursday, the 5th day of June, 2014,
at 7:00 p.m. in the Board Room at the Richard S.
Kirkendall Education Center located at 170 W. San
Jose Avenue, Claremont, California as the time and
place for hearing protests or objections to the levy
and collection of the proposed assessments on lots
and parcels of land within the Assessment District for
fiscal year 2014-2015. All interested persons shall be
afforded the opportunity to hear and be heard. The
Board shall consider all oral statements and all writ-
ten protests or communications made or filed by an
interested person. Prior to the conclusion of the hear-
ing, any interested person may file a written protest
with the Secretary to the Board or having previously
filed a protest may file a written withdrawal of that
protest Awritten protest shall state all grounds of ob-
jection. Aprotest by a property owner must contain a
description sufficient to identify the property owned
by the signer thereof.
Section 9. The Secretary to the Board is hereby
authorized and directed to give notice of such hearing
in accordance with law.
Section 10. Lots or parcels of land within the As-
sessment District that are owned or used by any
County, City, City and County, special district or any
other local or regional governmental entity, the State
of California or the United States shall be assessed
unless the District demonstrates by clear and con-
vincing evidence that such lots or parcels receive no
special benefit from the proposed improvements.
PASSED AND ADOPTED this 15th day of May
2014, by the Governing Board of the Claremont Uni-
fied School District of Los Angeles County, Califor-
nia, by the following vote:
AYES: 5
NOES: 0
ABSENT:
ABSTAIN:
STATE OF CALIFORNIA )
) SS
COUNTYOF LOS ANGELES )
I, James Elsasser, Secretary to the Governing Board
of the Claremont Unified School District of Los An-
geles County, do hereby certify that the foregoing is
a full, true, and correct copy of a resolution adopted
by the said Board at a regular meeting thereof held at
its regular place of meeting at the time and by the vote
above stated, which resolution is on file in the office
of the said Board.
/s/James Elsasser
Secretary to the Governing Board of the
Claremont Unified School District
Publish: May 23, 2014
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
File No. 2014133890
The following person(s) is (are) doing business as B
AND B LEARN AND PLAY, 4141 North Harlan
Ave., Baldwin Park, CA91706. Registrant(s): Nur
Karina Bandek, 4141 North Harlan Ave., Baldwin
Park, CA91706.
This business is conducted by an Individual.
Registrant has not yet commenced to transact busi-
ness under the fictitious business name or names
listed herein.
I declare that all information in this statement is true
and correct.
/s/ Nur Karina Bandek Title: Owner
This statement was filed with the Registrar-
Recorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles County on
05/16/14.
NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a) of sec-
tion 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally
expires at the end of five (5) years from the date on
which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk,
except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section
17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in
the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section
17913 other than a change in the residence address
of a registered owner. A new Fictitious Business
Name Statement must be filed before the expiration.
Effective January 1, 2014, the Fictitious Business
Name Statement must be accompanied by the Affi-
davit Of Identity Form.
The filing of this statement does not of itself author-
ize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name
in violation of the rights of another under federal,
state, or common law (see Section 14411 et seq.,
Business and Professions Code).
PUBLISH: May 23, 30, June 6 and 13, 2014
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
File No. 2014133941
The following person(s) is (are) doing business as
COMMUNITY HOME ENERGY RETROFIT
PROJECT, 4225 Piedmont Mesa Rd., Claremont,
CA91711. Registrant(s): Smart Energy Planet Cor-
poration, 1433 N. Fine, Fresno, CA93727.
This business is conducted by a Corporation.
Registrant has not yet commenced to transact busi-
ness under the fictitious business name or names
listed herein.
I declare that all information in this statement is
true and correct.
/s/ Devon Wright Hartman Title: Secretary
This statement was filed with the Registrar-Recorder/
County Clerk of Los Angeles County on 05/16/14.
NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a) of sec-
tion 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally
expires at the end of five (5) years from the date on
which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk,
except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section
17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in
the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section
17913 other than a change in the residence address
of a registered owner. A new Fictitious Business
Name Statement must be filed before the expiration.
Effective January 1, 2014, the Fictitious Business
Name Statement must be accompanied by the Affi-
davit Of Identity Form.
The filing of this statement does not of itself author-
ize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name
in violation of the rights of another under federal,
state, or common law (see Section 14411 et seq.,
Business and Professions Code).
PUBLISH: May 23, 30, June 6 and 13, 2014
legalads@claremont-courier.com 909.621.4761
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437 ELDER DR
3643 PADUA
1122 ALAMOSA
605 BLANCHARD PL
673 SILVERTREE RD
325 ST BONAVENTURE
103 PIEDMONT
354 ST BONAVENTURE
118 E ARROW HWY
1476 N INDIAN HILL
129 BLUE MOUNTAIN
632 DOANE AVE
443 E ARROW HWY
635 WINDHAM
421 MIRAMAR
122 SMITH DR
3393 YANKTON
741 SANTA BARBARA
229 W SAN JOSE
528 S MOUNTAIN
132 BELHAVEN
648 S MOUNTAIN
1298 W BASELINE
427 GENEVA
685 E SEBASTOPOL
3009 RHODELIA
1001 RICHMOND DR
437 WEST POINT DR
1495 BENEDICT
1252 BRIARCROFT RD
150 BRYN MAWR
658 DOANE AVE
1006 VANDERBILT
1736 CHATTANOOGA
208 ANDOVER
1585 FINECROFT DR
756 WINDHAM
425 WARNER
535 BISHOP PL
177 E AMERICAN
185 E AMERICAN
495 MARYGROVE
226 PIEDMONT
295 WAGNER DR
200 E SAN JOSE
217 E ANNAPOLIS
360 E ANNAPOLIS
520 CLARK
464 CONVERSE
740 VASSAR
639 W SAN JOSE
621 COLGATE PL
356 GENEVA
444 LEWIS CT
148 PIEDMONT
1660 AKRON PL
2150 URSINUS
1195 BERKELEY
1408 ASHLAND
1445 NIAGARA
958 MARYMOUNT
1947 CHAPMAN RD
533 BOWLING GREEN DR
400 FURMAN DR
1252 REIMS ST
616 GAYVILLE
344 NOTRE DAME
126 E SAN JOSE
443 STANFORD DR
1041 OCCIDENTAL DR
888 SYRACUSE DR
3102 LANSBURY
1466 WELLS AVE
157 BROWN DR
258 ARMSTRONG
666 HENDRIX
1440 VIA ZURITA
1078 LAKE FOREST DR
420 HEIDELBURG LN
4034 TENANGO
665 W SAN JOSE
583 CEDAR CREST
329 E CUCAMONGA
170 VILLANOVA
650 S COLLEGE
358 VICTORIA PL
451 SYCAMORE
238 W GREEN ST
679 W SAN JOSE
606 S MOUNTAIN
479 CARLETON
531 CARLETON
631 CARLETON
444 GENEVA
609 HENDRIX
489 NOTRE DAME
833 DRAKE
853 DRAKE
865 DRAKE
118 PRINCETON
148 PRINCETON
219 PIEDMONT
596 E ARROW HWY
546 CLARION PL
685 ROCKFORD DR
1900 N MOUNTAIN
174 WOODSTOCK
2309 WOOD
1687 CHATTANOOGA
3762 HENDERSON WAY
1370 N INDIAN HILL
1934 ACADEMY CT
1114 HARVARD
1251 N COLLEGE
1422 ASHLAND
841 NORTHWESTERN DR
983 VANDERBILT
1405 REGIS
916 SCRIPPS DR
853 OCCIDENTAL DR
1698 BRIDGEPORT
1979 JUDSON CT
2129 SAN MARCOS PL
1861 ROSEMOUNT AVE
522 E MIRAMAR
760 VIA SANTA CATARI
1257 FT LEWIS DR
137 LIMESTONE
2376 SAN BENITO CT
172 SEQUOIA
655 MARSHALL
667 MARSHALL
135 NASSAU
151 BALL DR
4157 LAS CASAS
1033 POMELLO
3428 CAMPUS
850 TOWNE
4312 MOHAWK
1067 LOOP BR
180 S CLAREMONT BLVD
2110 KEMPER
1960 N MILLS
3408 DUKE
451 CEDAR CREST
467 INDEPENDENCE
420 E ARROW HWY
200 SMITH DR
2751 VIA SINALOA
517 N INDIAN HILL
417 MARYGROVE
2440 N SAN DIEGO
1072 TREVECCA
1586 MURAL DR
232 OLIVE
353 WAGNER DR
449 ELDER DR
630 CITADEL
354 S COLLEGE
690 W ARROW HWY
633 COLGATE PL
630 CARLETON
323 GENEVA
626 GENEVA
302 SPRINGFIELD
619 BLACK HILLS DR
1881 DENVER
789 W 12TH ST
1585 OXFORD AVE
1820 ELMHURST
3719 ELMIRA
332 E RADCLIFFE
641 HARVARD
680 SCRIPPS DR
793 SCRIPPS DR
839 SCRIPPS DR
940 SCRIPPS DR
755 OCCIDENTAL DR
1964 JUDSON CT
2106 SAN MARCOS PL
266 MONTERREY DR
880 SYRACUSE DR
1006 LAKE FOREST DR
845 ST JOHNS PL
2505 BONNIE BRAE
1268 BRIARCROFT RD
155 LIMESTONE
1618 LYNOAK DR
3310 N MILLS
184 BUTLER CT
113 E BASELINE
4134 TENANGO
4185 TENANGO
1019 AMADOR ST
1367 CEDARVIEW DR
3801 NORTHAMPTON
504 E MIRAMAR
2141 OXFORD AVE
510 POMELLO
955 OLYMPIC CT
538 CINDERELLA
919 OCCIDENTAL DR
632 YALE
115 E SAN JOSE
848 HURON DR
404 E ARROW HWY
567 CONVERSE
2205 BRESCIA
746 LINDENWOOD
1015 WHITMAN
594 CEDAR CREST
120 MEREDITH
769 W 9TH ST
970 BUTTE ST
3960 WILLIAMS
174 MONTERREY DR
1117 HILLSDALE
1496 BRIARCROFT RD
3408 CAMPUS
1674 LONGWOOD
412 MIDDLEBURY
1335 CEDARVIEW DR
140 E BASELINE
541 GENEVA
339 S INDIAN HILL BLVD
690 N INDIAN HILL
1068 RICHMOND DR
1662 DENVER
495 NOTRE DAME
310 CARLETON
437 HEIDELBURG LN
2451 BONNIE BRAE
1053 MOAB
404 CINDERELLA
249 W RADCLIFFE
4369 TOCCOA FLS
1261 BERRIAN ST
4040 LA JUNTA
664 NAPA CT
465 MARYGROVE
126 PRINCETON
3779 ELMIRA
2142 WILKES CT
518 CHARLESTON
3027 RHODELIA
206 OLIVE
264 W 12TH ST
4268 PIEDMONT MESA
424 WEST POINT DR
1458 N MOUNTAIN
636 HENDRIX
655 ADIRONDACK
460 W 1ST ST
267 S INDIAN HILL
415 W FOOTHILL BLVD
701 S INDIAN HILL
Notice is hereby given that the Claremont City
Council will hold a public hearing on Tuesday,
June 10, 2014 at 7:00 p.m. in the Council
chamber, 225 W. 2nd St. to receive comment
or protests about liens placed against certain
properties for unpaid fees for sanitation serv-
ices including, rubbish, sewer maintenance and
street sweeping. The following is a list of
delinquent accounts as of May 20, 2014. /s/
Shelley Desautels
City Clerk
City of Claremont
Publish: May 23, 2014
Publish: May 30, 2014
If you have any questions, please call Sanitation
at (909) 399-5453.
Service Location Delinquent Balance
Claremont COURIER Classifieds/Friday, May 23, 2014 28
909-621-5626
SERVICES
909.621.4761
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Assessor's Parcel No.: 8281-010-049
T.S. No.: 13-12313-01
NOTICE OFUNIFIED
TRUSTEE'S SALE
YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF
TRUST DATED 5/6/2008. UNLESS YOU TAKE
ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT
MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU
NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE
OFTHE PROCEEDINGS AGAINST YOU, YOU
SHOULD CONTACT ALAWYER.
On 5/30/2014, at 9:00 AM, 400 CIVIC
CENTER PLAZA, POMONA, CALIFORNIA,
WT Capital Lender Services, a California corpora-
tion as the duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant
to Deed of Trust recorded on 5/8/2008 as Document
No. 20080814588, of Official Records in the Office of
the Recorder of Los Angeles County, California, exe-
cuted by Frydoun Sheikhpour, as Trustor, in favor of
Habib American Bank as Beneficiary,
WILL SELL AT PUBLIC AUCTION
TO THE HIGHEST BIDDER FOR CASH (payable at
time of sale in lawful money of the United States, by
Cash, a Cashier's check drawn by a state or national
bank, a check drawn by a state or federal credit union,
or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan
association, savings association, or savings bank spec-
ified in section 5102 of the Financial Code and autho-
rized to do business in this state) all right, title and
interest conveyed to and now held by it under said
Deed of Trust in the property situated in said County,
California, describing the land therein:
PARCEL 1 AS SHOWN ON PARCEL MAP NO.
1185, IN THE CITYOFDIAMOND BAR, COUN-
TY LOS ANGELES, STATE OF CALIFORNIA,
AS PER MAPFILED IN BOOK 27 PAGE 88 OF
PARCEL MAPS, IN THE OFFICE OF THE
COUNTYRECORDER OFSAID COUNTY.
EXCEPT THEREFROM ALL OIL, GAS AND
OTHER HYDROCARBONS AND MINERALS
NOW OR AT ANY TIME HEREAFTER SITU-
ATED THEREIN AND THEREUNDER,
TOGETHER WITH THE EXCLUSIVE RIGHT
TO DRILLFOR, PRODUCE, EXTRACT, TAKE
AND MINE THEREFROM SUCH OIL, GAS
AND OTHER HYDROCARBONS AND MINER-
ALS AND TO STORE THE SAME UPON THE
SURFACE OF SAID LAND, OR BELOW THE
SURFACE OFSAID LAND, TOGETHER WITH
THE RIGHT TO STORE UPON THE SURFACE
OF SAID LAND, OIL, GAS AND OTHER
HYDROCARBONS AND MINERALS WHICH
MAY BE PRODUCED FROM OTHER LANDS,
WITH THE RIGHT OF ENTRY THEREON
FOR SAID PURPOSES AS RESERVED BY
TRANSAMERICA DEVELOPMENT COMPA-
NY, A CALIFORNIA CORPORATION, IN
DEED RECORDED MARCH 29, 1968 AS
INSTRUMENT NO. 2456 IN BOOK D3955 PAGE
185, OFFICIALRECORDS.
ALL ENTRY RIGHTS AND RIGHTS OF SUR-
FACE STORAGE AS RESERVED ABOVE
WERE QUITCLAIM TO THE RECORD
OWNER BY DEED RECORDED DECEMBER
10, 1968 AS INSTRUMENT NO. 2736 IN BOOK
D4220 PAGE 214, OFFICIALRECORDS.
ALLRIGHTS TO THE USE OFSURFACE AND
SUBSURFACE TO A DEPTH OF 500 FEET
FROM THE SURFACE OF SAID LAND, FOR
ANY PURPOSE INCIDENTAL TO THE OWN-
ERSHIP OF THE OIL, GAS AND OTHER
HYDROCARBON SUBSTANCES AND MINER-
ALS AS RESERVED ABOVE, WERE QUIT-
CLAIMED TO THE RECORD OWNER BY
DEED RECORDED OCTOBER 29, 1970 AS
INSTRUMENT NO.1292 IN BOOK D4874 PAGE
57 OFFICIALRECORDS.
The property heretofore
described is being sold "as is". The street address and
other common designation, if any, of the real property
described above is purported to be: 206 S. Diamond
Bar Blvd.
Diamond Bar, CA
The undersigned Trustee
disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the
street address and other common designation, if any,
shown herein.
Beneficiary hereby elects to conduct a unified foreclo-
sure sale pursuant to the provisions of California
Commercial Code section 9604, et seq., and to include
in the non-judicial foreclosure of the real property
interest described in the Notice of Default and Election
to Sell Under Deed of Trust, all of the personal proper-
ty and fixtures, together with replacements and pro-
ceeds, if applicable, described in the security agree-
ment, dated 5/6/2008, and in a UCC-1 Financing
Statement filed with the Secretary of State, State of
California, on 9/3/2010, as 107243856187, and
recorded in the Office of the Los Angeles County
Recorder on 5/8/2008 as 20080814591 between the
original trustor and the original beneficiary, as it may
have been amended from time to time, and pursuant to
any other instruments between the trustor and benefi-
ciary referencing a security interest in personal proper-
ty. Beneficiary reserves its right to revoke its election
as to some or all of said personal property and/or fix-
tures, or to add additional personal property and/or fix-
tures to the election herein expressed, at Beneficiary's
sole election, from time to time and at any time until
the consummation of the Trustee's Sale to be conduct-
ed pursuant to the Deed of Trust and this Notice of
Trustee's Sale. Adescription of the personal property,
which was given as security for trustor's obligation is:
ALL INVENTORY, EQUIPMENT, ACCOUNTS
(INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO ALL
HEALTH-CARE-INSURANCE RECEIV-
ABLES), CHATTEL PAPER, INSTRUMENTS
(INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO ALL
PROMISSORYNOTES), LETTER-OF-CREDIT
RIGHTS, LETTERS OF CREDIT, DOCU-
MENTS, DEPOSIT ACCOUNTS, INVEST-
MENT PROPERTY, MONEY, OTHER RIGHTS
TO PAYMENT AND PERFORMANCE, AND
GENERAL INTANGIBLES (INCLUDING BUT
NOT LIMITED TO ALLSOFTWARE AND ALL
PAYMENT INTANGIBLES); ALL OIL, GAS
AND OTHER MINERALS BEFORE EXTRAC-
TION; ALL OIL, GAS, OTHER MINERALS
AND ACCOUNTS CONSTITUTING AS-
EXTRACTED COLLATERAL; ALL FIX-
TURES; ALL TIMBER TO BE CUT; ALL
ATTACHMENTS, ACCESSIONS, ACCES-
SORIES, FITTINGS, INCREASES, TOOLS,
PARTS, REPAIRS, SUPPLIES, AND COMMIN-
GLED GOODS RELATING TO THE FOREGO-
ING PROPERTY, AND ALL ADDITIONS,
REPLACEMENT OF AND SUBSTITUTIONS
FOR ALL OR ANY PART OF THE FOREGO-
ING PROPERTY; ALLINSURANCE REFUNDS
RELATING TO THE FOREGOING PROPER-
TY; ALL GOOD WILL RELATING TO THE
FOREGOING PROPERTY; ALL RECORDS
AND DATA AND EMBEDDED SOFTWARE
RELATING TO THE FOREGOING PROPER-
TY, AND ALLEQUIPMENT, INVENTORYAND
SOFTWARE TO UTILIZE, CREATE, MAIN-
TAIN AND PROCESS ANY SUCH RECORDS
AND DATA ON ELECTRONIC MEDIA; AND
ALL SUPPORTING OBLIGATIONS RELAT-
ING TO THE FOREGOING PROPERTY; AND
ALL PRODUCTS AND PROCEEDS (INCLUD-
ING BUT NOT LIMITED TO ALLINSURANCE
PAYMENTS) OF OR RELATING TO THE
FOREGOING PROPERTY. No warranty is made
that any or all of the personal property still exists or is
available for the successful bidder and no warranty is
made as to the condition of any of the personal proper-
ty, which shall be sold "as is, where is".
Said sale will be made,
but without covenant or warranty, expressed or
implied, regarding title, possession, encumbrances,
quiet enjoyment, or the like, to pay the remaining prin-
cipal sum of the note(s) secured by said Deed of Trust,
with interest thereon, as provided in said note(s),
advances, if any, under the terms of the Deed of Trust,
estimated fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee
and of the trust created by said Deed of Trust, to-wit:
$2,170,518.76 Estimated
Accrued interest and additional
advances, if any, will increase this figure prior to sale.
You have the right to
request an accounting of the unpaid indebtedness
secured by the property being sold. You may submit
your request to the address listed below. The charge
for this request is $30.00. You may be liable for any
deficiency if the secured obligation is not paid in full.
The beneficiary under said Deed of
Trust and Security Agreement heretofore executed and
delivered to the undersigned, a written Declaration of
Default and Demand for Sale, and a Written Notice of
Default and Election to Sell. The undersigned caused
said Notice of Default and Election to Sell to be
recorded in the County where the real property is locat-
ed and more than three months have elapsed since such
recordation.
NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are
considering bidding on this property lien, you should
understand that there are risks involved in bidding at
a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not
on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a
trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to
free and clear ownership of the property. You should
also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may
be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the
auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off
all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before
you can receive clear title to the property. You are
encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and
size of outstanding liens that may exist on this prop-
erty by contacting the county recorder's office or a
title insurance company, either of which may charge
you a fee for this information. If you consult either
of these resources, you should be aware that the
same lender may hold more than one mortgage or
deed of trust on the property.
NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date
shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or
more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a
court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil
Code. The law requires that information about trustee
sale postponements be made available to you and to
the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale.
If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been
postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and
date for the sale of this property, you may visit the
Internet Web site address listed below for information
regarding the sale of this property, using the file num-
ber assigned to this case file number. Information
about postponements that are very short in duration or
that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not
immediately be reflected in the telephone information
or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify post-
ponement information is to attend the scheduled sale.
DATED: April 29, 2014
WT Capital Lender Services, a California corporation
7522 North Colonial Avenue, Suite 101
Fresno, California 93711
(559) 222-4644
WTCap.com
By______________________________________
Debra Berg, Senior Vice President
PUBLISH: 5/9/14, 5/16/14, 5/23/14
legalads@claremont-courier.com 909.621.4761
LEGAL TENDER
Claremont COURIER Classifieds 29
SERVICES
Friday 05-23-14
CONTACT US
1420 N Claremont Blvd. Suite 205B Claremont, CA 91711
Ph: 909.621.4761 • Fax: 909.621.4072
classified@claremont-courier.com
Business Hours: Monday-Friday 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Acoustical
QUALITY Interiors. Acousti-
cal contractor, specializing in
acoustic removal, texture,
painting, acoustic re-spray
and drywall repairs.
Lic.602916. 909-624-8177.
AC/Heating
SAME DAY SERVICE
Free service call with repair.
Only $49.50 diagnostic
fee without repair.
All repairs—All brands
Edison and Gas
Company rebates.
Great prices.
Friendly service.
We're local.
909-398-1208
www.novellcustom.com
Lic.958830
STEVE’S HEATING
& Air Conditioning
Serving your area for over
25 years. Repairs all
makes/models. Free
service call with repair.
Free estimate on new units.
MC/Visa. 100 percent
financing. Senior discounts.
Lic.744873
909-985-5254
Bathroom Remodeling
A Bath-Brite
authorized dealer.
Bathtubs and sinks.
Showers, tile, countertops.
Refinish - Reglaze - Restore
Porcelain, ceramic,
fiberglass.
Quick and affordable.
Please call 909-945-7775.
www.bath-brite.com
DIAMOND TILE
Kitchens • Showers • Baths
Competitive rates
Free estimates
Lic.588500
909-346-3707
Carpentry
SEMI-RETIRED rough to
finish remodeler. Kitchens,
porches, doors, decks, fences,
painting. Lots more! Paul,
909-919-3315.
Carpet Service
ED EY The Carpet Guy. Car-
pet repairs and re-stretching.
Claremont resident. Free es-
timates. 909-621-1867.
Carpet Service
ANDERSON Carpet Service.
Claremont resident serving
Claremont since 1985. Power-
ful truck mounted cleaning
units. Expert carpet repairs
and stretching. Senior dis-
counts. 24-hour emergency
water damage service. Please
call 909-621-1182.
Chimney Sweep
Gash Chimney Sweep
Dust free chimney
cleaning. Repairs, chimney
covers, spark arrestors,
masonry and dampers.
BBB. Please call
909-467-9212.
Quality Fireplace
& BBQ
Chimney sweeping.
Complete fireplace,
woodstove installation,
service and repair.
Spark arrestor supply
and installation.
Call 909-920-6600.
392 N. 2nd Ave., Upland.
Concrete
ADVANCED
DON DAVIES
Veteran, Mt. Sac, Cal Poly
Stamped, broom,
color finishes.
Slate, flagstone, planters,
walls and walkways.
Call 909-599-9530 now
Cell 626-428-1691
Claremont area
30 years!
Lic.323243
JDC CONCRETE
909-624-9000
Driveways/walkways, block
walls, pavers, bricks,
stone veneer,
concrete staining, drainage.
Lic.894245 C8, C29.
Contractor
PPS General Contractor.
Kitchen and bathroom remod-
eling. Flooring, windows, elec-
trical and plumbing. Serving
Claremont for 25 years.
Lic.846995. 951-237-1547.
WENGER Construction. 25
years experience. Cabinetry,
doors, electrical, drywall, crown
molding. Lic.707381. Compet-
itive pricing! 951-640-6616.
ADVANCED
DON DAVIES
Veteran
New and repairs.
909-599-9530
Serving Claremont
for 30 years!
Lic.323243
Contractor
KOGEMAN
CONSTRUCTION
Room additions.
Kitchen/bath remodeling.
Custom cabinets.
Residential/commercial.
909-946-8664
Lic.B710309
Visit us on Facebook!
Cooking
Fresh Healthy Food
Personal Chef
Special Diets
Tasty Party Fare
Cooking Classes
Private Lessons
www.LotsaFlavor.com
Chef Linda Heilpern
909-625-9194
Drywall
THOR McAndrew Construc-
tion. Drywall repair and in-
stallation. Interior plaster re-
pair. Free estimates. CA
Lic.742776. Please call 909-
816-8467. ThorDrywall.com.
Electrician
CALL Lou. Flush lights, service
changes, repairs, service calls,
outdoor lighting and room addi-
tions. Lic.258436. Call 909-
241-7671, 909-949-8230.
SPARKS ELECTRIC
Local electrician for all your
electrician needs!
626-890-8887 or
909-251-2013. Lic.922000
MOR ELECTRIC &
HANDYMAN SERVICES
Free estimates
and senior discounts.
909-989-3454
Residential * Industrial *
Commercial. We do it all.
No job too big or small!
24/7 emergency services.
Reasonable and reliable.
Lic.400-990
30 years experience.
Hayden’s Services Inc.
Since 1978
Bonded * Insured
No job too big or small!
Old home rewiring specialist.
24-hour emergency service.
909-982-8910
* Senior Discount *
Lic.359145
Electrician
Serving Claremont
Since 1995. Residential,
Commercial.
Recessed lighting and
design, breaker replacement,
service panel upgrades,
ceiling fans, troubleshooting,
landscape lighting, rewires
and LED lighting. Free
estimates. 24-hours emer-
gency service. References.
909-900-8930
909-626-2242
Lic.806149
Fences & Gates
ADVANCED
DON DAVIES
Veteran
New, repairs.
ONE CALL DOES IT ALL!
909-599-9530
Cell: 626-428-1691
Lic.323243
Fictitious Name
A FICTITIOUS Name State-
ment (D.B.A.) is required if
you’re in business. You are re-
quired to file and publish a DBA
in the local newspaper. You
must renew every five (5)
years. You must republish if any
changes have been made to
your business. If your business
is in LA COUNTY, The Courier
will provide the legal form, file it
with the L.A. County Clerk, pub-
lish the Statement and provide
you with proof of publication.
Only $95.00 to publish plus a
$26 county fee. Claremont
Courier: 1420 N. Claremont
Blvd, Suite 205B Claremont.
Call Vickie, 909-621-4761.
Furniture Restoration
KEN'S Olden Oddities.com.
Taking the time to care for
Courier readers complete
restoration needs since 1965.
La Verne. Call 909-593-1846.
Garage Doors
SERVICE • REPAIR • INSTALL
Doors, Openers, Gates
Same Day
24/7 Emergency Service
909-596-3300
accessdoorsco.com
Gardening
EXPERIENCE our award
winning maintenance! We
create a customized main-
tenance program for your
property and lifestyle needs.
Sprinkler repairs and low
voltage lighting. Call Alan
Cantrall, 909-224-3327.
Lic.861685 and insured.
Eco-friendly landscaping.
We will get you a $3000
grant to remove your lawn!
Why mow when you can
grow? From the creators of
The Pomona College
Organic Farm.
Specializing in native
and edible landscapes.
909-398-1235
www.naturalearthla.com
Lic.919825
*$1.50 sq. ft. rebate*
MANUELS Garden Service.
General cleanup. Lawn main-
tenance, bush trimming,
general maintenance, tree
trimming and removal. Low
prices and free estimates.
Please call 909-391-3495 or
909-239-3979.
Garden Maintenance
Hand-pull weeding, mowing,
trimming, sprinkler work,
monthly service, cleanups
and junk removal.
Free estimates.
David, 909-374-1583
Girl Friday
I'M here to help! Housekeep-
ing, shopping, errands. Se-
nior, pet, house sitting.
Jenny Jones, 909-626-0027,
anytime!
DOT Will Do It! A full-service
errand business. Dorothy
"Dot" Sheehy. www.dotwill
doit.com. 909-621-9115 or
909-782-2885.
Handyman
SMALL repair jobs, fencing,
gates, brick block, concrete
cutting, breaking and repair.
25 years in Claremont. Paul,
909-753-5360.
Handyman
HOME Repair by Ken. Local
for 11 years. We can get it
done for you! 909-374-0373.
Claremont
Handyman Service
Carpentry, repairs,
gates, lighting,
small painting projects.
Odd jobs welcome!
Free consultations.
909-921-6334
ODD jobs, small repairs, low
prices. Jim, 951-264-2898.
A-HANDYMAN
New and Repairs
Inside, outside, small,
large, home, garage, yard,
ONE CALL DOES IT ALL!
909-599-9530
Cell: 626-428-1691
Lic.323243
30 years experience!
Claremont area.
Hauling
SAMEDAY-HAULAWAY
Free estimated.
Senior discount!
WE HAUL IT ALL CHARLIE!
909-382-1210
626-383-1442
sameday-haulaway.com
ADVANCED
DON DAVIES
Same Day
One call does it all!
Garage, yard, home,
moving!
909-599-9530
Health Care
MALE ICU nurse available for
in-home position. Full nursing
care provided for patients of
all ages. 909-542-9690.
House Cleaning
ESTABLISHED, upbeat, li-
censed house cleaning ser-
vice. Specializing in larger
homes. Organic cleaning
supplies used. 26 years of
experience. 909-224-1180,
909-946-7475.
CAROUSEL Quality Clean-
ing. Family owned for 25
years. Licensed. Bonded.
Senior rates. Trained profes-
sional services including:
baseboards, ovens, win-
dows. Hauling. Move in/out.
In home care. House/pet sit-
ting. 10 percent discount to
Claremont College faculty.
Robyn, 909-621-3929.
Shirley's Cleaning Service
28 years in business.
Office/residential
No job too small.
Free estimates.
We do spring cleaning!
909-730-8564
ROSIE'S Spic Span Cleaning
Service. Residential, commer-
cial, vacant homes, apart-
ments, offices. Free estimate.
Licensed. 909-986-8009.
Irrigation
SPRINKLER SYSTEMS
INSTALLATIONS
EXPERT REPAIRS
DRIP SYSTEM
SPECIALISTS
C.F.PRIVETT, LIC.557151
909-621-5388
ADVANCED
DON DAVIES
Veteran, Mt. Sac, Cal Poly
New, repairs. Professional.
All sprinkler repairs.
Call 909-599-9530 Now
Cell: 626-428-1691
Hayden’s Services Inc.
Since 1978
Bonded * Insured
No job too big or small!
24-hour emergency
service.
909-982-8910
* Senior discount *
Lic.359145
Landscape Lighting
ENJOY your yard after dark!
We offer expert design instal-
lation and repair of low volt-
age lighting. Alan Cantrall
Landscaping. 909-224-3327.
Contractor Lic.861685.
Landscaping
ADVANCED DON DAVIES
Mt. Sac, Cal Poly
New, refurbish or repair.
Design, drainage, concrete,
slate, flagstone, lighting, irri-
gation, decomposed granite.
909-599-9530
Cell: 626-428-1691
Claremont area 30 years!
Lic.323243
DLS Landscaping and De-
sign. Claremont native spe-
cializing in drought tolerant
landscaping, drip systems
and lighting. Artistic solu-
tions for the future. Over 35
years experience. Call: 909-
225-8855, 909-982-5965.
Lic.585007.
GREENWOOD
LANDSCAPING CO.
Landscaping contractor for
complete landscaping,
irrigation, drainage,
designing and gardening.
Lic.520496
909-621-7770
Dale's Tree &
Landscape Services
Pruning, removal, planting,
irrigation and yard cleanup.
909-982-5794
Lic#753381
Landscaping
DANS GARDENING
SERVICE
Sprinklers installed, re-
paired. Clean-up, hauling.
Sod, seed, planting,
lighting, drainage.
Free written estimates.
Insured. References.
Since 1977. Lic.508671.
Please call 909-989-1515.
Eco-friendly landscaping.
We will get you a $3000
grant to remove your lawn!
Why mow when you can
grow? From the creators of
The Pomona College
Organic Farm.
Specializing in native
and edible landscapes.
909-398-1235
www.naturalearthla.com
Lic.919825
*$1.50 sq. ft. rebate*
Learn Chinese
Fun and Easy
All Levels
Small Groups
School age children
Afternoon and Summer
Classes
Claremont
909-254-7084
Learn Japanese
TAUGHT by Sumi Ohtani at
the Claremont Forum in the
Packing House. Monday,
Tuesday, Wednesday after-
noons/evenings. All levels
welcome. Excellent brain exer-
cise for seniors! 909-626-3066.
Painting
ACE SEVIER PAINTING
Interior/Exterior
BONDED and INSURED
Many references.
Claremont resident.
35 years experience.
Lic.315050
Please call: 909-624-5080,
909-596-4095.
D&D Custom Painting.
Bonded. Lic.423346. Resi-
dential, commercial. Interior
or exterior. Free estimates.
909-982-8024.
RESIDENTIAL/Commercial.
Quality work at reasonable
prices. Free estimates.
Lic.541469. 909-622-7994.
Painting
KPW PAINTING
Older couple painting,
40 years experience!
Competitive rates.
Small repairs.
No job too small.
References available.
We work our own jobs.
Carrie or Ron
909-615-4858
Lic.778506
COLLINS Painting & Con-
struction Company, LLC. In-
terior, exterior. Residential
and commercial. Contractors
Lic.384597. 909-985-8484.
STEVE LOPEZ
PAINTING
Extensive preparation.
Indoor, outdoor, cabinets.
Offering odorless green
solution. 33-year master.
Lic.542552
Please call
909-989-9786.
AFFORDABLE. Traditional or
green options. Custom work.
No job too big or too small. 20
years of Claremont resident
referrals. Free estimates.
Lic.721041. 909-922-8042.
www.vjpaint.com.
Patio & Decks
ADVANCED DON DAVIES
New, refurbish and repair.
Concrete, masonry, lighting,
planters and retaining walls.
909-599-9530
Cell: 626-428-1691
Claremont area 30 years!
Lic.323243
Pet Care
CANINE Wellness Therapeu-
tics. Therapeutic, immune-
enhancing canine massage.
Canine athletes, arthritic
seniors, postsurgical healing,
anxiety issues. Certified therapist.
massagefordogs@yahoo.com.
626-825-1662.
Plastering & Stucco
PLASTERING by Thomas.
Stucco and drywall repair
specialist. Licensed home
improvement. Contractor
Lic.614648. 909-984-6161.
www.wall-doctor.com.
PLASTER, stucco, drywall,
texture. Small job specialist.
909-629-7576. Unlicensed.
Local 30 years.
Pools
Carr Pools
Family owned/operated
Claremont natives
Over 10 years experience
Dependable • Timely • Efficient
Tablets/filter
cleans included
909-624-5648
Plumbing
EXCEL PLUMBING
Family owned and operated.
30 plus years experience.
Expert plumbing repairs and
drain cleaning. Water
heaters, faucets, sinks,
toilets, disposals,
under slab lead detection,
sewer video inspection.
Licensed, bonded and
insured. Lic.917874.
909-945-1995
STEVE’S PLUMBING
24-hour service* Low cost!
Free estimates.
All plumbing repairs.
Complete drain cleaning,
leak detection,
water heaters.
Your local plumber
for over 25 years.
Senior discounts.
Insured, Lic.744873.
* 909-985-5254 *
Hayden’s Services Inc.
Since 1978
Bonded * Insured
NO JOB TOO BIG
OR SMALL!
24-hour emergency service.
909-982-8910
* Senior discount *
Lic.359145
RENES Plumbing and AC. All
types residential repairs,
HVAC, new installation, re-
pairs. Prices to fit the working
family’s budget. Lic.454443.
Insured professional service.
909-593-1175.
Roofing
GORDON Perry Roofing.
Reroofing, repairs of all
types. Free estimates. Qual-
ity work. Lic.C39588976.
909-944-3884.
Sprinklers & Repair
ADVANCED
DON DAVIES
Veteran
Mt. Sac, Cal Poly
New, repairs. Professional.
All sprinkler repairs.
Call 909-599-9530 now
Cell: 626-428-1691
DURUSSEL Sprinklers. Install,
repair, automate. Since 1982.
Free estimates. Lic.540042.
Call 909-982-1604.
WASTING WATER?
Poor Coverage?
Sprinkler repair.
Installations
and modifications.
C.F. Privett
909-621-5388
Lic.557151
Tile
Regrout, clean, seal, color
grout. 909-880-9719, 1-888-
764-7688.
MASTER tile layer. Quick
and clean. Stone and gran-
ite work. Residential, com-
mercial. Lic.830249. Ray,
909-731-3511.
DIAMOND TILE
20 years quality work.
Kitchens • Showers • Baths
Great prices • Discounts
909-346-3707
Lic.588500
Tree Care
Dale's Tree Service
Certified arborist. Pruning
and removals. Landscaping,
corrective and restoration
trimming and yard clean up.
909-982-5794
Lic#753381
MGT Professional Tree Care.
Providing prompt, depend-
able service for all your tree
care needs. Certified arborist.
Lic.#836027. Matt Gray-
Trask. Call 946-7444.
TOM Day Tree Service. Fine
pruning of all trees since 1974.
Free estimate. 909-629-6960.
Johnny's Tree Service
Tree trimming
and demolition.
Certified arborist.
Lic.270275, insured.
Please call:
909-946-1123
951-522-0992
Tree Care
BAUER TREE CARE
40 plus years
in Claremont.
Pruning of your small
and medium perennials.
909-624-8238
www.bauertreecare.com
Upholstery
PINK UPHOLSTERY
48 years of experience. Up to
30 percent discount on fabric.
Free pickup and delivery.
Please call 909-597-6613.
Weed Abatement
TIRED of dealing with weed
problems on your lot or field?
Help control the problem in an
environmentally safe manner.
To receive loads of quality wood
chips. Please call 909-214-
6773. Tom Day Tree Service.
ADVANCED
DON DAVIES
Veteran
Weed eating, mowing,
tractor fields,
manual slopes, hauling.
909-599-9530
Cell: 626-428-1691
JOHNNY'S Tree Service.
Weed abatement/land clear-
ing. Disking and mowing.
Please call 909-946-1123,
951-522-0992. Lic.270275.
Window Washing
NACHOS Window Cleaning.
For window washing, call Na-
cho, 909-816-2435. Free es-
timates, satisfaction guaran-
teed. Resident of Claremont.
30
Claremont COURIER Classifieds
SERVICES
Friday 05-23-14
tax help • antiques • house cleaning • landscaping
pet care • roofing • elder care • computer services
Although paid advertisements may appear in Claremont COURIER publications in print, online or in other electronic formats, the
Claremont COURIER does not endorse the advertised product, service, or company, nor any of the claims made by the advertisement.
Claremont COURIER Classifieds 31
REAL ESTATE
909.621.4761
CONTACT US
1420 N Claremont Blvd. Suite 205B Claremont, CA 91711
Ph: 909.621.4761 • Fax: 909.621.4072
classified@claremont-courier.com
Business Hours: Monday-Friday 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Friday 05-23-14
BRE# 01326104 & 01733616
CARLOS, 909-964-7631
PAT, 909-214-1002
www.SamuelsonRealEstate.com
We represent buyers and sellers with expertise, profession-
alism, technology and personal service. Neighborhood
knowledge is a top factor for successful sales. We know
and serve Claremont and the Foothill Communities.
Residential – Investment – Historical – Green – Short Sales
Check out
our reviews!
OPEN HOUSE DIRECTORY
SUNDAY, MAY 25
2-5 p.m. 821 Manchester Ct., Claremont. Wheeler Steffen Sothebyʼs International.
Your trusted resource as you
transition through the new
stage in your life...
Pamela Bergman-Swartz
REALTOR®, Transition Living Consultant,
Seniors Real Estate & Certified Probate Specialist
250 W. First St. Suite 100, Claremont
pamelabergman@ymail.com
(909) 636-2744
BRE#01899295
Best rates for LEGALS. Call Vickie:
909-621-4761, Claremont COURIER.
Claremont COURIER Classifieds/Friday, May 23, 2014 32
REALTORS!
Place your ads in the
most widely read real
estate section in the area.
Call Jessica at
621-4761
COURIER Classifieds
MALKA RINDE
Broker - Owner
Celebrating Over 25 Years
Selling Real Estate in the Area
Bus: 909-625-2407 Fax: 909-621-2842
www.malkarinde.com
EXPERIENCE MATTERS...
M MALKA RINDE REAL ESTATE ALKA RINDE REAL ESTATE
1876 Morgan Avenue, Claremont CA 91711
BRE# 00545647
REAL ESTATE
(909) 626-1261
www.curtisrealestate.com
Visit www.curtisrealestate.com for MLS, community info and more!
Carol Curtis, Broker
Sales Associates: Craig Beauvais, Maureen Mills,
Nancy & Bob Schreiber, Patricia Simmons, Corinna Soiles, Carol Wiese
Continuing the family tradition in the Claremont Village since 1947
107 N. Harvard, Claremont CA 91711
(909) 626-1261 www.curtisrealestate.com
VILLAGE WEST TOWNHOME
Charming tri-level in Claremont Village
Walk. 3 bedrooms and 2.5 bathrooms.
Wood floors, master bedroom opens to
covered patio, fireplace in living room.
Community pool, spa, BBQ and play-
ground. $510,000. (F757)
130 ARMSTRONG DRIVE, CALREMONT
Great location! This 5 bedroom, 3 bath-
room, tri-level home is located at the end
of the cul-de-sac surrounded by trees,
great mountain views and is walking dis-
tance to Thompson Creek Trail. Vaulted
ceilings, sliding glass doors leading to
spacious deck overlooking the serene
backyard and pool. Large family room
with fireplace, 3-car garage, new lawn
and fruit trees. This home has solar
electricity. $786,000. (A130)
SOLD IN 6 DAYS!
CLAREMONT three bedroom, two bathroom home featuring
living room with brick fireplace, formal dining room, large
landscaped yard completely fenced, four-car detached
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Claremont COURIER/Friday, May 23, 2014 34
SCRIPPS
Scripps College’s 2014 commencement speaker Nonie
Creme, the founding creative director of the global beauty
brand Butter London, urged graduating seniors on Saturday
to not “be scared about what comes next” in life and to take
risks as they “set the world on fire.”
“You’ll carry on reinventing yourself for the rest of your
life, but what you learned here at Scripps will creep in and
tap you on the shoulder at the most amazing times,” Ms.
Creme said.
This year, Ms. Creme, a 1994 Scripps graduate, is prepar-
ing the launch of a new global beauty line called Nonie
Creme-Colour Prevails, which will include nail products,
cosmetics and hair color. Ms. Creme has been featured in
Vogue, The New York Times and Women’s Wear Daily and
numerous other publications for her work in the beauty field.
“As I stand here, in the throes of my next company, which
the press describes as a beauty brand rooted entirely in
‘paint’ and ‘paint-like’ cosmetics, nail polishes and even hair
dyes, I can’t help but tear up when I look at each of you and
wonder where Scripps will lead you,” Ms. Creme said to the
231 seniors in attendance.
In her commencement address, she retraced her path from
Scripps student to successful entrepreneur managing a multi-
million dollar beauty enterprise. She described her experi-
ences as being far from typical, and by that she meant she did
not attend Harvard Business School. Instead, she relied on
the knowledge gleaned from her Scripps education with
what she refers to as her ferocious spirit to forge her profes-
sional success.
CLAREMONT LINCOLN
UNIVERSITY
When Russell Simmons took to the stage of
Garrison Theatre on Tuesday to speak at the first
convocation of Claremont Lincoln University, he
looked much like a college student, clad as he was
in jeans, sneakers and a zip-up sweatshirt.
Appearances can be deceiving. Mr. Simmons,
co-founder of the pioneering music label Def Jam
Records and co-creator of fashion lines such as the
wildly successful Baby Phat brand, has been cited
as the third richest figure in the world of hip hop.
Mr. Simmons, however—whose famous sib-
lings include Rev Run of Run DMC and artist
Joseph Simmons—isn’t content to fill his bank ac-
count. A practicing vegan, he is widely involved
in an array of philanthropic causes. He has written
widely about ethical business practices, including
co-authoring Super Rich: A Guide to Having It
All, which espouses giving as a lifestyle choice.
Mr. Simmons said that in a world fraught with
religious tension, the creation of a school aimed at
nurturing future leaders skilled in inter-religious
education, seems like an obvious innovation.
“The work you’re doing should be so obvious
that it’s spread around the world,” he said. “It
seems like it should be the norm.”
While he claims no single religion as his own,
Mr. Simmons said he has spent a lifetime study-
ing the various religions of the world. While each
has its own traditions, he feels their commonali-
ties exceed their differences.
“They are exactly the same: the aspiration, the
inspiration, the purpose and the service,” he said.
The world could use more understanding, the
kind of tolerance fostered by Claremont Lincoln
University, Mr. Simmons said.
The convocation featured presenters of many
faiths, including vocalist and flutist Bassem
Rashidi, who sang a song in English encouraging
people to treasure and guide their children as well
as a call to prayer in Arabic, and Temple Beth Is-
rael Cantor Paul Buch.
Mr. Buch noted that Claremont Lincoln Uni-
versity—which is currently a candidate for ac-
creditation—is very much a work in progress.
Nonetheless, he is excited about the institution’s
mission.
“I think it’s extremely important, and not only
locally,” he said. “We live in a pluralistic society
where we interact with people of other faiths. To
be able to take the wealth of wisdom of all of these
different traditions offers a tremendous opportu-
nity on a global scale.”
—Sarah Torribio
storribio@claremont-courier.com
COURIER photo/Steven Felschundneff
Music producer and entrepreneur Russell Simmons receives an honorary doctorate from President
Jerry Campbell on Tuesday during the first-ever convocation for Claremont Lincoln University at
Garrison Theater in Claremont. Mr. Simmons was the keynote speaker at the event.
COURIER photo/Helen Arase
Graduate candidates look toward the American flag and re-
cite the Pledge of Allegiance during commencement at
Keck Graduate Institute on Saturday in Claremont.
COURIER photo/Helen Arase
Benjamin Vel Marsh flashes a smile at his family after receiving his doctorate degree in
psychology on Saturday during commencement at Claremont Graduate University.
POMONA COLLEGE
If the job of a commencement
speaker is to offer food for thought,
Pomona College provided a feast at its
121st commencement, held Sunday in
the Marston Quadrangle.
Four distinguished guests—Obama
adviser Valerie B. Jarrett, Spanish tenor
Plácido Domingo, Homeboy Industries
founder Father Gregory Boyle and
mathematics professor Michael Star-
bird—took to the podium after being
presented with honorary degrees.
Top Obama Adviser Valerie Jarrett,
who served as the morning’s keynote
speaker, entreated the newly minted
grads to make friends with fear.
“I encourage you to embrace the phi-
losophy of Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, the
first African woman head of state, who
famously said, ‘If your dreams do not
scare you, then they’re not big
enough,” she said.
Ms. Jarrett’s post has allowed her to
meet some of the world’s greatest lead-
ers, and she hasn’t come across a single
one who wasn’t scared.
“All have found the courage to over-
come their fear and listen to their own
voices, even when that voice is much
softer than the voices that surround
them,” she said.
Ms. Jarrett had to muster her own
courage to veer from her well-laid
plans. In college, she had constructed
an itinerary that involved going to law
school, getting married, having her first
child by 30 and making partner in a
prestigious law firm by age 31. “It al-
most worked. My daughter was born
just shy of my 29th birthday.”
She then found herself in a period of
soul-searching. She had attended a
young leaders conference, meeting
business, civic and political leaders de-
voted to making Chicago a better city.
The experience prompted her to con-
sider public service. And by 30, she and
her husband had separated.
“I clearly remember sitting in my
beautiful office on the 79th floor of the
Sears Tower, staring at my very lucra-
tive paycheck and bursting into tears,
because I was absolutely miserable.”
Ms. Jarrett quit her job to became a
lawyer for the city of Chicago.
“Four years later, I hired a brilliant
young lawyer, with whom I bonded in-
stantly over our shared desire to serve
our community. Her name was
Michelle Robinson and, when we met,
she was engaged to a skinny guy with a
really funny name, Barack Obama.
And the rest…well, you know the
rest.”
Challenging typical ways of thinking
People immersed in the world of
numbers have a reputation for being
dry. Michael Starbird, a 1970 Pomona
College alumnus who teaches at the
University of Texas at Austin, turned
this notion on its ear by delivering one
of the morning’s more thought-provok-
ing speeches.
It’s important for people to acknowl-
edge that even our most firmly held
views might be wrong, according to
Mr. Starbird.
“What you revere as core truths may
later reveal some kind of disturbing nu-
ance, such as later it will seem com-
pletely bogus,” he laughed.
Anyone who says they are 100 per-
cent sure of an opinion is saying
they’re close-minded, he said. In con-
trast, Mr. Starbird urged his audience to
engage in self-examination.
“Do you really know why you sup-
port the collections of opinions you
hold dear?” he asked. “The answer is
you don’t, and neither do the people
who have opposite opinions. Acrimony
ensues.”
Mr. Starbird went on to make a mod-
est proposal that he said would promote
civility and humility.
Each time you state an opinion, you
should also state “a percentage that ac-
tually captures how strongly you be-
lieve it,” he suggested.
“For example: You say, ‘I think the
death penalty is a bad idea. 80 per-
cent,’” he said. “If somebody gives you
some credible evidence on the opposite
side, you don’t have to abandon your
opinion altogether. You have room to
wiggle and you say, ‘I still think the
death penalty is not a great idea, but
now only 68 percent.’”
Mr. Starbird wished the grads well,
100 percent.
Also saluting the Pomona College
Class of 2014 was Plácido Domingo.
He didn’t raise his voice in the tenor for
which he is famed. He did, however,
sing the praises of Pomona College and
its long association with the Los Ange-
les Opera, where he conducts. He also
took a moment to commend the skill of
the Pomona College choir and orches-
tra, who had performed earlier.
The day’s final speaker was Father
Gregory Boyle, who founded Home-
boy Industries to combat gang violence
with job training, life skills and em-
ployment opportunities. The rewards of
his job include seeing former gang
members who were once enemies work
side-by-side.
“They used to shoot bullets at each
other. Now they shoot text messages,”
he said.
Don’t throw anyone away, Father
Boyle urged.
“The measure of your compassion
lies not in your service of those on the
margin but in your willingness to see
yourself in kinship with them.”
The speeches were followed by a
moment of solidarity, when the gradu-
ates rose collectively to receive well-
earned degrees.
—Sarah Torribio
storribio@claremont-courier.com
Claremont COURIER/Friday, May 23, 2014 35
COURIER photos/Steven Felschundneff
Senior political adviser to President Barack Obama Valerie Jarrett
delivers the commencement address on Sunday during gradua-
tion at Pomona College.
AT RIGHT: Gavin Landgraf and Carly Goodrin give the ever-pop-
ular Latin salutation on Saturday during commencement exer-
cises at Claremont McKenna College.
COURIER photo/Helen Arase
Miranda Chantelle Parker, one of two student speakers, greets a fellow graduate
after receiving her bachelor’s degree in computer science during Harvey Mudd
College’s commencement. The school had two student speakers to illustrate the
collaboration students demonstrate throughout their years at HMC.
A new start
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909.447.7714
Gloria Alvarez
909.670.0322
Paul Steffen
Broker/Owner
Chris Macaulay
909.227.0162

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