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INFOSYS.110 BUSINESS SYSTEMS:
DELIVERABLE 2: BUSINESS SECTION
2014

Name Claudia Easton
NetID ceas537
Group Number: 09
Website Link: http://infosys1102014fcgroup09.blogspot.co.nz/
Tutorial Details
Tutor: Day: Time:
Claris Monday 9am
Time Spent on
Assignment:
25 hours Word Count: 1650

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MOLE MAP APP BUSINESS PROPOSAL
INTRODUCTION
The problem statement identified in D1 demonstrates that globally melanoma is a leading
cause of preventable deaths. Early detection of this form of skin cancer yields a 97% survival
rate compared with 15% for late diagnosis (American Cancer Society, 2013). The creation of
Mole Map App, can reduce the amount of deaths due to undiagnosed or late diagnosis of
melanoma, as it will track changes in moles so early detection of potentially malignant
moles is possible.
3. BUSINESS SECTION
3.1 Vision Statement
To reduce the amount of preventable melanoma deaths by empowering humanity to
proactively monitor the risk of melanoma skin cancer.
3.2 Industry Analysis: Skin Cancer Diagnosis Industry
Industry: Skin Cancer Diagnosis Industry
Defined as: The services and businesses that provide skin diagnosis techniques.
Force: High/Low: Justification:
Buyer
power:
High Common businesses in this industry are Doctors and
Dermatologists (Cancer Society, 2010). Practitioners in this
field are widely available and easily accessible (NZ Doctor,
2012). This warrants high buyer power as customers have
various service provider choices.
Supplier
power:
Low To diagnose melanoma, practitioners may do a shave or
incisional biopsy (American Cancer Society, 2014). This

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indicates, the primary industry suppliers provide medical
equipment; scalpels, anaesthetic and microscopes. Using NZ
as an example, supplier power is low as Government controls
and subsidises the health system, and suppliers have little
bargaining power. Therefore generally supplier power is low;
however this could vary depending on each country’s health
system.
Threat of
new
entrants:
High Despite it taking a lot of time, money and knowledge to open
a medical practice, new practitioners are still rapidly entering
the industry (NZ Doctor, 2012). Therefore threat of new
entrants is high.
Threat of
substitute
s:
Low Threat of substitutes is low because there is no current
substitute to skin cancer diagnosis.
Rivalry
among
existing
competito
rs:
High NZ Doctor (2012), doctor rates are increasing “14,333 active
doctors in New Zealand in 2011, up from 13,883 in 2010” (pp
34.). This insight and the combination of high buyer power
suggest high industry rivalry, thus a wide-range of choice for
buyers.
Overall attractiveness of the industry: Overall, it is apparent that the Skin cancer Diagnosis
industry is attractive. The industry is in high-demand due to rapidly increasing skin cancer
rates. In the US 1 in 87 Americans are at risk of developing malignant melanoma; an
increase of 1800% since the 1930s (Rigel, D. Friedman, R. Kopf, A,1996).

3.3 Customers and Thei r Needs

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Customers: Demographically, key customers are global male and female smartphone users
aged between 13-54, with a low-moderate income and limited time. Their psychographics
are people that are concerned about malignant moles and want skin cancer diagnosis. Men
and women are both susceptible to skin cancer and therefore should both have interest in a
preventative app. All ages are susceptible to melanoma, reflected by American Cancer
Society’s (2014) advocating that “melanoma is not uncommon even among those younger
than 30”. Moreover, the customer segmentation takes into account the average ages of
Smartphone owners determined as 13-54 (Comscore, 2011).
Customer’s needs: Ease of use and accuracy of the product. As the app is a substitute for
visiting the doctor, it must be easier or customers will choose the alternative. Additionally,
accuracy is vital; ethical considerations are a prime concern as inaccuracy of the app may
lead to fatality “the clinical failure to diagnose melanoma correctly has grievous implications
for survival of patients with that potentially fatal disease”(Ackerman & Miller, 1992 pp 559).

3.4 The Product and Service
The product will fulfil the customers need for ease of use as using the app allows diagnosis
to be done on a smartphone anywhere, anytime, anyplace, which is easier than an excursion
to the doctor. The customer’s need for accuracy will be met by careful development,
involving extensive testing and partnering with medical professionals to provide an accurate
diagnosis.
3.5 Suppliers and Partners
Partners: General Practitioners and Dermatologists. Dermatologists and General
Practitioners (GP’s) aim to be partners in the creation of this app, by enabling a “second
opinion” function that allows customers to distribute their mole information to GPs and
Dermatologists. This provides a mutual benefit for everyone as it will refer/create new
clients for the GPs and Dermatologists and provide more extensive features on the app.

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Suppliers: ITunes app store, App developers and scientific researchers. The ITunes app store
will host the app. Developers doctors, technology developers and IT experts will be involved
in creating the app as their knowledge and technical support is needed to create a
successful and accurate product.

3.6 Strategy: Cost leadership strategy
Business Insider (2013) states that “by the end of this current year, 1.4 billion Smartphone’s
will be in use” (cited by Leonard, 2013, pp 1.). Globally Smartphone usage is still in the
minority but is rapidly becoming a majority, and accessed by a broad range of people
demographically and geographically. Thus, the app’s ability to be used world-wide by
approximately 1.4 billion warrants the use of a broad market classification. It is likely that
only people with moles would use the app, however, this is a broad market as it is common
knowledge that most people have at least one mole.
The app is classified as low cost as one of the key reasons for it is to develop an easier and
cheaper alternative than going to the doctor. The recommended retail price is $20,
relatively cheap compared to other industry alternatives.

Overall strategy is therefore a cost leadership strategy.
3.7 Value Chain Activity: Research and Development
The most important value chain activity for this business is research and technology and
development.
The company vision is “To reduce the amount of preventable melanoma deaths by
empowering humanity to proactively monitor the risk of melanoma skin cancer”. Research
and development (R&D) is the most important value chain activity as it is vital to providing
an accurate tool for diagnosing melanoma. R&D is important to our low cost strategy as the
app must work for a broad range of people (ethnicities, age act.). This is how a low cost
option can be delivered, as diagnosis does not require individually tailoring.

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3.8 Business Processes
3.8.1. PATTERN MATCHI NG ALGORI THM DEVELOPMENT PROCESS
This process is vital to the app as it develops the pattern matching algorithm to detect if the
user has melanoma. The algorithm will be developed by the analysis of mole images, with
repeated testing to ensure the algorithm gives the right diagnosis.
PATTERN MATCHING ALGORITHM DEVELOPMENT PROCESS MODEL



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3.8.2. APP REFINING/ UPDATI NG PROCESS
The refinement of the app is important because it must continually be updated to provide
the best diagnostic accuracy. This process will use diagnostic data from users and evaluate
error patterns. It will fix these patterns by developing and updating the apps systems, and
then update the app itself.
APP REFINING/ UPDATING PROCESS MODEL

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3.9 Functionalities
3.9.1. PATTERN MATCHI NG ALGORI THM DEVELOPMENT PROCESS
 Picture pattern matching functionality
 Melanoma detection functionality
3.9.2. APP REFINING/ UPDATING PROCESS
 App updating functionality
 User feedback data analysis functionality
3.10 Systems

3.10. 1. APP UPDATING SYSTEM – This system incorporates the app update functionality. This
process is the purpose of the system, and therefore this functionality is vital for the system
to perform its task. This system is crucial to support the organisations vision because
accuracy is vital to melanoma diagnosis.
3.10. 2. PATIENT DATA ANALYSI S SYSTEM – This system captures user feedback data, and
analyses it to identify errors. This is important to our vision because to provide accurate
melanoma detection errors must constantly be identified and fixed. The User feedback data
analysis functionality is vital to the system as errors can only be identified through analysis
functionality.
3.10. 3. MELANOMA DETECTION SYSTEM – This system incorporates the pattern matching and
melanoma detection functionality by analysing the patient data and matching patterns
which links to a code to give a melanoma diagnosis. This is most crucial to our vision as
without this system we could not deliver a melanoma diagnosis app.

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3.11. Summary Table: Value Chain to Systems

Value Chain
Activity
Processes Functionalities Specific Information
System(s)
Broad Information
System(s)

Technology/
Research
and
Development
1. App
refining/
updating
process
1. App updating.

2. Patient data analysis.
App updating system

Patient data analysis system
Transaction processing
system

Customer relationship
management system.
2. Pattern
matching
algorithm
development
process
1. Pattern picture matching.

2. Melanoma detection.
Pattern matching system


Melanoma detection system
Enterprise Resource
planning system

Decision support system

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CONCLUSION

Our Company’s vision is to provide humanity with the resources to proactively monitor their
risk of melanoma skin cancer. I believe this is a hugely meaningful goal that can be reached
through the development of the Mole Mapper App. Information systems and technology
provide the company with the means to create such an app, through implementation of
systems and technology which work effectively to diagnose skin cancer in a broad range of
people. Therefore creating a competitive advantage, improving customer satisfaction and
reducing costs and most importantly saving lives.


REFERENCES

1. American Cancer Society. (2014, February 19). How is melanoma skin cancer found?
Retrieved May 1, 2014, from http://www.cancer.org/cancer/skincancer-
melanoma/overviewguide/melanoma-skin-cancer-overview-diagnosed
2. Cancer Society. (2010). Where can I get my skin cancer checked? Retrieved from
http://www.cancernz.org.nz/assets/files/info/IS_where%20can%20I%20get%20my%
20skin%20checked_Mar2010.pdf
3. Com Score Data Mine. (2011, June 20). US smartphone owners by age. Retrieved
from http://www.comscoredatamine.com/2011/06/us-smartphone-owners-by-age/
4. Leonard, H. (2013, February 7th) there will soon be one smartphone for every 5
people in the world. Business Insider. Retrieved from
http://www.businessinsider.com.au/

5. Rigel, D., Friedman, R., & Kopf, A. (1996, May). The incidence of malignant melanoma in
the United States: Issues as we approach the 21st century. Journal Academic of
dermatology. 17(4), 839–847. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0190-9622(96)90041-
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6. Miller, M & Ackerman, B. (1992, April).How accurate are dermatologists in the diagnosis
of melanoma? Degree of accuracy and implications. Arc Dermatol. 128(4), 559.
doi:10.1001/archderm.1992.01680140143021

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7. NZ Doctor. (2012).The number of active doctors in New Zealand increases. Retrieved
from http://www.nzdoctor.co.nz/news/2012/august-2012/22/number-of-active-
docs-in-nz-increases.aspx