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HONORS HOUSING EXPANDS AND MOVES TO LAMMERS HALL

LYNDON SEITZ
OFFICIAL PRESS OF THE WESTFIELD STATE UNIVERSITY HONORS PROGRAM
FALL 2010 VOLUME 2, ISSUE 1
THE SQUIRREL SQUIRE
I walked into Lammers
Hall on my first day of college
and took a turn into Honors
Housing, located in section D
on the first floor. Though it
looks like a typical residence
hall, the Honors section is
different in terms of its at-
mosphere and sense of com-
munity. After a short time, I
could name just about every-
one who lives in our area. I
haven’t heard that about any-
where else. Section events
have been well attended and
very entertaining, and I’ve
noticed we have been more
likely to hear about other
activities.
Students agree that Hon-
ors Housing is worth choos-
ing if you want to get your
work done. “I feel like it is an
easier place to learn,” said
Chelsey O’ Connor. Tim
McLaughlin seemed to agree.
“Honors Housing is great if
you forget a homework as-
signment or if you need help
studying for a test, because
other students from your
class are right down the hall.”
Honors Housing used to
be located in Courtney Hall.
In a focus group conducted
last fall by Dr. Kantrowitz,
Honors Program Chair, stu-
dents described living in
Courtney as like living in
New York City, while Lam-
mers felt more like a small-
town community. Students
voted to move to Lammers,
and since the move, Honors
Housing has expanded. “I
feel like I’m more connected
to the other Honors students
and I think Lammers is a per-
fect living facility,” said
sophomore Emilee Gagnon.
In F’11, Honors Housing
will be located in Lammers
A3/B3. Contact the Honors
Office for more information.

Lyndon is a first-year
English major from Web-
ster, MA.
FOUR HONORS STUDENTS RECEIVE PRESIDENT’ S AWARD
Students often gather to socialize in the Honors section of Lam-
mers. Cori Glennie is the Honors student RA in the section.
Four of the eight students
who received the President’s
Award were members of the
Honors Program: Erin Judge,
Colleen Murphy, Kristina
Norris, and Laura Satkowski.
The Westfield State Uni-
versity President’s Award is
presented annually to a small
group of students who exhibit
outstanding achievements in
leadership, encompassing the
areas of academics, co-
curricular involvements, and
community service. Recipi-
ents are selected from among
current students who exem-
plify the mission of the Uni-
versity through their daily
activities and achievements.
“Our campus is inspired by
the level of commitment and
social responsibility under-
taken by these students,” said
Evan Dobelle, President of
Westfield State University.
“Westfield State is pleased to
recognize these students for
making a difference and sup-
porting a culture of service of
which we can all be proud.”
Congratulations to:
Erin Judge
Colleen Murphy
Kristina Norris
Laura Satkowski

For more information, see
p. 6 & 7.
STUDENT HONORS ADVISORY COUNCIL (SHAC)
PAGE 2 THE SQUIRREL SQUIRE
SHAC, or the Student Honors Advisory Council, acts as a
liaison between Honors students and administration. Com-
prised solely of students, SHAC allows Honors students to be
heard in an open and constructive way. In addition to address-
ing student concerns, the council plans fun events throughout
the year. Have ideas for programming, interested in a leader-
ship position (F'11 council elections will be held during S'11
semester), or just want to find out more about SHAC? Con-
tact Erin Judge or Ted Zarek, Co-Presidents.
THE SQUIRE SQUAD
The Squire Squad, left to right: Mary Cafferty
(Newsletter Editor), Dr. Glen Brewster
(Honors Program Assistant Coordinator), Dr.
Ricki Kantrowitz (Honors Program Chair),
and Gretchen Konrad (Honors Program Sec-
retary).
We would like to welcome Dr.
Glen Brewster as Honors Pro-
gram Assistant Coordinator!
Erin Judge and Ted Zarek, SHAC Co-Presidents.
UPCOMING EVENTS
Get in touch with the Honors
Program! Visit the Honors Program
Office and Center in Mod Hall 103.
Call at (413) 572-8086. E-mail at hon-
ors@wsc.ma.edu, or find us on Face-
book.
Friday, February 18th Abstracts due for 17th Annual MA Statewide
Undergraduate Research Conference
Thursday, February 24th, 5-8 PM Etiquette Dinner
Friday, March 25th, by 2 PM Priority Registration forms due
Thursday, March 31st to Sunday, April
3rd
Northeast Regional Honors Conference, Portland,
ME
Wednesday, April 6th, 1-2:30 PM Welcome to Westfield, Accepted Honors Students
Luncheon
Friday, April 22nd 17th Annual MA Statewide Undergraduate Re-
search Conference
Thursday, February 3rd, 3:30-4:30 PM Conversation Hour with President Dobelle in the
Honors Center, Mod Hall 103D
The black squirrel, Honors Program mascot!
HONORS STUDENTS GET INVOLVED
When you hear of a group
called “Academic Pursuits,”
you probably imagine meet-
ings where people discuss the
plausibility of string theory or
economics in Lichtenstein. In
reality, Academic Pursuits is a
group of adventurers who
explore New England. The by
-laws of the club were written
by an Honors student who
wanted to develop a group for
extracurricular activities. The
club is open to all WSU stu-
dents who are interested in off
-campus adventures.
On one odyssey this semes-
ter, we traveled to Shake-
speare and Company’s Bern-
stein Theater to see Tom
Stoppard’s The Real Inspector
Hound, a play whose plot
twisted and turned more than
the roads we had just traveled.
Another adventure, to the
Springfield Museums, allowed
us to explore the cosmos,
witness how Ninjas dressed
and fought, and gaze upon an
ancient Chinese jade burial
suit. Have ideas for other ex-
peditions? Email me at cglen-
nie7281@wsc.ma.edu and I’ll
let you know when the club
meets next. We’re always
looking for enthusiastic new
adventurers!

Cori is a junior General
Science and Mathematics
double-major from
Groton, MA.
ACADEMIC PURSUITS
CORI GLENNIE
PAGE 3 THE SQUIRREL SQUIRE
BRENDAN O’ BRIEN WRITES FOR AS SCHOOLS MATCH WITS
JESSICA COMSTOCK
Brendan O’Brien, Math
major from Agawam, is an
Honors student with a unique
job. He works as a question
writer and fact checker for the
Emmy-nominated show As
Schools Match Wits (ASMW),
which is now in its 50th sea-
son. The show, produced by
students at Westfield State
University, is sponsored in
part by the Massachusetts
Teachers Association. It al-
lows high school students in
the local area to compete on a
knowledge-based quiz show
which is then broadcast on
WGBY television station.
Throughout his high school
years, Brendan participated in
Agawam High School’s As
Schools Match Wits club and
was a member of his school’s
TV competition team in his
junior and senior years. Upon
graduation, he felt so con-
nected with the program that
he wanted to look into a way
to get involved. Dr. Ricki
Kantrowitz, Chair of the Hon-
ors Program, put Brendan in
touch with Dr. Elizabeth Pre-
ston, Dean of Faculty and
Executive Producer of ASMW.
Brendan writes scripts and
submits them to Dr. Preston,
and he also looks over previ-
ously written scripts to iden-
tify any factual errors before
the show airs. His questions
cover a wide variety of aca-
demic areas, and usually re-
flect topics that are on his
mind. When asked about his
favorite part of being a writer
for ASMW, he responded that
it was great “knowing that
your questions will actually be
asked on the show.”
Jessica is a sophomore
Biology major from West
Brookfield, MA.
Brendan O’Brien, question writer, and Dr. Elizabeth Preston, Executive
Producer of ASMW.
Club members visit the Springfield Museums.
WSU has 74 clubs. Get involved!
Contact Barbara Hand or LeeAnn
Thompson in the Student Govern-
ment Office or check out the SGA
webpage.
HONORS STUDENTS GO GLOBAL
GRENOBLE, FRANCE

LAURA SATKOWSKI
PAGE 4 VOLUME 2, ISSUE 1
This past summer, I stud-
ied abroad for six weeks in
Grenoble, France, through
Academic Programs Interna-
tional. Grenoble is situated in
the French Alps, and waking
up to a view of the Alps is
indescribable.
I did not know a soul in
France upon arrival, but I
made amazing friends from
the US and other countries.
I took French classes four
hours a day, five days a week
through the intensive Lan-
guage Studies program at the
Université Stendhal in Greno-
ble. But most of my French
was learned by spending hours
in conversation with my host
family. I am glad I decided to
live with a family because I
was included in many cultural
experiences that I never
would have had if I lived in a
dormitory. My program in-
cluded excursions to Mont
Blanc, Paris, and Chamonix
(my new favorite place in the
world). I tried so many differ-
ent kinds of food, and ate cow
tongue for dinner most nights!
From the everyday enjoy-
ment of living with a French
family to walking inside a gla-
cier to climbing the Eiffel
Tower, this was the best six
weeks of my life. I would
highly recommend studying
abroad to every student!
Laura is a Psychology ma-
jor from Holland, MA. In
2009, she participated in
The Theatre of London —
Past and Present, a J-term
course in the UK.
Five students from WSU’s
Model United Nations pro-
gram had the opportunity this
past summer to travel to Italy
for 10 days with our fabulous
club advisor and WSU profes-
sor Dr. Brian Steinberg. Dur-
ing his graduate work in Italy,
Dr. Steinberg developed last-
ing relationships that enabled
us to be the only non-Italian
students invited to a summer
program focused on intercul-
turalism in Italy. To prepare,
we attended four Saturday
classes at WSU, where we
studied Italian government
and history, and viewed Italian
movies.
We landed in Naples
where we toured historic
landmarks and sampled deli-
cious authentic pizza. From
there, we traveled south by
train and bus to Potenza, the
site of the program.
While in Italy, we studied
the region of Basilicata, with
its Greek, Byzantine, and Arab
influences. Our classes, held
from 9 AM to lunchtime,
were entirely in Italian. They
were conducted by professors
from several schools, includ-
ing the Universities of Naples,
Salerno, Rome, and Basilicata,
as well as by Dr. Steinberg. A
translator helped us to under-
stand the material and partici-
pate in class, and at the end of
each session Dr. Steinberg
(cont. on p. 5)
POTENZA, ITALY
KAITLIN CALDERARA
Laura Satkowski in Annecy, France.
Kaitlin Calderara at ancient ruins in Metaponto, Italy.
Interested in going international? Visit
the International Programs Office in Parenzo
130 (lobby) or call at (413) 572-8819.
HONORS STUDENTS GO GLOBAL
PAGE 5 THE SQUIRREL SQUIRE
INTERNATIONAL STUDIES IN JORDAN AND FRANCE
MICHAEL BRILL
As a commuter student
from Southwick, MA, I will
always be grateful to WSU for
the opportunities I received to
travel abroad. If someone had
told me that in 2010 I would
have a passport and travel to
France and Jordan, I would
not have believed them.
The trip to Jordan was part
of a WSU Communication
course taught by Professor
John Paulmann. After meet-
ing weekly at WSU during the
spring semester, we spent the
first week in Jordan living in
the capital city of Amman and
the second week touring the
country from north to south.
The southern port city of
Aqaba, the ancient city of
Petra, and Wadi Rum, the
base camp for T.E. Lawrence
during the Arab Revolt in
WWI, were three highlights.
I spent most of my time in
France attending the Interna-
tional Media Conference,
sponsored by George Wash-
ington University and held at
the American University of
Paris. I was selected to go
based on my writing for The
Westfield Voice. At the confer-
ence I learned how various
media institutions work and
heard firsthand accounts from
many journalists.
One of the highlights of
my trip to France was the day
I traveled northwest from
Paris. After a two and a half
hour ride across the vast,
open and gently sloping
French countryside, I reached
the English Channel and the
northern coastal region of
Normandy.
Standing atop the cliffs of
Pointe du Hoc, I found it hard
to believe that a small group
of American soldiers was able
to make the 100-foot climb
while simultaneously battling
the German defenders above.
At the top of the cliffs, the
shell and bomb craters, along
with many German bunkers,
remain where they were left
in a battle fought over 66
years ago. Four miles to the
west of the cliffs is the Ameri-
can military cemetery over-
looking Omaha Beach. Walk-
ing amongst the seemingly
endless rows of crosses, along
with many Stars of David, was
a simultaneously tranquil and
haunting experience. It was a
powerful reminder of the
costs of war and the immense
sacrifice made by mostly
young men in the war to lib-
erate Western Europe and
destroy one of the most evil
empires in human history.
As an avid reader, I knew
about these places, but now
have a greater appreciation for
the importance of experienc-
ing them. In particular, my
trip to Jordan increased my
interest in the Middle East.
Hoping to further my knowl-
edge of Arabic, I have applied
to an Arabic language pro-
gram sponsored by the State
Department to be held in
Jordan or Egypt next sum-
mer.

Mike is a junior History
and Political Science
double-major from
Southwick, MA.
discussed the subjects with us
in English.
The best part about the trip
was the in-country travel. We
traveled to those areas in
Basilicata influenced by multi-
cultural communities. We
toured Matera, a UN heritage
site, saw ancient Greek ruins
at Metaponto, and explored
mountain top villages. The
Italian countryside is breath-
taking.
The trip was a great learn-
ing experience and we made
many friends that we still keep
in contact with on Face-
book. Since this is an exchange
program, a professor and stu-
dents from the University of
Basilicata will come from Italy
to WSU in August.


Kaitlin, a Political Science
major from Adams, MA,
graduated in Decem-
ber. In 2009, she partici-
pated in The Caribbean
Experience, a J-term
course in St. Maarten.
POTENZA, ITALY (CONT. )
Mike Brill in Wadi Rum, Jordan.
PAGE 6 VOLUME 2, ISSUE 1
HONORS STUDENTS GO BEYOND
FOUR HONORS STUDENTS RECEIVE PRESIDENT’ S AWARD
Kristina Norris: Kristina is a
senior Criminal Justice major
and a Political Science minor
from Braintree, MA. Kristina
has held a variety of roles on
campus including Representa-
tive to Student Government,
Student Ambassador, Resident
Assistant, and student-athlete.
She also represented WSU
during the Fall 2009 semester-
long Study Abroad program at
the University of Kingston,
London, England. Kristina
has participated in numerous
service projects including
hosting birthday parties for
disadvantaged children, work-
ing with elementary school
kids, and volunteering at a
benefit run for ALS research.
During her recent internship
experience, she has worked to
develop and coordinate sev-
eral “Getting into Law School”
seminars for college students
in the local area. Kristina
wrote in her essay: “Being in-
volved in Westfield has helped me
to create a stronger voice for what
I am passionate about, and I now
know that through my pursuit of
law as a career I can use my voice
to represent and stand up for other
people’s issues and passions.”

Laura Satkowski: Laura is a
senior Psychology major from
Holland, MA. Laura’s numer-
ous involvements include her
membership in Circle K and
the Psychology Club. She
served as a peer advisor in the
Academic Achievement Cen-
ter, and is a member of
Lambda Sigma, Psi Chi, and
Phi Kappa Phi honor societies.
Laura has devoted many hours
to community service includ-
ing being the only student
member of the Executive
Board at the Westfield Carson
Center for Human Services,
and volunteering at Shriner’s
Hospital, Westfield Soup
Kitchen, Habitat for Human-
ity, Breast Cancer Prevention,
and a benefit fashion show to
support Ugandan women. In
2009, Laura participated in a J
-term course in London and
during the summer of 2010,
she was a student in France
(see article, p. 4). Laura
Left to right: Kristina Norris, Laura Satkowski, President Dobelle, Erin Judge, and Colleen Murphy at the President’s Award dinner.
PAGE 7 THE SQUIRREL SQUIRE
HONORS STUDENTS GO BEYOND
wrote in her essay: “All of the
activities that I have been in-
volved with have helped me to
make friends, further my career,
and gain a sense of community.
They have taught me patience and
understanding…how to be a
leader and to stay organized. I
feel like I have utilized so much of
what Westfield State has to offer.”

Erin Judge: Erin is a History
and Ethnic and Gender Studies
double-major from Middle-
field, MA. She is earning cer-
tification in Middle and Secon-
dary Education. Erin has a
wide array of community ser-
vice and leadership involve-
ment. In addition to her mem-
bership in WSU’s Honors
Program, Erin has served on
both the Honors Advisory
Council and Student Honors
Advisory Council, which she
helped implement. Erin has
served the University on its
Curriculum Committee, as a
tour guide and tutor, and has
been involved in organizations
including Students for a Just
and Stable Future and the
WSU Students for Peace and
Justice. She presented her
research at the Massachusetts
Statewide Undergraduate Re-
search Conference in 2009
and 2010 and at the Northeast
Regional Honors Conference
in 2010. Erin has a long-
standing commitment to the
Highland Agricultural Society
where she has been actively
involved in volunteering. One
of her passions is working to
preserve the Middlefield Fair
which has a long history in her
community. Erin wrote in her
essay: “I believe that community
traditions should continue as a
way to bring community together
and celebrate and remember the
history. It has been important to
me to make the most of my time at
Westfield and make a contribution
to both my community at home
and here on campus.” (For
Erin’s Senior Honors Pro-
ject, see p. 12.)

Colleen Murphy: Colleen
is a senior Communication
major and Political Science
minor from Mansfield, MA.
Colleen, whose work exem-
plifies leadership, is serving in
her second term as the WSU
Student Government Associa-
tion President. Representing
the student body through for-
mal governance comes with
enormous responsibility and
requires countless hours of
work. Additionally, she serves
as class council officer, tour
guide, orientation leader, and
tutor for Communication
classes. Her volunteer work
has included helping at
Shriner’s Hospital, the Salva-
tion Army Turkey Drive, and
the “All I Want for Christmas”
Head Start campaign. Colleen
most recently led a video cam-
paign at WSU for the national
“It Gets Better” teenage sui-
cide prevention program. She
wrote in her essay: “Through
my involvements, I discovered that
I want to be able to continue to
work for people, changing lives as
positively as possible. In life, you
sometimes can work to earn tons of
money, have a stable job, and a
nice retirement. For me, it will be
more important that I work in an
opportunity that allows me to give
back, to help people, and to truly
make a difference in the world
around me.”


Ryan Meersman, WSU Student Trustee and a member of the Honors
Program, congratulating the recipients of the President’s Award for
Excellence in Leadership at the President’s Award Dinner.
“You are an engaged group of dedicated learners and
concerned citizens of this community and we are very
proud of you.”
— Evan Dobelle, WSU President

“These students initiate without being asked, ...have
worked to enhance and improve their environments, are
willing and capable of making tough decisions, and they
serve humbly knowing that recognition, although nice, is
not the reason behind their contributions.”
— Susan LaMontagne, Dean of Students
"If your actions inspire
others to dream more, learn
more, do more and become
more, you are a leader."
— John Quincy Adams,
6th President of the
United States
This summer, Kathleen
Jwanowski and I fulfilled our
upper-level Honors seminar
requirement by taking the
course City of Boston: Multidis-
ciplinary Perspectives at the
University of Massachusetts,
Boston. The course was offered
to students in Commonwealth
Honors Programs statewide.
The course took place over
five Saturdays. Each session was
dedicated to exploring the city
through a different lens: ar-
chaeological, geological, liter-
ary, and historical. Instructors
from these different disciplines
co-taught the course. The class
traveled throughout the city,
taking a boat tour of the islands
in the harbor, walking the Free-
dom Trail, and visiting the
homes and burial sites of many
famous historical Bostonians.
We visited Peabody Museum to
discuss the Native American
history of Boston and walked
along the original coast line to
see how much of the city rests
on man-made land. The course
concluded with a day spent at
the Boston Public Library,
where we talked about what
makes a great public space. It
was exciting to see a different
side of a place I have lived near
all my life.

Andrea is a senior Music
major from Marshfield,
MA.
CITY OF BOSTON:
MULTIDISCIPLINARY PERSPECTIVES
ANDREA BIAGINI
PAGE 8 VOLUME 2, ISSUE 1
HONORS COURSES GO BEYOND
IN SEARCH OF JACK KEROUAC
Dr. Michael Filas (English) traveled with his Honors section of Major American Writers to Lowell, MA, for a visit to the Jack
Kerouac Memorial Park which featured large marble pillars engraved with passages of Kerouac’s writing. They also toured the
Lowell Historical Museum where they viewed a film about Kerouac and a display case featuring his knapsack and typewriter.
Other sites included Kerouac's grave and place of residence.
Dr. Sabine Klein’s (English/Theatre Arts) Honors
section of Introduction to Theatre traveled to Hartford
Stage to see Shakespeare’s Anthony and Cleopatra.
SEEKING SHAKESPEARE
Special events, speakers, and outings
are often included in Honors courses.
HONORS COURSES GO BEYOND
PAGE 9 THE SQUIRREL SQUIRE
HONORS STUDENTS PRESENT AT NEW ENGLAND CHAPTER OF THE
AMERICAN COLLEGE OF SPORTS MEDICINE (NEACSM)
Laura Ryan, Education
major, and Sadie Noel, Move-
ment Science major, assisted
with a presentation entitled
“Promoting Physical Activity
Advocacy: A Multi-
Disciplinary Approach” at the
New England Chapter of the
American College of Sports
Medicine (NEACSM) Confer-
ence in Providence, RI, on
November 12, 2010. The
presentation stemmed from
the Honors seminar The
Physical Inactivity Crisis, of-
fered in Spring 2010 by Dr.
Teresa Fitts (Movement Sci-
ence) in which students initi-
ated and implemented physi-
cal activity advocacy projects.
Laura Ryan presented her
project, “Moving with Math,”
in which she used movement
to teach standard and non-
standard measurement to first
graders. Sadie Noel presented
data relating to an interactive
board game that was devel-
oped to teach middle-
schoolers about becoming
activity advocates. Both WSU
Honors students acted as fa-
cilitators of this game for the
conference participants. Many
found the interactive game to
be beneficial and applicable to
settings outside the middle
school. According to Dr.
Fitts, "Feedback about the
presentation was overwhelm-
ingly positive."

In the photos to the right are Laura
Ryan with first-graders (above) and
Sadie Noel with middle-schoolers
(below).
BRINGING IN SPECIAL GUESTS
Erica Wheeler presenting her Soulful Landscape workshop in Dr. Tarin
Weiss’ (Physical Science) upper-level Honors seminar, A Sense of Place.
Dr. Fawzia Afzal-Khan discussing the impact of government policy
on the status of Pakistani women in Dr. Philip Ettman’s (Economics
and Management) upper-level Honors seminar, Law and Society.
PAGE 10 THE SQUIRREL SQUIRE
Student Ambassadors Kristina Norris and Jessica Robinson being interviewed by Nate
Luscombe on a segment of Mass Appeal on 22News.
Honors student tour guides (top) with Emily Gib-
bings, Associate Director of Admission.
Honors Program (bottom) welcoming prospective
students at one of the Saturday Open Houses.
HONORS STUDENTS REACH OUT ON AND OFF CAMPUS
Honors student Michael
Fortier, Senior Airman,
stationed at Westover Air
Reserve Base, was deployed
to Joint Base Balad, Iraq, in
the summer of 2010.
Rachel Lareau and Jessica Robinson
(below), Student Ambassadors, represent
Westfield State University in welcoming
students and the public to on-campus
events, such as Speaker Series lectures.
Brian Cipoletta, WSU tour guide, leads a group of
parents and prospective students on a tour of the
campus.
Students interested in becoming campus
tour guides for the Fall ‘11 semester
should contact Kelly Forsythe in the Of-
fice of Admission or at (413) 572-8542
or by e-mail at kforsythe@wsc.ma.edu.
Interested in
expanding your
horizons?
Participate in Partners
in the Parks, an outdoor
experiential learning
program for Honors
students, volunteer for
Habitat for Humanity,
attend the WSU
Speaker Series, or be-
come a student leader
in the WSU Bully Pre-
vention Program.
INSIDE THE HONORS CENTER
PAGE 11 VOLUME 2, ISSUE 1
1. & 2.) End-of-the-Semester Chi-
nese Dinner. 3. & 4.) Student
presentations in Dr. Shapiro’s
Honors section of Principles of
Sociology. 5.) Dr. McIntosh and
Dr. Hidalgo at an Honors faculty
dinner. 6.) Dr. Kantrowitz advis-
ing students in preparation for
Priority Registration. 7.) Siera
Sinclair using the Honors Center
during finals week extended study
hours. 8.) Students meet to re-
view procedures for Senior Hon-
ors Projects. 9.) Dr. Bull’s Honors
section of World Regional Geog-
raphy meets for presentations and
pizza.
1. 2.
3. 4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
Honors Center is open
daily from 9 AM to 4 PM!
FALL 2010 SENIOR HONORS PROJECT PRESENTATIONS
Ted Zarek: “Blowin’ in the Leaves of Grass: Viewing
America through Literature and Music, from Emer-
son to Springsteen”
Committee: Project Advisor: Dr. Emily Todd; Departmental Reader: Dr.
Michael Filas; Honors Reader: Dr. Carsten Braun
Erin Judge: “The Middlefield Fair: A Case Study of
the Agricultural Fair in New England”
Committee: Project Advisor: Dr. Mara Dodge; Departmental Reader:
Dr. Margot Hennessy; Honors Reader: Dr. Ricki Kantrowitz
Laura Ryan: “Culturally Responsive Mathe-
matics Education”
Committee: Project Co-Advisors: Drs. Christine Von Renesse
& Robin DiAngelo; Honors Reader: Dr. Ricki Kantrowitz
Carly Amrhein: “Supporting Literacy Development for
Non-Native English Speakers”
Committee: Project Advisor: Dr. Kathleen Itterly (below, right); Departmen-
tal Reader: Dr. Sandra Berkowitz; Honors Reader: Dr. Janet Gebelt
Dr. Robert Hayes, Vice President of Academic Affairs (left), and Dr. Ricki Kantrowitz, Honors Program Chair (center), welcome students and guests to
the Fall 2010 Senior Honors Project presentations. Dr. Cheryl Stanley, Interim Dean of Education, concludes the program.