Strategies for Investigating Long-Term

College and Career Success


Matthew S. Ryan








Action Research
Professor Wamba
November 27, 2013


November 2013
Contents

Concept Map 1
Abstract 2
Introduction 2
Background Review 3
Schools and Programs that Succeed 7
Suggestions Based on Researched Solutions 10
Proposed Methods 11
Data Collection Tools 17
Outline for Online Survey/Questionnaire 17
Survey 1: Online High School Senior Exit SAPS 17
Survey 2: Online Two and Four Year High School Graduate SAPS 21
Survey 3: Online Six, Eight and Ten Year High School Graduate SAPS 26
Survey 4: College Survey Questions 29
Survey 5: Business Survey Questions 29
Survey 6: Survey for Parents 30
Work Cited 31



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Abstract
This research proposal is setup to analyze and create effective solutions connected to
student college and/or career success. Investigations were made detailing the state of current
district academics, social emotional learning and professional skills/abilities necessary for high
academic achievement. One proposed data collection method includes a 10 year longitudinal
survey/questionnaire using current and future senior class cohorts. Other methods involve
surveys for parents, colleges and local businesses/industry. Another method involves correlating
student GPAs from records found in guidance databases. Data provided by each of these
methods will enhance Glen Cove High School’s ability to solve issues while aligning curriculum
and instruction for college and/or career readiness. Reevaluations will occur to ensure accuracy
of collected data. Action plans will hopefully branch from this research and result in having
positive outcomes for all students.
Introduction
Many of our school systems are abundant with opportunity. Free will and choice are a
cherished and exercised right given to students who are interested in topics outside the realm of
Regents requirements. Often these courses are orchestrated in a manner that align with topics or
subjects that stem from core classes. This gives students a fair chance to look deeper into what
interest them. It is often thought that these courses are designed to broaden a student’s outlook
on the world today; with the eventuality of pursuing or rejecting this potential career path. Either
way, the goal is to provide a background in knowledge and experiences which will enhance any
student’s chance of being college and career ready.
The NYS Board of Regents has made it clear that all students must obtain a minimum
exposure to certain courses during their educational tenure. Studying in these areas often require
a slightly more rigorous approach to learning knowledge and skills. Students are exposed to a
variety of information while depth in topics tends to be rather shallow. Having a minimum
understanding of necessary skills is highly important in the eyes of the state as well as most
public institutions and industry. Philosophically, being exposed and successfully obtaining a
variety of information early on can offer more choice in one’s adulthood.

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The challenge and primary goal is to create a school environment where students are
offered the highest caliber of education. The curriculum of schools varies greatly in that some
schools have success providing many elective options to their students, while others do not.
Schools structured with the rigid fundamentals in core courses also have the same fate in terms
of success. Most notably a rigorous curriculum will ensure that students are exposed to the many
responsibilities necessary to successfully survive in society. Much of our society invests in the
understanding that a K-12 education will help their children obtain the American dream, which is
social mobility. However, at the government level this view is shared with a combined effort to
make all students are college and/or career ready.
The goal set for our students is to successfully find a niche in our society that provides a
common good or service. Success is measured, most typically, as having a profession that
provides all domestic necessities. There are several questions that this research attempts to
investigate. Are general elective courses essential in increasing the likelihood that a student will
be college and career ready, or should the curricular focus be on maintaining a sequence in core
and AP subjects? Does the rigorousness of curriculum weigh more on student preparation than
enrolling in many general electives? Furthermore, what college and career readiness skills lack
implementation in our district? How can we reinforce and use our current resources to increase
student preparation and future academic success?
Background Review
Creating an environment that is college and career ready should exhibit characteristics
which allow for every student to have the same exposure to fundamental learning. Creating two
separate paths for individuals only subjugates one group. Giving the opportunity to take rigorous
courses will give all students an opportunity to excel in thinking and problem solving, whether
for a college or career path (Hooker and Brand, 2009). Our society is ripe with opportunity, but
to take advantage of this students increasingly need a postsecondary education. Providing for
oneself needs to come as a result of having knowledge and skills originating from a common set
of core standards.
It has been unfortunate that as of the most recent decade, much of learning has revolved
around the notion of earning good grades and passing tests rather than higher level thinking.

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Areas that have been neglected center around reading, writing and math which meet college
expectations. In the most recent shift to performance based standards the focus has been on the
number of courses taken rather than the quality or rigor of those courses (Mueller and Gozali-
Lee, 2013). This current trend has been a result of high schools adhering to accountability
systems put in place that require meeting minimum standards for graduation. There is a conflict
of responsibility to these students. New federal regulations require that students be college and
career ready (CCR), but NYS standards require a minimum proficiency to obtain a Regents
diploma, with no designation. The new college and career readiness standards set in place
provide no increase of state controlled minimum proficiencies. It is up to the state and local
school districts to raise the standards of skills for students, so that CCR goals are met. The U.S.
government does define what a rigorous academic path is, but States are not required to
assimilate all of this into mandatory graduation requirements. The disconnected goals further
manifest themselves in the lack of communication by local school districts with college and
business leaders in the community, ensuring an adequate curriculum is in place.
Our district sometimes meets the minimum requirements for graduation like many others
who wish to find the fastest way to create graduates (Mueller and Gozali-Lee, 2013). Currently
our graduation rate fell below AYP and the previous year’s data has not been released by the
state for comparison. Missing AYP another year in a row will classify the us as a school in need
of improvement. The issues have not been addressed with the faculty, and therefore many in the
building are clueless to this problem. Little initiative has been taken to solve this issue, and we
lean towards achieving the minimum Regents requirement for a sizeable amount of students.
There are many solutions to this problem. It needs to first start with a strong academic
foundation where community members and parents are active stakeholders toward student
achievement. It is clear that our current requirements are not preparing these students for CCR
goals. Future trends show that we must realign our school initiatives and vision towards this
goal. Figures from the Bureau of Labor Statistics estimates that, “by 2018, 63% of all new and
replacement jobs will require at least some college education. In contrast, in 1973, 72% of
available jobs required no more than a high school education” (Perna and Jones, 2013). Our
students who are graduating next year will be potential candidates for positions available in
2018, with a four year college degree. Our current freshmen will be graduating high school the

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year prior to this final estimate. The time is now to analyze, critique and gather data on our
curriculum, instruction and community involvement strategies. An effective strategy is
necessary for the future well-being of our students.
There are several of strategies, which we can implement, that have adequately created
environments which allow students to grow. The strategies come from two main categories
being social emotional learning/applied skills and rigorous high school coursework. Other
strategies will involve parents, colleges, businesses and students to gather further academic
insight. It should be our goal to give students the necessary emotional and professional skills to
succeed. More importantly, skills are not purely based on regurgitating knowledge, but thinking.
This has become an unfortunate casualty to high-stakes testing. The predicament is being
created when teaching to the test is seen as a good career move. The current CCSS standards are
also expressed in a manner concordant largely with testing and memorization, rather than
thinking. It is necessary to come up with a plan that injects thinking into the relatively non-
rigorous standardized curriculum.
Social emotional learning and skills provide a precise base to which many academic
pillars can form. There are a myriad of skills desired by employers nationwide. The three that
stick out highest are professionalism/work ethic, teamwork/collaboration, and oral
communication. Hooker and Brand (2009) point out other skills that employers want which
“include adaptability, analytical abilities, interpersonal skills, problem-solving skills, integrity,
responsibility, organizational skills, and a willingness to learn.” These skills are not just good
for business, but are also good for academics. These critical skills assist students in overall
competence. Increased social capacity gives them confidence to pass exams and engage in
pursuing college and career paths. Success has been seen by implementing these skills into the
classroom and throughout the school environment.
“Participation in SEL [social emotional learning] programs was
associated with positive impacts on six major student outcomes,
including improved SEL skills, attitudes toward self and others,
social behavior, and academic performance as well as reduced
conduct problems and emotional distress. The impact on academic
performance translated to an 11 percentile point gain in students’
achievement test scores” (Dymnick, Yoel and Sambolt, 2013).

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Our objective should be to ensure that all students receive instruction relating to these skills.
Performing well in these areas indicates higher academic performance, but more importantly it
also increases student self-efficacy. Building self-reliance increases the likelihood that students
will try new experiences and take healthy risks toward being successful. For all students it is
beneficial to see the connections between what they are learning and how it translates in the real
world. Quintessentially, students can see how skills are used by adults in successfully obtaining
a degree or certificate from a postsecondary institution.
Coupling SEL with a rigorous academic curriculum gives students the ability to handle
new challenges which will better their chances in a college or career. There is a direct
correlation to students who take challenging curriculum paths and those who do not. First, here is
the definition of a rigorous curriculum path by the U.S. Department of Education, “At least 4
years of English and mathematics (including Precalculus), 3 years of science (including biology,
chemistry, and physics) and social studies, 3 years of foreign language, and one honors/AP
course or AP test score” (U.S. Department of Education, 2002). Comparing this to NYS, a basic
Regents diploma requires, “22 units of credit distributed as follows: 4 ELA, 4 Social Studies, 3
Science, 3 Mathematics, ½ Health, 1 Arts, 1 Language other than English (LOTE), 2 Physical
Education, 3 ½ Electives. Assessments: 5 required Regents exams with a score of 65 or better as
follows: 1 Math, 1 Science, ELA, Global History and Geography, US History and Government”
(NYSED - Diploma, 2013). The NYS requirements specifically require one mathematics
Regents exam to be passed for a basic Regents diploma. However, three math exams need to be
passed for a Regents diploma with advanced designation. There is no requirement outlining exact
science courses which need to be taken by all individuals, except for living environment. This
leaves it up to the local control of how they would like to plan out the last 2 credits of science
and course sequences in other subjects. The NYS requirement also reflects a rigorousness deficit
of 2 credits of language. The State also leaves open ended a provision for 3.5 credits to be
acquired anywhere (NYSED - Regents, 2013). To provide a rigorous curriculum as defined by
the U.S. DOE, students should only have 2 credits left to student choice, not 3.5 credits. This
would leave availability for AP or IB courses taken in junior and senior years.
Students who enroll in a rigorous academic curriculum are more likely to succeed, “71%
of students who enroll [in rigorous programs] in high school will persist to complete a bachelor’s

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degree” (Tierney, Colyar and Corwin, 2003). Furthermore, “taking a challenging curriculum
reduces by 50 percent the gap in college completion rates between high-income and low-income
students” (Gandall, Peltzman and Wiener, 2008). The strongest correlations come from
analyzing statistics generated by students taking higher level mathematics. “Students whose
highest levels of mathematics in high school were trigonometry, pre-calculus, or calculus level
courses had bachelor’s degree completion rates above 60 percent. For students who [just]
completed a calculus course… [the] completion rate was 83 percent” (Martinez and Klopott,
2005). This was irrespective of other courses that these students took. For assumptive purposes,
these students who excel at mathematics may also excel in other subjects. This may be why 70%
of students completing a rigorous academic path go on to obtain a bachelor’s degree.
Furthermore, math also correlated to higher earnings after college and thus can be deemed as a
good indicator for career success:
“The math courses that students take in high school are strongly
related to students’ earnings around 10 years later, even after
taking account of demographic, family, and school characteristics,
as well as the student’s high educational degree attained, college
major, and occupation… More advanced math courses have a
larger effect on earnings than less advanced ones. Our results
suggest that a curriculum that includes algebra and geometry is
systematically related to higher earnings for graduates a decade
after graduation” (Rose and Betts, 2004).
In summation, students who are provided the opportunity to excel above the minimum State
requirements will show improved success at completing college and obtaining a future career
which will provide them long-term stability.
Schools and Programs that Succeed
The demographics of our high school exhibit a great and powerful diversity of
individuals. This district is a strong melting pot of cultures and ethnic backgrounds which lend it
to positive and constructive interpersonal skills. Beyond that our school needs to offer
opportunities that extend into as well as out of the high school classroom. Our district has a
demographic breakdown of 1% American Indian or Alaska Native, 12% Black or African
American, 45% Hispanic or Latino, 4% Asian or Native Hawaiian/Other Pacific Islander, 38%
White and 1% Multiracial (NYSED - School Report Card, 2013). There are three schools with

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similar demographics which have success implementing higher learning aimed at college and
career readiness. They all have similar demographics and offer programs that prepare students
for higher achievement and well-being. They are Gateway to College (alternative high school)
in Rockville, Maryland, Annandale High School (comprehensive high school) in Fairfax County,
Virginia, and George Washington High School (comprehensive high school) in Denver,
Colorado. Each of these schools brings a similar set of skills that provide support and
opportunity for all of their enrolled students (Eugene, O., 2009).
The Gateway to College high school offers individual students the opportunity to take
part in a college bound track that they would have otherwise never had completed in a
comprehensive high school. Their demographic breakdown is as follows: 1% Asian, 20%
African American, 15% Latino, 3.3% Multiracial and 60% White. This alternative location
provides students with an environment which fosters several key elements. Students have the
opportunity to overcome social and economic barriers by enrolling in a program that offers dual
credit. Students are simultaneously earning high school credit whilst accumulating college
credits. The Gateway to College partners with Montgomery Community College where students
may wish to enroll after graduation in one of its three campuses. This school is designed with a
national framework in mind that replicates the college experience. Basic foundation courses
bring students up to speed on reading, writing and math. Above this they also offer specialized
courses in career development and college survival skills. This program offers a sense of
rehabilitation since many of the students indicate that they are from homes where education is
not a valued priority. The school ensures that extra emphasis is put on why certain behaviors are
necessary for college and career success. Students have responded positively to this environment
and had reported that attending college classes forces them to, “abandon sloppy work habits
when it quickly becomes clear they will fail without adjusting to higher standards” (Eugene, O.,
2009). The average cohort size is about 60 students. Of these students 35% of them graduate,
approximately 20 per year (Gateway, 2013). This program does show some success for students
that would have otherwise dropped out of school.
In another case, the Annandale High School in Fairfax, Virginia is great example with
similar demographics. As of 2011-12, Annandale's student body was 32.28% Hispanic, 23.97%
White, 24.97% Asian, 16.37% Black and 2.41% other (FCPS, 2012). This school boasts a

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successful graduation rate of 97% (Annandale, 2011). Of this amount, 91% go on to attend
either a two or four year college. The school does offer some AP courses, but it primarily uses
the IB curriculum to garner college readiness. From the last available statistics in 2006-07, 40%
of 11
th
and 12
th
graders successfully passed an IB course. A mainstay of the school is that it
offers open enrollment for all challenging courses. There is also a tremendously helpful Student
Achievement Model (SAM) program. This is a small learning community within the school that
offers small class sizes, extended learning opportunities (ELO) and nearby counseling support
for struggling individuals. The ELO provides services such as the state assessment boot camp
and other enrichment activities; such as SAT prep, college campus visits, taking career
assessments and advice on selecting college prep courses. This is not open to all students.
Individuals must apply to the program and the focus for enrolling is on those who have not quite
lived up to their full academic potential. Lastly, Annandale is very supportive of its parents who
have difficulty speaking English. Present at many school events is a group of part-time parent
liaisons that speak a total of 10 different languages. The school also offers a free transitional
school for parents of Annandale students who wish to learn English (Eugene, O., 2009).
The last comparable school district with similar student structure is George Washington
High School. Here the demographic breakdown is 4% Asian, 46% African American, 21%
Latino, 0.3% Native American and 28% White. This district has adopted a similar strategy for
success. Students here are part of a certified IB school with 33% of the student body attending
these courses. There are also 10 AP courses being offered by the district. This school’s success
is attributed to innovative professional development, teacher collaboration practices,
supplemental academic programs, and a focus on building students’ contextual skills and
awareness. In particular, one supplemental program is a key resource for helping students that
are struggling with earning credit. There is an after school program on school grounds which is
funded by Denver Public Schools (DPS). Students pay a fee to gain access, and upon
successfully completing courses they are fully refunded. This clause was created to incentivize
the students to work towards getting their money back. This program has ushered many
individuals toward graduation.
Another program that offers help is their writing lab. This is directly staffed by former
English teachers who are paid out of a special school fund. Furthermore, the school has created

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two highly useful enrichment resources, The Future Center and Advancement Via Individual
Determination (AVID) courses. The Future Center provides students with a full-time college
guidance counselor and many ways to learn about specific skills and opportunities related to
postsecondary success. About 50-60 students are enrolled in the AVID courses. This survival
skills course offers students ways to learn successfully in a college environment. It has paid off
well for George Washington H.S. (Eugene, O., 2009). Graduation statistics from 2011 and 2012
showed a 6% increase of students obtaining their diploma in four years. Secondly, of those who
graduated in 2011 and 2012 the statistics showed a 9% reduction of remedial courses taken in
college (Colorado State Report Card, 2011).
Suggestions Based on Researched Solutions
Quintessentially, several recommendations can be made based on the best practices of successful
schools highlighted and alluded to in this review. Here is a list of suggestions to entertain in the
future.
 Provide assistance and education on filling out FAFSA forms. Those who filled out a
FAFSA were 50% more likely to enroll in a two or four year college than students, who
were academically able, and did not (Kirst and Meister, 1985).
 A culture centered on going to college with unabashed community support.
 A support structure for students struggling to earn credit.
 Developing fundamental skills such as reasoning, problem solving and research.
 Providing sufficient scaffolding and support for all students to reach high expectations.
 Drafting a core academic program which aligns with college and career readiness
standards.
 Course selection should be reduced, so options for students are fully focused on college
and postsecondary success.
 College expectations should be integrated into creating assignments and grading policies.
 Promoting self-management skills.
 Socially preparing students to cope with new and complex environments.
 Building partnerships and collaborating with postsecondary schools and businesses;
allowing for a dual credit opportunity (Brand, 2009).

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The data mined, from our current constituents in the district and abroad, will give us a better
understanding how we can successfully implement some or maybe all of these college and career
readiness suggestions.
Proposed Methods
It is best to keep an open mind, but collection of data should be analyzed with a lens that
adheres to previously researched examples. Data collected from alumni, parents, colleges,
businesses and onsite databases will represent information tailored to our district’s specific
culture, needs and issues. Collection of this data will effectively create a resource base of key
topics and concerns. A top priority is to disaggregate this information to culminate a solution
focused on college and career readiness. To ensure participation of all parties involved, it is
crucial that students are recognized as an integral part of increasing their former high school’s
capacity to initiate future student success.
Students over the course of 10 years will anonymously share quantitative and qualitative
data through specific survey questions. Student names will only be used to mail out access codes
for completing questions in an online survey. When circumstances arise or upon request we can
generate a physical copy to participants. Personal identification information, other than
graduation year, will not be linked after receipt of completed survey materials. It is not
necessary for them to leave a name, but a current mailing and/or e-mail address allows us to
provide them with future survey access codes, if they forget or need a reminder. Occasionally,
we may also need to send out messages asking about any anticipatory movement, so that we can
make sure future information will be correctly delivered. Keeping track of total responses will
be based on cohort size. We will match the number of surveys received with the total number of
students in that cohort.
The data collection process will begin with our current high school seniors who will
receive an exit survey, at the end of the year, gauging their overall educational well-being. The
Skills, Abilities and Preparedness Survey (SAPS) will foster answer choices by using a value
range from one to five for each question (See Surveys 1 - 3). Specifically each value will
indicate a level of satisfaction. Subjectively, participants selecting a value of one will
correspond to strongly agree, two is agree, three is neutral, four is disagree and five is strongly

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disagree. Questions requiring a written answer of specific data will be structured for user
friendliness. Participants will also share measurable information regarding demographic (to
ensure the district is providing equal opportunity to all ethnic and cultural backgrounds) and the
number of completed AP, Regents and general elective high school courses in math, science,
history and English. A section at the end of the survey will allow students to offer opinions
regarding their experiences with the school’s quality of education. This will be given to each
consecutive senior class and data will continue to be collected as a cohort for future
interpretation and implementation. Data can also be used as a basis to develop local trends
related to rigor of coursework, college entrance and effectiveness of classroom skills training.
It is important to continue surveying for trends by reaching out to each senior class two
and four years later. Obtaining data from these individuals will provide feedback which may or
may not vindicate our efforts to successfully prepare students. Our former students at this point
will be in a stage of life representing several years of postsecondary education or career
experience. At this point it is important that survey questions are highly reflective on skills and
abilities acquired during high school. Target areas will see if our efforts were beneficial toward
mentally preparing them for higher education or the work force. Depending on individual choice
and circumstances in life, we need to have initial data which indicates who is in college, has left
college or is currently employed. First, alumni will answer a questionnaire section regarding
highest level of education obtained (thus far and if applicable), demographic, the number of
college courses taken in math, science, history and English, current sector of employment and
general range of earned yearly income (if applicable). We would like to collect information on
college enrollment data to see where we can align and provide similar courses to prep them for
course success. They will again answer questions that were on the first senior exit survey which
focused on social emotional learning skills and abilities. After the initial SAPS section, their
education/economic status responses to will guide them into questions related to their
educational preparation. At the end there will be a place to offer any written opinions or
reflections.
This feedback and data will be useful for comparing and contrasting the curriculum
offered in our district. Developing a beneficial environment in high school, that aligns with
similar college curriculums, is essential for successful postsecondary achievement. Feedback on

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skills and abilities learned in the district will further enhance our perspective on adult
preparation. This feedback is also highly important to share with teachers, so that faculty can
collaborate and align their instruction of curriculum closer to the most necessary skills and
abilities. Amendments to our overall curriculum may be necessary to provide a foundation for
individuals to take many college subjects and successfully complete them. This could include
eliminating or overhauling courses that have been earmarked as too easy.
Based on current trends of this economy, it is important to see how our former students
are doing at the six, eight and ten year mark. At these milestones our former students could be in
employment or working toward a graduate degree/certification. We would like to see if and how
we may have contributed to their possible success. It is prudent to note that many variables exist
and do occur between high school and college which may enhance or inhibit success. These
instances ought not to reflect on the district’s capacity since outside factors may contribute.
Nevertheless, it’s worth noting any valuable data at these stages of life which we can obtain from
them. Again, alumni will answer a questionnaire section regarding highest level of education
obtained, demographic, the number of college courses taken in math, science, history and
English (targeting new data from graduate degree/certification candidates), current sector of
employment and general range of earned yearly income (if applicable). The SAPS section will
be reduced to skills and abilities which are career focused.
At this point the participants had time to socially interact as adults, and either increased
proficiency in their SEL skills or learned them along the way. Our reach of influence is limited
due to unique environmental conditions that each person experiences. There will be a final
section available for personal reflection or comment which is at the discretion of the participant
to fill in. At years six, eight and ten years we may see how maturity and experiences may evolve
the perception of beneficial skills and abilities received during high school. Since each senior
cohort will see these questions, we may also witness how generations of students will put
emphasis on different qualities of their education. Ultimately, showing us where we may adjust
the curriculum/instruction of the school. Over the long-term, compiling information in a
sequential and repeating fashion will allow for a steady flow of data which can be analyzed and
implemented, with college and career readiness in mind.

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Beyond surveys it is just as important to tap resources we currently have established in
the district. Initially data must be gathered to look at the track most students are taking to obtain
credit and reorient these courses. Offerings should be more rigorous and beneficial after high
school. This may involve revising or eliminating elective courses, so that students are not
gravitating towards the path of least resistance. We need data to create ratios of student GPA to
course enrollment in electives. This data will give us a modest understanding of students who
are struggling and most critically at risk of either not graduating or attending postsecondary
education. Among other options, we can then implement a plan of action which may result in
evening recovery credits. We next need to look at students who are exceling academically and
choosing to take electives rather than a potentially more rigorous and beneficial path for
postsecondary success. These students may need to be significantly counselled back into a
rigorous sequence. A major goal is preventing a stigma that elective courses are easy. The staff
and administration should collaborate on the best ways to increase their curricular integrity.
Course legitimacy will be solely based on initiating higher standards in electives and finding
ways to incorporate SEL and key professional skills and abilities.
Collecting data from students is a slightly reactive approach to solving this problem, but
over time the data collected will influence proactive decisions. These decisions will lead to
effective action being taken in our schools. A proactive approach of collecting survey
information from local institutions and businesses can buffer this gap of action. With survey
data from collegiate institutions we can analyze if our district is heading in the right direction and
look at potential improvements. Comparable districts implementing best practices have shown
that aligning the curriculum to state and collegiate standards will fortify and enhance curriculum
and instruction. In large part we are interested in using the scholarly advice of professors in
college. Some of our many decisions will be based on their recommendations and feasibility of
implementation. This information can be regarded as a significant advantage in solving our
issues. Hearing from colleges what they feel is underrepresented in our curriculum will ensure
that our students are receiving an appropriate education. Postsecondary success in our schools
must be derived from this type of research as well as incorporating studies which have worked
elsewhere. This survey information should be collected on a bi-yearly basis to ensure that
curriculum being offered in the district does not become obsolete in a world where needs are
evolving on an ever shorter timescale. This time span offers fresh insight and flexibility for

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implementing it successfully into school. Thus, increasing future probabilities of student success
especially if teachers and support staff are trained, informed and take a genuine stake in this.
(See Survey 4)
Collaborative measures also need to be made with local businesses in the area, so that we
can start to align curriculum around the local needs of our region. A survey should be conducted
by our district involving several areas of the economy. The survey needs to be given at least bi-
yearly to major industries on the Long Island that are desperate for local talent. Places of interest
include Brookhaven National Lab, Grumman Aircraft, Newsday, Hospitals like North Shore LIJ
and Police departments in Nassau and Suffolk County. Most importantly, we can attempt to
forecast trends in the economy, so that adaptations can be made to our curriculum ensuring
flexibility to changing markets. Receiving information from students, colleges and local industry
will allow the district to refocus its vision and effectively prepare students for college and career
readiness. (See Survey 5)
The last component of successful data gathering comes from communication with parents
about involvement. It is important that we initiate and work with the parental community to
fully adopt a culture of success in college or a career. Our district needs to reach out to parents
who may speak a foreign language or are limited in English proficiency. This is certainly
probable since 28% of the city population aligns with being Hispanic (Glen Cove, 2013). It is
important to reach out to them via parent liaisons. It is doubly important that we create buy in
for these parents. We understand that they work very hard and access to the school during
evenings may be very difficult. A survey to parents relating to meeting availability and
curricular focus is critical for buy in. This shows we are mindful and empathetic toward their
circumstances. Extending our access will enhance their opportunity to meet with faculty
regarding the success of their student(s). Based on survey outcomes it would be best to entertain
working around parent availability.
A few suggestions for future reference, it may be necessary for faculty to be present and
potentially reimbursed for a couple of hours, outside of the school day, that allow more parents
to meet and discuss solutions for their student(s). These parent-teacher forums can be used for
soliciting immediate feedback from parents via surveys, completion of forms regarding reduced
lunch assistance as well as college and career advice from the guidance department. A portion of

November 2013
16 Strategies for Investigating Long-Term College and Career Success
the time can be set aside as a workshop for parents with their children on applying and attending
college. Attempting to provide flexibility to parents shows that we seriously want them
involved with our school, and that we truly want what’s best for their student(s). These bilingual
surveys will be given to parents at the end of second quarter and fourth quarter, so that based on
feedback we can adjust midyear and for the following year. This effort is necessary when
studies have shown that parents play an utmost critical role in their child’s future success
(Hoover-Dempsey & Sander, 1995).
Quintessentially, after gathering survey data from all constituents it is important to
recognize trends when answers to questions are aligning among all groups and participants.
These trends will become the highest priorities in the high school’s curriculum and instruction
reform. Pairing this information gives the district a new ability to respond quickly and
accurately to societal and labor force alterations. We may also encounter at certain phases of
data collection involving a decrease in participation, which may skew data trends. As a
committee we will continually reevaluate possible reasons for issues like this and brainstorm
solutions to maintain accuracy and participation in our long-term study. Additionally, we can
display our trends via graphs of these statistics at board meetings and through digital media.
These graphs will illustrate the trends and ultimately point out the direction we should be taking
in the district. At that point action must be taken. The data will offer an invaluable background
for creating and formulating solutions that are solely focused on preparing this districts youth for
future achievement. By far, looking at data from all stakeholders in this district we can make the
right curricular decisions to ensure college and career readiness.








November 2013
17 Strategies for Investigating Long-Term College and Career Success
Data Collection Tools:
Outline for Online Survey:
*Section 1 Questions - Background information and initial questions
*Section 2 Questions - High school social emotional well-being and skills
*Section 3 Questions - Key skills and abilities related specifically to initial employment,
postsecondary associates or bachelor’s degree success and future employment success.
*Section 4 - A written response section added to each survey for participants to engage in
offering opinions on their education not addressed by the survey.

Survey 1
Online High School Senior Exit SAPS - Skills, Abilities and Preparedness Survey
A survey ID number will be entered prior to logging into the system to complete the questions.
1 is strongly agree, 2 is agree, 3 is neutral, 4 is disagree and 5 is strongly disagree
Section 1: Certain questions will be bypassed if they do not apply to the participant. The bypass
will occur when participants fill out the number of courses taken while in high school.
Questions Response
1. What demographic do you most closely align with? (multiple choices)
2. Are you male or female? (pick one)
3. What is your age? (value choice)
4. What is the highest level of education for your father?
Options (Less than high school, High school/GED, Some college, 2 year
college degree (Associates), 4 year college degree (BA, BS), Master’s degree,
Doctoral degree, Professional degree (MD, JD))

5. What is the highest level of education for your mother?
Options (Less than high school, High school/GED, Some college, 2 year
college degree (Associates), 4 year college degree (BA, BS), Master’s degree,
Doctoral degree, Professional degree (MD, JD))

6. Are you attending college in the fall of this year? (yes/no)
7. Are you starting employment directly after high school? (yes/no)
8. How many AP math courses did you take? (# of courses)
9. How many AP history courses did you take? (# of courses)
10. How many AP English courses did you take? (# of courses)
11. How many AP science courses did you take? (# of courses)
12. How many sequential math courses did you take (Regents track)? (# of
courses)


November 2013
18 Strategies for Investigating Long-Term College and Career Success
13. How many sequential history courses did you take (Regents track)? (# of
courses)

14. How many sequential English courses did you take (Regents track)? (# of
courses)

15. How many sequential science courses did you take (Regents track)? (# of
courses)

16. How many general elective courses in math did you take? (# of courses)
17. How many general elective courses in history did you take? (# of courses)
18. How many general elective courses in English did you take? (# of courses)
19. How many general elective courses in science did you take? (# of courses)
20. There is a sufficient amount of course offerings in this school. 1 2 3 4 5
21. There are too many course offerings in this school. 1 2 3 4 5
22. You were motivated to complete high school. 1 2 3 4 5
23. You were highly motivated to attend a 2 to 4 years college. 1 2 3 4 5
24. You were motivated to take an AP elective? 1 2 3 4 5
25. I was likely to try something that challenged me. 1 2 3 4 5
26. I was likely to stay with a course when faced with a difficult curriculum. 1 2 3 4 5
27. Were you more likely to take a general elective course because it was
“easier?”
1 2 3 4 5
28. The school culture is focused around being college and/or career ready? 1 2 3 4 5

Section 2 & 3: This section below is for all students who are graduating. Specific questions will
be answered based on the data provided in the high school course questionnaire section.
1. Do you think an AP course(s) prepared you for college or a career? 1 2 3 4 5
2. Was there anyone who guided you into taking an AP elective? 1 2 3 4 5
3. Did you feel that the AP course(s) fostered an environment related to forming
positive relationships?
1 2 3 4 5
4. Did you feel that the AP course(s) fostered an environment related to dealing
directly with conflict?
1 2 3 4 5
5. Did you feel that the AP course(s) fostered an environment related to making
ethical, constructive choices about personal and social behavior?
1 2 3 4 5
6. Did you feel that the AP course(s) fostered an environment related to self-
awareness of one’s strengths and limitations?
1 2 3 4 5
7. Did you feel that the AP course(s) fostered an environment related to self-
management of emotions and behaviors to achieve one’s goals?
1 2 3 4 5
8. Did you feel that the AP course(s) fostered an environment related to social
awareness and showing an understanding and empathy for others?
1 2 3 4 5
9. Do you feel that all AP faculty members you encountered fostered these
environments?
1 2 3 4 5
10. If not, was there at least one AP faculty member who exhibited these
environments?
1 2 3 4 5
11. Did you feel that the AP course(s) fostered an environment related to
professionalism/work ethic?
1 2 3 4 5
12. Did you feel that the AP course(s) fostered an environment related to 1 2 3 4 5

November 2013
19 Strategies for Investigating Long-Term College and Career Success
teamwork/collaboration?
13. Did you feel that the AP course(s) fostered an environment related to oral
communication?
1 2 3 4 5
14. Did you feel that the AP course(s) fostered an environment related to
adaptability?
1 2 3 4 5
15. Did you feel that the AP course(s) fostered an environment related to
analytical abilities?
1 2 3 4 5
16. Did you feel that the AP course(s) fostered an environment related to
interpersonal skills?
1 2 3 4 5
17. Did you feel that the AP course(s) fostered an environment related to
problem-solving skills?
1 2 3 4 5
18. Did you feel that the AP course(s) fostered an environment related to a
willingness to learn?
1 2 3 4 5
19. Do you feel that all AP faculty members you encountered fostered these
environments?
1 2 3 4 5
20. If not, was there at least one AP faculty member who exhibited these
environments?
1 2 3 4 5
21. Do you feel that your sequential courses prepared you for college or a career? 1 2 3 4 5
22. Did you feel that your sequential courses, for your diploma, fostered an
environment related to forming positive relationships?
1 2 3 4 5
23. Did you feel that your sequential courses, for your diploma, fostered an
environment related to dealing directly with conflict?
1 2 3 4 5
24. Did you feel that your sequential courses, for your diploma, fostered an
environment related to making ethical, constructive choices about personal
and social behavior?
1 2 3 4 5
25. Did you feel that your sequential courses, for your diploma, fostered an
environment related to self-awareness of one’s strengths and limitations?
1 2 3 4 5
26. Did you feel that your sequential courses, for your diploma, fostered an
environment related to self-management of emotions and behaviors to achieve
one’s goals?
1 2 3 4 5
27. Did you feel that your sequential courses, for your diploma, fostered an
environment related to social awareness and showing an understanding and
empathy for others?
1 2 3 4 5
28. Do you feel that all faculty members you encountered fostered these
environments?
1 2 3 4 5
29. If not, was there at least one faculty member who exhibited these
environments?
1 2 3 4 5
30. Did you feel that your sequential courses, for your diploma, fostered an
environment related to professionalism/work ethic?
1 2 3 4 5
31. Did you feel that your sequential courses, for your diploma, fostered an
environment related to teamwork/collaboration?
1 2 3 4 5
32. Did you feel that your sequential courses, for your diploma, fostered an
environment related to oral communication?
1 2 3 4 5
33. Did you feel that your sequential courses, for your diploma, fostered an
environment related to adaptability?
1 2 3 4 5
34. Did you feel that your sequential courses, for your diploma, fostered an 1 2 3 4 5

November 2013
20 Strategies for Investigating Long-Term College and Career Success
environment related to analytical abilities?
35. Did you feel that your sequential courses, for your diploma, fostered an
environment related to interpersonal skills?
1 2 3 4 5
36. Did you feel that your sequential courses, for your diploma, fostered an
environment related to integrity?
1 2 3 4 5
37. Did you feel that your sequential courses, for your diploma, fostered an
environment related to responsibility?
1 2 3 4 5
38. Did you feel that your sequential courses, for your diploma, fostered an
environment related to organizational skills?
1 2 3 4 5
39. Did you feel that your sequential courses, for your diploma, fostered an
environment related to a willingness to learn?
1 2 3 4 5
40. Do you feel that all faculty members you encountered fostered these
environments?
1 2 3 4 5
41. If not, was there at least one faculty member who exhibited these
environments?
1 2 3 4 5
42. Did you take an elective that was outside of an Advanced Regents diploma
track?
1 2 3 4 5
43. Do you think your elective course(s) has prepared you for college or a career? 1 2 3 4 5
44. Did you feel that your general elective course(s) fostered an environment
related to forming positive relationships?
1 2 3 4 5
45. Did you feel that your general elective course(s) fostered an environment
related to dealing directly with conflict?
1 2 3 4 5
46. Did you feel that your general elective course(s) fostered an environment
related to making ethical, constructive choices about personal and social
behavior?
1 2 3 4 5
47. Did you feel that your general elective course(s) fostered an environment
related to self-awareness of one’s strengths and limitations?
1 2 3 4 5
48. Did you feel that your general elective course(s) fostered an environment
related to self-management of emotions and behaviors to achieve one’s goals?
1 2 3 4 5
49. Did you feel that your general elective course(s) fostered an environment
related to social awareness and showing an understanding and empathy for
others?
1 2 3 4 5
50. Do you feel that all faculty members you encountered fostered these
environments?
1 2 3 4 5
51. If not, was there at least one faculty member who exhibited these
environments?
1 2 3 4 5
52. Did you feel that your general elective course(s) fostered an environment
related to professionalism/work ethic?
1 2 3 4 5
53. Did you feel that your general elective course(s) fostered an environment
related to teamwork/collaboration?
1 2 3 4 5
54. Did you feel that your general elective course(s) fostered an environment
related to oral communication?
1 2 3 4 5
55. Did you feel that your general elective course(s) fostered an environment
related to adaptability?
1 2 3 4 5
56. Did you feel that your general elective course(s) fostered an environment
related to analytical abilities?
1 2 3 4 5

November 2013
21 Strategies for Investigating Long-Term College and Career Success
57. Did you feel that your general elective course(s) fostered an environment
related to interpersonal skills?
1 2 3 4 5
58. Did you feel that your general elective course(s) fostered an environment
related to problem-solving skills?
1 2 3 4 5
59. Did you feel that your general elective course(s) fostered an environment
related to integrity?
1 2 3 4 5
60. Did you feel that your general elective course(s) fostered an environment
related to responsibility?
1 2 3 4 5
61. Did you feel that your general elective course(s) fostered an environment
related to organizational skills?
1 2 3 4 5
62. Did you feel that your general elective course(s) fostered an environment
related to a willingness to learn?
1 2 3 4 5
63. Do you feel that all faculty members you encountered fostered these
environments?
1 2 3 4 5
64. If not, was there at least one faculty member who exhibited these
environments?
1 2 3 4 5
65. Overall would you say that you are satisfied with the education you received 1 2 3 4 5

Section 4: Open Response Section
1) Do you have any further comments you would like to add regarding your overall experience
in this high school? If so, please leave your response in the section provided below.

Survey 2
Online Two and Four Year High School Graduate SAPS - Skills, Abilities and
Preparedness Survey
A survey ID number will be entered prior to logging into the system to complete the questions.
1 is strongly agree, 2 is agree, 3 is neutral, 4 is disagree and 5 is strongly disagree
Certain questions will be bypassed if they do not apply to the participant. The bypass will occur
when participants fill out the number of courses taken while in high school.
Section 1: Below is for individuals who are currently in college, employed or have left college.
The bypass to appropriate questions will occur after entering this data.




November 2013
22 Strategies for Investigating Long-Term College and Career Success


Questions Responses
1. What demographic do you most closely align with? (multiple choices)
2. Are you male or female? (pick one)
3. What is your age? (value choice)
4. What year did you graduate? (value choice)
5. What is your age? (value choice)
6. Are you currently enrolled in a postsecondary educational setting? (yes/no)
7. What is the highest level of education for you have received?
Options (Less than high school, High school/GED, Some college, 2 year
college degree (Associates), 4 year college degree (BA, BS), Master’s degree,
Doctoral degree, Professional degree (MD, JD))

8. If applicable, what is the current sector of the economy in which you are
employed? (multiple choice of all possibilities from built in survey creators)

9. What is the highest level of education your father received?
Options (Less than high school, High school/GED, Some college, 2 year
college degree (Associates), 4 year college degree (BA, BS), Master’s degree,
Doctoral degree, Professional degree (MD, JD))

10. What is the highest level of education your mother received?
Options (Less than high school, High school/GED, Some college, 2 year
college degree (Associates), 4 year college degree (BA, BS), Master’s degree,
Doctoral degree, Professional degree (MD, JD))

11. If applicable, what is your current gross yearly income? (multiple choice:
Less than $10,000, $10,000 to $19,999, $20,000 to $29,999 and so on until
$150,000 and up)

12. How many AP math courses did you take? (# of courses)
13. How many AP history courses did you take? (# of courses)
14. How many AP English courses did you take? (# of courses)
15. How many AP science courses did you take? (# of courses)
16. How many sequential math courses did you take (Regents track)? (# of
courses)

17. How many sequential history courses did you take (Regents track)? (# of
courses)

18. How many sequential English courses did you take (Regents track)? (# of
courses)

19. How many sequential science courses did you take (Regents track)? (# of
courses)

20. How many general elective courses in math did you take? (# of courses)
21. How many general elective courses in history did you take? (# of courses)
22. How many general elective courses in English did you take? (# of courses)
23. How many general elective courses in science did you take? (# of courses)

November 2013
23 Strategies for Investigating Long-Term College and Career Success
This section below is for students who are currently and still completing a college degree.
24. How many college math courses have you taken? (# of courses)
25. How many college history courses have you taken? (# of courses)
26. How many college English courses have you taken? (# of courses)
27. How many college science courses have you taken? (# of courses)

Section 2 & 3: below is for all former students who are currently employed or in college, and
based on the data provided in the course questionnaire section.
28. Do you think an AP course(s) prepared you for college or a career? 1 2 3 4 5
29. Was there anyone who guided you into taking an AP elective? 1 2 3 4 5
30. Did you feel that the AP course(s) fostered an environment related to forming
positive relationships?
1 2 3 4 5
31. Did you feel that the AP course(s) fostered an environment related to dealing
directly with conflict?
1 2 3 4 5
32. Did you feel that the AP course(s) fostered an environment related to making
ethical, constructive choices about personal and social behavior?
1 2 3 4 5
33. Did you feel that the AP course(s) fostered an environment related to self-
awareness of one’s strengths and limitations?
1 2 3 4 5
34. Did you feel that the AP course(s) fostered an environment related to self-
management of emotions and behaviors to achieve one’s goals?
1 2 3 4 5
35. Did you feel that the AP course(s) fostered an environment related to social
awareness and showing an understanding and empathy for others?
1 2 3 4 5
36. Do you feel that all AP faculty members you encountered fostered these
environments?
1 2 3 4 5
37. If not, was there at least one AP faculty member who exhibited these
environments?
1 2 3 4 5
38. Did you feel that the AP course(s) fostered an environment related to
professionalism/work ethic?
1 2 3 4 5
39. Did you feel that the AP course(s) fostered an environment related to
teamwork/collaboration?
1 2 3 4 5
40. Did you feel that the AP course(s) fostered an environment related to oral
communication?
1 2 3 4 5
41. Did you feel that the AP course(s) fostered an environment related to
adaptability?
1 2 3 4 5
42. Did you feel that the AP course(s) fostered an environment related to
analytical abilities?
1 2 3 4 5
43. Did you feel that the AP course(s) fostered an environment related to
interpersonal skills?
1 2 3 4 5
44. Did you feel that the AP course(s) fostered an environment related to
problem-solving skills?
1 2 3 4 5
45. Did you feel that the AP course(s) fostered an environment related to a
willingness to learn?
1 2 3 4 5
46. Do you feel that all AP faculty members you encountered fostered these 1 2 3 4 5

November 2013
24 Strategies for Investigating Long-Term College and Career Success
environments?
47. If not, was there at least one AP faculty member who exhibited these
environments?
1 2 3 4 5
48. Do you feel that your sequential courses prepared you for college or a career? 1 2 3 4 5
49. Did you feel that your sequential courses, for your diploma, fostered an
environment related to forming positive relationships?
1 2 3 4 5
50. Did you feel that your sequential courses, for your diploma, fostered an
environment related to dealing directly with conflict?
1 2 3 4 5
51. Did you feel that your sequential courses, for your diploma, fostered an
environment related to making ethical, constructive choices about personal
and social behavior?
1 2 3 4 5
52. Did you feel that your sequential courses, for your diploma, fostered an
environment related to self-awareness of one’s strengths and limitations?
1 2 3 4 5
53. Did you feel that your sequential courses, for your diploma, fostered an
environment related to self-management of emotions and behaviors to achieve
one’s goals?
1 2 3 4 5
54. Did you feel that your sequential courses, for your diploma, fostered an
environment related to social awareness and showing an understanding and
empathy for others?
1 2 3 4 5
55. Do you feel that all faculty members you encountered fostered these
environments?
1 2 3 4 5
56. If not, was there at least one faculty member who exhibited these
environments?
1 2 3 4 5
57. Did you feel that your sequential courses, for your diploma, fostered an
environment related to professionalism/work ethic?
1 2 3 4 5
58. Did you feel that your sequential courses, for your diploma, fostered an
environment related to teamwork/collaboration?
1 2 3 4 5
59. Did you feel that your sequential courses, for your diploma, fostered an
environment related to oral communication?
1 2 3 4 5
60. Did you feel that your sequential courses, for your diploma, fostered an
environment related to adaptability?
1 2 3 4 5
61. Did you feel that your sequential courses, for your diploma, fostered an
environment related to analytical abilities?
1 2 3 4 5
62. Did you feel that your sequential courses, for your diploma, fostered an
environment related to interpersonal skills?
1 2 3 4 5
63. Did you feel that your sequential courses, for your diploma, fostered an
environment related to integrity?
1 2 3 4 5
64. Did you feel that your sequential courses, for your diploma, fostered an
environment related to responsibility?
1 2 3 4 5
65. Did you feel that your sequential courses, for your diploma, fostered an
environment related to organizational skills?
1 2 3 4 5
66. Did you feel that your sequential courses, for your diploma, fostered an
environment related to a willingness to learn?
1 2 3 4 5
67. Do you feel that all faculty members you encountered fostered these
environments?
1 2 3 4 5
68. If not, was there at least one faculty member who exhibited these 1 2 3 4 5

November 2013
25 Strategies for Investigating Long-Term College and Career Success
environments?
69. Did you take an elective that was outside of an Advanced Regents diploma
track?
1 2 3 4 5
70. Do you think your elective course(s) has prepared you for college or a career? 1 2 3 4 5
71. Did you feel that your general elective course(s) fostered an environment
related to forming positive relationships?
1 2 3 4 5
72. Did you feel that your general elective course(s) fostered an environment
related to dealing directly with conflict?
1 2 3 4 5
73. Did you feel that your general elective course(s) fostered an environment
related to making ethical, constructive choices about personal and social
behavior?
1 2 3 4 5
74. Did you feel that your general elective course(s) fostered an environment
related to self-awareness of one’s strengths and limitations?
1 2 3 4 5
75. Did you feel that your general elective course(s) fostered an environment
related to self-management of emotions and behaviors to achieve one’s goals?
1 2 3 4 5
76. Did you feel that your general elective course(s) fostered an environment
related to social awareness and showing an understanding and empathy for
others?
1 2 3 4 5
77. Do you feel that all faculty members you encountered fostered these
environments?
1 2 3 4 5
78. If not, was there at least one faculty member who exhibited these
environments?
1 2 3 4 5
79. Did you feel that your general elective course(s) fostered an environment
related to professionalism/work ethic?
1 2 3 4 5
80. Did you feel that your general elective course(s) fostered an environment
related to teamwork/collaboration?
1 2 3 4 5
81. Did you feel that your general elective course(s) fostered an environment
related to oral communication?
1 2 3 4 5
82. Did you feel that your general elective course(s) fostered an environment
related to adaptability?
1 2 3 4 5
83. Did you feel that your general elective course(s) fostered an environment
related to analytical abilities?
1 2 3 4 5
84. Did you feel that your general elective course(s) fostered an environment
related to interpersonal skills?
1 2 3 4 5
85. Did you feel that your general elective course(s) fostered an environment
related to problem-solving skills?
1 2 3 4 5
86. Did you feel that your general elective course(s) fostered an environment
related to integrity?
1 2 3 4 5
87. Did you feel that your general elective course(s) fostered an environment
related to responsibility?
1 2 3 4 5
88. Did you feel that your general elective course(s) fostered an environment
related to organizational skills?
1 2 3 4 5
89. Did you feel that your general elective course(s) fostered an environment
related to a willingness to learn?
1 2 3 4 5
90. Do you feel that all faculty members you encountered fostered these
environments?
1 2 3 4 5

November 2013
26 Strategies for Investigating Long-Term College and Career Success
91. If not, was there at least one faculty member who exhibited these
environments?
1 2 3 4 5
92. Overall would you say that you are satisfied with the education you received 1 2 3 4 5

Section 4: Open Response Section:
1) Do you have any further comments you would like to add regarding your overall
experience in this high school? If so, please leave your response in the section provided
below.
Survey 3
Online Six, Eight and Ten Year High School Graduate SAPS - Skills, Abilities and
Preparedness Survey
A survey ID number will be entered prior to logging into the system to complete the questions.
At this point the survey ID number will is linked to historical data regarding number of high
school courses taken, so this section is no longer needed.
1 is strongly agree, 2 is agree, 3 is neutral, 4 is disagree and 5 is strongly disagree
Section 1: Certain questions will be bypassed if they do not apply to the participant. The bypass
will occur when participants fill out the number of courses taken while in high school.
Questions Responses
1. What demographic do you most closely align with? (multiple choices)
2. Are you male or female? (pick one)
3. What is your age? (value choice)
4. What year did you graduate? (value choice)
5. What is your age? (value choice)
6. Are you currently enrolled in a postsecondary educational setting? (yes/no)
7. What is the highest level of education for you have received?
Options (Less than high school, High school/GED, Some college, 2 year
college degree (Associates), 4 year college degree (BA, BS), Master’s degree,
Doctoral degree, Professional degree (MD, JD))

8. If applicable, what is the current sector of the economy in which you are
employed? (multiple choice of all possibilities from built in survey creators)

9. What is the highest level of education your father received?
Options (Less than high school, High school/GED, Some college, 2 year
college degree (Associates), 4 year college degree (BA, BS), Master’s degree,
Doctoral degree, Professional degree (MD, JD))

10. What is the highest level of education your mother received?
Options (Less than high school, High school/GED, Some college, 2 year


November 2013
27 Strategies for Investigating Long-Term College and Career Success

This section below is for students who are currently and still completing a college degree.
12. How many college math courses have you taken? (# of courses)
13. How many college history courses have you taken? (# of courses)
14. How many college English courses have you taken? (# of courses)
15. How many college science courses have you taken? (# of courses)

Section 2 & 3: Below is for all former students who are currently employed or in college, and
based on the data provided in the course questionnaire section.
16. Do you think an AP course(s) prepared you for college or a career? 1 2 3 4 5
17. Did you feel that the AP course(s) fostered an environment related to
professionalism/work ethic?
1 2 3 4 5
18. Did you feel that the AP course(s) fostered an environment related to
teamwork/collaboration?
1 2 3 4 5
19. Did you feel that the AP course(s) fostered an environment related to oral
communication?
1 2 3 4 5
20. Did you feel that the AP course(s) fostered an environment related to
adaptability?
1 2 3 4 5
21. Did you feel that the AP course(s) fostered an environment related to
analytical abilities?
1 2 3 4 5
22. Did you feel that the AP course(s) fostered an environment related to
interpersonal skills?
1 2 3 4 5
23. Did you feel that the AP course(s) fostered an environment related to
problem-solving skills?
1 2 3 4 5
24. Did you feel that the AP course(s) fostered an environment related to a
willingness to learn?
1 2 3 4 5
25. Do you feel that all AP faculty members you encountered fostered these
environments?
1 2 3 4 5
26. If not, was there at least one AP faculty member who exhibited these
environments?
1 2 3 4 5
27. Do you feel that your sequential courses prepared you for college or a career? 1 2 3 4 5
28. Did you feel that your sequential courses, for your diploma, fostered an
environment related to professionalism/work ethic?
1 2 3 4 5
29. Did you feel that your sequential courses, for your diploma, fostered an
environment related to teamwork/collaboration?
1 2 3 4 5
30. Did you feel that your sequential courses, for your diploma, fostered an
environment related to oral communication?
1 2 3 4 5
college degree (Associates), 4 year college degree (BA, BS), Master’s degree,
Doctoral degree, Professional degree (MD, JD))
11. If applicable, what is your current gross yearly income? (multiple choice:
Less than $10,000, $10,000 to $19,999, $20,000 to $29,999 and so on until
$150,000 and up)


November 2013
28 Strategies for Investigating Long-Term College and Career Success
31. Did you feel that your sequential courses, for your diploma, fostered an
environment related to adaptability?
1 2 3 4 5
32. Did you feel that your sequential courses, for your diploma, fostered an
environment related to analytical abilities?
1 2 3 4 5
33. Did you feel that your sequential courses, for your diploma, fostered an
environment related to interpersonal skills?
1 2 3 4 5
34. Did you feel that your sequential courses, for your diploma, fostered an
environment related to integrity?
1 2 3 4 5
35. Did you feel that your sequential courses, for your diploma, fostered an
environment related to responsibility?
1 2 3 4 5
36. Did you feel that your sequential courses, for your diploma, fostered an
environment related to organizational skills?
1 2 3 4 5
37. Did you feel that your sequential courses, for your diploma, fostered an
environment related to a willingness to learn?
1 2 3 4 5
38. Do you feel that all faculty members you encountered fostered these
environments?
1 2 3 4 5
39. If not, was there at least one faculty member who exhibited these
environments?
1 2 3 4 5
40. Did you take an elective that was outside of an Advanced Regents diploma
track?
1 2 3 4 5
41. Do you think your elective course(s) has prepared you for college or a career? 1 2 3 4 5
42. Did you feel that your general elective course(s) fostered an environment
related to professionalism/work ethic?
1 2 3 4 5
43. Did you feel that your general elective course(s) fostered an environment
related to teamwork/collaboration?
1 2 3 4 5
44. Did you feel that your general elective course(s) fostered an environment
related to oral communication?
1 2 3 4 5
45. Did you feel that your general elective course(s) fostered an environment
related to adaptability?
1 2 3 4 5
46. Did you feel that your general elective course(s) fostered an environment
related to analytical abilities?
1 2 3 4 5
47. Did you feel that your general elective course(s) fostered an environment
related to interpersonal skills?
1 2 3 4 5
48. Did you feel that your general elective course(s) fostered an environment
related to problem-solving skills?
1 2 3 4 5
49. Did you feel that your general elective course(s) fostered an environment
related to integrity?
1 2 3 4 5
50. Did you feel that your general elective course(s) fostered an environment
related to responsibility?
1 2 3 4 5
51. Did you feel that your general elective course(s) fostered an environment
related to organizational skills?
1 2 3 4 5
52. Did you feel that your general elective course(s) fostered an environment
related to a willingness to learn?
1 2 3 4 5
53. Do you feel that all faculty members you encountered fostered these
environments?
1 2 3 4 5
54. If not, was there at least one faculty member who exhibited these 1 2 3 4 5

November 2013
29 Strategies for Investigating Long-Term College and Career Success
environments?
55. Overall would you say that you are satisfied with the education you received 1 2 3 4 5

Section 4: Response Section:
1) Do you have any further comments you would like to add regarding your overall
experience in this high school? If so, please leave your response in the section provided
below.

Survey 4
College Survey Questions (mailed to individuals, return fax number is provided)
1) What problem or issue, in your opinion, immediately comes to mind when specifically
discussing secondary high schools, as related to student backgrounds?
2) Would you be interested in speaking with our students in the high school?
3) Would you be interested in guiding our students through the college process, if funds
became available?
4) What suggestions do you have on refreshing our curriculum to fit the scope and sequence
of skills and knowledge taught in your college course(s)?
5) How can we assist you in providing students with the level of education needed for
students to be successful in college?
6) Would you be willing to take a tour of our school, meet with our teachers and make
suggestions that could lead to increased student potential?

Survey 5
Business Survey Questions (mailed to businesses, return fax number is provided)
1) What problems or issues, in your opinion, immediately come to mind when specifically
discussing secondary high schools, as related to your industry?
2) Would you be interested in speaking with students in our high school?
3) Would you be interested in interviewing students for prospective internships or work
study programs?
4) How can we assist you in providing students with the level of education needed for the
positions in your industry?
5) Would you be willing to take a tour of our school, meet with our teachers and make
suggestions that could lead to increased student potential?


November 2013
30 Strategies for Investigating Long-Term College and Career Success
Survey 6
Survey for Parents (A bilingual version will also be available)
How would each of the proposed ideas support you and your student(s) towards college and
career success? Based on the statement please choose 1 is strongly agree, 2 is agree, 3 is neutral,
4 is disagree and 5 is strongly disagree.
Questions Responses
1) Create opportunities and activities for students to explore what they are
really interested in doing for a career.
1 2 3 4 5
2) Have students take a skill survey for career matching. 1 2 3 4 5
3) Provide students and parents with an annual update of employment trends
and job prospects.
1 2 3 4 5
4) Support families in completing college applications and financial aid
paperwork.
1 2 3 4 5
5) Provide “How to write an application essay” as part of junior year English. 1 2 3 4 5
6) Offer or require career pathway courses in Jr. High. 1 2 3 4 5
7) Provide equal support for both 2 year and 4 year college options. 1 2 3 4 5
8) Embed service learning experience, character education, collaboration,
communication and responsible citizenship skills into curriculum.
1 2 3 4 5
9) Provide clear information on H.S. graduation requirements and college
acceptance requirements.
1 2 3 4 5
10) Provide tools to parents and students to connect the high school course
selection to potential careers.
1 2 3 4 5
11) Develop varied college credit opportunities for high school classes in both a
2 year and 4 year career path.
1 2 3 4 5

What is the best way to communicate with families?
1) Brief, regular e-mail on timely topics for college and career readiness. 1 2 3 4 5
2) Webpage that organizes all communications for reference throughout the
year.
1 2 3 4 5
3) Parent handbook and a timeline of process to plan and prepare for
postsecondary school. The handbook would be provided to freshman parents
and guide them through easy to follow steps.
1 2 3 4 5
4) Teachers share and discuss college and career readiness as part of
parent/teacher conferences.
1 2 3 4 5
5) Meetings held at the school to walk parents through important steps like
ACT testing.
1 2 3 4 5
6) Social network tools such as tweets or Twitter, Facebook or blogs and
forums.
1 2 3 4 5



November 2013
31 Strategies for Investigating Long-Term College and Career Success
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