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Multiple Intelligences

Unit Plan Template
EDUC 522

Unit Title: The Canterbury Tales Teacher: Katie Waferling

Grade Level: 12


Subject: English Time Frame: 4 Weeks
Objective(s):
1. Stuuents will
gain a bettei
unueistanuing of
the estate system
of fouiteenth-
centuiy English
society.

2. Stuuents will
uemonstiate theii
unueistanuing of
the text on foui
levels: factual,
inteipietive,
ciitical, anu
peisonal.

S.Stuuents will be
able to uefine,
iuentify, anu
piouuce satiie.

4. Stuuents will be
able to uefine anu
iuentify situational
anu veibal iiony.

6. Stuuents will be
able to uefine
pilgiimage anu
explain the
ieasons foi
pilgiimage.

7.Stuuents will be
able to iuentify
Chaucei's majoi
aiguments
iegaiuing the
chuich, the
nobility, anu the
Intelligences:
Verbal
Visual
Kinesthetic
Interpersonal
Intrapersonal
Naturalist
Logical
Musical

Technologies:
• Computer
• Projector
• Prezi
• Notability App
• Youtube
• Google Document
App
• iPad
• Internet Access
• iMovie App
• Schoology
• Mindmeister
• Google Numbers
App
• iPhone
• Fakebook
• ComicStripCreator
• TimeToast App


Standards:
Common Core Standards

Reading Comprehension
2.2: Analyze the way in which
clarity of meaning is affected by
the patterns of organization,
hierarchical structures, repetition
of main ideas, syntax, and word
choice in the text.
2.4: Make warranted and
reasonable assertions about the
author’s arguments by using
elements of the
text to defend and clarify
interpretations.
2.5: Analyze an author’s implicit
and explicit philosophical
assumptions and beliefs about a
subject.

Literary Response and
Analysis
3.2: Analyze the way in which
theme or meaning of a selection
represents a view or comment on
life,
using textual evidence to support
the claim.
Writing
1.3: Structure ideas and
arguments in a sustained,
persuasive, and sophisticated
way and support them
with precise and relevant
examples.

Written and Oral English
Language Conventions
1.1: Demonstrate control of
grammar, diction, and paragraph
and sentence structure and an
understanding of English usage.
common class.



Listening and Speaking
1.9: Use research and analysis to
justify strategies for gestures,
movements, and vocalization,
including dialect, pronunciation,
and enunciation

Technology Standards
Cieativity anu Innovation
Students demonstrate creative
thinking, construct knowledge,
and develop innovative products
and processes using technology.
Students:
a. apply existing knowledge to
generate new ideas, products, or
processes.
b. create original works as a
means of personal or group
expression.
c. use models and simulations to
explore complex systems and
issues.

Communication anu
Collaboiation
Students use digital media and
environments to communicate
and work collaboratively,
including at a distance, to
support individual learning and
contribute to the learning of
others. Students:
a. interact, collaborate, and
publish with peers, experts, or
others employing a variety of
digital environments and media.
b. communicate information and
ideas effectively to multiple
audiences using a variety of
media and formats.
c. contribute to project teams to
produce original works or solve
problems.
d. Reseaich anu Infoimation
Fluency

Students apply digital tools to
gather, evaluate, and use
information. Students:
a. plan strategies to guide
inquiry.
b. locate, organize, analyze,
evaluate, synthesize, and
ethically use information from a
variety of sources and media.
d. process data and report results

S. Ciitical Thinking, Pioblem
Solving, anu Becision Naking
Students use critical thinking
skills to plan and conduct
research, manage projects, solve
problems, and make informed
decisions using appropriate
digital tools and resources.
Students:
a. identify and define authentic
problems and significant
questions for investigation.
b. plan and manage activities to
develop a solution or complete a
project.
c. collect and analyze data to
identify solutions and/or make
informed decisions.

6. Technology 0peiations anu
Concepts
Students demonstrate a sound
understanding of technology
concepts, systems, and
operations. Students:
a. understand and use
technology systems.
select and use applications
effectively and productively.











Materials:
Digital Materials:
• Computer
• Projector
• Speakers
Intelligences:

-Visual, Kinesthetic, Verbal
-Visual, Verbal
-Musical
• Prezi
• Notability App
• Youtube
• iPad (Each student will have their own)
• Internet Access
• iMovie App

• Schoology
• Mindmeister
• Google Numbers
• iPhone
• Fakebook
• Google Document
• Comicstripcreator
• TimeToast App


Non-Digital Materials
• Expository text about Chaucer’s life
• Copies of The Canterbury Tales for each student
• Journal
• Paper
• Pen
• White Board and markers
• Socratic Seminar Guidelines
• Socratic Seminar Outer Circle Handout
• Essay prompt handout
• Pilgrimage presentation note-taking guide

-Verbal, Visual
-Visual, Logical
-Visual
-Visual, Verbal, Interpersonal
-Visual, Verbal
- Verbal, Interpersonal,
kinesthetic
-Intrapersonal, Interpersonal
-Visual, Logical
- Visual, Logical
- Visual, Musical
-Visual, Naturalist
- Logical, Visual
-Verbal, Interpersonal
-Visual, Logical
- Visual, Logical


-Intrapersonal
-Visual, Intrapersonal
-Intrapersonal
-Visual
-Visual
- Visual, Interpersonal
-Verbal, Logical
-Verbal, Logical
- Intrapersonal, Logical
- Visual


Procedures:
Week 1
Day 1
Students will take notes, using the Notability App on their ipad, as
the teacher presents a Prezi presentation
http://prezi.com/ybcadnbdf_se/copy-of-the-canterbury-tales/to give
students background information about Geoffrey Chaucer and
medieval England, as well as introduce them to the terms “satire”
and “estate satire.” Students will then watch a clip of the
Californians on Hulu http://www.hulu.com/watch/350669 and work
in small groups to decide how Californians are being presented
satirically and why it is funny. For homework, students will read a
piece of expository text about Chaucer’s life and respond to
questions.

Day 2
The teacher will use a prezi http://prezi.com/z9_gzbmb7cmg/copy-
of-elements-of-fiction-irony/, with embedded Youtube videos to
introduce students to the terms “verbal irony” and “situational
irony.” The Youtube videos will present examples of verbal and
situational irony. As the teacher is going through the Prezi
presentation, students will use Notability to take notes. Students will
Intelligences:


Visual, Verbal,












Visual, Verbal,





then watch a clip of “A Nonpartisan Message from Governor Sarah
Palin and Senator Hilary Clinton” on Hulu
lhttp://www.hulu.com/watch/34465. After students have watched
the video clip, they will discuss with a partner how verbal and
situational irony were used to create satire/parody. For homework,
students will read and annotate the first ten pages of The General
Prologue of The Canterbury Tales.

Day 3
Students will work in pairs to complete an irony scavenger hunt
through the first ten pages of The General Prologue, identifying
examples of verbal and situational irony. Students will record each
example of verbal and situational irony in their digital scavenger
hunt chart that they have copied from Google Documents and
explain how the irony created a satirical portrayal of the pilgrim it
was associated with. Based on the satirical portrayal of the pilgrims,
students will decide what aspects of medieval society Chaucer is
criticizing. For Homework, students will read ten more pages of The
General Prologue.

Day 4
Students will work in a group of four or five to research a societal
topic or situation to present satirically in a skit. They will use an ipad
to conduct their research on the internet and complete a video
proposal, using the copied form from Google Docs. For homework,
students will submit a satire video proposal in Schoology
https://www.schoology.com/home.

Day 5
Students will use an ipad to film their video presentation. Students
must use at least 5 examples of verbal irony and 5 examples of
situational irony in their video to present their societal topic or
situation satirically. This activity will demonstrate students’
understanding of satire and the ways in which verbal irony and
situational irony are used to create satire. For homework, students
will edit their video using iMovie. Once their video is completed and
edited, they will upload it to Youtube and turn in the video link in
Schoology https://www.schoology.com/home.



Week 2
Day 1
The teacher will instruct students to use their internet browser on
their ipad to navigate to the Schoology page
https://www.schoology.com/home where the links to all satire videos
are located. The teacher will instruct students to watch one video
made by a group other than their own. Students will then have 10
minutes to write a journal entry, reflecting on the group’s use of
satire, identifying examples of verbal and situational irony used by
the group. Once students have completed their journal entry, they











Interpersonal, Logical,










Interpersonal, Visual







Interpersonal, Visual, Verbal,
Kinesthetic












Visual, Intrapersonal, Naturalist








will work with a partner to create a mind map, at Mindmeister.com
, to record details about each of the 29 pilgrims.
For Homework, students will categorize the pilgrims into one of
three lists: The Clergy, The Aristocracy, and The Common People.
This will help students better understand how the pilgrims fit into
medieval society.


Day 2
The teacher will instruct students to take out the lists of pilgrims that
they created for homework. On one side of the white board, the
teacher will write: The Clergy, The Aristocracy, and The Common
People and ask students to list the pilgrims that belong in each
category. On the other side of the board, the teacher will write the
title of each pilgrim. One by one, the teacher will ask students to
decide if Chaucer had a positive, negative, or neutral view toward the
pilgrim. Students will defend their choice for each pilgrim by
referencing Chaucer’s language, specifically verbal irony. After
Chaucer’s view of each pilgrim has been determined, students will
work in pairs to categorize the 29 pilgrims into groups according to
Chaucer’s view of them in The General Prologue and graph the
results using Google Numbers.. For homework, students will finish
their graphs in Google Numbers and submit a link in Schoology
https://www.schoology.com/home.


Day 3
The teacher will ask students to look at the graph they created in
Google Numbers and draw a conclusion about how Chaucer viewed
each estate based on his opinion of individual pilgrims. Students will
record their thoughts and conclusions in their journals. After students
have finished their journals, the teacher will ask them to choose a
pilgrim that interests them and reread Chaucer’s description of the
pilgrim in The General Prologue. After they have read the
description, they will use their ipad or iphone to make a play list of
five songs that describe the personality or actions of the pilgrim. The
teacher will make sure that each of the 29 pilgrims is claimed. In a
Google Document, they will need to give the name of each song and
copy and paste the lyrics of the chorus. Under the chorus of each
song they will justify why this song belongs on the play list of this
pilgrim. When students have completed their play list, they will
submit a link to their Google Document in Schoology
https://www.schoology.com/home.


















Naturalist, Visual, Logical

















Logical, Intrapersonal, Musical

















Day 4
The teacher will introduce students to a two-day character role-play
activity. The teacher will explain that students will be assuming the
role of the pilgrim that they chose for the play list activity. They will
be creating a Fakebook page at classtools.net
for their pilgrim in preparation to participate in a speed dating
activity that will act as the assessment of their knowledge of the 29
pilgrims. The teacher will show students
examples of pilgrim Fakebook pages so the expectations are clear.
Students will have the remainder of the period to work on their
pilgrim Fakebook page. For Homework, students will complete their
Fakebook page and submit a link in Schoology
https://www.schoology.com/home

Day 5
In class, Students will participate in a speed dating activity that will
require them to identify the pilgrims being portrayed by their
classmates. Three at a time, students will assume seats at the front of
the classroom. While they are sitting at the front of the classroom,
their classmates will have the opportunity to ask three questions that
each one of them will answer. Students must determine the identity
of each student based on their answers. Students will be recording
their answers in a copied Google Document on their ipad. At the end
of the activity, students will submit a link to their Google Document
in Schoology. This activity will assess students’ knowledge of the 29
pilgrims. For homework, students will read The Miller’s Tale.

Week 3
Day 1
As Students come into class, they will begin responding to journal
prompt in which they will reflect on Chaucer’s argument concerning
the common people, citing evidence from The Miller’s Tale to
support their claim. Once students have finished their journal entry,
the teacher will hand out a paper with tone words on one side and
mood words on the other side. The teacher will present a Prezi
presentation http://prezi.com/fy9a1i3ybyfj/copy-of-tone-vs-mood/
about tone and mood with embedded Youtube videos. Students will
take notes as the teacher lectures, using the Notability App on their
iPads. After students have taken notes on tone and mood, they will
practice identifying tone and mood in the Youtube videos embedded
in the Prezi presentation. The teacher will then have students take out
their copy of The Miller’sTale and decide what the tone and mood of
the tale is, and if there are any shifts in tone. Students will discuss
their finding with a partner and then participate in a brief class
discussion.

Visual, Logical




















Verbal, Logical, Kinesthetic













Intrapersonal, Visual, Logical,
Verbal















Day 2
The teacher will present a brief Prezi presentation
http://prezi.com/hbdvbgivvcyf/copy-of-pardoner/ to introduce
students to the role of a pardoner in medieval society. During the
presentation, students will take notes using the Notability App on
their iPads. Once students have background knowledge of the role of
a pardoner, students will read The Pardoner’s Prologue aloud as a
class. After reading The Pardoner’s Prologue, students will work
with a partner to identify the six shifts in the tone of the pardoner’s
confession. These shifts will be recorded in a Google Doc and
submitted on Schoolology https://www.schoology.com/home. For
Homework, students will read The Pardoner’s Tale.


Day 3
Students will respond to a journal prompt in which they decide what
Chaucer’s argument regarding the clergy is based on their knowledge
of pardoners and The Pardoner’s Prologue and The Pardoner’s Tale,
as well as Chaucer’s use of irony. After students have completed
their journal entry, the teacher will ask students to share their
thoughts with the class. The teacher will then have students retell
The Pardoner’s Tale in the form of a comic strip at
http://www.comicstripcreator.org They will be required to include
dialogue and drawings that reflect the events of the tale and
Chaucer’s use of verbal and situational irony within the tale.
Students will complete their comic strip for homework and submit a
link in Schoology https://www.schoology.com/home.


Day 4
The teacher will present a Prezi presentation on the art of asking
questions. Students will take notes, using the Notability App on their
ipads, as the teacher walks them through the three levels of questions
and four different types of questions. The teacher will handout
guidelines for Socratic Seminar and read through it with the students.
Students will use the remainder of the period writing question for
Socratic Seminar based on the sections of The Canterbury Tales that
they have read up to this point. For homework, students will
complete the Socratic Seminar preparation form, which requires
them to identify six significant quotes from the text and develop a
question connected to each quote.

Day 5
As students enter the classroom, they will sit in either the inner circle
or the outer circle. When sitting in the inner circle, students will use
the questions that they developed for homework to participate in a
Socratic Seminar over The General Prologue, The Miller’s Tale and
The Pardoner’s Tale. When sitting in the outer circle, students will
record significant questions and commentary of the inner circle in the
outer circle handout. For homework, students will read The Wife of
Bath’s Prologue.



Visual, Verbal, Interpersonal












Intrapersonal, Logical, Visual















Visual, Logical, Intrapersonal












Logical, Verbal








Week 4
Day 1
The teacher will present a Prezi presentation giving students
background information regarding the status of women in medieval
English society and the role of the Wife of Bath in The Canterbury
Tales http://prezi.com/_dyq2ouf-vkd/copy-of-the-wife-of-baths-tale/.
Students will take notes, using the Notability App on their iPads. The
teacher will then have students work with a partner and use the
TimeToast App on their ipad to create a digital timeline
demonstrating the sequence of The Wife of Bath’s argument
regarding marriage. For homework, students will read The Wife of
Bath’s Tale.


Day2
As students enter class, they will begin responding to a journal
prompt in which they will discuss how The Wife of Bath’s Tale
reflects her prologue, as well as the arguments Chaucer is making
regarding women in medieval society. After students have completed
their journal entry, the teacher will invite volunteers to share their
thoughts with the class. After a brief discussion, the teacher will
introduce students to the essay prompt that they will be responding to
regarding Chaucer’s satirical portrayal the three estates in medieval
society. Students will go to mindmeister.com
on their ipads to create an outline for their
essay. For homework students will finish their essay outline.

Day3
The teacher will instruct students to take out paper and a pen.
Students will use the outline they created on mindmeister.com
on the previous day to write an in class essay
addressing the following prompt: Discuss how Chaucer uses
situational and verbal irony to present a satirical portrayal of the
three estates of medieval England. Students will turn in their essays

before leaving class.






Visual, Logical, Interpersonal











Intrapersonal, Verbal, Visual,
Logical, Naturalist


















Visual, Logical, Intrapersonal














Procedures:
Week 1
Day 1
Students will take notes, using the Notability App on their ipad, as
the teacher presents a Prezi presentation
http://prezi.com/ybcadnbdf_se/copy-of-the-canterbury-tales/to give
students background information about Geoffrey Chaucer and
medieval England, as well as introduce them to the terms “satire”
and “estate satire.” Students will then watch a clip of the
Californians on Hulu http://www.hulu.com/watch/350669 and work
in small groups to decide how Californians are being presented
satirically and why it is funny. For homework, students will read a
piece of expository text about Chaucer’s life and respond to
questions.

Day 2
The teacher will use a prezi http://prezi.com/z9_gzbmb7cmg/copy-
of-elements-of-fiction-irony/, with embedded Youtube videos to
introduce students to the terms “verbal irony” and “situational
irony.” The Youtube videos will present examples of verbal and
situational irony. As the teacher is going through the Prezi
presentation, students will use Notability to take notes. Students will
then watch a clip of “A Nonpartisan Message from Governor Sarah
Palin and Senator Hilary Clinton” on Hulu
lhttp://www.hulu.com/watch/34465. After students have watched
the video clip, they will discuss with a partner how verbal and
situational irony were used to create satire/parody. For homework,
students will read and annotate the first ten pages of The General
Prologue of The Canterbury Tales.

Day 3
Students will work in pairs to complete an irony scavenger hunt
through the first ten pages of The General Prologue, identifying
examples of verbal and situational irony. Students will record each
example of verbal and situational irony in their digital scavenger
hunt chart that they have copied from Google Documents and
explain how the irony created a satirical portrayal of the pilgrim it
was associated with. Based on the satirical portrayal of the pilgrims,
students will decide what aspects of medieval society Chaucer is
criticizing. For Homework, students will read ten more pages of The
General Prologue.

Day 4
Students will work in a group of four or five to research a societal
topic or situation to present satirically in a skit. They will use an ipad
to conduct their research on the internet and complete a video
proposal, using the copied form from Google Docs. For homework,
students will submit a satire video proposal in Schoology
https://www.schoology.com/home.

Day 5
Students will use an ipad to film their video presentation. Students
must use at least 5 examples of verbal irony and 5 examples of
situational irony in their video to present their societal topic or
situation satirically. This activity will demonstrate students’
understanding of satire and the ways in which verbal irony and
Intelligences:


Visual, Verbal,












Visual, Verbal,















Interpersonal, Logical,










Interpersonal, Visual







Interpersonal, Visual, Verbal,
Kinesthetic




Assessments:

Satire Video






















Intelligences




Interpersonal,
Visual, Verbal,
Kinesthetic












































Pilgrim Fakebook Page























Intrapersonal,
Visual, Logical
















































Literary Analysis Paper


















Logical,
Intrapersonal














































Socratic Seminar






















Logical, Verbal,
Intrapersonal















































Video Link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DMaGEJnEKbg
Pilgrimage Presentation





Visual, Verbal,
Intrapersonal