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THE RECRUITMENT PROCESS ★TURNING YOUR INTERNSHIP INTO A FULL-TIME JOB ★PROFILES OF REAL INTERNS AT WORK

i nsi der gui de
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GETTING YOUR IDEAL INTERNSHIP
BRAND MANAGEMENT
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INSIDER
GUIDE
Getting Your Ideal Internship:
Brand Management
Getting Your Ideal Internship: Brand Management
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GETTING YOUR IDEAL INTERNSHIP: BRAND MANAGEMENT
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Getting Your Ideal Internship: Brand Management
CHAPTER
Getting Your Ideal Internship:
Brand Management
3
2 1
1 INTERNSHIPS:
THE BIG PICTURE
2 Overview

2 Benefits of
Internships
3 Why They
Want You
7 THE SEARCH
8 Where are the
Internships?
10 Identifying Your
Ideal Internship

11 Timing the Search
13 GETTING HIRED
14 The Recruiting Process

15 What Employers Want
17 Timeline: Landing
an Internship
17 Getting Your
Act Together
18 Interviewing 101
Getting Your Ideal Internship:
Brand Management
contents
4
23 NAVIGATING YOUR
INTERNSHIP
24 Hitting the Ground
Running

26 Acting Like a Pro
28 Making the Most
of Your Internship
29 Timeline: Your
Internship
6
5
35 REAL INTERN
PROFILES
36 More than
Marketing
37 The Spirit of
Competition
38 A Sense of
Accomplishment
39 Managing
Uncertainty
41 FOR YOUR
REFERENCE
42 Recommended
Resources
43 WetFeet Resources
Internships:
The Big Picture
1
Overview .......................................2
Benefits of Internships ..................2
Why Tey Want You .....................3
Getting Your Ideal Internship: Brand Management
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OVERVIEW
› AN INTERNSHIP IN brand management is one
of the most effective tools for success in the business
world: a vehicle that puts your real-world experience
and business savvy to the test in a new field. It’s an
opportunity to see what brand management is truly
about and to verify if the field—and what type of com-
pany and brand management niche—is right for you.
You’ll hone and apply new skills, gain memorable expe-
riences and measurable accomplishments, and make
valuable professional connections.
By and large, the brand management internship is
MBA territory. Internships do exist for undergrads, but
opportunities are scarce and competition is fierce: Firms
typically seek interns with MBA-grade business savvy
and management training. (For more information on
opportunities for undergrads, see the section below.)
On the other hand, for MBAs looking to enter the field,
a 10- to 12-week summer internship is a de facto indus-
try requirement—and that’s the type of internship we’re
concentrating on this guide.
Brand management internships can be done at a
wide range of organizations. At major consumer pack-
aged goods (CPG) companies, the position often carries
the title assistant brand manager intern. At non-CPG
companies, brand management duties will often be
handled by the marketing department, thus the title
will be marketing intern. Keep this in mind as you
browse internship postings.
Note that the availability of internships is less
affected by fluctuations in the economy than you might
think. Tere’s good business sense behind this: When
a rough economy forces a company to cut back on its
full-time employees, interns can sometimes fill the gap.
INTERNSHIPS FOR UNDERGRADS
Brand management internship recruitment is far less
common for undergrads than it is for MBA candidates.
But you can up your chances by targeting Midwest-
based companies, which are less successful at attracting
MBA candidates than their big-city coastal counter-
parts. So, these rural firms are likely to develop talent
in-house through undergraduate recruits.
Undergrads are most likely to snag brand-man-
agement internships if they attend a core school, one
where consumer packaged goods companies recruit, or
by landing an interview at a diversity conference. Keep
in mind a firm might only hire one or two interns per
year—countrywide. You’re more likely to make some
headway after graduation, when you can aim to get into
a training program, usually lasting two to three years.
As for undergraduate majors, they need not be market-
ing or business. “We’ve taken on liberal arts majors,”
says a recruiter. “What matters more is the passion for
marketing than a degree in marketing.
BENEFITS OF
INTERNSHIPS
› THE EXPERIENCE YOU add to your resume as
the result of a well-chosen internship will give you
an advantage on your peers. Internships are a means
of inside access by connecting you to the networks
of people who influence hiring. Getting an intern-
ship is not a guarantee of a full-time position at a
particular company, but it certainly increases your
chances. One brand recruiter says about two-thirds of
brand management interns industrywide are offered
full-time jobs.
INSIDER SCOOP
“Our strategy is to recruit the best interns and
bring them into our company. From there, we look
to convert the top performers into full-time hires.”
INSIDER SCOOP
“We like to hire people who’ve already worked at
the company. It’s a matter of ‘try before you buy.’”
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SKILL BUILDING
Even if your internship doesn’t result in a job at the
company, it will still help you build marketable skills.
Te fieldwork is a chance to hone your communication
skills, marketing savvy, and financial acumen; learn how
to work as part of a team; take ownership of and juggle
various projects; and figure out ways to show initia-
tive. When it’s over, you might be able to add product-
relaunch or line-extension experience to your resume.
INDUSTRY EXPOSURE
Te knowledge you’ll acquire in an internship will be
firsthand. Sure, you can find out about industry trends,
key players, and company performance on the Internet.
But that can’t compare to what you’ll learn working
alongside the pros. Why was Product X introduced?
Why did they change the marketing strategy for Product
Y? Of all a company’s competitors, which is the one that
poses the biggest threat? As an intern, you’ll gain insights
you couldn’t possibly obtain by research alone.
Because brand management internships typically
consist of three different projects, you’ll usually get
experience on three different fronts: creative, strategic,
and analytical.
VERIFYING FIT
Companies can claim what they wish on their brochures,
and alumni recruiters will tell you their employer is
great because of X, Y, and Z. Until you’re there, though,
you won’t know if the company’s strengths are the ones
that are best for you. It may take an internship to figure
out that the firm’s “entrepreneurial spirit” means you
aren’t going to get the support you are seeking. Or, for
all the virtues of a company’s streamlined administra-
tion, if it doesn’t give you room for innovation, you may
decide it isn’t what you’re looking for.
NETWORKING, MENTORING,
AND REFERENCES
Anywhere from 25 to 50 percent of interns per year
end up accepting full-time offers from their internship
employers. Tose that don’t can still leverage other
interns and brand managers as valuable sources of rec-
ommendations or references.
ACADEMIC CREDIT
Not only is it great experience, it’s a mandatory piece of
the MBA pie.
A LESS STRESSFUL
SECOND YEAR OF B-SCHOOL
Te ideal scenario is that you tough it out through
the internship recruitment process, get paired up with
your ideal employer, have an excellent interning experi-
ence (a feeling your boss shares), and accept a full-time
offer. In this scenario, your second year of B-school is
recruitment-free. MBA candidates say not having to go
through the recruiting process again makes the second
year of B-school far easier. Insiders say only half of all
future brand managers live out this ideal.
If this isn’t how it plays out for you, don’t worry.
You’re still on track to get an awesome job in brand
management postgraduation. Te second-year recruit-
ing process is more rigorous and there might be fewer
spots to fill, but you’ll consider yourself lucky you expe-
rienced another company.
WHY THEY WANT YOU
› INTERNS PERFORM REAL work for companies.
Tey can provide useful extra hands and fresh knowl-
edge on projects. Moreover, an internship program
can help a company build goodwill in the business
and educational communities. And for corporations,
the real value of internships comes as an extension of
INSIDER SCOOP
“Interning is very much a hurdle—if you can pass
it, you’ve got a much better chance at a full-time
job than you will in your second year. We recruit far
fewer second-year candidates.”
Getting Your Ideal Internship: Brand Management
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the recruiting process. “Internships provide us the best
opportunity to make full-time hiring decisions regard-
ing students,” says one senior marketing director. “We
get to see how they perform on the job for 10 to 12
weeks doing real work. It’s the surest way of finding
out if there’s a good fit between us and the student.”
Employers sometimes use interns to test the super-
visory skills of management candidates within the
company. Coaching, mentoring, training, and dele-
gating are all interpersonal managerial skills employees
need to develop to gain promotions. Some companies
even use the exit interview as a time to ask interns
how their supervisors fared during the course of the
internship.
INSIDER SCOOP
“Getting an internship is an important
indication to a company that you’re really
interested in brand management. A lot of us come
from another industry that isn’t marketing—say,
consulting—and the companies are afraid that we’ll
just end up going back to our old career. This shows
we’re really interested in brand management.”
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The Search
2
Where Are the Internships? ...........8
Identifying Your
Ideal Internship ........................... 10
Timing the Search ........................11
Getting Your Ideal Internship: Brand Management
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WHERE ARE THE
INTERNSHIPS?
› THE MOST COMMON channels for finding a
brand-management internship are on-campus recruit-
ment and career conferences, which are often diver-
sity-themed. Some companies—especially industry
giants—recruit using only these two methods. Others
are more flexible: Tey might consider resumes passed
along by someone within the company. If a company
has gone through the first round of internship offers
and had still not reached its quota, it will consider
online applications.
CORE SCHOOLS
Each major CPG company has anywhere from one to
ten core schools it targets for recruiting. Tese rarely
change—if a company recruited at your school last year,
it’s a pretty safe bet it will be back again. Te companies
that treat your school as a core recruitment pool are
the ones you and your classmates have the best shot of
interning for.
Because so many of a firm’s full-time brand managers
are sourced from a handful of MBA programs, alumni
tend to play a hand in recruiting at their alma mater.
CONFERENCES AND
CAREER SYMPOSIUMS
Local, regional, and diversity conferences can provide
a way of connecting with and learning about employ-
ers that might not recruit on your campus. While some
conferences and career symposiums are marketing-
focused, others target specific groups who represent
diversity, such as African Americans, Latino, or LGBT
MBAs. (You might not need to identify personally with
the target group to gain entry to a conference.) Here are
some conferences to look for:
• Reaching Out LGBT MBA Conference
• National Association of Asian MBAs Global
MBA Leadership Conference
• National Black MBA Association Conference
& Exposition
• National Society of Hispanic MBAs Conference
& Career Expo
• Te Consortium for Graduate Study (a diversity
themed conference that occurs the spring before
MBA coursework begins; students must attend a
member school and apply to join the consortium)
Some conferences serve as venues for first-round
interviews. If you simply show up with your resume,
you might have a chance of scoring a time slot, but
some companies request that resumes be submitted
ahead of time. Tey’ll then contact potential candidates
to confirm interview slots at the conference. Research
who’ll be there and find out what their conference
interview policies are.
OTHER ROUTES
If a company doesn’t target your school on its core list,
and you aren’t able to attend any of the conferences
where it recruits, you can still try other approaches.
Recruiting Beyond the Core
Even if a company doesn’t formally recruit at your
school, it’s still possible to approach it through less
formal channels. Keep an eye out for visits—or even
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phone-call availability—offered by alumni who work
at your targeted companies. One brand manager tells us:
“Te best part of every year is the recruiting season, when
we—a team of 15 alums—get to go back to campus and
meet folks who are interested in interning for us.”
Applying Online
Most CPG company websites offer a place for MBA
candidates to submit applications. But the biggest and
most popular employers resort to web applicants only
to fill empty intern spots, which are usually few and
far between. But a web application might be your best
bet for smaller companies and those without a formal
recruiting program. You should also approach them
through any points of contact you might have.
Leveraging Contacts
We’ve all heard that “it’s who you know,” and the field
of brand management is no exception. Maybe you’re
going off the beaten path of major CPG companies
in a quest for something on a smaller scale and more
targeted to your objectives, or maybe you simply want
as many glowing recommendations as possible to be
tacked onto the resume you submitted. Either way,
your friends, family, and school contacts might know
people who can help you to get where you’re going.
Plus, nowadays you can find out whom your contacts
know by looking them up on LinkedIn.
• Family: More solid opportunities come from contacts
made through family members than any other source.
• Friends: Use them well, and find out if their families
have connections.
• Professors: Treat any contact that comes from
a professor like gold. He might have spent years
cultivating it.
• Career centers: Tey have vast usable contacts and
opportunities.
• Alumni: Te alumni office and its website will usu-
ally provide the means to find alumni in your industry.
Making Your Own Internship
You might want to work at a company that has no for-
mal internship program in place, but that shouldn’t dis-
courage you. You can try pitching a project of your own
devising. Tis is an especially good tactic with smaller
companies and startups because they’re likely to be flex-
ible enough to review your project ideas. Research the
company and find ways its activities dovetail with your
interests, skill set, and career goals. Find someone in the
marketing department and discuss your strengths and
background as a way of showing what you can offer.
INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS
If you’re a foreign
national studying
in the U.S.,
your internship
possibilities might
be limited. Of course,
you will need the
proper work permits.
(Information on
different types of
educational and work
visas is available at
J-1 Visa Exchange
Visitor Program, a
government website:
http://j1visa.state.
gov/). Be aware that
some employers
have a policy
against sponsoring
international
students for
permanent work
authorization, so
those employers
are unlikely to
hire international
students as interns.
With on-campus
recruiting, you
might be in luck:
Because these
internships are part
of the curriculum, the
school might handle
the task of obtaining
the necessary papers
for foreign students.
“Te best part of every year is
the recruiting season, when
we—a team of 15 alums—get
to go back to campus and
meet folks who are interested
in interning for us.”
Getting Your Ideal Internship: Brand Management
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for internships. Te company’s website will offer a basic
outline with a certain amount of hype; on-campus pre-
sentations are likely to do more of the same. Because
the first few times you meet a potential employer might
solely be to get to know one another, those meetings
should give you a good chance of picking up the vibe
and culture of the company.
Some assiduous digging can yield results. You
might get an idea of what to expect from a review on
Glassdoor.com, which provides an inside look at jobs
and companies. With a little bit of initiative you can
turn these resources into veritable Wikipedias of infor-
mation about internships. When you target a specific
company, go through your career center to find alumni
who interned there. LinkedIn is a great source for find-
ing out who has interned at a company. When you
spot them, send friendly queries about their interning
experiences. Did they work on important projects? Did
they receive on-the-job mentoring? What was the work-
place atmosphere like?
FIND A MENTOR
A mentor can be an invaluable support in your intern-
ship search. Trough your network—friends, family,
school, previous jobs—you should find an experienced
person in your chosen field and cultivate the relation-
ship. A mentor, wise to the ways of the world and the
workplace, can help you realize your goals. She will have
ideas about which companies will make good targets for
your internship search. She also can serve as an example
of how success is achieved in your industry, set a bench-
mark for the skills you’ll need, and provide insight on
the skills you’ll need—and on the pitfalls you’ll need
to avoid.
IDENTIFYING YOUR
IDEAL INTERNSHIP
› YOUR CAREER CENTER is a vital resource. If
you’re targeting companies that recruit on campus, you
have to work through that office. Even if you’re blazing
your own trail, the career center can help you with leads
and counseling. But ultimately, you’ll be your own
headhunter.
SELF-ASSESSMENT
Before you decide which companies you’ll apply to,
consider the following questions.
1. Your objectives:
• What will suit your work style best? An entrepre-
neurial role in a startup? A standard role at an
established market leader?
• How much do you value a firm’s reputation?
• Do you want to work in a specific city or geographic area?
• Do you want to work for an organization of a certain
size?
• Are there any specific skills you wish to hone?
2. Your interests and abilities:
• What, besides marketing, interests you?
• What type of product do you hope to get involved
with? Software? Food? Medical goods?
3. Your personality:
• Do you prefer working with a lot of direction an
limited flexibility or are you more comfortable with
open-ended assignments that require you to be a
self-starter?
4. Your Campus:
• Who recruits on your campus?
• Who will be present at upcoming conferences and
symposiums?
DIG DEEP
You would not buy a car without doing research on it.
Treat an internship the same way. After all, this experi-
ence is an invaluable one that will have a great effect on
your future. Unfortunately, there’s no Consumer Reports
INSIDER SCOOP
“Larger CPG companies tend to offer more
on-the-job training, whereas smaller companies
often enable you to develop a range of skills and
move up the management ladder more quickly.”
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TIMING THE SEARCH
› THERE’S NO HARD-AND-FAST schedule for the
process of getting an internship, but you should expect
to take the following steps:
1. Learn about existing opportunities.
2. Put together your application package: resume,
cover letter, references.
3. Get on LinkedIn
4. Join your school’s marketing club.
5. Chart deadlines for internships of interest:
application due dates, the start of formal recruiting.
6. Prepare for interviews through research.
7. Do interviews and follow-ups.
8. If your initial plans fall through, cast a wider net.
Each of these steps takes time. Your resume that
was targeted to consulting firms needs to be tweaked.
Be sure to begin the process several months before you
hope to interview for an internship. Some conferences
(and thus interviews) may take place before your first
year, so think far, far in advance.
Getting Hired
3
Te Recruiting Process ................ 14
What Employers Want ................ 15
Timeline:
Landing an Internship ................. 17
Getting Your Act Together .......... 17
Interviewing 101 ......................... 18
Getting Your Ideal Internship: Brand Management
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THE RECRUITING
PROCESS
THE RULES OF ENGAGEMENT
As you aim for that ideal internship, you’ll be compet-
ing with many other highly qualified candidates. Here
are some ways you can improve your odds:
Use Your Best Resource
A career center is your greatest ally in the recruiting
process. Take advantage of it. Check with your career
center to stay up-to-date with recruiting events, sign
up for newsletters, and visit its career resource site regu-
larly.
Gather Intelligence
Te number-one complaint among recruiters is stu-
dents’ lack of research. When you show up for an
interview, you should have a pretty good idea of the
company’s products and operations. Use the news
media, your informational interviews with former
interns, Web sources, and any information your career
center can provide.
Plan Your Strategy
You don’t want to race after every recruiter who shows
up on campus. It’s better to focus your energy on strate-
gic targets. People who have a clear sense of their career
goals will probably know which five, or at most ten,
companies will help them achieve their aims. Others
will want to cast a wider net. Career-shifters in particu-
lar can scout the territory of brand management by get-
ting to know as many recruiters—and companies—as
possible.
Know the Industry
Get up to date on recent product launches, line
extensions, and rebranding initiatives. Know each
visiting company’s basic product portfolio: Do they
work with food? Dirt? Liquor brands?
Do Legwork
Don’t sit around and wait for the campus visit. Find
good contacts at the company—people with a role
in internship hiring decisions—through your alumni
database, through LinkedIn, and through whatever per-
sonal contacts you’ve established. Email them, tell them
about yourself and your qualifications, and explain your
reasons for wanting this internship.
Use Social Media
One week prior to the recruiters’ visits, initiate contact
with them. Perhaps the employer has a Facebook page or
LinkedIn profile. Become a friend or fan, and send the
company a message. Let the recruiter know you’re look-
ing forward to meeting. Make yourself stand out from
the competition by showing a sincere interest in the com-
pany. Don’t forget to double-check your spelling. And
don’t be a Facebook stalker: One message is enough.
Be a Good Sport
If you get a “no” at any point, take it gracefully. Sending
the representative a thank-you note is a good touch.
ON-CAMPUS RECRUITING
Te classic internship recruiting process, in which stu-
dents work with the companies who scout on-campus,
follows a general pattern. (If you seek an internship
through other means, you’ll be following a process of
your own devising. See “Making Your Own Internship”
in Chapter 2.)
1. You’ll start by registering with the career office and
completing a profile that includes at least one ver-
sion of your resume.
2. You’ll submit your resume to compete for interview
slots. On many campuses, this is known as the
resume drop.
3. Around this time, look out for meet-and-greets,
information sessions, and panel discussions offered
by your recruiting companies. Network, network,
network.
4. Te companies that have chosen you as a candidate
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will interview you on campus. Tis might include
multiple rounds.
5. If you make the cut, pat yourself on the back! Te
on-campus interview is most likely the final inter-
view step.
WHAT EMPLOYERS
WANT
› AS AN ORGANIZATION screens candidates during
career fairs and interviews, it’s looking for ability, pos-
sibility, and fit:

Ability

Your ability is the sum of your past achievements,
your aptitude, and your skills. Tese are the elements
you can offer an employer right off the bat. Even
though employers will not expect a student to have
a huge amount of experience in brand management,
your previous employment and abilities will offer an
index of your ambition and your dedication to hard
work. Recruiters look for leadership, analytical skills,
results-orientation, and evidence of strong collabo-
ration and teamwork. All of this should be demon-
strated throughout your resume.
Possibility
Tis is what you might become for the employer—
your potential. Your past projects might offer a key to
this; so may your aspirations and an air of motivation.
Your grades, of course, also are an indication of what
you can offer the company. Showing you mastered X
program or Y framework in a short time will prove to
employers you have the capacity to pick up the idio-
syncrasies of the industry quickly.

Fit

Your fit is the measure of your knack for adapting to
and internalizing the company culture. Not all brand
marketing internships are alike; business structure and
culture will vary. While an employer seeks candidates
who demonstrate the potential to fit in at the com-
pany, it is also determining if the company will match
the individual. After all, the company is aiming to hire
interns who can be brought on full time after gradua-
tion; starting with the right fit increases these odds. If
you’re not happy, they’re not happy either.
YOUR SKILL SET
Besides the general characteristics detailed above, recruit-
ers are keeping an eye out for specific skills. In your
resume, in your interaction with recruiters, and during
your interview, you should highlight the following.
Communication Skills
In brand management, you’ll be communicating with
different departments throughout the day—from finance
to R&D to sales. As the person who keeps all of the parts
INSIDER SCOOP
“People with analytical backgrounds, in finance
or consulting, will do well. With a marketing,
advertising, or sales background, if you’re
interested in the analytical side, you might well
be equally prepared.”
Getting Your Ideal Internship: Brand Management
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of a project in motion, you’ll need to be able to articulate
goals, needs, and ideas to a wide range of people.
You’ll likely find all your competitors in the recruiting
process are highly qualified. To set yourself apart, work
on building relationships with recruiters. Here, too, an
ability to communicate effectively will give you an edge.
Analytical Skills
Brand management requires analyzing and planning for
the brand’s business performance; in fact, it’s heavier
on analytics than true marketing. Te ability to look
at data and figures (be it on consumers or financials),
draw conclusions, and make a sound recommendation
is what the job is about. You’ll also likely have a core
internship project aimed at testing your analytical skills.
Integrity
Integrity is important across all industries, but it’s key
in brand management. Product integrity keeps custom-
ers. Tat emphasis carries into what companies expect
from their employees. Be honest about your skills, work
experience, and past job responsibilities. Play to your
strengths, but don’t exaggerate anything on your resume
or in a meet-and-greet, however informal, because you
might find yourself on the spot when a project calls for
the skills you’ve pretended to possess.
Leadership
Brand managers are required to show leadership. After
all, you’re the hub of the wheel, the central point con-
necting outward to each department. It’s a job that calls
for intense project-management skills. Having the abil-
ity to take the lead is key.
Business Acumen
Brand management is less about marketing than many
people think. Especially at larger firms, the job involves
more profit and loss statements, economic considerations,
and supply chain issues than it does attending commer-
cial shoots or running focus groups. Revisit the financial
and operational frameworks from your business classes.
A Marketing Lens
Candidates need to remember that consumers and
marketers don’t (and shouldn’t) look at products and
marketing schemes in the same way. A consumer might
say Lays potato chips are addictive and come in great
flavors. A marketer would point out that Lays markets
various flavor profiles and seeks to lead consumers to
discover their preferences. Troughout the recruiting
process, turn off your consumer filter and put on your
marketing lens.
Initiative
Your behavior during the recruiting process is a key to
demonstrate you’re motivated. Don’t expect the recruit-
ers to hold your hand; show them through your actions
that you’re a self-starter. You should provide examples,
from school or job experience, where you volunteered
for an important task or proposed a new project.
Work Ethic
Offer examples from of how your hard work helped
you accomplish a task. Make sure recruiters know
about your nonacademic achievements: Perhaps you’re
INSIDER SCOOP
“Being a good communicator is huge. We have to
ask ourselves, ‘In a cross-functional meeting or a
presentation to a buyer, how put-together would
this person be?’”
Turn off your consumer
filter and put on your
marketing lens.
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an accomplished pianist, or a green belt in tae kwon
do. Volunteer work is a great indicator of your work
ethic—if you’re a Big Brother or Big Sister, don’t hide it!
Brand management is a job that requires multitasking
and collaboration with all types of people and depart-
ments. It is best suited for well-rounded people.
TIMELINE: LANDING
AN INTERNSHIP
› IT’S KEY TO start thinking about your internship
well in advance—as early as the spring before you start
B-school. Here’s a list of the various steps you’ll need to
take and when you’ll need to take them.
Spring/Summer (The Year Before)
• Prepare a resume focused on brand management.
• Update your LinkedIn account.
• Look for early conferences and symposiums. If you
are able to attend any, submit your materials in
advance to participating recruiters. Ten prepare to
ace the preliminary interview.
• Check your school’s career resource website and see
if it lists internship placements for upperclassmen.
Research featured employers.
• Leverage your personal contact pool. Conduct
informational interviews.
• Find potential sources through your school’s alumni
database and LinkedIn.
• Research and prepare for fall conferences.
• Keep up with sources such as Brandweek,
Advertising Age, McKinsey Quarterly,
MarketingPower.com, and Knowledge@Wharton.
Fall Semester
• Attend on-campus employer information sessions
and meet-and-greets.
• Prepare for and attend applicable conferences.
Follow up with those you meet.
• Join your school’s marketing club and attend meet-
ings.
• Have the marketing club or career center critique
your resume.
• Make a list of resume drop dates.
• Keep up to date on industry trends, new product
launches, and rankings.
• Take notice of strong advertising on television, in
print, and on the Web.
• Identify and research contacts whom you can meet
for informational interviews during your breaks.
• Make a list of employers that won’t be visiting your
campus. Reach out to them through contacts.
• Participate in mock interviews with peers.
• Brush up on common marketing and financial
frameworks.
• Research companies thoroughly before interviewing.
Spring Semester
• Review the Fall Semester items listed above, not-
ing that some companies have earlier deadlines for
applications.
• Interview with employers of choice. Follow up with
a thank-you letter after each interview. Tis is not
only a courtesy, it’s a confirmation of your sincere
interest in the position.
GETTING YOUR ACT
TOGETHER
› YOUR SELF-PRESENTATION IS key to landing an
internship. You’ll be working alongside full-time brand
managers performing what is essentially full-time work.
Don’t approach the process haphazardly. Trough care-
ful preparation, you can maximize your appeal as a
INSIDER SCOOP
“We’re looking for someone who can foster
trust between colleagues and inspire the
cross-functional team to move quickly in the
strategic direction they’ve set.”
Getting Your Ideal Internship: Brand Management
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candidate and get a leg up on the competition. Here
are some tips:
• Have your resume reviewed and reviewed and
reviewed again—the more eyes, the better. Take
advantage of any relevant workshops offered by your
college career center. Because your resume likely
summarizes years of professional experience, spend
more time on it than you think you should.
• Research the employer. Use newspapers, maga-
zines, and websites. Contact former and present
employees, especially recent interns and graduates,
and seek out information.
• Practice, practice, practice. Conduct a mock inter-
view and videotape it if possible. Ten review the
tape and make notes about the things you did well
and the areas you’d like to improve. College career
centers or your school’s marketing club will usually
offer interview workshops, mock interviews, and
even video critiques.
• Dress for the part. Company employees can give
you a sense of the dress code, but you should err
on the side of being too formal. Te day before an
interview, lay out the clothes you plan to wear—you
don’t want to find a missing button on your shirt
minutes before you’re about to leave.
• Approach the interview with confidence. Recognize
the attributes that make you a good candidate—and
own them.
INTERVIEWING 101
› YOU’VE MADE THE cut; now is the critical juncture
when you find yourself face-to-face with an interviewer.
Of course, after meeting and greeting various times
with recruiters, you know enough about the company’s
culture to dress and conduct yourself like a member of
the firm. Here are some other essential precepts to bear
in mind. For more information on the brand manage-
ment interview, pick up a copy of WetFeet’s Ace Your
Interview: Brand Management guide.
BE ENTHUSIASTIC
Tis is basic. You should have been enthusiastic
since the first day you met the representatives for
each company—the other candidates certainly were.
Enthusiasm alone won’t land you the internship, but
if you don’t seem avid about the prospect of getting
the job, the employer will quickly pass you over—it’s
BUZZ KILLERS
• A resume that’s
poorly organized or
doesn’t reflect the
skills required for
the position
• A generic cover
letter: If it uses
phrases such as
your company or
this position, they’ll
smell a rat
• Poor grooming and
sloppy attire
• Substandard
written or oral
communication
skills: Bad
grammar and
misspellings can
sink your chances
• Bad manners
• Lack of enthusiasm
• Arrogance
• Timidity
Remember, the interviewing process isn’t
designed just to find the right candidates;
it also screens out the wrong ones. Here are
some mistakes that can throw you out of the
running:
Spend more time on your
resume than you think you
should.
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that simple. And lip service isn’t enough. You may
say you’re enthusiastic about the prospect of working
for the company, but if you act apathetic or bored,
you’re cooked. You should make your enthusiasm clear
through attentive posture, an alert tone of your voice,
and a smile that says you’re glad to be there. Greet the
interviewer warmly. Make eye contact, smile, and offer
a firm handshake. It’s likely you’ve spent time get-
ting to know her or one of her colleagues during the
informal recruiting process, so take this opportunity
to open with a personal gesture, something like, “I
read that article you recommended,” or “Did you get a
chance to try that new restaurant on campus I told you
about?” At the very least, you should say something
like, “I’m delighted you’re taking the time to meet me,
and I’m really excited about this position and eager to
learn more about it.” Let her know up front you’re
glad to have this opportunity. If you’re unenthusiastic
at the start of the process, it bodes ill for your future
demeanor on the job.
EXUDE CONFIDENCE
To inspire an employer’s confidence in your abilities,
you have to demonstrate confidence in yourself. During
the nerve-wracking course of the recruiting process, this
might be easier said than done. But bear in mind the
basics of confident body language: Make frequent eye
contact with your interviewer. Speak up, but not too
fast. Don’t fidget. Sit upright, but not rigidly. Stay calm
because he’ll want to know you can keep your cool as a
team manager.
Most of all, come prepared to state your strengths.
Give concrete examples of how you’ve put them to
use. Don’t overstate your accomplishments but don’t
downplay them either. Keep self-deprecating humor
to a minimum: It might be fine when you’re with your
friends, but this is neither the time nor place for it.
If remaining confident is a struggle for you, give
yourself a pep talk before the interview. Better yet,
enlist an enthusiastic friend to give you one. Or, prac-
tice techniques for managing your nerves, such as deep
breathing and visualizing success. If you’re at ease, the
interviewer will be too.
KNOW YOUR LIMITS
Some people spend the night before an interview bon-
ing up on company facts and figures as though cram-
ming for the test of their lives. But interviews aren’t
oral exams; they are an exchange between two people,
who might soon be coworkers, about shared pro-
fessional interests. You do need to know something
about the industry and the organization, but you’re
not expected to know it all—just enough to ask your
interviewer informed questions, to understand the
questions your interviewer asks, and to give reason-
able answers. Your common sense should prepare you
to give sound answers to any questions that might arise
about how you would handle a specific problem during
your internship. Te details will emerge later, when you
become part of the team.
Like any other conversation, an interview requires
give and take, so don’t expect to dominate it. Give your
interviewer a chance to contribute to the conversation.
KNOW WHAT YOU’LL BE ASKED
Te interview will consist of two major parts. You’ll be
asked behavior-based questions (“Tell me about a time
when…”) to get a sense of your leadership, teamwork,
and analytical skills. You’ll then asked about what you
think are examples of good or bad marketing campaigns
or brand launches. Te interviewer might present an ad
and ask you to analyze it. In this case, make sure you’re
speaking through that marketing lens.
INSIDER SCOOP
“Energy and enthusiasm are the biggest things I
look for. We’re not looking for what they can do,
but what they can get others to do. For that, you’ve
got to be positive.”
Getting Your Ideal Internship: Brand Management
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QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS
Te old saying, “Tere’s no such thing as a bad ques-
tion,” does not pertain to the interview process. When
you ask the right questions in an interview, it shows
you’re paying attention and you’re truly interested in
the job and the company. But offer questions carefully.
“You can kill yourself with a question if it shows a lack
of knowledge about the company,” says an internship
hiring supervisor. Don’t ask questions you could have
answered yourself by spending a few minutes on the
employer’s website. (If you sat in on a company infor-
mation session or two, then you really have no excuse.)
Ideally, you’ve taken notes on any casual conversations
you’ve had with each firm’s recruiters. Following up on
loose ends will score you points.
A good question might resemble one of these:
• What products have been the most successful
recently? What do you think made them work well?
• What are some of the critical challenges assistant
brand manager interns face?
• What management style can I expect?
• Can you describe the performance review process?
• Can you give me examples of the types of projects I
might be assigned to?
As you research the company, other relevant ques-
tions might spring to mind. If the opportunity presents
itself, be sure to ask them.
RAPPORT IS VITAL
Once recruiters are done interviewing a round of
candidates, the first thing they will ask each other is,
“What did you think?” Tey’ll share their gut reac-
tions. A candidate is either a fit or he isn’t. Even if
you’re a leading contender for the position on paper,
your chances of getting an offer are slim if you’ve
failed to build rapport with the interviewer. In the
end, everyone is qualified. You need to find a way to
be memorable.
Tere’s no foolproof way of turning your interviewer
into an ally. But here are some tactics that can put you
in a good light:
• When responding to a question, give a brief over-
view of the points you want to cover and clear them
with the interviewer. For example: “I did a school
project integrating aspects of finance, marketing and
operations. Would you like to hear the details?”
• Appropriate humor (in small doses!) is a good thing.
• If you aren’t sure of the meaning of a question, ask
clarifying questions.
• Mean what you say. If you seem insincere, it’ll be an
immediate turnoff.
• Make sure you close the interview. Reiterate your
interest in the position and ask for the interviewer’s
business card. Give a friendly closing handshake as
well.
When You’re Torn Between Offers
Perhaps you’re lucky enough to receive multiple offers.
Congrats! Now it’s time to make the decision. Start by
listing the pros and cons to each company. Is one in the
same city as your boyfriend, another doing best finan-
cially, but the third has a brand portfolio you admire
more? If they’re still equally attractive, consider one cur-
rent brand manager’s former internship dilemma.
“I go back to dating. You’re courting these different
companies, and you can only marry one of them. My
decision came down to two companies. One was the
hot girl in the room, the one that everyone wanted to go
TIP
>
Be aware you may have the opportunity to ask
just two or three questions, so choose wisely.
TIP
>
When the interview is over, send a thank-you
note within 24 hours. Email is okay; snail
mail is even better. Include thoughtful com-
ments about the session. When relevant,
refer to some personal fact the interviewer
mentioned: “Good luck shopping for that new
van,” or “How’d you do at racquetball?”
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out with. When I got to B-school, I hadn’t really cared
about her, but since everyone else wanted to go out with
this company, I thought I should too. Whenever I was
with this hot girl, I was on my best behavior, afraid to
screw anything up. In the back of my mind, I knew that
if I did something stupid, she was going to move on to
the next person, because that’s just how she rolls.
“But this other company was the girl I could totally
feel myself with. She laughed at my dumb jokes, and I
knew I could have a very comfortable relationship with
her all the time. She’s the girl I eventually went with.
It’s all about how you feel when you interact with the
people at that company. Of course, you need to find
out their financials and portfolio and all of that, but
you have to get to know the company. Visit the campus.
Above all, you have to talk to people.”
What type of “girl” is each of your prospective com-
panies?
YOUR HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT
Research is the single
most important
thing you can do
before any interview.
With so many
resources available—
the Internet, career
centers, career
fairs—there’s no
excuse for being
uninformed. But the
most critical part of
your research will be
contacting people
with experience in
the company and
within the field.
Talk to alumni who
have worked for
your prospective
employer. Meet
with peers who’ve
done internships
in the same target
functional area or
industry. They’ll
help you pick up the
lingo and give you
a clear, insightful
understanding of
the industry and the
company.
Navigating Your
Internship
4
Hitting the Ground Running ......24
Acting Like a Pro ........................26
Making the Most
of Your Internship .......................28
Timeline: Your Internship ...........29
Getting Your Ideal Internship: Brand Management
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HITTING THE
GROUND RUNNING
› YOUR INTERNSHIP IS a short-term proposition.
Most likely, the summer will be over before you know
it. Tat’s why you have to make every day—every
minute—count.
Te process should start before you show up at
the office. Here’s where the research you did to
prepare for the interview really pays off. Your contact
with insiders will have started you on the road toward
understanding how the company and the industry
work. Each industry has its own lingo; by now you
should have started picking some of this up. You
should know the technical jargon you’ll need in your
new job, any recent developments in the company,
and the names and functions of the company’s top
brass. Your new colleagues will see this as an encourag-
ing sign of your interest.
BEFORE YOU START
Your search is over once you’ve accepted the intern-
ship—but your work has just begun. Find out to
whom you will be reporting. Contact that person
well before you show up at work. Find out what
projects she has in mind for you. If the answer is
vague, try to elicit details as politely and diplomati-
cally as you can. Explain that you put a high prior-
ity on doing good work and you need to prepare as
thoroughly as possible. You also can request being
assigned to a particular area or particular type of
project. But don’t appear too demanding because
these conversations with your boss will set the tone
of future dialogue. You’ll also get a sense of your
boss’s managerial style—whether detached and for-
mal or laid-back and approachable. It helps to know
what lies ahead.
You might have certain amount of flexibility in
determining the scheduling of your internship. For
instance, in the interest of accommodating different
school schedules, the employer might give you a choice
of start date. Consider this carefully. You may have
hoped for a nice vacation after exams, but it doesn’t
necessarily look good to say you need a break between
school and work. Ideally, you’ll start at the same time as,
or even before, the other interns. If you show up after
everyone else has started, you’ll have to catch up. You’ll
miss orientation sessions, possibly even the chance to
work on choice projects.
Most employers will not consider you for the job
unless they are sure to get a summerlong commitment
from you. Others may grant the permission but resent the
time you take away from your internship. Tey’ve com-
mitted time and resources to making your internship pro-
ductive and they want to get maximum benefit out of it.
Your employer will usually make sure you have
all the proper resources when you show up for your
internship: a workstation, a company email address,
voicemail. But these details can sometimes fall between
the cracks. Don’t be afraid to discuss these matters in
advance; it will save valuable time during that precious
first week on the job.
INTERNSHIP PROJECT STRUCTURE
As an assistant brand manager intern, you’ll be working
on a few different projects—usually three. Most will take
INSIDER SCOOP
“In the internship, people expect you to know less
but to do even more than when you start full time.
It’s a bizarre paradox.”
TIP
>
If possible, before you begin your internship,
speak with the professionals whose team
you’ll be joining. Ask about their careers and
professional interests, ongoing projects, and
challenges. Also ask for advice. The knowledge
will be useful—and so will the rapport you’ve
started to build.
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up only part of the period. Generally, you’ll be assigned a
strategic project that will last the length of your stint; the
culmination of your internship will be your project pre-
sentation. All of these projects will fall into one of three
categories: strategic, analytical, or creative.
Strategic
Your biggest, most comprehensive project will probably
explore long-term strategies for a brand. You’ll begin
it at the start of your internship and will be expected
to present it upon completion of your internship. It’ll
require more research, more collaboration, and more
foresight than the others. It could take a form like:
• Determine if a breakfast version of our popular fro-
zen dinner entrée would be a good idea.
• Brand X isn’t doing well; find out if we can push it
out of the market. Take into account the likelihood
of another competitor moving in.
Analytical
Analytical projects test your talent with data—whether
financial or consumer-based—and your ability to fol-
low through with recommended solutions. Sample
projects include:
• Our volume (sales, dollars) are down on this
particular account. Find out why.
• Analyze consumer reports and complaint calls;
aggregate into a recommendation for how we can
change our tactics and cut down on complaints.
Creative
Creative projects use the left side of the brain, encour-
aging you to look at strategies with a consumer’s eye.
Sample projects include:
• Work with ad agency to create a one-page coupon (a
free-standing insert, also known as a FSI).
• Review current website with media agency; detemine
what an overhauled version of our website should
look like.
HOW PROJECTS ARE ASSIGNED
Te needs of the company at the time of your intern-
ship determine your projects. Before the summer
internship period begins, recruiters and brand managers
sit down to determine each brand’s needs, keeping the
skills of the incoming intern class in mind. Companies
try their hardest to find projects of equivalent diffi -
culty for each intern, but the doling out of assignments
finally comes down to business needs.
If you find one type of brand particularly interesting
and wish to explore it more deeply, you can present your
inclination in a genuinely passionate way. But remem-
ber, companies can’t accommodate all of their interns’
desires. Te point of the internship is to expose you to
as many aspects and methods of brand management as
possible. Managers hope to make you well-rounded so
you’ll be experienced in the various functions that play a
part if the time comes when you’re managing your own
INSIDER SCOOP
“So many people think an internship is all about the
final project—the great climax at the end of your
three months. I think it’s so much more about the
first two weeks.”
Getting Your Ideal Internship: Brand Management
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brand for the company. For example, if you’re a finance
whiz, they might assign you a project that focuses on
supply chain, or something to stretch your creativity.
Te point is to get you out of your comfort zone.
ACTING LIKE A PRO
› REMEMBER, YOUR INTERNSHIP is a sum-
merlong interview. Tat means you need to show the
company you’d be a worthwhile candidate for a full-
time position. If your supervisors want you to develop
certain skills and areas of expertise, apply yourself
diligently. And, at all times remain professional in your
demeanor and your approach to the job at hand.
Here are some key ways you can present yourself as
a worthy member of the team:
Be on Time
It sounds simple, but punctuality speaks volumes about
your professionalism.
Stay Positive
No one wants to work with a grouch. If you maintain a
positive, can-do attitude during your internship, you’ll
show yourself as someone who coworkers will want to
see again—in a full-time position.
Be Modest
No need to point out your every accomplishment. Rest
assured your managers are watching; they know about it
already. A soft sell is the best tactic for proving your worth
to the company. Don’t aggressively tout your abilities and
accomplishments to your manager; let her discover them
for herself. And that trick of shooting off an email to her
when working into the wee hours? Oldest one in the book.
Act Like a Full-Timer
Never think of yourself as a temp. Take your projects
seriously; don’t blow off an assignment just because
you think you won’t finish before your summer stint
ends. If you have any interest in getting hired full time,
act like you’re in the game for the long haul.
Swallow Your Pride
You’re a hot shot at a top university. But one unin-
formed jerk has the audacity to ask you to send a fax.
Don’t say “that’s not in my job description”—because
now it is. No matter how menial the task, show how
professional you can be. Photocopying and filing
might not be glamorous chores that seem to be an
aspect of brand management, but they’re essential
ones. And if you do a sloppy job copying a stack of
documents, what does this say about the integrity of
your work moving forward?
Be Stalwart
Show yourself as somebody your colleagues can lean
on. Go out of your way to help others. Stay late and
offer assistance when others at the company are over-
loaded with work. Remember, now’s the time to show
you’re already an indispensable part of the team.
Master the Territory
Delve as deep as time allows into the company and the
industry. Look for relevant information in the news
and in trade magazines.
Ask Questions
You might go to a top business school, but you still
don’t know it all—and, guess what? You aren’t expected
to. Most managers would rather answer your questions
when you get the assignment than have to fill in the
gaps after you turn it in. Don’t feel sheepish; there’s a
learning curve. If you don’t understand how to go about
an assignment, ask your supervisor for clarification.
Find out what resources are available to you. But use
your discretion by figuring out the right people to ques-
INSIDER SCOOP
“Companies want to find out where you lack
expertise and build that area up. It makes you a
greater asset to the organization.”
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tion and the right time to question them. Don’t corner
a senior vice president at a cocktail party and start ask-
ing about the specifics of workflow.
Don’t Be Afraid to Socialize
Sure, you’ll run into annoying brownnosers who spend
more time schmoozing the higher-ups than working.
Even more galling, the tactic can sometimes work. Te
lesson? Although getting the job done is of paramount
importance, don’t underestimate the importance of
building important social connections.
Speak Up
It’s fairly safe to assume the employer knows about
your hope for a full-time job offer. But don’t take it
for granted. Tey’re less likely to give you an offer if
they think you’ll say no. Demonstrate your interest. If
you hope to come back after graduation, let everyone
know—your boss, your colleagues, and the support
staffers.
INTERNING KRYPTONITE
Because interns are usually new to the corporate world,
they’re sometimes prone to make mistakes a sea-
soned professional would avoid. Some bad moves can
destroy your chances faster than kryptonite can disable
Superman. Here’s a list of 10 ways to obliterate your job
prospects with a single blunder:

Interning Under The Influence
You have a right to a social life. As long as you’re of
drinking age, you’re free to head to a bar with your
coworkers for some happy hour cheer. But proceed with
caution wherever alcohol and work mix. Know your
drinking limits and stay well within them. Loud, lewd
behavior will nix your chances at the company.
Loose Lips
Your more experienced colleagues might like to dish the
dirt. But it’s best to turn a deaf ear to gossip. You’re new
on the scene and can’t afford to get caught up in the
crossfire of office politics.

Axes to Grind
Don’t complain—not about the company, not about
your assignments, not about the cafeteria food. A posi-
tive outlook could make or break you in management’s
eyes.

Impolitic
Religion, politics and sex are not safe subjects for the
workplace. Yes, as you develop personal ties with col-
leagues, these issues might come up. But in any group
setting, these topics should stay off the table.

Fashion Sense
If the other women are wearing closed-toe heels every
day, leave the wedge sandals in the closet. And even if
you see your supervisors taking business casual to new
levels, don’t break out the muscle shirts. In business
dress, it always makes sense to err on the side of caution.

Digital Distractions
You might be used to treating your iPhone or BlackBerry
as an appendage. But while you’re on the job, use it only
to get your work done. When your supervisor is hover-
ing over your desk, it’s not the time to send texts to your
INSIDER SCOOP
“The reporting manager who oversees interns
treats them like regular employees. We’re looking
to see how much direction they need, their
initiative, and the quality of their work. We check
on their progress throughout the summer.”
TIP
>
When you’re first assigned projects, come up
with as many questions as you can. As you
meet people in pertinent roles, ask them to
help you answer them or to point you in the
direction of someone who can.
Getting Your Ideal Internship: Brand Management
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girlfriend. And those iPhone games? You can play them
when you get home.

Too Much Information
Yes, you should let your supervisor know what you’re up
to. But she doesn’t need minute-to-minute updates. If
you’re running out for a cup of coffee, there’s no need to
interrupt her activities to announce it.

Space Invasions
Te men’s washroom? Not a good place to engage your
boss in work chatter. Be assured he wants to finish his
business in there before attending to the business outside.

Unfunny Business
It’s okay to leave before other colleagues. But as you
stroll out the door, never cheerily say, “Don’t work too
hard”—or you’ll be branded as the kind of person who
says things like that.

Competitor Trashing
It’s pretty standard: Your internship company will have
competing companies in the market. Before you men-
tion company X’s weak product launch or company Y’s
worthless line of print ads, stop yourself for two reasons.
First, they might know someone who worked on the
product. Second, even if a product was unsuccessful over-
all, that line of print ads might have done well in market.
MAKING THE MOST
OF YOUR INTERNSHIP
› AN INTERNSHIP PRESENTS a great opportunity
for learning and career advancement. It’s your respon-
sibility to maximize it. Learn your way around the
organization and familiarize yourself with day-to-day
operations. Master the company’s communications
systems and any software programs you’ll need to do
your job. You want to integrate yourself into the office’s
operations as quickly and thoroughly as possible. When
you need help with a task, ask the seasoned staffers.
Tey’ll appreciate your efforts to become a member of
the team.
Don’t stop at questions. You should be making
as many connections as you can with colleagues and
supervisors; your internship is a prime networking
opportunity. However, be sensitive to people’s availabil-
ity—these are busy professionals and they might have
more important things to do than chat.
Te role you play in your new team is crucial in your
effort to make the internship worthwhile. Understand
how your skills and background can support—or even
compliment—the team.
It’s up to you to get the full value of your internship.
If you find you aren’t doing the work you expected to
do, let your supervisor know. Be diplomatic and don’t
whine. You can’t indicate you’re bored with your present
project but you might be able to get reassigned to more
suitable work.
At some point in the process—usually halfway
through, then again at the end—you will go through
an evaluation process. Tis is a great opportunity for
FALSE FRIENDS
It might sound harsh
and it might sound
Machiavellian, but
the astute intern
never befriends the
first people to seek
him out. There’s a
high probability
they’re in need
of instant allies.
Stay cordial and
professional, but
not chummy.
If you find yourself
the lunch pal of a
guy who is known
for badmouthing
the brass, you
become guilty by
association.
INSIDER SCOOP
“Some companies see internships as a shot to
prove that you’re worthy of a full-time offer. Others
essentially consider the full-time job yours unless
you lose it.”
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personal growth. Listen carefully and with an open
mind. Don’t be defensive. If they tell you about areas
where your skills and work habits can be improved, take
heed—these people know what they’re talking about.
Tey’re also likely to discuss your strengths, which are
useful to bear in mind when you’re pitching your ser-
vices in your next job hunt.
Te evaluation process is a two-way street: While
the company is sizing you up, you’ll be figuring out if
you like the work and the work environment. Have you
found the qualities that attracted you to the employer
in the first place? Is the company a good fit for your
style, your values, and your goals? Before you proceed
forward to a full-time job, be sure you have found a
comfortable fit.
SIGNING OUT
Your exit interview might serve two purposes. It will
probably be your last chance to get a personal evalua-
tion, and the company team will probably elicit your
feedback about your experience. Te information will
help the team as it plans future internships. Be open
and honest, but focus on the positive. By no means
should you turn this into a gripe session. Make con-
structive suggestions, and don’t burn any bridges.
When the summer is over, you might be inclined
to submerge yourself into the current business of
your life—especially if you’re cramming to fulfill your
school requirements. But you shouldn’t let go of the
connections you made during your internship regard-
less of how things turn out. Send thank-you notes
immediately to the key people on your team. In the
months ahead, keep in touch. Don’t be a pest about
it, but periodically update them about your activi-
ties. Send them articles you think might be of interest.
Nurturing this network can give you an inside track on
job opportunities within the company down the road.
Use LinkedIn aggressively. Add your new contacts,
and get a supervisor to recommend you there. Follow
up with your fellow interns, check on their plans, and
maintain the conversations you started about your
ideal job.
TIMELINE: YOUR
INTERNSHIP
› AS YOU CONTEMPLATE the summer ahead, it
might seem you have all the time in the world. Well,
you don’t. Your internship is more likely to fly by,
reaching its endpoint before you know it. Tat’s why
it’s best to plot your route in advance, making sure you
progress toward your goals as the internship runs its all-
too-short course. (Internships generally run 10 to 12
weeks; we’ve decided to outline an 11-week stint.)
WEEKS 1 AND 2:
LEARNING THE ROPES
It’s likely your company will have some sort of orienta-
tion during the first week or two. You’ll also be jump-
ing into your assigned projects. Before you immerse
yourself in strategy and analyzing data, get to know
your workplace. Pay special attention to these areas:
People
Te ties you establish with your colleagues and your com-
prehension of their places in the corporate structure are
INSIDER SCOOP
“It’s never about whether or not someone is intel-
lectually capable of doing the work. The reason
someone wouldn’t get an offer is that he failed to
leverage the resources of other departments.”
TIP
>
If your employer doesn’t have events planned
for you and your fellow interns, take the initia-
tive yourself and suggest some after-work
get-togethers. These can be great networking
opportunities—your peers may hold the keys
to future career opportunities.
Getting Your Ideal Internship: Brand Management
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keys to your success during the summer. Te following
steps will help you map out the job’s human landscape:
• Familiarize yourself with the company’s organiza-
tional structure. Find out how your team fits into the
department and how the department fits into the divi-
sion. Who are the key stakeholders in the work you do?
• Learn who depends on your group for informa-
tion or resources, and who the group depends on.
Remember, you’re a link in the chain.
• Find out who does what within your group. Learn
the role of each member. Tis knowledge helps
especially when you’re looking for information—it
allows you to target questions to the right person.
• Learn which, if any, nonbrand managers were once in
your shoes. Ask them to share their stories and advice. A
career-molding insight might be a friendly question away.
• Make administrative staffers your allies. Receptionists,
mail handlers, assistants and secretaries, IT people,
the HR team—all of them can help you navigate the
company’s systems and gain access to resources. And
the way you treat them is a sure reflection of your
professionalism.
Work Tools
Learn the core methods and tools your group uses, and the
terms applied to those processes. Te quicker you master
them, the sooner you’ll be an effective group member.
• Do your colleagues use a specific type of software,
planning tool, protocol, or group dynamic process?
Your job is to get up to speed on them quickly.
• Find out where past work is stored and how to access
it. You’ll likely have some downtime during your
first week. Use that time to study the types of deliv-
erables the group has recently produced.
• Take note of which communication and collabo-
ration tools the group favors. Does it use meet-
ing management software such as Outlook? A
real-time instant messaging tool such as Skype?
Is there anyone on the road who uses only a cell
phone to check email? Better not attach that 10 Mb
document if you aren’t sure.
Projects
• Make sure you’re clear on what your managers will
expect from your projects. Have deadlines been set?
Is there a model or template you should follow? Is
there someone in the office who has done something
similar and could offer help?
• Do you have access to the resources and information
you need? Now is the time to ensure you have the
tools to be successful.
WEEKS 3 AND 4:
MAKING CONNECTIONS
You’re starting to feel more comfortable. You’ve been
making good progress in your projects and you’re get-
ting familiar with the company’s tools and jargon. Even
more important, you’re getting to know your cowork-
ers inside and outside your group. Tese people can
help you reach your goals. Here’s how you can use this
period to make those connections mean something:
DEAR DIARY
One tool that can
truly enhance
your internship
experience is a work
diary for recording
your activities and
accomplishments,
taking notes of the
things you’ve learned
and the questions
that have arisen, and
evaluating your daily
experiences. Aside
from helping focus
on your goals for the
internship, it will
provide raw material
you can present when
you’re evaluated
toward the end of
the process. It can
also be used
to record insights
and techniques
you can use for
marketing cases
during your second
year of B-school.
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Find a Mentor
Seek a senior colleague who can provide advice and give
feedback about your work habits and accomplishments.
Although some companies have formal mentorship
programs, this person will not necessarily just drop in
your lap. Use your networking skills. Look within your
area and outside of it to find someone you can trust and
admire. Tat person could become your champion—a
key ally in your quest for a full-time job.
Network Within
Make a list of key people, in your group and outside of
it, who can help you toward your goals. Contact them
to discuss their roles and the challenges they face. You’ll
develop a deeper understanding of the work at the com-
pany and a better sense of whether you want to work
there.
Meeting Expectations
If you’re not doing the work you were expecting to
do—which isn’t likely to happen—it should be clear
by now. Speak up and let your supervisor know. Make
suggestions of how your internship can come closer
to your expectations. You might find out the plans
the two of you discussed during your first two weeks
will come to fruition later, and your patience will be
awarded. Perhaps the group’s business needs changed
and your expertise is needed for some other vital proj-
ect. Whatever the case, be diplomatic in anything you
request.
WEEKS 5–8: BUILDING BRIDGES
By now, you’re running at full steam. Your projects are
moving along, if one hasn’t been completed. Now is the
time for using the relationships you’ve established to
build bridges for your career.
Get Reviewed
Te midsummer review should be part of your intern-
ship’s agenda; make sure it takes place. When you talk
to your supervisor, don’t be afraid to mention the ways
you’ve contributed to the team. But also talk about the
ways you can improve. Get as much feedback as you
can to help you improve your work style and help you
adapt to the corporate culture.
Go to Lunch
As you start becoming friendly with the company’s full-
timers, ask them out for one-on-one lunches if some
kind of lunchtime meet-and-greets are not already in
place. In most cases they’ll be flattered by your inter-
est and glad to share their expertise. Ask them about
their career histories and the ways they got their posi-
tions. If you’re lunching with an employee from another
department, ask him what he thinks has and hasn’t been
successful when working with brand managers. Tese
conversations can deliver insight about company work-
ings and invaluable career advice.
Expand Your Network
When a colleague or mentor mentions people he works
with, inside or outside the company, ask if it would
be okay to contact them and mention his name. Use
these secondary contacts for information gathering and
industry perspectives. Find out what they’re working
on—even the projects they have on hold. Tis informa-
tion could soon prove invaluable.
Scout Your Prospects
You should have started to get an idea of whether you’re
interested in full-time work with the company. If so,
ask your supervisor, along with the recruiting and HR
team, about your prospects. Ask, “What can I do to
ensure that I’m a strong candidate for a full-time posi-
tion?”
Snag an Offer
You may have decided you don’t want to return to the
company. Don’t broadcast the fact; try to snag an offer
anyway. Other employers will want to know whether
your internship resulted in an offer. It will increase your
perceived value in the job market.
Getting Your Ideal Internship: Brand Management
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WEEKS 9 AND 10:
SHARPENING YOUR FOCUS
As you wrap up your project deliverables, you’ll face a
blizzard of final meetings and last-minute changes. But
it’s still important to maintain a clear focus on your
objectives. Keep the conversations going with the people
who make the hiring decisions. Try to create a situation
in which you can step right into a great job after gradua-
tion.
If it looks like the perfect job won’t be waiting for
you, it might not be too late. Wowing the higher-ups
during your final weeks might keep you in the running.
Nail your presentations. Make sure they know you’re
interested in coming back as a full-timer.
FINAL WEEK: SEAL THE DEAL
With the end in sight, develop a short list of tasks that
will help ensure your internship ends with a bang.
Finish Strong
Make sure your final performance review takes place.
Ask your supervisor to share your performance review
(it’s stellar, right?) with the decision makers who might
be able to deliver your dream job.
Show Off
Find out if you can invite people outside the group—the
key contacts who’ve aided you in your work and might
be vital players in your full-time position—to your final
strategic project presentation. If you can’t invite them,
ask if you can conduct a separate presentation for them,
or at least send them a summary of your work.
Give Thanks
Leave personalized thank-you notes, emails, and/or
voicemail messages for the people who helped you dur-
ing the summer. Include the senior executives who
might have offered support, and the tech-support
people and administrative assistants who’ve helped you
master the workplace’s logistics. If all goes well, you
might come back as their full-time coworker.
Who’s Judging You?
Te decision to offer you a full-time position will ulti-
mately be made by the brand manager who serves as
your direct manager. But the school recruiter from
your campus, who might work on another brand, has
a say. Together, they’ll reach out to other people you’ve
worked with—be it in finance or supply chain—to
get their assessment of your viability as a full-time
employee.
Take Personal Inventory
How do you view your internship experience? Were
you challenged? Supported? Did you get to use creative,
analytical, and strategic processes? Do you feel the fit
was right? If you’ve made a great impression during the
summer, you might find yourself in the enviable posi-
tion of receiving an offer for full-time employment.
You’ll generally have one to three weeks to make your
decision. Only about half of the brand-management
interns who get offers end up accepting them.
THE PITFALLS OF MEETINGS
You’re a smart,
energetic person,
and you want to
shine before your
colleagues. But your
first meetings—daily
team updates,
group program
reports, brain-
storming sessions,
project reviews,
departmental-plan-
ning conclaves—are
not occasions for
strutting your stuff.
If you’re too aggres-
sive about making
your presence known,
you run the risk of
seeming like an arro-
gant pup. Minimize
the danger by asking
your supervisor or
a trusted colleague
how much you’re
supposed to partici-
pate—then err on the
side of caution. In the
beginning, the time
to express your view-
point might not come
until after the meet-
ing. Still, if you’re
asked to contribute
an opinion, by all
means speak up.
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Te Spirit of Competition ...........37
A Sense of
Accomplishment .........................38
Managing Uncertainty ................39
> We sought out interns across the
CPG spectrum and asked them to share
their internship success stories. Here’s a
glimpse into the intern experience.
Real Intern
Profiles
5
Getting Your Ideal Internship: Brand Management
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What kinds of people do well in this industry?
People who are self-motivated leaders. As a brand man-
ager, I’m managing several projects at once and man-
aging a large team of cross-functional partners. From
business school I’ve brought the leadership and negotia-
tions skills required to ensure I’m getting the best work
from my team and that we’re meeting all of our dead-
lines and milestones. Additionally, I have to be able to
pull myself out of the details and think about my brand
strategically: How do my projects fit in the bigger pic-
ture? What is the long term vision for my brand?
What did you really like about
your internship?
I liked that I got to use my creative, strategic, and ana-
lytic skills every day. Tere are so many different ele-
ments to the job and every day is different, so I feel like
I’m always learning and developing. Te internship
prepared me for that. I also loved my fellow interns and
the brand managers we worked with. Now that I’m here
full time, I’ve got a great group of close friends whom I
worked with as an intern.
What did you dislike?
Working at a big, public company comes with its fair
share of politics and bureaucracy. Te training was
great, but sometimes I wished we could be more nimble
and take more risks without getting bogged down in
process.
What’s one thing you learned
in your internship?
Tat brand management is not solely marketing. It’s
more general management with a healthy dose of mar-
keting and strategy.
How can someone get an internship
like yours?
Network with industry professionals and learn about
the various companies and their cultures. Study mar-
keting and show a genuine interest in products and the
MORE THAN
MARKETING
Education: BA, economics; MBA
Work hours per week: 60
Size of company: 160,000+
What did you do in your internship?
I was an associate brand management intern at a big
consumer packaged goods company. I worked under
the general manager who handled a variety of projects
and managed a cross-functional team. I worked on new
products, from concept to launch. I worked with agen-
cies on advertising and communication campaigns. I
worked on finding ways to improve our product qual-
ity and margins, and coordinated with global teams to
keep our strategy aligned around the world.
What did you do before?
I worked as a management consultant and as a project
manager in the strategy group of a music company.
How did you get the internship?
Trough on-campus recruiting at my business school.
I met representatives from the company, had informa-
tional interviews with them and realized the company
would be a good fit for me. Investing the time in get-
ting to know the company and building relationships
kept me top-of-mind when it came time to select can-
didates to interview.
What are your career aspirations?
Te internship led to a full-time job, so right now I’m
getting a great education in marketing from a world-
class marketing company. Eventually, I’d like to either
start my own company or work for a smaller company
where I can apply the skills I’m developing in brand
management.
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consumer insights behind every decision the company
made to getting that product to market. From the pack-
aging to the advertisement, the consumer is at the cen-
ter of CPG; incorporating that perspective in interviews
can be helpful.
How did the internship prepare you for
your current role as a brand manager?
Not only was I able to see that my internship company
was one where I then wanted to work full time, but I
was exposed to best practices that I now employ. It also
solidified the fact that I’m passionate about brand man-
agement and allowed me to begin forming strong con-
tacts in the company
THE SPIRIT OF
COMPETITION
Education: MBA
Work hours per week: 40
Size of company: 130,000+ employees
What did you do in your internship?
I worked for a medical-device company that was losing
share in the pediatric market. I was asked to conduct
market research to figure out why.
How did you get your internship?
It wasn’t easy. I worked really hard networking, and
kept asking for the opportunity.
What kinds of people do well in
this industry?
People who do well in this industry are strategic think-
ers, creative, and work very well in cross-functional
teams.
What do you really like about your job?
I’m a very competitive person. I like to build business
cases that can steal share from my competitors. I came
to marketing from a sales position, and I think it helps
that I have a good sense of what the sales reps need.
What do you dislike?
It is hard working for a company that doesn’t have a
large brand-marketing budget. Your capabilities are
limited.
What is the biggest misconception
about your job?
Tat it’s all about colors, fonts, and promotional mate-
rials. At the end of the day, marketers are the people
who are responsible for identifying future trends and
building business plans. Marketing is the heart of a
company.
Getting Your Ideal Internship: Brand Management
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A FEELING OF
ACCOMPLISHMENT
Education: BA, mathematics; MBA
Work hours per week: 50
Size of company: 100,000+
What did you do in your internship?
I managed a product launch from concept to reaching
shelf in a major test market. I managed the budget and
worked with customer teams on strategies selling our
product to state governments. I also analyzed potential
direct-mail programs, and also educational materials for
the sales force to use with medical professionals.
What did you do before?
Before going back to get my MBA, I was a military offi-
cer in the U.S. Army, specializing as a combat engineer
in the Corps of Engineers. I led more than 30 men and
women into combat, managed logistical operations for
over 200 companies, and helped rebuild Iraqi provincial
police organizations.
How did you get this job?
I interviewed as part of the MBA on-campus process.
But I started very early on meeting people within the
organization, networking, and going to company-spon-
sored events. By the time the process was over, I had
developed a personal relationship with the interviewers
and decision makers.
What is your career aspiration?
To become a general manager of a major CPG. Along
the way, I hope to experience many roles and sizes of
brands. I would also like to travel overseas to help
develop business in an emerging market and enhance
my entrepreneurial skill set.
What kinds of people do well in
this industry?
People with intense discipline and organizational skills.
Tey don’t have to be creative, but they need to know
how to evaluate creative thinking.
What do you really like about
brand management?
Working on a product that consumers need is very sat-
isfying. It’s amazing to work with a skilled team to bring
creative ideas to life. It takes many rounds of critiquing
and revising. But when you get buyoff from manage-
ment, it’s a feeling of amazing accomplishment.
What do you dislike?
Many times you will come across or create new ideas
that seem to be blockbusters, but because of legal con-
straints or budgetary restrictions, they have to be put on
hold. You continually need the approval of your man-
agement. Life as an ABM will never have the speed of
an entrepreneur’s life.
What do you do in your current job?
I manage upcoming brand initiatives and create
monthly reports for my managers to help them make
crucial decisions. I also manage the brand’s marketing
budget, and I work with customer teams.
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What is the biggest misconception about
your job?
It’s that you have to be creative to be successful.
Honestly it’s all about your ability to manage projects
and think analytically. You need to manage relation-
ships, identify trends, diagnose problems, and meet
deadlines.
How can someone get a job like yours?
My best advice would be to demonstrate your manage-
rial experience. Te initiatives you take will strengthen
your resume and develop the skill set that employers are
looking for in marketers.
MANAGING
UNCERTAINTY
Education: BA, communications; MBA
Work hours per week: 45 to 50
Size of company: 24,000+
What do you do now?
I assist the brand team in strategic, creative, and analyti-
cal projects.
What did you do in your internship?
For my strategic project, I created a sales story aimed
at winning shelf space from a major competitor that
was expected to exit the market. My creative project
was working with the ad agency to launch an FSI—
free standing insert—for a new line extension. And for
my analytical project, I led a monthly team meeting,
reviewing scanner data and presenting insights and
recommendations.
What did you do before your internship?
I created and managed a consumer publication about
home construction, then sold it.
How did you get this job?
Trough on-campus recruiting. I knew I had an inter-
est in CPG companies when I applied to B-school, so I
specifically chose a school that I knew was targeted by a
number of top CPG companies. Networking is always
key—but it’s easier when the networking comes to you.
What are your career aspirations?
In the short term, I want to be a brand manager, but I
ultimately hope to become the general manager of an
entire business unit. Brand management arms gives you
the business fundamentals needed to manage an entire
portfolio of brands.
What kinds of people do well in
this industry?
You have to love working with others since the job
depends on your ability to use cross-functional teams to
complete your agenda, even though you have no direct
authority over them. You need to be comfortable with
ambiguity and with juggling dozens of projects at a
time. And you must know how to prioritize.
What do you really like about your job?
Tat the business has objectives to meet, and it’s up to
you to figure out how to achieve them. But I have to
say—sometimes that’s the thing I most dislike about
the job!
What is the biggest misconception about
your job?
Just how analytical it is. It’s all about the day-to-day num-
ber crunching needed to review business performance
and find opportunities for growth and improvement.
How can someone get a job like yours?
Understand what the company will expect of you day-
to-day, and show them how your past experiences will
answer those needs.
Recommended Resources ............42
WetFeet Resources ......................43
For Your
Reference
6
Getting Your Ideal Internship: Brand Management
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RECOMMENDED
RESOURCES
› THE RESOURCES LISTED here are a small
sampling of the information available to help you land
an internship.
ONLINE RESOURCES
Naturally, you’ll want to check out the websites of the
top consumer packaged goods companies, and you
already know you’ll need to study carefully the websites
of any companies with which you interview. But that’s
just the tip of the iceberg. Tere are many excellent
online resources for your brand management research.
Here are some of our favorites:
• Adweek (http://www.adweek.com) magazine covers
media news with a heavy dose of branding and
advertising.
• Advertising Age (www.adage.com) is one of the
most respected ad industry publications. Te
website offers rankings of companies based on their
ad spending, lists of the top agencies, salary surveys,
and up-to-date advertising news.
• Te Fortune 500 list (http://money.cnn.com/
magazines/fortune/fortune500) ranks the 500
biggest American companies, including consumer
goods companies, and provides information about
revenues and employees for each.
• Knowledge @ Wharton is the online publication of
the renowned business school and includes a section
devoted to marketing issues and news (http://
knowledge.wharton.upenn.edu).
• Te McKinsey Quarterly, a publication of the
top strategy consulting firm, contains a section
focused on marketing-related issues (http://www.
mckinseyquarterly.com/Marketing).
• MarketingPower.com, produced by the American
Marketing Association, includes tutorials on
marketing topics.
• Interbrand’s BrandChannel.com provides
information on industry conferences, learning
opportunities, and careers in marketing.

GENERAL INTERNSHIP RESOURCES
• WetFeet’s InternshipPrograms.com
(www.internshipprograms.com): Find internship
postings by location, industry, or keyword.
• JobWeb (www.jobweb.com): Hosted by the
National Association of Colleges and Employers,
this useful website provides resources and statistics
on co-ops and internships.
• CollegeGrad.com (www.collegegrad.com): Tis
extensive site has postings for internships and full-
time positions.
• Internships-USA (www.internships-usa.com): Tis
website lists thousands of internships in the U.S.
with hundreds of employers and organizations.
• InternJobs.com (www.internjobs.com): Global
database of internships and entry-level positions for
students, recent graduates, and career changers.
• InternWeb.com (www.internweb.com): Database
searchable by internship type, employer type, and
state.
• Monster College (college.monster.com/education):
Te leading job-posting board offers a section
tailored to college students.
• Internships.com (www.internships.com): Website
linking potential interns with employers.
• USAintern (www.usaintern.com): Resource for
finding internships and volunteer opportunities.
YOUR CAREER CENTER WEBSITE
Your university’s career center will probably have
information on internships on its website. Sometimes
this will take the form of a database listing the employers
targeting your school and the internships they’re making
available. In most cases, this information is password-
protected. Tis is a key resource when you’re researching
your ideal internship.
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EMPLOYER RESEARCH
Learn about the companies or organizations you want
to target:
• Te Business Journals (www.bizjournals.com):
Business news from 41 local markets and
46 industries.
• PR Newswire (www.prnewswire.com/news/)
• WetFeet’s industry and company profiles
(www.wetfeet.com)
PUBLICATIONS WITH COMPANY LISTS
Some of the best-known lists about employers can be
found through a good local library or through paid
subscriptions to the following magazines:
• Business 2.0
(http://money.cnn.com/magazines/business2)
• Bloomberg Businessweek (www.businessweek.com)
• Forbes (www.forbes.com)
•Fortune (http://money.cnn.com/magazines/fortune)
• Inc. (www.inc.com)
CONFERENCES
Some key conferences to watch for are:
• Reaching Out LGBT MBA Conference
(http://reachingoutmba.org/)
• National Association of Asian MBAs Global MBA
Leadership Conference (http://www.asianmba.org)
• National Black MBA Association
Conference & Exposition
(http://www.nbmbaa.org/Conference/Default.aspx)
• National Society of Hispanic MBAs Conference &
Career Expo (http://www.nshmba.org)
• Te Consortium for Graduate Study
(http://www.cgsm.org)
RESOURCES IN PRINT
Te Back Door Guide to
Short-Term Job Adventures
Michael Landes (Ten Speed Press, 2005)
Peterson’s Internships
Peterson’s Guides, 2005
Te Internship Bible
Princeton Review, 2005
Te Internship Series from
Career Education Institutes
(www.internships-usa.com/books.htm)
WETFEET
RESOURCES
ONLINE
A number of resources are available to you at www.
wetfeet.com, including:
• A profile of the CPG industry
• Real People Profiles of individuals working in
brand management and marketing positions, and
employees in the consumer products industry
• A host of articles on interviewing, resume prep,
networking, switching careers, and many more
career-related subjects
• Job and internship listings
Getting Your Ideal Internship: Brand Management
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INSIDER GUIDES
Careers in Brand Management
Turn to this Insider Guide to learn everything you need
to know about the field of brand management, the
opportunities that exist beyond the consumer packaged
goods industry, what it takes to succeed as brand
manager, the kind of lifestyle you can expect and the
hours you’ll keep, the income you’ll likely earn as you
work your way up the corporate ladder, the most typical
career paths for brand managers, and much more.
Ace Your Interview: Brand Management
Once you’ve decided to pursue a career in brand
management, you’ll need to polish your interviewing
skills to help you land the job. Ace Your Interview:
Brand Management will help you prepare to keep hiring
conversations focused, productive, and pleasant so
that you can keep your wits about you even when the
stakes seemalarmingly high. You’ll learn how to figure
out what employers are looking for in brand managers
and how to give it to them, the art of interview
Q&A—including the marketing case question, what
employers really want to know when they make those
seemingly innocuous queries, what you need to know
about brands and marketing before you interview, how
to conclude the interview gracefully and follow up
effectively, and what publications you should keep up
on to ensure you’re in the brand management loop.
Careers in Marketing
Turn to this Insider Guide to learn about the difference
between marketing and marcom; the opportunities
that exist beyond marketing and brand building for
the consumer packaged goods industry; what it takes
to succeed as a market researcher, marketer, or creative
specialist; the kind of lifestyle you can expect and
the hours you’ll keep; the income you’ll likely earn as
you work your way up the corporate ladder; the most
typical career paths for marketers; and much more.
Networking Works
You probably know that most job vacancies are filled
well before a job description is even posted. But how
do people know about these secret openings? Tat’s
right—networking. Tis Insider Guide will teach you
the skills necessary to stay in the loop. So, when that
perfect job opportunity comes along, you’ll be miles
ahead of the pack. You’ll learn how to tap your existing
network and expand it even further; how to overcome
obstacles to successful networking, such as shyness or
embarrassment; alternative means of networking using
online and community resources; tips on mastering
the subtle art of small talk; how to invite someone to
lunch when you only know them through a mutual
acquaintance; how to maintain an active network of
contacts—so they’ll think of you and only you when
they hear of that perfect job opening; and how to repay
the favor when you land the job they told you about.
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>>
The WetFeet Story
WetFeet was founded in 1994 by Stanford MBAs Gary Alpert and Steve Pollock. While exploring their
next career moves, they needed products like the WetFeet Insider Guides to guide them through their
research and interviews. But these resources didn’t exist yet—so they started writing! Since then,
millions of job seekers have used the WetFeet Insider Guides and WetFeet.com to research their next
career move.
In 2007 WetFeet became part of Universum Communications, the global leader in employer branding.
Thanks to the integration of WetFeet into the Universum group, WetFeet products are now used by
job seekers all over the world. In addition to our Insider Guides and WetFeet.com, we produce WetFeet
magazine, which features career advice tailored to undergraduate students.
>>
The WetFeet Name
The inspiration for our name comes from a popular business school case study about L.L. Bean, the
successful mail-order company. Leon Leonwood Bean got his start because he literally got his feet wet:
Every time he went hunting in the Maine woods, his shoes leaked. One day he set out to make a better
hunting shoe, doing such a good job that his friends lined up to buy pairs of the boots. And so L.L. Bean
was born.
The lesson we took from the Bean case? Well, it shows that getting your feet wet is the first step toward
achieving success. And that’s what WetFeet is here for: To help you get your feet wet and take the right
steps toward ever-greater career goals, whatever they may be.
>>An internship is a rite of passage for any MBA
candidate hoping to become a brand manager.
This invaluable experience will help you learn the ropes and give
you and your potential employer a chance to evaluate each
other. Plus, most consumer products firms use their internship
programs to recruit new employees for full-time brand management
positions. As you can imagine, competition is fierce. This Insider
Guide will show you how to network with recruiters on campus, get
the internship, wow the higher-ups, and snag that full-time offer.
TURN TO THIS WETFEET
INSIDER GUIDE TO EXPLORE
WetFeet has earned a strong reputation among college
graduates and career professionals for its series of highly
credible, no-holds-barred Insider Guides. WetFeet’s investi-
gative writers get behind the annual reports and corporate
PR to tell the real story of what it’s like to work at specific
companies and in different industries. www.WetFeet.com
★ WHAT QUESTIONS TO ASK YOURSELF
WHEN CONSIDERING WHERE TO APPLY
★ HOW TO NAVIGATE THE ON-CAMPUS RECRUITING
PROCESS, AND HOW TO APPROACH COMPANIES
THAT DON’T RECRUIT ON CAMPUS
★ THE PARTICULAR SKILLS AND EXPERIENCE
RECRUITERS ARE LOOKING FOR, PLUS HOW
TO DIFFERENTIATE YOURSELF FROM THE
COMPETITION
★ WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT A FIRM AND
ITS BRANDS BEFORE YOU MAKE CONTACT
★ THE DIFFERENT TYPES OF PROJECTS THAT BRAND
MANAGEMENT INTERNS TYPICALLY WORK ON
★ HOW TO INCREASE YOUR CHANCES OF GETTING
A FULL-TIME OFFER
★ PROFILES OF REAL INTERNS WORKING IN BRAND
MANAGEMENT

ISBN 978-1-58207-987-5
$ 14.95 U.S.