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INFOSYS.110 BUSINESS SYSTEMS:
DELIVERABLE 2: BUSINESS SECTION
2014

Name Benjamin Tu’itahi
NetID Btui618
Group Number: 350
Website Link: Http://INFOSYS1102014S1GROUP350.blogspot.co.nz/
Tutorial Details
Tutor: Day: Time:
Kirsten van Dorp Thursday 9am
Time Spent on
Assignment:
15 hours Word Count: 1645

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MASTERMIND CARPARK SOLUTIONS
INTRODUCTION
We at Mastermind Parking Solutions have seen how Auckland’s ever-increasing population
has resulted in increased parking problems- namely, increased difficulty locating your car.
Because of this, we came up with a simple, yet elegant, solution for this problem: a more
advanced ticketing system that provides more detailed information that gives you the exact
location of your car- street address, floor number and row/park number.
3. BUSINESS SECTION
3.1 Vision
To provide the world with the most convenient, informative and time-efficient parking
ticketing system known to humankind.
3.2 Industry Analysis: NZ Parking Ticketing System Industry
Industry: NZ Parking Ticketing System Industry. While our business vision is world-reaching,
we’re looking to start off in New Zealand, and expand from there.
Force: High/Low: Justification:
Buyer power: High There are already a large number of Parking
Solutions available for carpark owners, ranging
from Automated Solutions Limited to Frogparking
and many more. (NZPA, 2013).
Supplier power: Low In regards to handheld ticketwriters, there are a
variety of models available to the industry. The
products range from well-known “mainstream”
brands such as Casio and Motorola, to more
obscure brands such Zebra Technologies and

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Datamax-O’Neil (T2 Systems, 2014).
Threat of new entrants: Low We aim solely to provide a parking solution to
carpark owners, rather than being an all-in-one
company. As a result, there isn’t a ridiculous
amount of resource (i.e. money for software
development and purchases of handheld
ticketwriters) needed to start up in this specific
industry, but what keeps new entrants from
really being a threat is that the NZ Parking (not
parking ticketing services) market is, as Hawken
said in 2012, “dominated by the two main
players, Wilson and New Zealand-owned
Tournament Parking”. Their dominance also
creeps into this industry through their in-house
products (For example, Parking Enforcement
Service, a division of Wilson Parking dedicated to
parking solutions and technologies.)
Threat of substitutes: Low It could be argued that public transport is a
substitute to parking tickets, but I see it as a
substitute to cars and other privately owned
vehicles rather than the parking ticket system
itself. Therefore it can be said that if you need to
park your car somewhere , there are virtually no
substitutes to a carpark ticketing system apart
from free parking.
Rivalry among existing
competitors:
High New advancements in the parking industry are
constantly created. Those firms who fail to keep

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up with these new innovations will be left behind-
for instance, the testing of GPS systems (TVNZ,
2014) and dynamic pricing methods (Warwood,
2014) is something that all carpark solution
companies are likely to endavour on
implementing in the near future.
Overall attractiveness of the industry: This industry is not very attractive. The recent
stream of developments and innovations in parking system technologies has resulted in a
need for companies to be less complacent and more adaptive in order to be valued by your
customers.
3.3 Customers and Thei r Needs
Our main target group of customers are those who aren’t necessarily familiar with the place
they’re parking in. We figure that if we can satisfy their needs, we can then also satisfy the
needs of other groups such as long-term users.
From aggregating and analysing reviews and feedback of a couple of existing carpark
companies (Wilson Parking New Zealand and Tournament Parking, 2009-2014), we found
that the needs of this group includes:
- Convenience
- Information presented in a simple and easy to understand way
- A reliable system that works for each individual customer that needs to access the carpark
3.4 The Product and Service
Our service is able to satisfy the needs of the “casual” or “one-time” carpark user by
providing the necessary information needed for them to easily locate their car, e.g. street
address, and floor row/column if they’re in a large multi-storey carpark, all on the ticket.
The ticket also contains a QR code that, when scanned, links them to an image of the
position of their carpark if they need it for reference. However we find that, in most cases,

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the information supplied on the ticket alone is sufficient for quick and painless relocation of
their car.
3.5 Suppliers and Partners
Our suppliers include:
Paytech Solutions and Integrated Technology Solutions Limited
http://www.paytechsolutions.com.au/
http://www.itslonline.com/
They supply to us parking meters and some specific self service machine models such as the
MultiService machine (Paytech Solutions, 2010) that we then integrate with our own
services and custom software, and then either contribute to our partners or supply to our to
our customers (i.e. commercial carpark owners get the machines and the public get the
services.)

Our partners include:
Hamilton City Council and Palmerston North City Council
http://www.hamilton.govt.nz/Pages/default.aspx
http://www.pncc.govt.nz/

We work together to oversee a portion of the carparks that they have control over by
supplying them parking meters and other forms of parking solutions with our own software
for free as well as a small percentage of the sales, so that we are allowed to place our own
logo and branding on the machines and in the carparks which provides decent exposure to
any specific businesspeople and members of the public who may be seeking an efficient
parking solution.


3.6 Strategy: Cost Leadership

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Since our vision is world-embracing, as mentioned earlier, we consider our competitive
scope to be that of a broad market, rather than a narrow market. At the same time, to give
the financial means to use our services to the biggest market share that we can, we have
decided that our cost strategy be a low cost strategy.
Therefore our overall strategy is Cost Leadership.
3.7 Value Chain Activity: Making the product/service
The most important value chain activity for Mastermind Parking Solutions is making the
service that we provide. This is because we believe that the the values of convenience,
efficiency and intelligence will, for the most part, be integrated into the system’s creation
and the overall design. We will design how we want our customers to interact with our
systems and software so that they find the experience convenient and informative. At the
same time, we are aiming for a low cost strategy so we need to focus on making sure the
systems are as reliable as possible so that costs incurred from other processes further along
in the value chain (such as services after the sale) are minimised.
3.8 Business Processes
3.8.1. ORDER MANAGEMENT PROCESS
This is an important business process for making our service as we use it in searching for the
best parking equipment that works successfully with our Cost Leadership strategy in mind. It
involves first purchasing a “sample” of a potential candidate for the parking equipment that
we may use with our own software. We then send it through a rigorous test, evaluating how
well it meets each criteria of our ideal Cost Leadership strategy-approved parking
equipment. If it meets the requirements, then we go ahead and follow up on the sample
order by making a full order. If it doesn’t then we move on to the next candidate on our list.


Order Management Model

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START
Identify parking
equipment models
to order
Create and send a
SAMPLE purchase
order (i.e.1-3 units)
Send it through to
be evaluated
Has it passed
the test?
Make a full
purchase order
Yes
Request for a
refund (if possible)
or resell
No
Software Development HQ
Software Development HQ
END
Receive sample
order
Receive Invoice
Research & Development
Send payment for
sample





3.8.2. EQUIPMENT EVALUATION PROCESS

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This is an important business process as it allows us to evaluate the various parking
equipment choices supplied from the ordering management process. There are two main
criteria for the equipment: seamless intergration and ease of use. This is so our software
and parking systems can work as close to our exact intentions. If we can get a high rate of
intergration and compatibility and our design to a standard of excellence, then our service is
likely to be used with ease by the largest amount of people.
Equipment Evaluation Model
START
Receive sample
order from
Manufacturing &
Production
Install software
onto equipment
Evaluate the rate of
integration/
compatibility
Is the
integration/
compatibility
seamless (or
close to)?
Continue with test Yes
Send back to
Manufacturing &
Production to be
returned/stored
No
Implement in Sales
and Marketing staff
carpark
Receive feedback
Does feedback
indicate ease of
use?
END
Send the message
to Manufacturing
and Production to
make a full order
Yes
No
END
Manufacturing and Production
Manufacturing and Production




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3.9 Functionalities
3.9.1. ORDER MANAGEMENT PROCESS
- Identify the parking equipment we need
- Send payment for sample order
3.9.2. EQUIPMENT EVALUATION PROCESS
- Installing the software
- Evaluating the software’s compatibility with the equipment
3.10 Systems

3.10. 1. INVENTORY/MATERIALS MANAGEMENT SYSTEM
This system is needed to support specifically the identification of which parking equipment
we need to order. This is to ensure that we have considered all the possibilities and choices
before deciding on which set of equipment to use our parking software solutions.
3.10. 2 ACCOUNTING SYSTEM
This system supports the the functionality of sending payments, specifically for the sample
orders of each brand and model of parking equipment. This is needed so that we can see
what portion of our budget is used up by the equipment evaluation process. We also use
this system to make sure payments go out in time so that in the event that we do choose
that supplier, the prompt payment gives a reliable first impression.
3.10. 3. HARDWARE ANALYSIS SYSTEM
This system supports the functionality to evaluate our software’s compatibility with the
equipment that we test. This is to make sure that we find the most compatible equipment
to work with, and so that the customer will be experiencing our software as close as to our
original vision as possible.

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3.11. Summary Table: Value Chain to Systems

Value Chain
Activity
Processes Functionalities Specific Information
System(s)
Broad Information
System(s)

Making the
Product/service
1. Order
Management
Process
- Identify the parking equipment we need
- Send payment for sample order

Inventory Management
System
Accounting System
Transaction Processing
System
Decision Support System
2. Equipment
Evaluation
Process
- Installing the software
- Evaluating the software’s compatibility with the
equipment

Hardware Analysis System Decision Support System



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CONCLUSION
From this report, it should be easy to see how our parking ticketing solutions heavily rely on
information systems in order to design and refine our systems and software; From selecting
the very best equipment to fit our software’s needs, to recording transactions which will
give us indications of how to make our production costs be balanced between quality and
efficiency. In the end, our aim is to end up with a final product that customers will use and
find not only informative, convenient, and time-efficient, but also affordable.
REFERENCES

1. New Zealand Parking Association (2013). Nzpa tradies. Retrieved from
http://www.nzparking.com/tradies/tradies.html

2. T2 Systems (2014). Parking Handheld Tickewriters, Computers and Printers.
Retrieved from http://www.t2systems.com/solutions/parking-handheld-
ticketwriters-computers-printers.aspx

3. Ninness, G. (2012). Arrested tycoon’s NZ parking empire. Retrieved from
http://www.stuff.co.nz/national/crime/6710328/Arrested-tycoons-NZ-parking-
empire

4. TVNZ (2014). GPS parking system the way of the future?. Retrieved from
http://tvnz.co.nz/national-news/gps-parking-system-way-future-5873470
5. Warwood, K. (2014). And here comes the Parking Revolution!. Retrieved from
http://parkingithere.blogspot.co.nz/2014/03/and-here-comes-parking-
revolution.html

6. Wilson Parking New Zealand – Google Reviews (2012-2014). Retrieved from
https://www.google.co.nz/search?q=wilson+parking#lrd=lrd

7. Tournament Parking – Google Reviews (2009-2014). Retrieved from
https://www.google.co.nz/#q=tournament+parking&lrd=lrd

8. Paytech Solutions (2010). PayTech Solutions > Products. Retrieved from
http://www.paytechsolutions.com.au/Products/tabid/57/mode/details/pid/38/cid/5
/subid/28/Default.aspx