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INFOSYS.110 BUSINESS SYSTEMS:
DELIVERABLE 2: BUSINESS SECTION
SUMMER 2014

Name Louis Yarrell
NetID Lkem314
Group Number: 457
Website Link: http://infosys1102014s1group457.blogspot.co.nz/
Tutorial Details
Tutor: Day: Time:
Kirsten Thursday 12PM
Time Spent on
Assignment:
19 hours Word Count: 1649






















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Remind Me Why
INTRODUCTION

‘Remind Me Why’ is an app designed for smart phones. The sole objective of the app is to help aid
people wishing to not relapse back into smoking, the app uses a variety of personal details obtained
from the phone, like photos, friends, videos etc. The clever use of media collaborates together and
reminds the user why they wanted to stop smoking through incentives shown when the app is
opened.
3. BUSINESS SECTION
3.1 Vision
Making quitting the cigarettes easier and smarter.
3.2 Industry Analysis: Quit Smoking Smartphone Apps

Force High/Low Justification:
Buyer Power High There are many apps out there already designed to aid
smokers attempting to quit and prevent relapse, with a
few recognised as the best in the industry.
(Stephen Walkiewicz, 2014)
Supplier Power High There are two main players in the smartphone app
industry, they are the Apple app store and the Google Play
store, with 43.5% of all smart phones being Apple
smartphones and 51.2% being android smartphones, with
a further 5.3% remaining with other providers such as
blackberry, windows phone etc. (Harry McCracken,
2013)
Threat of Substitutes High Threat of substitutes is high in the quit smoking app
market, due to simple coding involved in making an app
like it, other apps can also quickly copy designs and apply
it to their own apps. A copyright of some sort would
remedy this if the idea is original.
“Substitute products i.e. the applications for a particular
task are high in numbers”. (Shweta Jain, 2009)




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Threat of new entrances High This is high because the barriers for entry are not that
significant, the relative difficulty to make a simple app like
our proposed ‘Remind Me Why’ app is low, because the
coding that would be involved in making the app can be
learned easily through online forums etc. Plus it only costs
$99.00 per year to be an app developer on iTunes, thus
not cost intensive if coding personally. (CARTER
THOMAS, 2011)
Rivalry High Rivalry is high between quit smoking app developers as
the apps are easy and cheap to make, easy to copy, plus a
lot of the app companies have their apps on for little to no
cost at all, thus many companies try to differentiate.
The overall attractiveness of our business idea in reflection is not an attractive market to emerge in,
the fact that buyer power is so high and supplier power high, with vast numbers of very similar
products on the market already, which in turn would make it very difficult to succeed in the market
unless we had a significant differentiation from our competitors.
3.3 Customers and Thei r Needs
Our Customers are people wanting to quit smoking, “There are some 1.1 billion people who smoke
on our planet earth. Just less than one-third of all adults in the world smoke regularly” (Medical
News Today, 2004) thus a focused, but large market. These people’s needs are the incentive to
abstain from relapsing. We would attempt to achieve this by triggering emotional strings for the
person by showing them the reasons why they wanted to quit in the first place when they
downloaded the app and filled in the necessary formula, this would include; motivational quotes,
pictures of loved ones, videos on dealing with withdrawal symptoms etc.
3.4 The Product and Service

Our product satisfies customer’s needs and wants by providing an easy to operate application that is
both factual and sensitive at the same time. We would provide incentive to quit with facts, quotes,
personal pictures of loved ones, personal messages generated to overrule the habit etc.
The product and service we provide satisfies customer’s needs with key services and functionalities,
these include; tracking progress of weeks abstained, calculating how much money they’ve saved,
online forums to get in contact with other people trying to quit/mentors etc.
3.5 Suppliers and Partners
Our App developer would be our supplier as they supply us with the coding and programming base.
(This is under the assumption that we can’t code the programme ourselves) For example, there is a
New Zealand app business called Sush Mobile that made mobile applications for companies such as
Nz Herald, etc. (Sush Mobile, 2014). Another form of suppliers would be the app sharing sites, such
as; iTunes, Google Play store, Windows Phone, they supply us because we need to have our app
listed on their site(s) to be compatible with the various smartphones




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We could partner with an online quit smoking site, such as; Quitline. This could be easily
implemented as you could just open the app and you’re instantly in touch with a free counselling
service. We would partner with them as it would give us another significant selling point for our app,
showing that you can be in contact with help in only a matter of clicks.
3.6 Strategy: Focused Low Cost
Our market that we are trying to enter is the Focused Low Cost section of the generic strategies
model as it is focused just on people who smoke, thus not broad.
Under the focused section of the generic strategies model, our market fits in the low cost segment
as it costs next to nothing for an app like ours in the app stores. For example, the most popular quit
smoking application is free, with the most expensive app only costing a mere $1.99. (Stephen
Walkiewicz, 2014).
3.7 Value Chain Activity: Marketing and selling the product or service

Our business will use the value chain activity of marketing and selling the product or service. We will
implement this by completing market research by observing similar products on the market, what
features and functions they use, and how we can improve on what these apps already have to offer,
we will also sell the product ourselves by listing it on the iTunes app store, the Google Play store, and
any other stores we see fit.

3.8 Business Processes

3.8.1. BUSINESS PROCESS 1 Market Research Process
Market Research is a component of marketing and is a vital process as it gives us relevant feedback
from our target market on what they would want with an app like ours, whether people would be
willing to pay for it etc.
This Business Process starts with the marketing department deciding on goals they wish to achieve
through market research, they then decide on what method of research to use to implement these
goals through using decision support systems. They then distribute a form to be filled out by the
target market, we will then receive and store the data into a data base, furthermore we will analyse
the data and turn it into information, upon when we will write reports off our research’s findings.





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3.8.2. BUSINESS PROCESS 2 SELLING THE PRODUCT OR SERVICE PROCESS
This Business Process is important as our product and service must be sold/downloaded through one
of the app stores first to be compatible with a smart phone. Thus the sales process must be
uncomplicated to maximise downloads. The app store ordering process goes as follows, the
customer finds our app, generates an order, the sales department receives the order (and so does
the app store), we and the app store alike then proceed to check the legitimacy of the account
submitting the order, checking that the accounts information is correct, for example, correct
password, good credit rating, etc. If this all checks out, the free download is allowed and the
customer receives their app and the transaction is listed into our Transaction processing system. If
not, the person gets to review why their account has failed to download our app through looking if
the information they supplied is correct, the person submits their information again, if all data is
correct second time round, the download is allowed as normal. But if not correct, download is
cancelled and they must start again.





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3.9 Functionalities

3.9.1. BUSINESS PROCESS 1 Market Research Process
 Results of Market Research stored in data base
 Turns raw data into applicable information like graphs and tables
3.9.2. BUSINESS PROCESS 2 Selling the Product or Service Process
 Stores data of all transactions/downloads in TPS database
 Creates sales performance graphs
3.10 Systems

3.10.1. SPECIFIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS 1:
DATABASE MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS:
This is a vital system to support market research as listed above, because it sorts and stores raw data
in a large database ready to be evaluated and turned into relevant information. This relates to




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market research as it can house the data related to potential customer’s opinions of what they
would want in our app.
3.10.2. SPECIFIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS 2:
Performance Management Systems:
It generates information such as sales performance graphs for the selling the product process, it also
can generate tables and graphs from raw data such as survey form results for the market research
process.
3.10.3. SPECIFIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS 3:
Management Information System:
This is a vital system to support the functionalities listed above and the business process of market
research as it generates relevant information from data for managers off survey data provided.


3.11. SUMMARY TABLE: VALUE CHAIN TO SYSTEMS
Value
Chain
Activity
Processes Functionalities Specific Information
System(s)
Broad Information
System(s)

Market
and Sell
the
product
or
service
1. Market
Research
1. Results of Market
Research stored in
data base
2. Turns raw data into
applicable
information like
graphs and tables

1. Database
Managament
System
2. Management
information
System
1. Decision Support
System
2. Decision Support
System
2. Selling the
Product or
Service
1. Stores data of all
transactions/downl
oads in TPS
database
2. Creates sales
performance
graphs

1. Performance
Management
System
2. Performance
Management
System
1. Transactional
Processing
Systems
2. Transactional
Processing
Systems
CONCLUSION
We believe that our innovative product could be useful for many aiming to wean of tobacco, the
useful and supportive features we propose to implement would be an asset to a healthier life
through utilising modern technology in what are known as smartphones nowadays.






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REFERENCES

1. Stephen Walkiewicz, 2014, The Five Best Quit-Smoking Apps, Retrieved from:
http://www.mensfitness.com/life/gearandtech/five-best-quit-smoking-apps
2. Harry McCracken, 2013, Who’s Winning, iOS or Android? All the Numbers, All in One Place,
Retrieved from: http://techland.time.com/2013/04/16/ios-vs-android/
3. Carter Thomas, 2011, How Much Does it Cost to Develop an App? Retrieved from:
http://www.bluecloudsolutions.com/blog/cost-develop-app/
4. Shweta Jain, 2009, Mobile Applications, A Consulting Report That Defines the Entry Strategy
for a Client Company, Retrieved from: http://www.slideshare.net/shwetaj/mobile-
applications-7643425
5. Medical News Today, 2004, Effects of Smoking on Life Span, Retrieved from:
http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/releases/9703.php
6. Sush Mobile, 2014, Sush Mobile, Retrieved from: http://www.sushmobile.co.nz/

7. Quitline, 2014, Quitline, Retrieved from: http://smokefree.gov/


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