GOODISON FOR EVERTON

REDEVELOPMENT OF GOODISON PARK LIVERPOOL

FEASIBILITY STUDY PART A PART B PART C

W A RD
McHUGH
SHEFFIELD
A SSO C I A T ES

GOODISON FOR EVERTON

REDEVELOPMENT OF GOODISON PARK LIVERPOOL

FEASIBILITY STUDY

PART A

WAR D
McHUGH
ASSOCIATES SHEFFIELD

REDEVELOPMENT OF GOODISON PARK

This Feasibility Study attempts to demonstrate how it would be possible to redevelop Goodison Park into a state of the art soccer stadium that would become a national and international venue.

The Study investigates two options of redevelopment, firstly a scheme that provides a 50 000 seater stadium on the existing footprint, and secondly, a scheme that provides a 55 000 seater stadium but in the context of a wider redevelopment of the locality - a vision that could help regenerate the economic vitality of the whole area.

Both options allow for a phased renewal that would enable Everton FC to continue to play at Goodison Park whilst redevelopment was carried out.

A NEW GOODISON PARK

Despite the tradition, the history, the heroes, the memories and the achievements of Everton Football Club, the current Ground at Goodison Park is outdated, outmoded and from the outside looks more like an industrial complex than an exciting entertainment venue.

The main criticisms of the Ground could be summarised as:

• • • • •

inadequate capacity inadequate facilities low income generation high maintenance costs continually upgrading to achieve safety requirements.

A new stadium on the existing site would not only remain as the true focal point to continue the tradition of Everton as a Football Club, it would also ensure that Everton maintain their reputation as being at the forefront of innovative stadium development that has been their hallmark for over 100 years.

A new Stadium would provide: • •

a national and international venue a capacity of 50 000 on the existing footprint, or a capacity of 55 000 if part of a wider redevelopment

kudos for the Club and the City of Liverpool if it was rebuilt - as a new Stadium - on the present site

• • •

excellent uninterrupted views for all spectators safe, comfortable and convenient facilities for all spectators significantly increased opportunities for income generation

a new ground that would incorporate the traditional features of Goodison Park and help provide instant loyalty

a development that could kickstart the regeneration of the local community and local economy

a football club that remains the focus of the local community and part of the local fabric - physically - commercially - and socially

a developmant that would receive support from the City and Community, and therefore access to additional funding sources.

DESIGN CRITERIA

A number of assumptions have been made in order to establish the criteria for a new Ground.

These assumptions may not necessarily coincide with Everton Football Club’s aspirations and requirements - but first and foremost - this Study attempts to illustrate that Goodison Park can be redeveloped in a manner that would place it amongst the top Grounds in the Premiership, the country and indeed Europe. It could also play as significant a part in a future World Cup competition as it did in 1966.

OPTION 1

The main assumptions were as follows: •

A capacity of 50 000: this figure was chosen as being the best compromise that could demonstrate the feasibility of providing an economically realistic facility whilst allowing the Ground to be redeveloped substantially on the existing footprint

Maintain the existing pitch orientation: although not ideal, maintaining the existing pitch in the same orientation - but taking the opportunity of moving/adjusting the grass surface during phased developments - allows the Ground to be redeveloped in phases, provides a playing area of 68m x 105m (in accordance with both FIFA and UEFA’s recommendations for World Cup and European Championship finals) and immediate surrounds that also comply, but which keep the spectators as close to the pitch as possible

Provide optimum conditions for all spectators: the design of the seating decks will provide unobstructed views of the whole of the playing surface with both sightlines and seating in accordance with FSADC recommendations

Provide good facilities for all spectators: the design allows for incorporating additional features over what is normally provided, including supporters clubs’ bars and lounges - some with pitch views - but intended to attract supporters to the Ground earlier and increase the spend per head

MAP OF EXISTING SITE

ILLUSTRATION

ILLUSTRATION 2

ILLUSTRATION 3 CROSS SECTION OF STAND

Provide commercial areas for maximum generation: the design allows for an intermediate middle tier that can be used as a premium seating area - backed by either lounges, hospitality boxes or suites - all with pitch views - providing a total of approximately 3000 seats that can be sold in premium commercial packages.

In addition, there are further areas that can be used to provide commercial ticketed packages should the demand be generated •

A phased redevelopment: by phasing the renewal of the Stands it will be possible to enable Everton to continue to play all their matches at Goodison Park maintaining a minimum capacity of 30 000 at any one time.

Create a new Ground uniquely Everton FC provide an exciting, impressive design that is at the forefront of Stadium design whilst maintaining features that are uniquely associated with Goodison Park and evoke the atmosphere and traditions of the past.

PHASING PROPOSALS

CURRENT GROUND CAPACITY:

40 179

Comprising:

Main Stand Bullens Road Gwladys Street Park End Stand

12 402 10 759 11 052 5 966

Maximum time will need to be gained at both ends of the “Close Season” to provide the fullest opportunity for construction periods. Completion or sectional completions of each construction phase can be arranged to ensure that overall capacity is maintained at the highest levels possible and in consultation/agreement with the safety authorities. Also rearranging/rescheduling home fixtures from the start to later in the season would provide additional weeks for construction periods to be completed.

Phasing, therefore, assumes construction starts early May, with a 10-month overall construction period for Stands on the long side of the Ground and nine months for Stands on the short side of the Ground. Full fitting out of specialist areas would take a further two months.

Four floodlight pylons are proposed for the new Stadium for a number of reasons - but in particular to enable the floodlighting to be provided in a phased manner and maintained at all times during periods of redevelopment that overlap the football season - and thus avoid temporary installations or having to rely on roofs being completed before floodlights can be permanently installed and commissioned.

Redeveloping the Bullens Road Stand first will enable all the Club’s facilities to be provided including new offices and ticket selling areas, changing rooms and Players facilities, Chairman’s offices and Directors suites - whilst the existing facilities are still in use - thus ensuring minimum disruption when the “changeover” occurs.

The Bullens Road Stand could also include significant income generation facilities such as hospitality boxes, suites and lounges that can be designed to function 365 days a year - to help secure the fullest possible income stream from the new development at the earliest opportunity.

OPTION 1 PHASE 1: Demolish Bullens Road Stand Rebuild new Stand - Lower Tier Complete New Stand

Capacities 40 179 - 10 759 29 420 + 7 600 37 020 + 6 650 43 670 43 670 12 402 31 268 + 7 600 38 868 + 6 650 45 518 45 518 11 052 34 466 + 5 760 40 226 + 4 990 45 216 45 216 5 966 39 250 + 5 760 45 010 + 4 990 50 000 -

Start of Season end September end February

PHASE 2: Demolish Goodison Road Stand Rebuild new Stand - Lower Tier Complete new Stand

Start of Season end September end February

PHASE 3: Demolish Gwladys Road Stand Rebuild New Stand - Lower Tier Complete new Stand

Start of Season end August end January

PHASE 4: Demolish Park End Stand Rebuild new Stand - Lower Tier Complete new Stand

Start of Season end August end January

The above phasing plan allows for the Ground to be fully redeveloped in 3.75 years from start to finish. It would be possible, however, to achieve full redevelopment in 2.75 years by combining Phase 3 and Phase 4, ie the short sides of the Ground, and carrying out the work simultaneously would provide the following capacities:

Capacities: PHASE 3: Demolish Gwladys Street Demolish Park End Stand 45 518 11 052 5 966 28 500 Rebuild New Stands - Lower Tiers + 11 520 40 020 Complete New Stands + 9 980 50 000 end February end September Start of Season

IMPACT OF A NEW GOODISON PARK - A WIDER VISION

OPTION 2

A redeveloped Goodison Park could provide a major benefit to the locality - but it could also have many significant dis-benefits - with an increased capacity and more intensive all-year-round use. The GFE have consulted a broad base of interested and involved organisations and authorities to discuss the impact that a new redeveloped Goodison Park may have.

There has been a quite remarkable level of positive comment from all sections concerning how it would not only be possible, but in many respects be both preferable and beneficial to the local community and the City for Goodison Park to be redeveloped and for Everton FC to continue in a new purpose-built Stadium.

The response was such that it encouraged the GFE to consider a wider vision, and investigate how associated development could help provide a broader economic base to better sustain the financial aspects of the redevelopment of a new soccer Stadium and help with the economic regeneration of the locality.

A number of options were considered - all physically capable of being accommodated - but with differing benefits and synergies for Everton FC - and for the City.

To pursue such a vision would require the close cooperation of Everton FC with the City and the community. Many noticeable and recent examples of very successful developments have been made possible by a partnership approach between a soccer club and a local authority, where a club has been able to redevelop a new ground and the City and community have benefited greatly.

Such an approach would possibly enable Everton FC to consider a more optimum development - one that was less constrained by current circumstances and existing footprints - and which would provide an opportunity to realise a more ambitious and farsighted vision for Goodison Park as a soccer ground and Everton FC, the Club.

A wider redevelopment concept would allow more “elbow room” and enable a new stadium achieve a more satisfactory fit on its existing site as well as providing a broader economic base for redevelopment.

In addition to the assumptions given for Option 1 above, the second Option is based on the following additional assumptions: •

A capacity of 55 000 This figure is more in line with current trends and the potential for certain Premiership clubs to maximise their opportunities. It would perhaps ensure that Goodison Park would once again be among the select of national and international soccer venues

Additional commercial potential The larger capacity doubles the provision of premium seating areas to a total of 6000 to allow for enhanced income generation

A more appropriate setting By considering the wider redevelopment of the locality it creates the opportunity to provide a more appropriate and impressive setting for an international soccer venue.

ILLUSTRATION 4

ILLUSTRATION 5

ILLUSTRATION 6

ILLUSTRATION CROSS SECTION 55 000

OPTION 2 PHASE 1: Demolish Bullens Road Stand Rebuild new Stand - Lower Tier Complete New Stand

Capacities 40 179 - 10 759 29 420 + 9 360 38 781 + 6 200 44 980 44 980 12 402 32 578 + 9 360 41 938 + 6 200 48 138 48 138 11 052 37 086 + 7 190 44 276 + 4 750 49 026 49 026 5 966 43 060 + 7 190 50 250 + 4 750 55 000 -

Start of Season end September end February

PHASE 2: Demolish Goodison Road Stand Rebuild new Stand - Lower Tier Complete new Stand

Start of Season end September end February

PHASE 3: Demolish Gwladys Road Stand Rebuild New Stand - Lower Tier Complete new Stand

Start of Season end August end January

PHASE 4: Demolish Park End Stand Rebuild new Stand - Lower Tier Complete new Stand

Start of Season end August end January

Again, if Phases 3 and 4 were carried out simultaneously then the following capacities would be provided: Capacities: PHASE 3: Demolish Gwladys Street Demolish Park End Stand Rebuild New Stands - Lower Tiers Complete New Stands 48 138 - 11 052 5 966 31 120 + 14 380 45 500 + 9 500 55 000

Start of Season end September end February

COSTING PROPOSALS

A number of new stadia have been built recently which provides a good indication of likely build costs for a redeveloped Goodison Park. Average costs for new stadia range from £650-£1000/seat, but these costs include oncosts of site preparation - often involving contaminated sites - and infrastructure provision, as well as forming and setting a new pitch.

By redeveloping Goodison Park, not only would land ownership costs be avoided, but site preparation costs would be minimal. There would be infrastructure costs that would include

upgrading the capacity of utility services and the installation of new floodlighting, but overall the cost per seat for redevelopment would be lower than new-build, even allowing for phased rebuilding.

Ignoring land acquisition costs we believe that the following assumptions are realistically based anticipated build costs:

New build stadium: Redeveloped stadium:

£810/seat £750/seat

These figures would mean therefore that the costs for the two options would be:

OPTION 1 OPTION 2 -

50 000 seat capacity: 55 000 seat capacity:

£37.5 million £41.25 million

The above cost estimates would provide for a very good quality, fully fitted out new stadium, redeveloped in phases and with excellent facilities that could be used on non-match days throughout the year.

Initial redevelopment costs would be significantly reduced by rescheduling the comprehensive fitting out of various Stands in order to be able to respond to demand over time.

Assuming the short sides of the Ground were not fully fitted out but the long sides were, this would produce costs to compare with the above of:

OPTION 1 OPTION 2 -

50 000 seat capacity: 55 000 seat capacity:

£32.13 million £35.28 million.

FINANCIAL REVIEW OF PROPOSALS

The aim of this financial review is to: • •

provide an illustration of the key differences between a redevelopment and a new build provide an example of the likely cash flows from the proposals for the redevelopment of Goodison Park.

Using conservative assumptions it can be shown that the redevelopment of Goodison Park will repay itself.

Direct comparison of redeveloping Goodison against building a new stadium shows a lower funding requirement on redevelopment.

The Club should seriously consider expanding the capacity to a 55 000 seater option or even beyond.

Cash Flow

The cash flow has deliberately used conservative assumptions. Nineteen Premier League games are assumed with just one home cup game. Nothing is assumed about Europe. The “New Stadium Effect” of increasing attendances is assumed to be around 40% of the usually observed effect. An interest rate of 12% has been used to cover future rises. A full list of assumptions is shown in Appendix 4.

It is assumed that Everton would be able to finance £20 million of the development from advance sponsorship, corporate entertaining, grants and share issues. Such a capital injection serves to increase profits by reducing the interest burden and gives a large “comfort” margin. The proposals will, however, pay back without the initial injection.

Three cash flows are included. Appendix 1 develops the proposals for rebuilding the stadium on the current footprint. Appendix 2 gives a comparison for the same stadium being built, but on a new site. Appendix 3 begins to develop the wider redevelopment proposals for expanding the stadium capacity to 55 000.

An unavoidable cost of the rebuilding option.Against this should be set the increased capacity of the rebuilt stands and the financially beneficial effect of the added ‘’premium’’ seating.

In working the cash flows three sets of assumptions have been followed.The first was to assume that Everton will sell,as a proportion of available seats,the same proportion as for the 197/98 season.An exception was made for those periods where capacity will fall below the present average attendance of 35 353.When the capacity falls below this level it has been assumed that all seats will be sold. On this basis the increase in capacity from the new stands,by October in the second year.All the losses caused by the initial drop in capacity are recouped by the end of the second year.

For inclusion in the cash flow analysis it has been assumed that some ‘’New Stadium Effect’’(see below) will arise.The assumption is that attendances in the new 50 000 seater stadium will average 45 000 rather than the 44 000 predicted by the ‘’current percentage’’ sold.It has also been assumed that this increase in attendances will occur in proportion to the additional capacity.

For the increased capacity cash flow average attendance of 50 000 has been assumed.

In all the calculations the net effect of capacity variances becomes beneficial before the stadium has been completely redeveloped.The increased capacity generated can be used to part fund the further development.By contrast a new build stadium will only begin to contribute when its complete,the full build cost will need to be expended before any is recouped.

The peak level of funding required for a redevelopment is considerably lower than that for a new build,as Appendices 1 and 2 show.

If a new build however can be completed earlier (in Sunderland's case,within 1 year),rather than the two years assumed for a new 50 000 seater stadium in this report,then the full rather than partial benefits flow earlier,and a new build makes more profit earlier than a redevelopment.

Loss of Capacity

The inevitable loss of capacity and, therefore, gate receipts on demolition of the stands to be redeveloped is an unavoidable cost of the rebuilding option. Against this should be set the increased capacity of the rebuilt stands and the financially beneficial effect of the added “premium” seating.

In working the cash flows three sets of assumptions have been followed. The first was to assume that Everton will sell, as a proportion of available seats, the same proportion as for the 1997/98 season. An exception was made for those periods where capacity will fall below the present average attendance of 35 353. When the capacity falls below this level it has been assumed that all seats will be sold.

On this basis the increase in capacity from the new stands and the premium seating income, begins to outweigh the loss from demolitions of stands, by October in the second year. All the losses caused by the initial drop in capacity are recouped by the end of the second year.

For inclusion in the cash flow analysis it has been assumed that some “New Stadium Effect” (see below) will arise. The assumption is that attendances in the new 50 000 seater stadium will average 45 000 rather than the 44 000 predicted by the “current percentage” sold. It has also been assumed that this increase in attendances will occur in proportion to the additional capacity.

For the increased capacity cash flow an average attendance of 50 000 has been assumed.

In all the calculations the net effect of capacity variances becomes beneficial before the stadium has been completely redeveloped. The increased capacity generated can be used to part fund the further development. By contrast a new build stadium will only begin to contribute when it is complete, the full build cost will need to be expended before any is recouped.

The peak level of funding required for a redevelopment is considerably lower than that for a new build, as Appendices 1 and 2 show.

If a new build however can be completed earlier (in Sunderlands case, within one year), rather than the two yeare assumed for a new 50 000 seater stadium in this report, then the full rather than partial benefits flow earlier, and a new build makes more profit earlier than a redevelopment.

How Big Should the Stadium Be?

When Goodison Park was first built gates increased. When Ajax moved into their new stadium gates increased. When Northampton moved into their new stadium gates increased. When Sunderland and Reading moved into their new stadium and got relegated gates increased. Now or then, Premiership or Nationwide, UK or overseas it does not appear to matter. New stadiums increase attendances.

There are many reasons for this “New Stadium Effect”. Views are better, that last 5 000 seats with restrictive views are no longer restricted. Facilities are better. A lot may be down to people attending a match “just to see what all the fuss is about” and finding out how exciting it is. Whatever the reasons it has to be said that the effect exists and is big - two thirds increase in attendances is about average, the above costings assume 28.5%.

An increase in capacity does not have to sell out to be financially profitable. At an incremental cost of £500 per seat extra interest of 12% x £500 = £60 will be incurred.

That will be covered by sales for just five matches at £14.50 (giving £14.5 x 5 = £72.50). The surplus of £72.50 - £60 = £12.50 can be used to reduce the loan to £487.50. The following season, with seat prices now at £15.15 and the lower loan generating interest of £58.50, five sales produce a surplus of £17.25. The surplus continues to accelerate until, in this very marginal example, the seat pays for itself in 11 years, selling

the seat 6 times a year repays in 9 years, 7 times repays 7 years and so on. The question is not “can we fill the stadium” but “can we fill the stadium about six times a year”.

In order to allow realistic comparisons with the Club’s existing plans to build a 50 000 seater stadium this review has limited itself to examining this capacity. The board should be aware that the profitability, cash flow and self-funding nature of the redevelopment can all be enhanced by increasing the end capacity.

APPENDIX 1

PHASE 1

PHASE 2 TITLE GOODISON FOR EVERTON CAMPAIGN RE-DEVELOPMENT PROPOSALS -PHASING STRATEGY 1

W A RD
McHUGH
A SSO C I A T ES

PHASE 3

W A RD
McHUGH
A SSO C I A T ES

TITLE GOODISON FOR EVERTON CAMPAIGN RE-DEVELOPMENT PROPOSALS -PHASING STRATEGY 1

PHASE 1

PHASE 2 TITLE GOODISON FOR EVERTON CAMPAIGN RE-DEVELOPMENT PROPOSALS -PHASING STRATEGY 2

W A RD
McHUGH
A SSO C I A T ES

PHASE 3

PHASE 4 TITLE GOODISON FOR EVERTON CAMPAIGN RE-DEVELOPMENT PROPOSALS -PHASING STRATEGY 2

W A RD
McHUGH
A SSO C I A T ES

GOODISON FOR EVERTON

REDEVELOPMENT OF GOODISON PARK LIVERPOOL
FEASIBILITY STUDY

Part B

WAR D
McHUGH
ASSOCIATES SHEFFIELD

GOODISON FOR EVERTON

REDEVELOPMENT OF GOODISON PARK LIVERPOOL

FEASIBILITY STUDY SUPPLEMENTARY REPORT

WAR D
McHUGH
ASSOCIATES SHEFFIELD

REDEVELOPMENT OF GOODISON PARK

This Supplementary Report attempts to identify and quantify further sources of funding and income in addition to that previously assumed in the main Feasibility Study.

It also confirms that a phased redevelopment better manages capital loan requirements by enabling accelerated income streams to pay back capital and interest earlier, thus minimising indebtedness.

This Supplementary Report as well as the previous Feasibility Report was produced in conjunction with and help from Tony Lloyd ACA (0370 921659).

John Dix of Deloitte & Touche Management Solutions (01727 839000) has helped in identifying and quantifying the additional income sources. Although he has reservations regarding certain assumptions that have been made, believes that further more detailed studies are required to test and confirm these assumptions.

REDEVELOPMENT OF GOODISON PARK LIVERPOOL for EVERTON FOOTBALL CLUB
GOODISON for EVERTON

INTERNAL VIEW OF THE STADIUM

W A RD
McHUGH
PROPOSED NEW 55 000 SEAT STADIUM
A SSO C I A TES

Further considerations have been made regarding the financing of the redevelopment proposals, together with consultations carried out to investigate potential, additional income sources and their effect on Everton Football Club’s ability to fund the whole project.

It is clear that redevelopment of the existing site provides many considerable advantages over relocation to a new greenfield(?) site, these are:

potentially large savings can be made by avoiding the infrastructure costs that would be required to develop a new site

redevelopment of the existing site is likely to prove to be overall, the quickest way of providing a new Stadium

redevelopment of the existing site - with an existing use - is more likely to receive the necessary approvals, when compared with the uncertainty - and possible timescale - of obtaining approval for a stadium on a new greenfield(?) site

phased redevelopment allows the Club to refine or amend proposals, to revise the content and cost of each phase in response to levels of demand generated by previous phases

phased redevelopment allows for phased funding - minimising overall levels of debt.

Set against these potential advantages, the disadvantages would be limitations on ground capacity during redevelopment phases (reduced to a 30 000 minimum for a limited number of matches), the impact on supporters of a “building site” over the redevelopment period (which could be between 2.75 to 3.75 years), and the limited potential for commercial development to help fund the new Stadium. However, it would appear to be the case that not one of the new stadia that has been completed or currently contemplated, has been or will be built without significant grant aid, either in the form of European or Lottery money, free land, contribution to infrastructure costs or politically expedient planning consents on commercially valuable land.

All of which makes a compelling argument in favour of redevelopment rather than relocation.

The previous Report assumed that £20 million of finance would be available from advance sponsorship, corporate entertaining, grants and share issues as capital contribution. We have

identified how some of this additional finance could become available and the potential contributions are based upon the following assumptions:

Advance Sponsorship In line with the trend to “name” new stadia and with Everton’s status it would be reasonable to assume that naming individual stands and branding the new Stadium could provide an annual income of £500 000 - or a capital sum of £2.5million structured as front-end contributions to coincide with development phases

Corporate Hospitality Currently, Everton FC has a limited income from hospitality boxes - eleven 10-person boxes at £22 500 per season. It is understood that there is a long waiting list, but for a Premiership Club this is a remarkably low number. A feasible level of provision in comparison with Premiership Clubs of comparable status would be in the order of 50 hospitality boxes. Assuming therefore an additional 39 boxes, then this could generate an additional net income of £650 000 per annum.

Alternatively, pre-selling of hospitality boxes on, say, a 3-year lease would provide a capital sum of £22 500 x 50 x 3 = £3 375 000, again, structured as front-end contributions to coincide with development phases.

Grant Aid From a number of consultations made it would appear unlikely that grants would be available or be of any significance in the funding of a redeveloped Goodison Park on a purely soccer base.

GOODISON for EVERTON

W A RD
McHUGH
A SSO C I A T ES

REDEVELOPMENT OF GOODISON PARK LIVERPOOL for EVERTON FOOTBALL CLUB
PROPOSED NEW 55 000 SEAT STADIUM

It is possible that sources of grant aid would exist on a base case of creating an international venue, but for the purposes of this Study capital contributions from grant aid have been ignored.

Development Land The land adjacent to the proposed Stadium - approximately 5 acres - is assumed to be capable of being acquired for £5 million.

This sum was factored into the cash flow model in the Feasibility Study (Appendix 3) and is in addition to the £41.25 million cost identified for a new 55 000 capacity Stadium.

It is considered a feasible proposition to pre-sell this land for £4 million. This proposition is based on an assumption that there is a political will within the City for Everton to remain at Goodison Park and that the “wider vision” articulated in the Feasibility Study that would allow for a 55 000 capacity Stadium, will be realisable.

Share/Rights Issue In any comparable project of this nature funding organisations would expect equity contribution to form part of the overall capital sum raised - possibly in the order of 30% of the total requirement.

The potential capital contribution could therefore comprise the following: • • • Advance Sponsorship Corporate Hospitality 2 500 000 3 375 000

Development Land

4 000 000

TOTAL:

£9 875 000

This would therefore leave a balance to be found from equity contribution in the order of £10 million, out of a total project cost of some £46 million.

The beneficial effect of being able to phase the development of the new Stadium can be seen from the following simplified summary:

• • •

Advance income from Land, Sales and Sponsorship Equity contribution Maximum indebtedness (overdraft) paid for by additional capacity (Appendix 3)

10 000 000 10 000 000 11 000 000

Enhanced income streams throughout redevelopment period

15 000 000

TOTAL:

£46 000 000

It is understood that the above financial plan represents only one possible approach to structuring the project development costs, and that this may not be the way Everton FC would choose to do it. Nevertheless it does represent and illustrate how the redevelopment of Goodison Park would appear to be a feasible proposition.

GOODISON for EVERTON

W A RD
McHUGH
A SSO C I A T ES

REDEVELOPMENT OF GOODISON PARK LIVERPOOL for EVERTON FOOTBALL CLUB
PROPOSED NEW 55 000 SEAT STADIUM

GOODISON FOR EVERTON

REDEVELOPMENT OF GOODISON PARK LIVERPOOL

Final Submitted Report to Everton FC.
FEASIBILITY STUDY JUNE 2000

PART C

WAR D
McHUGH
ASSOCIATES SHEFFIELD

REDEVELOPMENT OF GOODISON PARK

This Feasibility Study attempts to demonstrate how it would be possible to redevelop Goodison Park into a state of the art soccer stadium that would become a national and international venue.

The Study investigates two options for redevelopment.Firstly a scheme that provides for a 55 000 seater stadium with commercial development within the footprint of the new stadium,and secondly,a scheme that provides for a 55 000 seater stadium with the commercial development located separately alongside,fronting onto Walton Road.Both proposals see the redevelopment of the stadium in the context of a wider redevelopment of the locality-a vision that could help regenerate the economic vitality of the whole area.

Both options also allow for a phased renewal that would enable Everton FC to continue to play at Goodison Park whilst redevelopment work was carried out.

A NEW GOODISON PARK

Despite the tradition, the history, the heroes, the memories and the achievements of Everton Football Club, the current Ground at Goodison Park is outdated, outmoded and from the outside looks more like an industrial complex than an exciting entertainment venue.

The main criticisms of the Ground could be summarised as:

• • • • •

inadequate capacity inadequate facilities low income generation high maintenance costs continually upgrading to achieve safety requirements.

A new stadium on the existing site would not only remain as the true focal point to continue the tradition of Everton as a Football Club, it would also ensure that Everton maintain their reputation as being at the forefront of innovative stadium development that has been their hallmark for over 100 years.

A new Stadium would provide: • • •

a national and international venue a capacity of 55 000 on the existing site, as part of a wider redevelopment kudos for the Club and the City of Liverpool if it was rebuilt - as a completely new Stadium on the present site

• • • •

excellent uninterrupted views for all spectators safe, comfortable and convenient facilities for all spectators significantly increased opportunities for income generation a new ground that would incorporate the traditional features of Goodison Park and help

• •

Significantly increased opportunities for income generation. a new ground that would incorporate the traditional features of Goodison Park and help provide instant loyalty

An exciting new building,designed to fit an urban area with a scale that relates to the surroundings.

a development that could kickstart the regeneration of the local community and local economy

a football club that remains the focus of the local community and part of the local fabric - physically - commercially - and socially

a developmant that would receive support from the City and Community, and therefore access to additional funding sources.

DESIGN CRITERIA

A number of criteria have been adopted in order to produce a viable set of proposals that would serve to provide Everton with a stadium that will take them well into the new millennium and demonstrate that the Club is a major player in the Premiership,with strong ambitions to remain at the forefront of national and international soccer.

The main criteria are as follows: •

A capacity of 55 000 This figure was chosen as being the optimum capacity,taking into account the Club’saverage attendances figures,the supporter’s profile,the anticipated increase in attendances, and the developments in televised soccer.

Maintain the existing pitch orientation: Although not the most ideal it is within the recommended zone for soccer.Maintaining the same orientation—but taking the opportunity of moving/adjusting the grass surface during phased developments—allows the Ground to be redeveloped in phase.A playing area Of 68m x 105m has been allowed for in accordance with both FIFA and UEFA’s recommendations for World Cup and European Championship finals.

Provide optimum conditions for all spectators: The design of the seating decks will provide unobstructed views of the whole of the playing surface with both sightlines and seating in accordance with FSADC recommendations. The immediate surrounds also comply, but which keep the spectators as close to the pitch as possible

Provide good facilities for all spectators: the design allows for incorporating additional features over what is normally provided, including supporters clubs’ bars and lounges - some with pitch views - but intended to attract supporters to the Ground earlier and increase the spend per head.

Provide commercial areas for maximum income generation: the design allows for an intermediate middle tier that can be used as a premium seating area backed

Provide commercial areas for maximum income generation: the design allows for an intermediate middle tier that can be used as a premium seating area backed by either lounges,hospitality boxes or suites - all with pitch views—providing a total of approximately 6000 seats that can be sold in premium commercial packages.

In addition,there are further areas that can be used to provide commercial ticketed packages should the demand be generated.

Provide commercial areas for maximum income generation: the design allows for an intermediate middle tier that can be used as a premium seating area backed by either lounges,hospitality boxes or suites - all with pitch views—providing a total of approximately 6000 seats that can be sold in premium commercial packages. •

A phased redevelopment: By phasing the renewal of the Stands it will be possible to enable Everton to continue to play all their matches at Goodison Park maintaining a minimum capacity of 30 000 at any one time.

Create a new Ground uniquely Everton FC Provide an exciting,impressive design that is at the forefront of Stadium design whilst maintaining features that are uniquely associated with Goodison Park and evoke the atmosphere and traditions of the past.

OPTION STUDIES

Two options have been investigated to help determine the most appropriate form of development and general arrangements that would achieve the clubs objectives.

Option One:

This option provides for a significant commercial component within the footprint of the new stadium, with the surrounding areas laid out for car parking and the creation of open spaces.

There are existing current models where commercial developments are located within a major soccer ground, and run as separate businesses from the main host. They are managed in a way that allows complimentary use between their operations and the soccer club.

This form of development ensures that a stadium would be full of activity for large periods of time on normal non-match days, helping to ensure its closer integration into the community

Option Two:

In this option the commercial development is provided as a stand alone development fronting onto Walton Lane , with car parking provided at semi-basement level within the footprint of the new stadium. This is perhaps a more conventional arrangement , and again is now to be found at a number Of new grounds around the country.

IMPACT OF REDEVELOPMENT

Redeveloping on exactly the same footprint would not allow for increase in capacity or for the provision of adequate corporate or commercial facilities . Neither would it provide an appropriate setting for the type of stadium that the club wish to develop. It would be essential for the club’s future to secure a larger site area and consider the redevelopment of the whole of the site bounded by Goodison Road , Gwladys Street and Walton Lane.

Doing so would allow for the following:

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More space around the stadium for spectators to move freely and safely. Reduce the impact of the height of the new stands by moving the stadium further away from the houses on Goodison Road and Gwladys Street.

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Provide a more appropriate and fitting setting for a new stadium. Reduce the conflict of large volumes of spectators on the surrounding arrears. Allow for associated commercial development that would compliment the new stadium development and help start the regeneration of the area.

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Provide significant opportunities for real community involvement with the club. Demonstrate a significant improvement in the physical fabric of the area and a provide a massive improvement in the overall visual amenity.

The consequences of this wider redevelopment are very significant and can only be achieved if there is a genuine partnership involving the club ,the city and the community to deal with the issues raised.

The Club would require the strong support of the City Council to help achieve their objectives in redeveloping their existing ground .Equally the Club will need to demonstrate that it is prepared to help contribute to the problems posed in these proposals ,and the community would needt to understand the longer term benefits that could accrue.

A significant start could be made by relocating the existing Gwladys Street School and providing a brand new school on a nearby site already owned by the club. This site would also provide an opportunity to build new houses that would replace 40% of the houses affected by these proposals . Further investigation needs to be done to establish whether there are suitable sites in the immediate vicinity to replace the remaining houses affected.

There are a number of other very significant aspects involved that would be beyond the resources of the Club alone and would need assistance from the City Council and the community .But redevelopment of the whole site would act as a catalyst to the economic regeneration of the area and halt the spiral of decline that has begun to gather pace.