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INFOSYS.110 BUSINESS SYSTEMS:
DELIVERABLE 2: BUSINESS SECTION
2014

Name Queena Perry
NetID qper369
Group Number: 201
Website Link:
http://infosys1102014s1group201.blogspot.co.nz/p/d2-
qper369.html
Tutorial Details
Tutor: Day: Time:
Johnnie Shubert Wednesday 10am
Time Spent on
Assignment:
27 hours Word Count: 1647

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ELECTRONIC DOG TRAINING COLLAR
INTRODUCTION
They say dogs are a man’s best friend. If that’s true, why is the problem of dog attacks
prevalent in New Zealand society? Dog attacks risks lives; six people have died since 1969
and about one-third of dog attacks are on children aged under 12 (Boyer, APNZ, 2014). Our
innovative solution to address this issue is an electronic dog training collar. It aims to
address the root causes attacks by addressing the dogs’ aggressive nature and improper
training by owners.
3. BUSINESS SECTION
3.1 Vision
To build towards a better world by providing personalised, innovative training tools for dogs
that will ensure the safety of humankind.
3.2 Industry Analysis: Electronic Dog Training Collar Industry
Industry: Electronic Dog Training Collar Industry
Force: High/Low: Justification:
Buyer power: Low Buyers are offered a small range of collars to
choose from. Only Dogtra, SportDOG & Innotek,
Garmin (Tri-tronics), PetSafe, D.T. Systems
produce electronic collars in this industry
(DogMaster Trainers NZ, n.d.).
Supplier power: Low Many suppliers can provide raw materials as the
materials required are readily available e.g.
silicon, copper, plastics and stainless steel,
“contact points made of stainless steel” (Tri-

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tronics, n.d.). Collars use similar inputs to
GPS/tracking systems, “We introduced the first-
ever GPS tracking collar…many of our customers
have asked us to integrate dog tracking
capabilities with electronic dog training” (Garmin,
n.d.). As the technology in GPS/tracking systems
is well-established, buyers can choose from many
supply sources.
Threat of new entrants: Low Electronic collar production requires
techonological expertise and knowledge, time
and high start up capital costs. “We have spent
the last 40 years designing and building products
that meet these needs.”(Tri-tronics, n.d.) suggests
the effort required to overcome high entry
barriers to establish their market position.
Threat of substitutes: High Rather than using electronic training collars, dog
owners could manually train them themselves, or
hire a qualified dog trainer. Other training tool
substitutes include “choke chains, pinch collars,
“alpha rolls” and throw chains.” (Hetts, n.d.).
Rivalry among existing
competitors:
Low There are not many companies in this industry.
“D.T. Systems has consistently led the industry in
"cutting edge" technology, breaking new ground
at every turn” and “Tri-tronics is our most trusted
brand of Dog Training Collars” (My Good Puppy,
n.d.) suggests there are only a few big players in
the industry that have a large market share which

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is not eroded away by fierce competition from
many smaller businesses.
Overall attractiveness of the industry: High, provided you can convince customers to
substitute away from manual training tools and switch to electronic versions.
3.3 Customers and Thei r Needs
Our customers are current dog owners, but also future ones. There are 4.47 million
residents in NZ (Statistics New Zealand, 2013) and 29% of households own a dog, a total of
700,000 dogs (WSPA, 2011). Customers need a personalisable training tool tailored for their
dog’s behaviour “Any dog, of any breed, can bite and be aggressive. It just depends on the
way they've been brought up, and the way their owner socialises and owns them.” (Harper,
2012). This also shows customers’ need for a tool that is humane and safe to use. Customers
also require a permanent solution to fix aggressive behaviours so that there is no chance for
them to even attack at all, “Those dogs, if something triggers them, they just latch on and
don't let go." (Boyer, APNZ, 2014).
3.4 The Product and Service
Our product is an electronic dog training collar which detects the dog’s heart rate and if it
reaches past a certain level it would trigger pre-recorded commands in the owner’s voice, to
pacify the dog. Different heart rate levels trigger different degrees of severity of the
commands.
It satisfies the needs of owners because the functionality of recording the owner’s
personalised voice means dogs will respond better to it. Positive reinforcement through
commands is used unlike controversial shock collars, and also requires training of the dogs
beforehand so that they can understand the commands, allowing for bonding time. It is a
preventative measure because the dog receives reinforcement before it can even attack.
3.5 Suppliers and Partners
A supplier is a collar materials supplier whom will supply the raw materials e.g. stainless
steel to make the physical, external parts of the collar. Another is an IT supplier, who would

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create “specialised algorithms to collect and analyse data.” (DailyMail, 2014) for the built-in
heart rate monitor and voice recorder.
A partner would be Tri-tronics (Garmin) as their vision links with ours and they are an
established market leader, “Since 40 years ago…committed to designing, manufacturing and
selling only the highest quality, most durable and reliable, and easiest to use electronic dog
training products in the world.” (Tri-tronics, n.d.). Another partner is Auckland Council/local
government department as our product aligns with their aims to reduce dog attacks, “Local
government… is seeking… a review of current dog control laws to see if there is anything
else that can be done to prevent serious attacks.” (Binning, E, 2012). They could subsidise
production costs or promote the use of our collars within the community.
3.6 Strategy: Differentiation
Our competitive scope is broad market due to our large customer base of present and
future dog-owners in NZ. We can satisfy all market segments with our personalisable collar.
Our cost strategy is high cost due to the large capital requirements for production of a high
quality, technologically advanced collar. It is feasible to pass on this high cost to customers
as they will perceive the high value of this innovation and will pay to receive its benefits.
The overall strategy is therefore Differentiation
3.7 Value Chain Activity: Technology Development (and R&D)
The most important value chain activity for this business is Technology Development (and
R&D).
This is critical in supporting our vision of providing a personalisable and innovative product,
to ensure safety from dog attacks. This requires extensive research and development so we
can enact our vision, meet our customers’ needs and maintain our differentiation strategy.
Technology development allows us to gain first-mover advantage with a unique product and
sustain a competitive advantage which will differentiate ourselves from other competitors
in this market.


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START
A selection of dog
collars are selected
at random
A member of staff
records a range of
voice commands
Does the voice
recorder work/
capture the sound?
Match the severity
of command to the
appropriate heart
rate level
Yes
Voice recorder
issues assessed
No
Staff member tests
heart rate monitor
component on him/
herself
Does the correct command
sound at 60-80bpm (resting
human heart rate level)?
Incorrect command
issues assessed
Simulate various
weather conditions
e.g. rain/snow by
submerging collar in
water/ ice.
No
Yes
Voice recorder fixed
and approved?
Reject
product
No
Command issues fixed
and approved?
Reject product
No
Yes
Does collar withstand weather
simulations testing?
Issues with
durability of collar
assessed
Approve
durability?
Final approval and
reviewof product
Reject product
No
END
Yes
Yes
Research and Development
Department
Information Systems
Product Testing
Management System
Yes
No
END
END
END
3.8 Business Processes
3.8.1. PRODUCT TESTING PROCESS - This process is essential to ensure that the collar is
successful in providing a unique benefit to customers. By continously testing our product we
can ensure that the dogs are getting properly trained; that they are receiving the correct
reinforcement appropriate to their heart rate. By testing our product we are developing it-
continually assessing it and making adjustments which is in line with our value chain activity.





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START
Identify a need for a
product in the
market
Brainstorm possible
design ideas
Research materials
and their
applications
Is it feasible to carry out the
design using the materials?
Assess the use of
materials and
modify applications
Analyse the ethical
implications of
design ideas
Yes
Does it comply with legal
standards/codes of practice?
Assess ethical/legal
issues and align
design ideas
No
No
Critically assess all
other factors
involved in designs
Develop prototypes
Evaluate prototypes
and materials used
Approved?
Reject design idea(s)
Compliance?
Consider social and
environmental
impacts of designs
Yes
Reject design idea(s)
Resolve and/or
modify design
Choose one best
design
Briefly develop the
best design idea
Reject all of the
design ideas
Yes
END
Does the design meet
the required needs?
Finalise design and
details
END
Yes
Design Department
Information Systems
Design Management
System
No
Yes
No
Yes
No
No
END
END
3.8.2. COLLAR DESI GN PROCESS – This process is essential in improving our collar designs to
deliver the innovation and personalisation that satisfies our customers’ need. This will help
us maintain a competitive advantage as we are continuously developing better prototypes,
assessing, modifying and sometimes rejecting them if they don’t meet the required
standards. This process is integral in the value chain activity of technology development
(and R&D) and allowing us to enact our vision in a concrete fashion.



















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3.9 Functionalities
3.9.1. PRODUCT TESTING PROCESS
 Checks whether the voice recorder works, and whether the collar will
function in a variety of weather conditions.
 Identifies whether the appropriate heart rate level triggers the correct
severity of command.
3.9.2. COLLAR DESI GN PROCESS
 Resolves/modifies potential faults in prototypes to develop the product
design.
 Evaluates whether the design ideas for a dog collar product are suitable and
feasible to produce.
3.10 Systems

3.10. 1. PRODUCT TESTING MANAGEMENT SYSTEM - This manages the collar testing by
identifying if a certain heart rate level will trigger the correct command, which is the
essence of the collar’s and functionality. This allows staff to decide whether the product
serves its purpose of giving commands to the dog which supports our vision because it
assists in determining whether a possible dog attack could be prevented.
3.10. 2. DESI GN MANAGEMENT SYSTEM – This manages the design aspect from various
prototypes to the final product. It assists in evaluating any potential pitfalls in the design
process and allows critical assessment of prototypes for effective development. It supports
the processes, decisions and strategies that enable innovation. This aligns with our vision of
building towards a better world through innovative products because we continually make
adjustments to our designs to enhance them.
3.10. 3. QUALI TY CONTROL ANALYSI S SYSTEM – This helps staff analyse the the functioning of
the voice recorder and durability in weather conditions. It assists them in checking whether
it meets quality standards or not, allowing them to assess any issues, fix and approve them
so a quality product can be released that satisfies the customers’ expectations for the
product. This supports our vision as to ensure safety, our products need to be of a high
quality and perform optimally.

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3.11. Summary Table: Value Chain to Systems

Value Chain
Activity
Processes Functionalities Specific Information
System(s)
Broad Information
System(s)

Technology
Development
(and R&D)
1. Product
Testing
Process
1. Checks whether the voice recorder works,
and whether the collar will function in a
variety of weather conditions.

2. Identifies whether the appropriate heart rate
level triggers the correct severity of
command.
Quality control analysis
system


Product testing management
system
Transaction processing
system


Transaction processing
system

2. Collar
Design
Process
1. Resolves/modifies potential faults in
prototypes to develop the product design.

2. Evaluates whether the design ideas for a dog
collar product are suitable and feasible to
produce.
Design management system


Design management system
Decision support system


Decision support system

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CONCLUSION
Our business is centred on providing a personalised, innovative tool that will address the
issue of dog attacks. Our electronic dog training collar is reliant on information systems and
information technology. Information systems supports our business as it enables
information flow into and within our organisation. Without IT/IS we would not be able to
deliver maximum value and reach our organisational goals and ultimately, enact our vision.
REFERENCES

1. DogMaster Trainers New Zealand, (n.d.). Dog containment systems, bark control
collars, dog training collars & more! Retrieved May 10, 2014, from
http://www.dogmaster.co.nz/index.html
2. Ott, E. (2012). What materials are used to make computers? Retrieved from
http://www.ehow.com/list_6162960_materials-used-make-computers_.html
3. Hetts, S. (n.d.). Understanding dog training equipment. Retrieved May 12, 2014,
from http://www.animalbehavior.org/ABSAppliedBehavior/article-applied-
behavior/understanding-dog-training-equipment
4. Statistics New Zealand. (2013). National population estimates: at 30 June 2013.
Retrieved from
http://stats.govt.nzhttp://www.stats.govt.nz/browse_for_stats/population/estimate
s_and_projections/NationalPopulationEstimates_HOTPAt30Jun13.aspx
5. WSPA. (2011, August 15). NZ survey reveals a nation of pet owners and animal
lovers. Retrieved from
http://www.wspa.org.nz/latestnews/2011/NZ_survey_a_nation_of_animal_lovers.a
spx
6. Tri-tronics. (n.d.). Products- Special features. Retrieved May 12, 2014, from
http://www.tritronics.com/content/products/special-features/
7. My Good Puppy. (n.d.). DT Systems Training Collars. Retrieved May 14, 2014, from
http://mygoodpuppy.com/ecom-catshow/DT-Systems-Training-Collars.html
8. Harper, P. (2012, January 23). Owner problem, not dog problem- expert. The New
Zealand Herald. Retrieved from
http://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=10780605
9. Boyer, S., & APNZ. (2014, March 5). Dog Victim’s anger over new attack. The New
Zealand Herald. Retrieved from http://www.nzherald.co.nz/dog-
attacks/news/article.cfm?c_id=575&objectid=11214003
10. Binning, E. (2012, January 25). 11,708 dog attacks on Kiwis last year- ACC. The New
Zealand Herald. Retrieved from
http://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=10780946
11. Daily Mail. (2014, January 9). The ‘FitBit’ for DOGS: $299 collar measures heart rate,
counts calories and checks if a pet is getting enough exercise. Retrieved from
http://www.dailymail.uk.com/the-fitbit-for-dogs-299-collar-measures-heart-rate-
counts-calories-and-checks-if-a-pet-is-getting-enough-exercise/

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12. Garmin. (n.d.). Pet products. Retrieved May 15, 2014, from
http://www.garmin.com/us/products/onthetrail/pet-products