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INFOSYS.110 BUSINESS SYSTEMS:
DELIVERABLE 2: BUSINESS SECTION
2014

Name Simon Long
NetID slon730
Group Number: 340
Website Link: http://infosys1102014s1group340.blogspot.co.nz
Tutorial Details
Tutor: Day: Time:
Kirsten Van Dorp Thursday 10am
Time Spent on
Assignment:
25.5 hours
Word
Count:
1649
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FAULKNER SOLUTIONS LTD - INTERCEPT
INTRODUCTION
"In 2012, speeding was a contributing factor in 68 fatal crashes, 307 serious injury
crashes and 1,049 minor injury crashes" (Transport, n.d.). Our business, Faulkner
Solutions, will provide a speed-tracking device called Intercept, which will allow
the New Zealand government to monitor and address speeding across the country.
This device uses preexisting cell towers to communicate data from the ECU of any
vehicle to our data department (Vodafone NZ, n.d.). We will then use the data to
contact the New Zealand Transport Agency (NZTA) if necessary (New Zealand
Transport Agency, n.d.). This will effectively reduce speeding through the issuing
of tickets and warnings when offences occur, as people will be discouraged to
speed again. We plan to take the device overseas if its implementation on New
Zealand roads is successful.
3. BUSINESS SECTION
3.1 Vision
“To make New Zealand roads a safer place, through our innovative speed tracking
and interpretation systems”.
3.2 Industry Analysis: GPS tracking industry
Industry: The GPS tracking industry.
Force: High/Low Justification:
Buyer power: High Buyer power in the GPS tracking industry is
high as there are many players such as Argus
Tracking and Snitch, giving buyers more of a
decision as to which provider they would
prefer to support their operations (Argus
Tracking, n.d.)(Snitch, n.d.).
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Supplier power: Low Supplier power is low for the GPS tracking
industry as a business has the option of many
suppliers at all stages of the production
process. For example, a business can choose
to have one of their product components
made at a multiple electronics factories.
Threat of new
entrants:
Low The threat of new entrants to the GPS
tracking industry is low. This is because the
business will want to order a large quantity
of devices, as it reduces the cost of devices
on a per unit basis. This requires a large
startup capital, making the barriers to entry
high.
Threat of substitutes: Low The threat of substitutes is low, as there are
very few alternatives to GPS tracking. The
closest alternative is RFID tagging which is
more suited to smaller areas such as a
hospital where all everything requires
tracking (HowStuffWorks, n.d.). Although
GPS tracking is not suited to smaller scale
operations such as hospitals, it is not rivaled
in any other situation such as fleet tracking.
Rivalry among existing
competitors:
High Rivalry among existing competitors is high as
GPS systems do not have unlimited
capabilities, meaning current companies in
the market must fight for cost leadership
(Argus Tracking, n.d.)(Snitch, n.d.). This is
even more so due to the large amount of
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businesses already in the GPS tracking
industry.
Overall attractiveness of the industry: I believe the industry is attractive as all of
the forces are favorable except rivalry among existing competitors and buyer
power, of which I believe can be combated by effective cost leadership.
3.3 Customers and Their Needs
Our customers are primarily governments as they are in a position to effectively
interpret and use the data for the greater good of safer roads. Governments know
that speed cameras and road police are not enough to effectively combat
speeding, which will makes our product ideal for the keeping roads safe
(Transport, n.d). The government will first be required to purchase a quantity of
devices they feel is necessary to begin a nationwide rollout through the NZTA. Our
business will then provide support for any technical issues that may arise during
the devices use.
3.4 The Product and Service
Our product is a device that attaches to the ECU of any vehicle in order to track its
speed and road user data. This data will then be relayed to existing cell towers, so
the data can be sent to our data processing department where the decision will be
made on whether the driver has breached the speed limit or not. If we find the
driver has exceeded the speed limit, we can view the serial number of the
offending device, view the details required to contact the driver and send this
relevant information to NZTA, where the appropriate fine and/or warning will be
issued. The product will be inserted into every vehicle during its next Warrant of
Fitness (WOF), meaning the maximum rollout period for our device is one year, as
all of New Zealand’s vehicles would have required at least one WOF by that time
(VTNZ, n.d.). The device will then continue to be serviced until the devices useful
life runs out, at which point it will be replaced.
3.5 Suppliers and Partners
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Our suppliers range from the producers of raw materials that go into our product
to the companies that manufacture the parts of the device. Our product requires
plastics supplier Lehigh Valley Plastics (based in US) to supply the plastic required
to produce the outer shell of the device (Lehigh Valley Plastics, n.d.). This plastic
is then transported to Star Prototyping (based in China) where it is molded into a
shell that meets our specifications (Star Prototyping, n.d.). The shells along with
various other components are then sent to Foxconn where they are assembled and
shipped to New Zealand (Foxconn, n.d.). NZTA is a key partner for our business as
they are responsible for processing the data and issuing the tickets and warnings
(NZTA, n.d.). Vehicle mechanics are also a major partner for our business as they
are responsible for installing the device during a vehicles next WoF (VTNZ, n.d.).
3.6 Strategy: Focused low cost
Our target market is narrow (scope) as our product is currently only aimed at
governments, in particular, the New Zealand government. Our device is also low
cost as the GPS tracking industry is competitive (five forces analysis), forcing us to
deliver our device at a competitive price. This strategy should allow us to expand
overseas in the future, providing the same device to other governments. Our
overall strategy is therefore focused low cost.
3.7 Value Chain Activity: Delivering the product or service
An important value chain activity for our business is delivering the product or
service as our business not only provides a good (the device), but we also provide
the cell tower infrastructure and service to allow the NZTA to issue tickets or
warnings. As our vision encompasses making roads a safer place through speed
tracking, we need to deliver our device and associated services well, in order for it
to provide round the clock data, which will eventually lead to the issuing of tickets
through the NZTA (NZTA, n.d.).
3.8 Business Processes
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3.8.1. DATA COLLECTION PROCESS - This is the process of collecting data from a
traveling vehicle, transmitting it to the nearest cell tower, the cell tower
transmitting the data to our information center, the center alerting NZTA and
NZTA correctly issuing tickets and warnings. This process is important, as it
underpins the final stage of issuing tickets and warnings, is it is the only deterrent
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to stop people from speeding again.

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3.8.2. TICKET ISSUING PROCESS - This is the process of receiving data of from a
cell tower and observing a speeding offence. The tracking department then checks
the database to find the vehicle linked to the device, viewing their details and
sending these details to NZTA so a fine can be issued. This process is important as
is what allows tickets to be issued following an offence.

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3.9 Functionalities
3.9.1. DATA GATHERING PROCESS
• COLLECTS DATA FROM A VEHICLES JOURNEY
• RELAYS DATA TO NEAREST CELL TOWER
3.9.2. TICKET ISSUING PROCESS
• FINDS THE LATEST SPEEDING OFFENCE
• SENDS ALERT TO NZTA
3.10 Systems

3.10.1. DATA ANALYSIS SYSTEM - This system is responsible for inspecting and
transferring the data from the vehicle, allowing correct data to be sent to cell
towers and onwards. It is also responsible for finding the latest speeding offences,
making this system important as it produces core data that will allow tickets to be
accurately issued through analysis. This will help to reduce speeding and create
safer roads nationwide.
3.10.2. DATA PROCCESING SYSTEM - This system is responsible for processing the
data so it can be used to determine if a ticket should be issued. The data requires
processing as the raw data directly from the vehicle is not helpful to NZTA. They
require summarized data (which has been processed) along with other information
such as the driver’s details. As we can provide NZTA with this summarized
information, tickets can be accurately issued, effectively reducing speeding.
3.10.3. DATA MANAGEMENT SYSTEM - This system is responsible for managing the
data so NZTA can be sent the correct alerts, with the correct information (derived
from the data) required to issue a ticket. It is also responsible for organizing the
data so NZTA can be sent information used to issue a ticket, which is required for
our vision to occur.

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3.11. Summary Table: Value Chain to Systems
Value Chain
Activity
Processes Functionalities
Specific
Information
System(s)
Broad
Information
System(s)

Delivering the
product or
service

Data
collection
process
Collects data through
a vehicles journey

Relays data to the
nearest cell tower
Data analysis
system

Data
processing
system
Decision
support system

Transaction
processing
system
Ticket
issuing
process
Finds the latest
speeding offence

Sends alert to NZTA
Data analysis
system

Data
management
system
Decision
support system

Transaction
processing
system

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CONCLUSION
Our device aims to reduce speeding and resulting accidents on New Zealand roads.
To do this, we have created a device to track the speed of any vehicle so we can
alert NZTA who will issue a ticket if we find the speed limit has been breached.
The GPS tracking industry we are in is more attractive than not, which is key to
our future success as a business. I believe we can meet the New Zealand
government’s needs through our established array of suppliers and partners.
Following success in New Zealand, we hope to take our device overseas where
other governments can also utilize our device, make their roads a safer place too.
REFERENCES
1. About us. (n.d.). NZ Transport Agency. Retrieved May 25, 2014, from
http://www.nzta.govt.nz/about/index.html
2. Mobile Network Coverage on 2G, 3G and 4G. (n.d.). Vodafone NZ. Retrieved May
25, 2014, from http://www.vodafone.co.nz/network/coverage
3. Industrial Plastics Suppliers | Wholesale Plastics Supplier | Plastics and Plastic
Materials -Lehigh Valley Plastics. (n.d.). Industrial Plastics Suppliers | Wholesale
Plastics Supplier | Plastics and Plastic Materials -Lehigh Valley Plastics. Retrieved
May 25, 2014, from http://www.lehighvalleyplastics.com
4. Plastic Injection Molding. (n.d.). Star Prototype. Retrieved May 25, 2014, from
http://www.star-prototype.com/services/plastic-injection-
molding/?gclid=CNr_1pH5tr4CFY8kvQod3HoAsg
5. About Us. (n.d.). Foxconn. Retrieved May 25, 2014, from
http://www.foxconnchannel.com/#
6. Messenger Services. (n.d.). Snitch Inc I The Revolution in GPS Tracking.
Retrieved May 25, 2014, from http://www.snitch.co.nz
7. Welcome to Argus Tracking. (n.d.). Argus Tracking. Retrieved May 25, 2014,
from http://www.argustracking.co.nz/site/
8. HowStuffWorks "Types of Tracking". (n.d.). HowStuffWorks. Retrieved May 25,
2014, from http://electronics.howstuffworks.com/everyday-tech/location-
tracking2.htm
9. Speed Crash Facts 2013. (n.d.). Transport. Retrieved May 25, 2014, from
http://www.transport.govt.nz/assets/Uploads/Research/Documents/speed-
crashfacts-2013.pdf
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10. Warrant of Fitness (WoF). (n.d.). VTNZ. Retrieved May 25, 2014, from
http://www.vtnz.co.nz/services/wof?gclid=CLDs_-7HxL4CFQ1xvAod9ykAVg