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PREFACE
Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) is a common illness associated with major morbidity
and high mortality throughout the world. It is the fourth leading cause of death in the United States
1

and is projected to rank fth by 2020 in terms of burden of disease worldwide, according to a study
by the World Bank and World Health Organization.
2
Yet COPD is relatively unknown to the public and
often ignored by health policy makers and government ofcials.
In 1998, the Malaysian Thoracic Society with the support of the Academy of Medicine of Malaysia
and Ministry of Health of Malaysia in their efforts to create awareness about the disease and
improve patient care, initiated the publication of COPD management guidelines to be used as a
reference for medical practitioners.
3
The working group comprised 10 respiratory specialists who
were working in government hospitals, teaching institutions and private medical facilities. The
recommendations made were mainly based on the published literature available at the time after
thorough assessment by the assigned member or members of the working group and discussion
at several face-to-face meetings. The evidence used for the recommendations was then graded
according to its level of strength with some recommendations made based on the consensus
agreement of members of the working group. Notwithstanding, the concept of evidence-based
medicine was just emerging at that time. After more than a decade, with advancement of care
made and with the publication of many important large-scale, randomised studies which added
new dimension to the management of COPD, the time had come for these guidelines to be reviewed
and updated. An updated set of CPG will ensure that the recommendations for the management
of COPD in Malaysia are current. We would like to emphasise the importance of (1) early diagnosis
through targeted spirometry and early intervention including smoking cessation even in mild COPD;
(2) improving dyspnoea and activity limitation in stable COPD using up-to-date evidence-based
treatment algorithms; and (3) preventing and managing acute exacerbations, particularly in more
severe COPD.
I sincerely hope this revised edition of the CPG for the Management of COPD will be fully utilised
by all relevant healthcare professionals and will benet patients suffering from COPD. I would
like to express my heartfelt gratitude to everyone who was involved in the development of these
guidelines and especially to the working group members for their enthusiasm, relentless effort and
immense contribution.
Professor Dr. Liam Chong-Kin
Chairman
COPD CPG Working Group
References:
1. National Heart, Lung, And Blood Institute. Morbidity And Mortality Chartbook On Cardiovascular, Lung And Blood Diseases. Bethesda, Maryland: Us Department Of
Health And Human Services, Public Health Service, National Institute Of Health. Accessed At:http://Www.Nhlbi.Nih.Gov/Resources/Docs/Cht-Book.Htm; 2004.
2. Lopez Ad,Shibuya K, Rao C, Et Al. Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: Current burden and future projections. Eur Respir J 2006; 27:397-412.
3. Guidelines In The Management Of Chronic Obstructive PUlmonary Disease-A Consensus Statement Of The Ministry Of Health Of Malaysia, Academy Of Medicine Of
Malaysia And Malaysian Thoracic Society. Med J Malaysia 1999; 54:387-400.
ii iii
GUIDELINES DEVELOPMENT AND OBJECTIVES
Guidelines Development
Respiratory physicians working in government hospitals, academic institutions and private medical
facilities; an emergency medicine physician and primary care physicians from a government health
clinic, an academic institution and private general practice were invited to be members of the
guidelines development working group.
The previous edition of the CPG on the Management of COPD (1998) was used as the basis for
the development of this present set of guidelines. Members of the working group were divided
into smaller groups comprising 2 to 5 members who were assigned to prepare documents on
the following sections: (1) definition, classification of severity and mechanism of COPD;
(2) burden of COPD; (3) risk factors; (4) assessment and monitoring of disease; (5) reducing risk
factors; (6) managing stable COPD - pharmacological treatments; (7) managing stable COPD -
non-pharmacological treatments; (8) managing exacerbations; and (9) translating guidelines
recommendations to the context of primary care.
Members responsible for each section were tasked to ensure that the relevant literature was
adequately searched, retrieved, critically appraised and accurately presented. Literature search
was carried out at electronic databases which included PUBMED, Medline and Cochrane Database
of Systemic Reviews. The full text of reference articles quoted in these guidelines was carefully
studied. In addition, the reference lists of relevant articles retrieved were searched to identify
other studies. Other guidelines on the management of COPD that were referred to included the
Guidelines of the Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) global strategy
for the diagnosis, management and prevention of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (2008)
and the Canadian Thoracic Society recommendations for management of chronic obstructive
pulmonary disease(2007).
Each section leader presented his/her section of the proposed guidelines at several meetings
where all members of the working group met and participated in the discussion. The nal draft
of these guidelines inclusive of recommendations was the result of agreement by the majority, if
not all, members of the working group at such meetings as well as through e-mail discussions in
between the meetings. Throughout the development of these guidelines, a total of six meetings
were held from 10 January 2009. In situations where the evidence was insufcient or lacking, the
recommendations made were by consensus of the working group.
In these guidelines, statements are supported by evidence which is graded using the United
States/Canadian Preventive Services Task Force Level of Evidence scale with the level of evidence
indicated in parentheses after the relevant statement, while the grading of recommendations was
based on modied Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Networks (SIGN) Grade of Recommendations
which is also shown in parentheses.
The draft guidelines were sent for external review. The draft guidelines were also posted on the
Ministry of Health Malaysia website for comments and feedback. These guidelines were presented
to the Technical Advisory Committee for Clinical Practice Guidelines and the Health Technology
Assessment and Clinical Practice Guidelines Council, Ministry of Health Malaysia for review and
approval.
ii iii
Objectives
The main objective of these guidelines is to provide up-to-date evidence-based recommendations
to assist health care providers in the identication, diagnosis and optimal management of people
with COPD.
Clinical Questions
The clinical questions of these guidelines are:
1. How can COPD be prevented?
2. How is COPD diagnosed?
3. How can people with COPD be optimally managed?
Target Population
These guidelines are applicable to all adults with COPD.
Target Groups/Users
These guidelines are intended for all health care professionals involved in managing patients
with COPD who include: respiratory physicians, general physicians, geriatricians, family medicine
specialists, emergency medicine physicians, medical ofcers, general practitioners, assistant
medical ofcers, pharmacists, respiratory nurse educators, nurses, physiotherapists and public
health personnel.
CLINICAL INDICATORS FOR QUALITY MANAGEMENT
Proportion of people with COPD treated for acute exacerbation (with antibiotics and/or systemic
corticosteroids and/or requiring hospitalisation)
Numerator : Number of episodes of acute exacerbation treated in one year
#
Denominator : Total number of patients with COPD on treatment in one year
(
#
It is necessary to distinguish patients with moderate stable COPD from those with severe or very
severe stable COPD)
The optimum achievable standard:
For patients with
Moderate COPD : 1 exacerbation per patient per year
Severe or very severe COPD : 1.5 exacerbations per patient per year
These standards are arrived at based on the results of several recent large randomised controlled trials.
In the INSPIRE study involving patients with severe and very severe COPD (FEV
1
< 50% predicted), the
exacerbations rates were 1.28 per year in patients treated with salmeterol/uticasone combination
and 1.32 per year in patients on tiotropium.
1

(Level 1)
In the TORCH study involving patients with moderate
to very severe COPD (FEV
1
< 60% predicted), treatment with salmeterol, uticasone and salmeterol/
uticasone combination was associated with exacerbation rates of 0.97, 0.93 and 0.85, respectively
compared to 1.13 in patients on placebo.
2 (Level 1)
In the UPLIFT study involving patients with moderate
to very severe COPD (FEV
1
70% predicted) already on a regular b
2
-agonist with or without inhaled
corticosteroids, treatment with tiotropium or placebo was associated with exacerbation rates of 0.73
and 0.85 per patient-year, respectively.
3 (Level 1)
REFERENCES:
1. Wedzicha JA, Calverley PM, Seemungal TA, et al. The prevention of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease exacerbations by salmeterol/uticasone propionate or
tiotropium bromide. Am J Respir Crit Care Med 2008; 177:19-26.
2. Calverley PMA, Anderson JA, Celli B, et al. Salmeterol and uticasone propionate and survival in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. N Engl J Med 2007; 356:775-
789.
3. Tashkin DP, Celli B, Senn S, et al. A 4-year trial of tiotropium in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. N Engl J Med 2008; 359:1543-1554.
iv v
TABLE OF CONTENTS

PREFACE i
GUIDELINES DEVELOPMENT AND OBJECTIVES ii
CLINICAL INDICATORS FOR QUALITY MANAGEMENT iii
CLINICAL PRACTICE GUIDELINES WORKING GROUP vi
EXTERNAL REVIEWERS vii
SECTION 1 DEFINITION, CLASSIFICATION OF SEVERITY AND PATHOPHYSIOLOGY 1
1.1 Denition 1
1.2 Airow Limitation in COPD 1
1.3 Spirometric Classication of COPD Severity 1
1.4 Assessment of COPD Severity 3
1.5 Pathology, Pathogenesis and Pathophysiology 5
SECTION 2 COPD : EPIDEMIOLOGY AND DISEASE BURDEN 6
SECTION 3 RISK FACTORS 8
3.1 Introduction 8
3.2 Genes 8
3.3 Exposure to Particles 8
3.4 Lung Growth and Development 9
3.5 Oxidative Stress 9
3.6 Gender 9
3.7 Infection 9
3.8 Socioeconomic Status 10
SECTION 4 ASSESSMENT AND MONITORING 11
4.1 Initial Diagnosis 11
4.2 Assessment of Symptoms 11
4.3 Medical History 11
4.4 Physical Examination 12
4.5 Measurement of Lung Function 12
4.6 Bronchodilator Reversibility Testing 12
4.7 Assessment of COPD Severity 12
4.8 Additional Investigations 12
4.9 Differential Diagnosis 13
4.10 Ongoing Monitoring and Assessment 14
SECTION 5 REDUCING RISK FACTORS 16
5.1 Introduction 16
5.2 Smoking Prevention 16
5.3 Smoking Cessation 16
5.4 Five Step Programme for Intervention (5A) 17
5.5 Counselling 18
5.6 Pharmacotherapy 18
5.7 Occupational Exposure 18
5.8 Indoor and Outdoor Air Pollution 18
5.9 Steps for Health Care Providers/Patients 19
iv v
SECTION 6 MANAGING STABLE COPD :
EDUCATION AND PHARMACOLOGICAL TREATMENTS 20
6.1 Objectives of Managing Stable COPD 20
6.2 Patient Education 20
6.3 Inuenza Vaccination 21
6.4 Pneumococcal Vaccination 21
6.5 Treatment Strategy: Pharmacological and
Non-pharmacological Treatments 21
SECTION 7 MANAGING STABLE COPD : NON-PHARMACOLOGICAL TREATMENTS 28
7.1 Pulmonary Rehabilitation in COPD 28
7.2 Domiciliary Oxygen Therapy for COPD 29
7.3 Nutrition in COPD 30
7.4 Lung Volume Reduction for COPD 30
7.5 Lung Transplantation 31
7.6 COPD and Surgery 31
SECTION 8 MANAGING EXACERBATIONS OF COPD 33
8.1 Introduction 33
8.2 Denition of Acute Exacerbation of COPD 33
8.3 Morbidity and Mortality Associated with Acute Exacerbations of COPD 33
8.4 Causes of Acute Exacerbations of COPD 33
8.5 Diagnosis and Assessment of Severity 33
8.6 Differential Diagnoses 35
8.7 Managing Acute Exacerbations of COPD 35
8.8 Home Management 36
8.9 Hospital Management 36
8.10 Management of Severe but Not Life Threatening Exacerbations
of COPD in the Emergency Department or the Hospital 42
8.11 Non-invasive Ventilation 43
8.12 Invasive Mechanical Ventilation 43
8.13 Hospital Discharge 44
8.14 Follow Up 44
SECTION 9 TRANSLATING GUIDELINES RECOMMENDATIONS TO
THE CONTEXT OF PRIMARY CARE 45
9.1 Introduction 45
9.2 Early Diagnosis 45
9.3 Smoking Cessation 45
9.4 Spirometry 45
9.5 Long Term Management 45
9.6 When to Refer to Hospital-Based Specialists? 46
GLOSSARY OF TERMS 47
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS 48
DISCLOSURE STATEMENT 48
SOURCES OF FUNDING 48
REFERENCES 49
vi vii
MEMBERS (alphabetical order)
Dato Dr. Abdul Razak Muttalif
Senior Consultant Chest Physician
Hospital Pulau Pinang
Pulau Pinang
Datin Dr. Aziah Ahmad Mahayiddin
Senior Consultant Chest Physician
Institut Perubatan Respiratori
Hospital Kuala Lumpur
Kuala Lumpur
Dr. Che Wan Aminud-din bin Hashim
Chest Physician
Hospital Universiti Sains Malaysia
Kubang Kerian
Kelantan
Assoc. Prof. Dr. Fauzi Mohd. Anshar
Consultant Chest Physician
Pusat Perubatan Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia
Kuala Lumpur
Dr. George Gomez
General Practitioner
Pertama Medical Associates
Johor Bharu
Dato Dr. George K. Simon
Senior Consultant Chest Physician
Hospital Sultanah Bahiyah
Alor Setar
Assoc. Prof. Dr. How Soon Hin
Consultant Chest Physician
International Islamic University Malaysia
Hospital Tengku Ampuan Afzan
Kuantan
Prof. Dr. Khoo Ee Ming
Consultant Primary Care Physician
Pusat Perubatan Universiti Malaya
Kuala Lumpur
Dr. Leong Oon Keong
Senior Consultant Chest Physician
Leong Oon Keong Chest & Medical Clinic Sdn. Bhd.
Ipoh
CLINICAL PRACTICE GUIDELINES WORKING GROUP
CHAIRMAN
Professor Dr. Liam Chong-Kin
Senior Consultant Chest Physician, Pusat Perubatan Universiti Malaya, Kuala Lumpur
Dr. Mohd Idzwan Zakaria
Emergency Medicine Physician
Pusat Perubatan Universiti Malaya
Kuala Lumpur
Assoc. Prof. Dr. Pang Yong Kek
Consultant Chest Physician
Pusat Perubatan Universiti Malaya
Kuala Lumpur
Prof. Dr. Richard Loh Li Cher
Consultant Chest Physician
Kolej Perubatan Pulau Pinang
Pulau Pinang
Dr. Rohaya Abdullah
Family Medicine Specialist
Klinik Kesihatan Masai
Johor Bahru
Assoc. Prof. Dr. Roslina A Manap
Consultant Chest Physician
Pusat Perubatan Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia
Kuala Lumpur
Assoc. Prof. Dr. Tengku Saifudin Tengku Ismail
Consultant Chest Physician
Universiti Teknologi MARA
Hospital Selayang
Selangor
Dr. Wong Kai Fatt
General Practitioner
LW Medical Associates
Kuala Lumpur
Dr. Yap Boon Hung
Consultant Chest Physician
Hospital Tung Shin
Kuala Lumpur
Dato Dr. Zainudin Md Zin
Senior Consultant Chest Physician
Hospital Pakar Damansara
Petaling Jaya
vi vii
Dr. Ashoka Menon
Senior Consultant Chest Physician
Pusat Perubatan Sime Darby
Subang Jaya
Associate Professor Ayiesah Hj Ramli
Physiotherapy Programme Coordinator
Faculty of Allied Health Sciences
Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia
Kuala Lumpur
Ms P. Devashanti
Pharmacist
Pusat Perubatan Universiti Malaya
Kuala Lumpur
Associate Professor Dr Fanny Ko Wai-San
Department of Medicine and Therapeutics
The Chinese University of Hong Kong
Hong Kong
Dr. Hooi Lai Ngoh
Senior Consultant Chest Physician
Public Specialist Centre
Georgetown
Dr. Jamalul Azizi Abdul Rahman
Head of Department & Consultant Respiratory Physician
Department of Respiratory Medicine
Hospital Queen Elizabeth
Kota Kinabalu
Dr. Kuppusamy Iyawoo
Senior Consultant Chest Physician
Hospital Assunta
Petaling Jaya
Puan Nurhayati Mohd. Nur
Clinical Nurse Specialist in Respiratory Medicine
Nursing Ofcer
Pusat Perubatan Universiti Malaya
Kuala Lumpur
Dr. Wong Wing Keen
Senior Consultant Chest Physician
Pusat Perubatan Sunway
Petaling Jaya
Dr. Zarihah Mohd Zain
Disease Control Division
Ministry of Health Malaysia
Putrajaya
EXTERNAL REVIEWERS (alphabetical order)
The following external reviewers provided feedback on the draft.
1
SECTION 1 DEFINITION, CLASSIFICATION OF SEVERITY AND PATHOPHYSIOLOGY
1.1 Denition
Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), a preventable and treatable respiratory disorder
largely caused by smoking, is characterised by progressive, partially reversible airow obstruction
and lung hyperination with signicant extrapulmonary (systemic) manifestations
1 (Level II-2)
and co-
morbid conditions
2 (Level II-3)
all of which may contribute to the severity of the disease in individual
patients.
The co-morbid conditions associated with COPD include ischaemic heart disease; osteopenia,
osteoporosis and bone fractures; cachexia and malnutrition; normochromic normocytic anaemia;
skeletal muscle wasting and peripheral muscle dysfunction; diabetes mellitus; sleep disorders;
cataracts and glaucoma; lung cancer;

and anxiety and depression both of which increase in
incidence with disease severity.
1-9 (Level II-2)

1.2 Airow Limitation in COPD
The chronic airow limitation in COPD is due to a mixture of small airway disease (obstructive
bronchiolitis) and lung parenchymal destruction (emphysema), the relative contributions of which
vary from individual to individual. Airow limitation, associated with an abnormal inammatory
reaction of the lung to noxious particles or gases, the most common of which worldwide is cigarette
smoke, is usually progressive, especially if exposure to the noxious agents persists.
Airow limitation is best measured by spirometry, the most widely available and reproducible test
of lung function.
1.3 Spirometric Classication of COPD Severity
Objective demonstration of airow obstruction by spirometry is essential for the diagnosis of
COPD. Spirometry also provides an assessment of the severity of pathological changes in COPD.
Spirometry should be performed after an adequate dose of an inhaled bronchodilator (e.g., 400 g
of salbutamol)
10 (Level III)
in order to minimise variability.
For diagnosis and severity assessment of COPD, a post-bronchodilator FEV
1

/FVC ratio of < 0.70
and post-bronchodilator FEV
1
measurement, respectively are recommended.
11

(Level III)
A simple but
yet to be clinically validated classication of COPD severity into four stages based on spirometric
cut-points (FEV
1
< 80, 50, or 30% predicted) is recommended (Table 1-1).
11 (Level III)

2 3
Table 1-1 Classication of COPD Severity
11 (Level III)

COPD
stage
Severity
Post-bronchodilator
spirometric values
11 (Level III)

Symptoms that may be present
I Mild
FEV
1
/FVC < 0.70
FEV
1
> 80% predicted
Chronic cough and sputum
production may be present.
At this stage, the individual is
usually unaware that his or her lung
function is abnormal.
II Moderate
FEV
1
/FVC < 0.70
50% < FEV
1
< 80%
predicted
Dyspnoea typically on exertion,
cough and sputum production
sometimes also present.
This is the stage at which patients
usually seek medical attention
because of chronic respiratory
symptoms or an exacerbation of
COPD.
III Severe
FEV
1
/FVC < 0.70
30% < FEV
1
< 50%
predicted
Greater dyspnoea, reduced exercise
capacity, fatigue, and repeated
exacerbations that almost always
have an impact on the patients
quality of life.
IV
Very
severe
FEV
1
/FVC < 0.70
FEV
1
< 30% predicted
or
FEV
1
< 50% predicted plus
chronic respiratory failure
Respiratory failure may lead to
cor pulmonale with signs which
include elevation of the jugular
venous pressure and pitting ankle
oedema. At this stage, quality
of life is markedly impaired
and exacerbations may be life-
threatening.
FEV
1
: forced expiratory volume in one second; FVC: forced vital capacity; respiratory failure: arterial partial
pressure of oxygen (PaO
2
) less than 8.0 kPa (60 mmHg) with or without arterial partial pressure of CO
2
(PaCO
2
)
greater than 6.7 kPa (50 mmHg) while breathing air at sea level.
2 3
1.4 Assessment of COPD Severity
The relationship between the degree of airow limitation based on spirometry and COPD symptoms
is not perfect. The impact of COPD on an individual patient depends not just on the degree of airow
limitation, but also on the severity of symptoms - especially breathlessness and decreased exercise
capacity. COPD management decisions for the individual patient should therefore not be based
solely on spirometry results, but also on the severity of dyspnoea and disability
12 (Level III)
which can
be assessed using the Modied Medical Research Council (MMRC) dyspnoea scale (Table 1-2)
13
(Level III)
which reects overall disease impact among COPD patients than FEV
1
.
A multidimensional grading system of disease severity, the BODE index [body mass index (BMI),
airow obstruction, dyspnoea and exercise capacity], better predicts survival in COPD patients than
FEV
1
.
14 (Level II-2)
A simple but yet to be validated classication of COPD severity can be based on both
spirometry and symptoms (Table 1-3) bearing in mind that there may be poor correlation between
spirometric measures of lung function and symptoms in individual patients.
Table 1-2 The Modied Medical Research Council (MMRC) Dyspnoea Scale
13 (Level III)
Grade of
dyspnoea
Description
0 Not troubled by breathlessness except on strenuous exercise
1 Shortness of breath when hurrying on the level or walking up a slight hill
2
Walks slower than people of the same age on the level because of breathlessness
or has to stop for breath when walking at own pace on the level
3 Stops for breath after walking about 100 m or after a few minutes on the level
4 Too breathless to leave the house or breathless when dressing or undressing
To determine the appropriate treatment, a comprehensive assessment of COPD severity should
take into account the patients level of symptoms and the severity of the spirometric abnormality;
the presence of complications such as respiratory failure, cor pulmonale and weight loss; as well as
the presence of extrapulmonary effects of COPD and co-morbidities. Besides spirometry, the overall
assessment of a COPD patient should also include the assessment of the patients BMI, the patients
dyspnoea (such as using the MMRC dyspnoea scale),
13 (Level III)
exercise capacity (such as using the
6-minute walk test),
15 (Level III)
and co-morbidities.
4 5
Table 1-3 Classication of COPD Severity Based on Spirometric Impairment and Symptoms
(adapted from references 11 and 12)
(Level III)
COPD
stage
Severity
Classication by post-
bronchodilator spirometric
values
Classication by symptoms and
disability
I Mild
FEV
1
/FVC < 0.70
FEV
1
> 80% predicted
Shortness of breath when
hurrying on the level or walking
up a slight hill (MMRC 1)
II Moderate
FEV
1
/FVC < 0.70
50% FEV
1
< 80% predicted
Walks slower than people of the
same age on the level because
of breathlessness; or stops for
breath after walking about
100 m or after a few minutes at
own pace on the level
(MMRC 2 to 3)
III Severe
FEV
1
/FVC < 0.70
30% FEV
1
< 50% predicted
Too breathless to leave the house
or breathless when dressing or
undressing (MMRC 4)
IV Very severe
FEV
1
/FVC < 0.70
FEV
1
< 30% predicted or
FEV
1
< 50% predicted plus
chronic respiratory failure
Presence of chronic respiratory
failure or clinical signs of right
heart failure
FEV
1
: forced expiratory volume in one second; FVC: forced vital capacity; respiratory failure: arterial partial
pressure of oxygen (PaO
2
) less than 8.0 kPa (60 mmHg) with or without arterial partial pressure of CO
2
(PaCO
2
)
greater than 6.7 kPa (50 mmHg) while breathing air at sea level.
After conrmation of diagnosis by spirometry, the treatment for the individual patient may be based
on symptoms with the recognition that symptoms may be made worse by co-morbid conditions
which should also be appropriately treated if present.
*Should there be disagreement between FEV
1
and symptoms, follow symptoms
4 5
1.5 Pathology, Pathogenesis and Pathophysiology
The pathological changes in COPD, which include chronic inammation and structural changes
resulting from repeated injury and repair due to inhaled cigarette smoke and other noxious
particles, are found in the proximal airways, peripheral airways, lung parenchyma, and pulmonary
vasculature.
16 (Level II-2)
The chronic inammation in COPD is characterised by an increase in the
numbers of neutrophils (in the airway lumen), macrophages (in the airway lumen, airway wall,
and parenchyma), and CD8+ lymphocytes (in the airway wall and parenchyma).
17 (Level II-2)
The cells
and mediators involved in the inammatory processes in COPD and in asthma are different which
explains the differences in physiological changes, symptoms and response to treatment in these
two diseases.
These pathological changes lead to mucus hypersecretion,
18 (Level II-2)
expiratory airow limitation
with dynamic small airway collapse causing air trapping and lung hyperination, gas exchange
abnormalities, and progressive pulmonary hypertension that may lead to cor pulmonale.
19 (Level II-2)
There is further amplication of the inammatory response in the airways during exacerbations,
which may be triggered by bacterial or viral infections or by environmental pollutants.
In general, the inammatory and structural changes in the airways increase with disease severity
and persist on smoking cessation.
Recommendations: Diagnosis and Assessment of Severity
1. Spirometry is essential for the diagnosis of COPD and is useful for assessment of the severity
of airow obstruction. [Grade C]
2. Management decisions should be guided by the overall assessment of the patient which
should include symptoms, exercise capacity as well as the presence of co-morbidities and
complications, in addition to spirometry. [Grade C]
6 7
SECTION 2 COPD : EPIDEMIOLOGY AND DISEASE BURDEN
COPD prevalence, morbidity, and mortality vary across the world and across different ethnic
groups within countries. The prevalence and burden of COPD are projected to increase in
the coming decades due to continued exposure to COPD risk factors and the changing age
structure of the worlds population.
20-22 (Level II-3)
According to WHO estimates in 2007, 210 million
people have COPD worldwide with 80 million of them experiencing moderate to severe chronic
disease.
23 (Level II-3)
COPD was ranked as the twelfth leading cause of disability in 1990, but it is
projected to rank fth in 2020, behind ischaemic heart disease, major depression, trafc accidents
and cerebrovascular disease as a leading cause of disability.
24 (Level II-3)
It is second only to heart
disease as a cause of disability that forces people to stop working.
25 (Level II-3)
The number of deaths
from COPD have increased more than 60% over the last 20 years, and more than 95% of all COPD-
related deaths occur in people older than age 55 (Figure 2-1).
26 (Level II-3)
COPD will become the third
leading cause of death worldwide by 2030.
27 (Level III)

Figure 2-1: Age Standardised COPD Mortality Rate by WHO Region
A Regions
AMRO BD
EURO BC
EMRO
SEARO
WPRO B
AFRO
A Regions
AMRO BD
EURO BC
EMRO
SEARO
WPRO B
AFRO
MALE
FEMALE
I
n
c
i
d
e
n
c
e
/
1
0
0
,
0
0
0
I
n
c
i
d
e
n
c
e
/
1
0
0
,
0
0
0
1000
2000
3000
4000
5000
6000
0
500
1000
1500
2000
2500
3000
3500
4000
0
0-4 5-14 15-29 30-44 45-59 60-69 70-79 80+
Age Group
0-4 5-14 15-29 30-44 45-59 60-69 70-79 80+
Age Group
A regions: developed countries in North America, Western Europe, Japan, Australia, and New Zealand; AMRO BD: developing countries in the Americas;
EURO BC: developing countries in Europe; EMRO: Eastern Mediterranean and North Africa; SEARO: South-east Asia; WPRO: Western Pacic; AFRO:
Sub-Saharan Africa.
6 7
These statistics are likely to underestimate COPD as a cause of death due to the imprecise and
variable denitions of COPD that complicate the quantication of its mortality and morbidity.
28 (Level
II-3), 29 (Level III)
In addition, COPD is more likely to be reported as a contributory rather than underlying
cause of death or morbidity, or may not be reported at all.
30, 31 (Level III)
In Asia-Pacic countries
where tobacco smoking and indoor air pollution are highly prevalent the rise of COPD incidence
is particularly dramatic contributing to a signicant disease burden.
32 (Level III)
Data from a WHO/
World Bank study were used to extrapolate a COPD prevalence gure of 3.8% for the entire Asian
population,
24 (Level III)
but recent studies suggest that COPD is a more signicant problem in the region
than has been previously realised.
Two major studies conducted in Japan
33 (Level II-2)
and Korea
34 (Level II-2)
more recently showed a COPD
prevalence of 8.55% and 7.5% respectively. The prevalence of COPD in Asia-Pacic has been
estimated indirectly through a risk factor prevalence model, which was mainly driven by varying
smoking rates and levels of air pollution.
32 (Level III)
The prevalence of moderate to severe COPD in
adults aged 30 years or above in the Asia-Pacic region was estimated to be at approximately 6.3%
and for Malaysia at 4.55% (Figure 2-2).
Figure 2-2: Model Projections of Moderate-Severe COPD in Population Aged 30 Years
Consistent with the ndings of WHO Global Burden of Disease study,
24 (level II-3)
both mortality and
morbidity rates for COPD in the Asia-Pacic region were reported to be higher in men than inwomen
and increased with increasing age.
35 (Level III)
COPD-related illness was higher in men, with rates of 32.6
to 334
26 (Level II-3)
per 10,000 people, compared with rates of 21.2 to 129 per 10,000 for women.
36 (level
III)
Chronic respiratory disease including COPD is responsible for 7% of the total Disability-Adjusted
Life Years (DALYs) in Malaysia and is ranked fth as the leading cause of disease burden.
37 (Level III)
The
burden of COPD in males is almost three times that of females. The per capita burden of disease
increases with age both in males and females where it is predominantly due to COPD in males, while
in females it is related to other respiratory diseases.
37 (Level III)
In a survey by the Southeast Asia Tobacco
Control Alliance (SEATCA) in Malaysia in 2006, 77% of the health economy burden with the highest
growth projected health care cost (2004-2010) among the three major tobacco-related diseases in
Malaysia is contributed by COPD.
37 (Level III)

38,10
5,011 1,80
2,08
1,91
1,502 1,1Z
3 558
118
139
1



100,000
10,000
1000
100
10
1
China Japan ndonesia Vietnam Philippines Thailand South
Korea
Taiwan Australia Malaysia Hong KongSingapore
N
u
m
b
e
r

o
f

C
O
P
D

c
a
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e
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0
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8 9
SECTION 3 RISK FACTORS
3.1 Introduction
Cigarette smoking is the best known and most studied risk factor for COPD. About 15% of smokers
develop COPD.
38 (Level II-2)
However, tobacco smoke is the risk factor for as much as 90% of the
cases of COPD.
39 (Level III)
Understandably, tobacco smoke cannot be the only risk factor for COPD as
non-smokers may also develop the disease. Other risk factors for COPD are varied and are listed
in Table 3-1.
Table 3-1 Risk Factors for COPD
Genes
Exposure to particles
Tobacco smoke
Organic and inorganic occupational dusts
Indoor air pollution from heating and cooking with biomass in poorly ventilated dwellings
Outdoor air pollution
Lung growth and development
Oxidative stress
Gender
Age
Respiratory infections
Socioeconomic status
3.2 Genes
Severe alpha-1 antitrypsin enzyme deciency causes panlobular emphysema in both smokers
and non-smokers. This rare hereditary disease is most commonly seen in individuals of Northern
European origin.
40 (Level II-2)
There have been inconsistent reports on the familial risk of airow
obstruction in smoking siblings of patients with severe COPD.
41 (Level II-2)

3.3 Exposure to Particles
Tobacco smoke
Cigarette smoke causes COPD in susceptible individuals. The risk of COPD in smokers is dose-
related.
42
Pipe and cigar smokers have greater COPD morbidity and mortality rates than non-
smokers, although their rates are lower than those for cigarette smokers.
43 (Level III)
Environmental
tobacco smoke also contributes to respiratory symptoms and COPD by increasing the lungs total
burden of inhaled particles and gases.
44,45 (Level II-2)
Pregnant women are advised to stop smoking
as tobacco smoke poses a risk to the foetus by affecting lung growth and development in
utero.
46 (Level II-3)
Occupational dusts and chemicals
Occupational exposures are independently associated with the severity of airow limitation,
respiratory symptoms, and employment status in patients with COPD.
47 (Level II-3)
These exposures
include organic and inorganic dusts, chemical agents and fumes. Livestock farmers have an
increased risk of chronic bronchitis, COPD and reduced FEV
1
. Ammonia, hydrogen sulphide,
inorganic dust and organic dust may be causally involved, but a role for specic biological agents
cannot be excluded. Atopic farmers appear more susceptible to develop farming-related
COPD.
48 (Level II-3)
8 9
Indoor air pollution
Biomass and coal are the main sources of energy for cooking and heating in many communities in
the Middle East, Africa and Asia.
49,50 (Level III)
Wood, animal dung, crop residues and coal are burned
in poorly functioning stoves, in poorly ventilated rooms and lead to very high levels of indoor air
pollution, a well established risk factor of COPD in women.
51-54 (Level II-2)
Outdoor air pollution
The role of outdoor air pollution in causing COPD is unclear, but appears to be small when compared
with cigarette smoking. However, air pollution from motor vehicle emissions in cities is associated
with a decrease in lung function.
55 (Level II-3)
3.4 Lung growth and development
Any factor that affects lung growth during gestation and childhood has the potential for increasing
an individuals risk of developing COPD. A large study and meta-analysis conrmed a positive
association between birth weight and FEV
1
in adulthood.
56 (Level III)
3.5 Oxidative stress
Oxidative stress results from an imbalance between oxidants (generated by phagocytes during
mitochondrial electron transport, air pollutants, cigarette smoke, etc.) and antioxidants. Oxidative
stress directly injures the lungs and initiates lung inammation which plays a role in the
pathogenesis of COPD.
57 (Level III)
3.6 Gender
The role of gender in determining COPD risk remains unclear. Some studies have suggested that
women are more susceptible to the effects of tobacco smoke than men and raise concerns on the
increasing number of female smokers in both developed and developing countries.
58 (Level II-3)
3.7 Infections
Infections, both viral and bacterial, may contribute to the pathogenesis, progression of COPD
59

and the bacterial colonisation associated with airway inammation.
60 (Level II-1)
Infection also plays a
signicant role in exacerbations associated with deterioration in lung function.
61 (Level II-2)
Figure 3-2
is a schematic diagram of the vicious circle hypothesis of the role of bacterial colonisation in the
progression of COPD.
62 (Level III)
Figure 3-2: Vicious Circle Hypothesis
62
Initiating factors
e.g. smoking, childhood respiratory disease
Impaired mucociliary
clearance
Bacterial
colonisation
Airway
epithelial injury
Bacterial
products
Inflammatory
response
Progression of
COPD
Altered elastase
anti-elastase
balance
Increased elastolytic
activity
Image courtesy of Sanjay Sethi
10 11
3.8 Socioeconomic status
There is evidence that the risk of developing COPD is inversely related to socioeconomic status.
63
(Level II-2)
It is not clear whether this pattern reects exposures to indoor and outdoor air pollutants,
crowding, poor nutrition, or other factors that are related to low socioeconomic status.
64,65 (Level III)
10 11
SECTION 4 ASSESSMENT AND MONITORING
4.1 Initial Diagnosis
COPD is signicantly underdiagnosed worldwide, including Malaysia.
35,66

(Level III)
Many COPD
patients present to their doctors with advanced disease at the time of diagnosis. Early diagnosis
with successful smoking cessation interventions reduce the decline in lung function, and early
intervention with effective treatment improves symptoms and health status.
67,68 (Level II-2)
A clinical diagnosis of COPD should be considered in any patient with a history of exposure to risk
factors for the disease with symptoms of chronic cough, sputum production or dyspnoea.
The diagnosis should be conrmed by spirometry. A post-bronchodilator FEV
1
/FVC ratio of less than
0.7 conrms the presence of airow limitation that is not fully reversible and is currently widely
accepted as diagnostic of COPD.
69 (Level III)
If spirometry is unavailable, clinical signs and symptoms, such as progressive shortness of
breath and chronic cough with low peak expiratory flow rate, can be used to help with the
diagnosis.
70 (Level III)
Since peak expiratory flow readings have poor specificity,
71 (Level II-2)
every
effort should be made to refer the patient for spirometry to confirm the diagnosis.
4.2 Assessment of Symptoms
Dyspnoea is the hallmark symptom of COPD and the main reason patients seek medical attention.
The dyspnoea is progressive over months or years and is persistent. As lung function deteriorates,
the breathlessness interferes with patients daily activities.
Cough is often the rst symptom of COPD which may initially be intermittent but later present
daily, often with chronic sputum production. Wheezing and chest tightness may also be present.
Extrapulmonary effects such as weight loss, signs of cor pulmonale and other co-morbid conditions
should also be identied and assessed.
72 (Level III)
Psychiatric morbidity is common in advanced
COPD.
73 (Level III)
COPD patients experience uctuations in symptoms and general feelings of well-being which can
vary from day to day.
4.3 Medical History
A thorough medical history should include the following:
Current symptoms and the pattern of symptom development including severity of
breathlessness, for example using the Modied Medical Research Council (MMRC) dyspnoea
scale (Table 1-2)
13
Exposure to risk factors and possibilities for eliminating or reducing exposure
- Smoking history
Quantication of tobacco consumption: total pack-years = (number of cigarettes smoked
per day 20) x number of years of smoking
- Occupational and environmental exposures to other lung irritants
12 13
Impact of disease on psychosocial well being
Past medical history including exacerbations and admissions for respiratory illnesses
Family history of any respiratory disorder
Presence of other co-morbidities such as cardiovascular disease, psychiatric illness, malignancy,
osteoporosis and musculoskeletal disorders
All current medical therapy and its appropriateness
Social and family support available to the patient
4.4 Physical Examination
Physical examination is not usually diagnostic of COPD but is an important part of patient care.
Physical signs of airow limitation and air trapping (barrel chest, loss of cardiac and liver dullness,
prolonged expiration, reduced breath sounds) are not usually present until the disease is already at
an advanced stage. Physical examination may detect co-morbidities or other illnesses and detect
the development of complications of COPD such as malnourishment and cor pulmonale.
4.5 Measurement of Lung Function
Spirometry is required to conrm the diagnosis of COPD and to assess the severity of the disease.
Spirometry should be performed in people with exposure to risk factors who have chronic cough
and sputum production even without dyspnoea as it may help identify patients earlier in the
course of the disease.
13,74 (Level III)
Peak ow measurements can detect airow limitation but has
poor specicity. The relationship between peak expiratory ow and FEV
1
is poor in COPD.
75 (Level II-2)

4.6 Bronchodilator Reversibility Testing
Bronchodilator testing is required to establish the best attainable lung function at that point of
time. Response to a bronchodilator is considered signicant if the change in FEV
1
is both at least
200 mL and 12% above the pre-bronchodilator FEV
1
.
76

(Level III)
If there is a marked response to
bronchodilators, asthma should be considered. A proportion of COPD patients may show signicant
response to bronchodilators.
77 (Level III)
4.7 Assessment of COPD Severity
COPD severity is based on the patients level of symptoms, the severity of spirometric abnormality
based on FEV
1
and the presence of complications such as respiratory failure and cor pulmonale


(Table 1-3).
78 (Level III)
Multi-dimensional assessment of severity includes the BODE index
79 (Level II-2)
and
the locally developed SAFE index.
80 (Level II-2)
4.8 Additional Investigations
i. Six Minute Walk Test (6MWT)
This test measures the distance covered during six minutes and is a useful test of exercise capacity
81 (Level III)
and provides prognostic information.
82 (Level II-2)
Arterial oxygen desaturation can be measured
with a pulse oximeter during walking.
12 13
ii. Chest Radiograph
A chest radiograph is valuable in excluding other diagnoses such as lung cancer, heart failure,
bronchiectasis and tuberculosis. Radiological changes associated with COPD include the presence
of hyperination (attened diaphragm and increased lung volume), bullae and hyperlucency of the
lungs. High resolution computed tomography scanning is not routinely recommended unless there
is diagnostic uncertainty.
iii. Arterial Blood Gas Analysis
This should be performed in patients with FEV
1
< 40% predicted if they have low arterial oxygen
saturation (less than 92% on pulse oximetry) or with clinical signs of respiratory failure or cor
pulmonale as these patients may benet from long term oxygen therapy at home.
83

(Level III)
iv. Full Blood Count
This detects underlying anaemia of chronic diseases. Polycythaemia can develop with chronic
hypoxaemia.
v. Electrocardiography (ECG)
ECG is useful in detecting pulmonary hypertension in advanced disease and concurrent ischaemic
heart disease.

vi. Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deciency Screening
This should be performed in young COPD patients (< 45 years old) or those who have a strong
family history of the disease.
Other suggested investigations include fasting plasma glucose, serum albumin and serum fasting
lipids to detect other common co-morbidities.
4.9 Differential Diagnoses
Other potential diagnoses in older patients presenting with progressive breathlessness are listed in
(Table 4-1). The major differential diagnosis is chronic asthma. In most instances, the diagnosis
can be easily made (Table 4-2) but occasionally a clear distinction between asthma and COPD
may not be possible clinically and physiologically, and it is assumed that both conditions co-exist
in these patients.
Table 4-1 Main Differential Diagnoses of COPD
Bronchial asthma Bronchiectasis
Congestive heart failure Diffuse parenchymal lung disease
Pulmonary tuberculosis Pulmonary vascular disease
14 15
Table 4-2 Clinical Differences Between Asthma and COPD
Clinical features Asthma COPD
Age of onset Usually early childhood, but
may have onset at any age
Usually > 40 years old
Smoking history May be non-, ex- or current
smoker
Usually > 10 pack-years
Atopy Often Infrequent
Family history Asthma or other atopic
disorders commonly present
Not a usual feature
Clinical symptoms Intermittent and variable Persistent and gradually
progressive worsening
Cough Nocturnal cough or on
exertion
Morning cough with sputum
Sputum production Infrequent Often
Reversibility of airow obstruction Characteristic of asthma Airow limitation may improve
but never normalises
Exacerbations Common at all levels of
severity except in mild disease
Increase in frequency with
increasing severity of disease
4.10 Ongoing Monitoring and Assessment
COPD patients should be followed up regularly as COPD is usually a progressive disease with
deterioration in clinical symptoms and lung function over time. Ongoing monitoring and assessment
in COPD is vital to ensure that the goals of treatment are being met.
Follow-up visits should include evaluation of the following:
Exposure to risk factors especially tobacco smoke. Ask about smoking and their willingness to
stop (Refer to Section 5).
Current symptoms and any new or worsening symptoms to suggest deterioration in lung
function or development of complications. Consider the presence of concomitant conditions or
co-morbidities.
Physical examination to detect complications such as respiratory failure or cor pulmonale and
other co-morbidities. Body weight and body mass index provide information on the nutritional
status of the patient.
Spirometry measurement especially if symptoms worsen. Active smokers and patients with
frequent exacerbations are at risk of faster decline in lung function.
Pharmacotherapy and other medical treatment. Assess the effectiveness of current regimen
in controlling symptoms and any side effects from the medications. Ensure that patients are
taking their medication at the right dose and frequency and inhaler techniques are correct.
Issues regarding non-compliance to medications should be addressed.
14 15
Exacerbation history. The frequency, severity and causes of exacerbations should be recorded.
Severity can be estimated by the increased need for bronchodilator medication or systemic
glucocorticosteroid requirements. Hospitalisations should be documented including the
duration of stay and any use of invasive and non-invasive ventilation.
Patient education. It is important for patients with COPD to understand the nature of their
disease, risk factors for progression and strategies to help minimise symptoms.
Recommendations: Diagnosis and Assessment of Severity
1. The diagnosis of COPD should be conrmed by spirometry showing a post-bronchodilator
FEV
1
/FVC ratio of less than 0.7. [Grade C]
2. Assessment of COPD severity should be based on the severity of spirometric abnormality, the
patients symptoms, exercise capacity and the presence of co-morbidities and complications.
[Grade C]
16 17
SECTION 5 REDUCING RISK FACTORS
5.1 Introduction
Identication, reduction, control and elimination of risk factors are important steps toward effective
prevention and management of any disease. For COPD, these risk factors include tobacco smoke,
occupational exposures, indoor and outdoor air pollution and irritants. Since cigarette smoking is
the most commonly encountered risk factor for COPD worldwide, priority must be given to tobacco
control programmes. Smoking prevention strategies and availability of smoking cessation services
should be emphasised to encourage smoke-free lifestyles.
5.2 Smoking Prevention
Smoking prevention is the single most effective intervention to reduce the risk of developing
COPD and stop its progression.
68 (Level I)
This is endorsed by the international community with the
establishment of the WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (WHO FCTC) in 2005.
Comprehensive tobacco control policies and programmmes with clear, consistent, and
repeated nonsmoking messages should be delivered through every feasible channel, including
health care providers; community activities; schools; and radio, television, and the print media.
Mandatory legal provision for pictorial health warnings on cigarette packs and packages is an
efcient way to deliver clear, truthful anti-smoking messages directly to smokers.
National and local campaigns should be undertaken to reduce exposure to tobacco smoke
in public places. Such bans are proven to work, resulting in measurable gains in respiratory
health.
84 (Level I)
Smoking prevention programmes should target all ages, including young children, adolescents,
young adults, and pregnant women.
Interventions to prevent smoking uptake and maximise cessation should be implemented at
every level of the health care system.
Doctors and public health ofcials should encourage smoke-free environments, including
smoke-free homes.
Second-hand smoke exposure is also an important cause of respiratory symptoms and increased
risk for COPD, especially in partners and offspring of smokers.
85 (Level I)
Long-term indoor exposure,
combined with crowded living conditions in poorly ventilated homes, adds to the total burden of
particulate exposure and increases the risk of developing COPD.
86 (Level I)
Adults should not smoke in
the immediate vicinity of non-smokers, especially children, nor in enclosed spaces such as cars and
poorly ventilated rooms that expose others to increased risk. Children less than two years old who are
passively exposed to cigarette smoke have an increased prevalence of respiratory infections, and are
at a greater risk of developing chronic respiratory symptoms later in life.
87.88 (Level I)

5.3 Smoking Cessation
Quitting smoking can prevent or delay the development of airow limitation, or reduce its
progression,
88 (Level I)
and can have a substantial effect on subsequent mortality.
89 (Level I)
All smokers
including those who may be at risk for COPD as well as those who already have the disease
should be offered the most intensive smoking cessation intervention available.
16 17
Smoking cessation interventions are effective in both sexes, in all racial and ethnic groups, and
in pregnant women. Age inuences quit rates, with young people less likely to quit. Nevertheless,
smoking cessation programmes can be effective in all age groups. Effective interventions include
individual as well as group programmes such as community-based stop-smoking challenges. The
essential approaches are:
1. Pharmacotherapy
Nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) in the form of transdermal patches, gums, lozenges and
nasal sprays
Varenicline
Bupropion
Nortriptyline
2. Counselling from doctors and other health professionals, given either by individual face-to-face
interactions, group interactions or through telephone or web-based quit smoking services
3. Combination of counselling and pharmacotherapy
A successful smoking cessation strategy requires a multi-faceted approach that includes sustained
escalation in tobacco taxation, coherent government policies and legislations to reduce tobacco
demands and production as well as health education and frequent dissemination of consistent anti-
tobacco messages through the media and settings such as schools.
90,91 (Level III)
However, healthcare
providers, including doctors, nurses, dentists, psychologists, pharmacists and others, are key to the
delivery of smoking cessation messages and interventions. Healthcare workers should encourage all
patients who smoke to quit, even those patients who attend for unrelated reasons and do not have
symptoms of COPD.
92 (Level III)

5.4 Five Step Programme for Intervention (5A)
91 (Level III)
1. ASK: Systematically identify all tobacco users at every visit.
Implement an ofce-wide system that ensures that, for EVERY patient at EVERY
clinic visit, tobacco-use status is queried and documented.
2. ADVISE: Strongly urge all tobacco users to quit in a clear, strong, and personalised manner.
3. ASSESS: Determine willingness to make a quit attempt.
Ask every tobacco user if he or she is willing to make a quit attempt at this time
(e.g., within the next 30 days).
4. ASSIST: Aid the patient in quitting.
a. Help the patient with a quit plan
b. Provide practical counselling
c. Provide intra-treatment social support
d. Help the patient obtain extra-treatment social support
e. Recommend use of approved pharmacotherapy except in special
circumstances
f. Provide supplementary materials.
5. ARRANGE: Schedule follow-up contact, either in person or via telephone.
18 19
5.5 Counselling
Counselling delivered by doctors and other healthcare professionals signicantly increases quit
rates over self-initiated strategies.
93 (Level I)
Even a brief (three-minute) period of counselling to urge
a smoker to quit results in smoking cessation rates of 5-10%.
94 (Level II-2)
At the very least, this should
be done for every smoker at every healthcare provider visit.
95 (Level III)
5.6 Pharmacotherapy
Numerous effecti ve pharmacotherapi es for smoki ng cessati on now exi st,
96 (Level I I I )
and
pharmacotherapy is recommended when counselling is not sufcient to help patients quit smoking.
Special consideration should be given before using pharmacotherapy in selected populations:
People with medical contraindications
Light smokers (fewer than 10 cigarettes/day)
Smokers who are pregnant
Adolescent smokers.
All forms of nicotine replacement therapy are signicantly more effective than placebo.
96 (Level III)

Every effort should be made to tailor the choice of replacement therapy to the individuals culture
and lifestyle to improve adherence. Other pharmacotherapy, like bupropion
97 (Level I)
and nortriptyline
have also been shown to increase long term quit rates,
98,99 (Level I)
but should always be used as one
element in a supportive intervention programme rather than on their own. Varenicline, a nicotinic
acetylcholine receptor partial agonist that aids smoking cessation by relieving nicotine withdrawal
symptoms and reducing the rewarding properties of nicotine has been demonstrated to be safe and
efcacious.
100 (Level I)
The main adverse effect of varenicline is nausea, mostly mild or moderate which
usually subsides over time. There are recent concerns that varenicline may be linked with depressed
mood, agitation or suicidal thinking and behaviour in some smokers.
101 (Level III)
5.7 Occupational Exposure
Many occupations have been shown to be associated with increased risk of developing COPD,
particularly those that involve exposure to fumes and mineral and biological dusts. Although
it is not known how many individuals are at risk of developing respiratory disease from
occupational exposures, many occupationally induced respiratory disorders can be reduced or
controlled through a variety of strategies aimed at reducing the burden of inhaled particles and
gases.
102 (Level lI-2),103,104 (Level III)
The main emphasis should be on primary prevention, which is best achieved by the elimination or
reduction of exposures to various substances in the workplace. Secondary prevention, achieved
through surveillance and early case detection, is also of great importance. Both approaches are
necessary to improve the present situation and to reduce the burden of lung disease.
5.8 Indoor and Outdoor Air Pollution
Individuals experience diverse indoor and outdoor environments throughout the day, each of which
has its own unique set of air contaminants and particulates that cause adverse effects on lung
function.
104 (Level III)
Reducing the risk from indoor and outdoor air pollution is feasible and requires a combination of
public policy and protective steps taken by individual patients. Reduction of exposure to smoke from
biomass fuel, particularly among women and children, is a crucial goal to reduce the prevalence
of COPD.
18 19
5.9 Steps for Health Care Providers/Patients
The health care provider should consider COPD risk factors including smoking history, family
history, exposure to indoor/outdoor pollution and socioeconomic status for each individual patient.
Some steps to consider are:
Individuals at risk for COPD should be counselled concerning the nature and degree of their risk
for COPD
If various solid fuels are used for cooking and heating, adequate ventilation should be
encouraged
Respiratory protective equipment has been developed for use in the workplace in order to
minimise exposure to toxic gases and particles
Ventilation and interventions to meet safe air quality standards in the workplace offer the
greatest opportunity to reduce worker exposure to known atmospheric pollutants and reduce
the risk of developing COPD.
In patients who have been diagnosed with COPD:
Persons with advanced COPD should monitor public announcements of air quality and be
aware that staying indoors when air quality is poor may help reduce their symptoms.
The use of medication should follow the usual clinical indications; therapeutic regimens should
not be adjusted because of the occurrence of a pollution episode without evidence of worsening
of symptoms or lung function.
Recommendation: Smoking Cessation
1. Smoking cessation is the single most effective and cost effective intervention in most people
to reduce the risk of developing COPD and stop its progression. All smokers should be offered
smoking cessation interventions. [Grade A]
20 21
SECTION 6 MANAGING STABLE COPD

6.1 The Objectives of Managing Stable COPD
These include:
1. Preventing disease progression
2. Reducing frequency and severity of exacerbation
3. Improving exercise tolerance
4. Improving lung function and general health
5. Improving patients symptoms, e.g. dyspnoea, cough and tiredness.
6. Improving quality of life
7. Reducing mortality.

6.2 Patient Education
Patient education, essential in any chronic illness, should be individualised to address the cause,
disease severity, specic symptoms, response to therapy and other co-morbidities. It is aimed to
improve their quality of life.

Topics for patient education may include:
A brief explanation on
o The aetiologies of COPD which will enable patients to take necessary steps toward avoiding
these risk factors
o The pathophysiological changes of COPD which have contributed to their symptoms
o The differences between asthma and COPD (refer to Table 4-2).
Information about the natural course of the illness:
o COPD is a progressive disease
o Smoking cessation has the most signicant effect on modifying the course of disease
progression
o COPD exacerbation accelerates disease progression. Education has been shown to improve
health outcomes in patients with chronic illnesses.
106 (Level I),107 (Level III)
Patients should be counselled on their roles in optimising treatment and health outcomes.
Studies have shown that education plays a role in improving patients skills, ability to cope with
illness and health status.
108,109 (Level III), 110 (Level II-1), 111 (Level I)
Instruction on how to use an inhaler, assessing inhaler technique (consider recommending a
holding-chamber if technique is unsatisfactory) and other treatment.
Self-management plan in acute situation (e.g., recognition of a COPD exacerbation, treatment
intervention; and, when to seek medical help).
Strategies on minimising dyspnoea.
Information on proper nutrition intake, exercise and pulmonary rehabilitation.
Roles of vaccination.
For patients with more severe disease, counselling may include:
o Information about complications of COPD
o information about long-term oxygen therapy
o Advanced directive and end-of-life decisions. Prospective end-of-life discussion can lead
to better understanding of advanced directives and effective therapeutic decision at end of
life.
112 (Level II-1)

20 21
Limited published data suggest that the chronic care model in COPD management results in
lower rates of hospitalisations and emergency/unscheduled visits and shorter lengths of hospital
stay.
113 (Level I)
However, COPD patients recruited to a comprehensive COPD education programme
in Canada had signicantly fewer exacerbations and hospitalisations.
114 (Level I)
They also utilised
less health care resources.

These results may encourage adoption of similar programmes locally.
6.3 Inuenza Vaccination
Reduces the risk of COPD exacerbation.
115 (Level II-2)
COPD patients with infuenza have a signifcant risk of requiring hospitalisation.
116 (Level II-1)
Annual infuenza vaccination reduces infuenza-related acute respiratory illness by 76%.
117 (Level I)
In a retrospective, multi-season cohort study, elderly patients (aged 65 years-old) with chronic
lung diseases (some COPD patients were included) who were vaccinated with the inuenza
vaccine showed a 52% reduction of hospitalisation (secondary to inuenza and pneumonia)
and a 70% reduction in the risk of death compared to unvaccinated patients.
116 (Level II-1)

6.4 Pneumococcal Vaccination
The beneft of pneumococcal vaccination in COPD is less well established. Some reports state
that the vaccine has up to a 65% efcacy in COPD patients,
118 (Level II-2)
although an effect on
reducing the frequency of COPD exacerbation has yet to be established.
A recent report demonstrated a reduction in the prevalence of community-acquired pneumonia
following pneumococcal vaccination in a subgroup of COPD patients younger than 65 years
with an FEV
1
< 40% predicted.
119 (Level I)
Hence, a 23-valent polysaccharide vaccine (PPV23) is recommended for patients who are
younger than 65 years but with a FEV
1
< 40 % predicted (irrespective of age)
Even though the vaccination of PPV23 remains controversial, the panels support the WHO
position stand to vaccinate all COPD patients at least once in their lifetime and have it repeated
5 years (with a maximum of two doses in ones lifetime).
120 (Level III)
6.5 Treatment Strategy: Consisting of Pharmacological & Non-pharmacological Interventions

6.5.1 Pharmacological Therapy
Bronchodilators remain the mainstay of pharmacological therapy.
o They reduce airway smooth muscle tone, improve expiratory ow rate, reduce air-trapping
and hyperination of the lung.
o They also improve the patients dyspnoea scores, increase exercise tolerance, reduce
disability in daily living and improve overall health status.
o Optimal pharmacotherapy should be guided by the patients symptoms, level of activity and
frequency of COPD exacerbation.

Inhaled short-acting bronchodilators
These include inhaled short-acting b
2
-agonists (SABAs) and inhaled short-acting anticholinergics
(SAACs).
22 23
Inhaled SABAs
(Examples: MDI salbutamol 200 g, fenoterol 200 g or terbutaline 500 g PRN or 4 to 6 hourly)
They have been shown to improve lung function, dyspnoea and exercise tolerance.
o A systematic review of 13 randomised controlled trials (RCTs) showed that inhaling
SABAs on a regular basis for at least 7 days in patients at various stages of COPD (FEV
1
of
< 70% predicted) is associated with improvements in post-bronchodilator lung function
and a decrease in both breathlessness and treatment failure. Nonetheless, they have not
been shown to have a consistent impact on quality of life.
121 (Level I)
Inhaled SAACs
(Example: MDI ipratropium bromide 40 g 6 hourly)
Inhaled SAACs act on the muscarinic receptors by blocking their bronchoconstrictor
effects and reducing mucus secretions. An increase in FEV
1
was observed with
anticholinergics compared to the placebo.
122-125 (Level I)
Some studies also found that the
inhalation of SAACs is associated with an improvement in dyspnoea, a reduction in
the need for rescue medications,
123-126 (Level I)
and an improvement in the quality of life.
125 (Level I)
The
combination of inhaled SABA and SAAC achieves a greater bronchodilator effect than
either one alone.
123,127 (Level I)
However, there was no data to show that either SAAC or SABA
reduces exacerbation.

Inhaled long-acting bronchodilators
Consist of long-acting b
2
-agonists (LABAs) and long-acting anticholinergics (LAACs)
Offer a more sustained relief of symptoms and improvement of lung function
Also improve patients compliance to treatment.
Inhaled LABA
(Examples: salmeterol 50 g twice daily or formoterol 9 g twice daily)
The duration of action of LABAs is 12 hours or longer as compared to 4 hours in SABAs.
A review of 23 randomised controlled trials showed that the treatment of patients with COPD
(FEV
1
< 75% predicted) using LABA as compared to placebo produces modest increases in lung
function, and improves health-related quality of life and symptoms.
127 (Level I)
In this review, LABA
was also associated with a signicant reduction in COPD exacerbations.
127 (Level I)
The results of this systematic review were further supported by the TORCH study, a 3-year
randomised controlled study, which showed that salmeterol signicantly reduced exacerbations,
improved lung function and improved health-related quality of life as compared with placebo in
patients with COPD of FEV
1
< 60% predicted.
128 (Level I)

Inhaled LAAC
Tiotropium is the only LAAC currently in the market. The dose is 18 g once daily administered
through a Handihaler

.
It is effective for at least 24 hours in patients with airfow limitation and dynamic hyperinfation.
Several clinical trials using tiotropium for 6 weeks to 12 months showed improvement
in exercise tolerance, quality of life and dyspnoea as well as reduction in exacerbation as
compared to the placebo.
129-132 (Level I)
This is further supported by a 4-year prospective study, the UPLIFT trial, which demonstrated
that the use of tiotropium in patients with FEV
1
< 70% predicted, was associated with a
22 23
reduction in exacerbation and hospitalisation due to exacerbation but was not associated with
a reduction in the rate of decline in FEV
1
when compared to placebo.
133 (Level I)
A few studies have suggested that tiotropium produces superior bronchodilation as compared
to the LABAs.
134,135 (Level I)

Inhaled LAAC and inhaled LABA
Two small short-term studies showed that the combination of tiotropium and formoterol may have an
additive effect on lung function and may reduce the use of rescue medication.
135,136 (Level I)
However, in a
larger and longer study on patients with moderate to severe COPD, the OPTIMAL study, the addition of
salmeterol to tiotropium did not show any improvement in lung function or a reduction in exacerbation
compared to tiotropium alone.
137 (Level I)
Nonetheless, this combination did improve the health-related
quality of life.

Inhaled LABA and inhaled corticosteroid (ICS) combination
The combination of LABA/ICS has been shown to improve lung function, quality of life and reduce
exacerbations compared with placebo in COPD patients with FEV
1
< 65% predicted.
128, 138-140 (Level
I)
In the TORCH study, there was a trend towards a reduction in mortality in patients taking LABA/
ICS compared to placebo, though the reduction was not statistically signicant.
128 (Level I)
In the same
study, the decline in lung function in the patients taking LABA/ICS (39 mL/year) was also slower
compared with placebo (55 mL/year).
141 (Level II-1)
When ICS/LABA was compared with LAAC in the
INSPIRE study among patients with severe and very severe COPD with a history of exacerbation,
there was no difference in exacerbation rate but the former was associated with better health
related quality of life and lower mortality.
142 (Level I)
However, this study was not statistically powered
to study the mortality outcome.

Inhaled LAAC and inhaled LABA/ICS combination
In the UPLIFT study, where 53% of the study patients had severe to very severe COPD and 46% of
them were on ICS/LABA, the addition of tiotropium was associated with a signicant improvement
in lung function, a signicant delay in time to rst exacerbation, signicant reduction in number of
exacerbations and signicant improvement in health-related quality of life.
133 (Level I)
Thus, in patients
who are already on a LABA/ICS combination, but still have persistent symptoms, addition of a LAAC
should be considered. On the other hand, the OPTIMAL study showed that adding ICS/LABA to
tiotropium signicantly improved lung function, improved quality of life and reduced hospitalisation
but did not reduce exacerbation rates.
137 (Level I)
Inhaled corticosteroids (ICS)
(Examples: uticasone 500 g twice daily by Accuhaler

, budesonide 400 g twice daily by


Turbuhaler

)
The trial outcomes using ICS on COPD are rather conficting. The EUROSCOP trial
143 (Level I)
and
the Copenhagen Lung Health Study
144 (Level I)
showed the use of ICS in mild COPD does not slow
the rate of decline of FEV
1
. However, the ISOLDE trial
145 (Level I)
and and the study by Paggiarro PL
et al
146 (Level I)
showed that treatment with high dose ICS, in this case, uticasone 1000 g a day,
in moderate to severe COPD decreases exacerbations and modestly slows the progression of
respiratory symptoms, but has minimal or no impact on lung function.

Two recent multi-centre
randomised controlled studies conrmed that ICS alone improves FEV
1
and health-related
quality of life, and reduces moderate to severe exacerbations.
128,140 (Level I)
Furthermore, the
TORCH study showed a slower rate of decline in lung function in patients taking high dose ICS
alone (42 mL/year) as compared with placebo (55 mL/year).
141 (Level II-1)
24 25
Oral corticosteroids
About 10% of COPD patients show signifcant improvement in lung function (defned as an
improvement of at least 20% of FEV
1
) after oral corticosteroid administration.
147 (Level I)
However, chronic systemic corticosteroid usage is known to be associated with potentially
serious side-effects such as osteoporosis, premature cataract, muscle weakness, diabetes
mellitus and hypertension.
Indeed, one study showed that in severe COPD patients, maintenance treatment with oral
glucocorticoids is associated with increased mortality in a dose-dependent manner.
148 (Level II-2)
Hence, prolonged courses of systemic corticosteroids for the treatment of COPD should be
discouraged.
148 (Level II-2)

Combination of LAAC and ICS
There is no data to support the use of this combination.

Methylxanthines
(Example: oral sustained-release theophylline 125-300 mg twice daily)
Theophylline is a weak bronchodilator, hence offering only a modest improvement in symptoms
and exercise tolerance.
This drug should be relegated to third line therapy. It should only be added if inhaled long-
acting bronchodilators and ICS do not achieve the desirable control of symptoms.
It may be added to bronchodilator treatment if patients still have persistent symptoms despite
LABA.
149 (Level II-1)
This potential beneft should be weighed against its side-effects, such as nausea, abdominal
discomfort, diarrhoea and risk of cardiac arrhythmias.
In view of the narrow therapeutic window and signifcant toxicity, monitoring of drug levels is
desirable. The therapeutic range is 10-20 mg/L.
150 (Level III)
Some recent studies suggest that it has an anti-infammatory effect.
151,152 (Level I)
In one study,
COPD patients treated with low doses of theophylline (with concentration < 10 mg/L) were
noted to have reduced neutrophil counts, interleukin (IL)-8 concentration and myeloperoxidase
levels, as well as reduced neutrophil chemotactic responses in induced sputum.
151 (Level I)

In another placebo-controlled study, a signicant reduction in myeloperoxidase and neutrophil
elastase was noted after four weeks of treatment with theophylline.
152 (Level I)
Corticosteroids suppress the infammatory genes through deacetylation of core histone
by histone deacetylase (HDAC). It has been found that HDAC activity is reduced in cells of
cigarette smokers possibly due to increased oxidative stress.
153,154 (Level II-1)
There is some
evidence to suggest that low doses of theophylline restore steroid responsiveness in COPD
patients by increasing the HDAC activity.
155 (Level II-1)
24 25
Phosphodiesterase-4 (PDE4) inhibitors
(e.g. oral roumilast 500 mg once daily, cilomilast 15 mg twice daily)
Recently, treatment with PDE4 inhibitors have been studied in COPD patients.
The results of four phase III clinical studies have been recently published on rofumilast. Two
12-month studies of patients with severe COPD and bronchitic symptoms demonstrated that
roumilast produced a statistically signicant and clinically relevant reduction in exacerbations,
17% per patient per year (rate of 1.14 events per year with roumilast vs. 1.37 per year with
placebo, p < 0.001).
156 (Level I)
This reduction in exacerbations occurred even in patients treated
with concomitant LABA. The other two studies involving patients with moderate-to-severe
COPD showed roumilast improved patients pre-bronchodilator FEV
1
beyond long-acting
bronchodilators (salmeterol or tiotropium). However, in the latter study, it did not lead to a
statistically signicant reduction in COPD exacerbations.
157 (Level I)
Across the studies, roumilast
demonstrated a statistically signicant improvement in pre-bronchodilator FEV
1
, in the range
of 48 to 80 mL.
One 24-week, randomised, placebo-controlled study of COPD patients treated with
cilomilast showed quite similar results. A difference of 40 mL of pre-bronchodilator FEV
1
was
detected, favouring cilomilast. There was a clinically signicant mean reduction by 4.1 in
the total St Georges Respiratory Questionnaire score in subjects receiving cilomilast therapy
compared with those on placebo. A higher proportion of subjects in the cilomilast group were
exacerbation-free at 24 weeks compared with those on placebo (74% versus 62%).
158 (Level I)
Signifcant adverse effects in subjects treated with PDE4 inhibitors include nausea, diarrhoea,
weight loss and headache.
PDE4 inhibitors maybe an important treatment for patients with COPD, particularly those with
bronchitic symptoms, in the future.

Recommendations: Managing Stable COPD
1. Treatment recommendation should be based on disease severity, symptoms and frequency of
COPD exacerbations (Figure 6.1). [Grade C]
2. COPD patients at any stage of disease severity should be advised to quit smoking if they still
smoke. [Grade A]
3. In patients with mild COPD who are symptomatic, SABA or SAAC or a combination of both may
be prescribed. [Grade C]
4. In patients with moderate to very severe COPD with persistent symptoms, but without frequent
COPD exacerbations, either a LAAC or LABA may be initiated. If symptoms persist despite this
treatment, an ICS/LABA combination should be added; and vice versa. [Grade A]
5. Theophylline can be added to patients who are symptomatic despite maximum inhaled
therapy. [Grade C]
6. In resource-limited settings, alternative treatment may be used (Figure 6.2). [Grade C]
26 27
Figure 6-1: Algorithm for Managing Stable COPD
Notes:
1. SABA Short-acting b
2
agonist; SAAC Short-acting anticholinergic; LAAC Long-acting anticholinergic; LABA Long-
acting b
2
agonist; ICS Inhaled corticosteroid; LVRS lung volume reduction surgery
2. ICS dose per day should be at least 500 g of uticasone or 800 g of budesonide
a. All COPD patients, irrespective of disease severity, should be prescribed SABA or SABA/SAAC combination (Berodual

/
Combivent

) as needed. SABA has a more rapid onset of bronchodilatation than SAAC.


b. Dened as need for rescue bronchodilators more than twice a week.
c. Frequent exacerbation is dened as one or more episodes of COPD exacerbation requiring systemic corticosteroids
antibiotics and/or hospitalisation over the past one year
d. Consider alternative causes - it is less common for patients with mild COPD to have frequent exacerbations; similarly,
respiratory failure is uncommon in patients with mild to moderate COPD severity. Hence, in such patients, an alternative
cause should be explored even if the COPD diagnosis is rmly established.
COPD severity
Pulmonary rehabilitation
Clinical features
Infrequent
symptoms
SABA/SAAC combination as needed
Mild
SABA as needed
Persistent
symptoms
b LAAC or LABA
Moderate Severe Very severe
For all patients: education, smoking cessation, avoidance of exposure, exercise,
mantain ideal BMI, vaccination, short-acting bronchodilator
a
as needed
LAAC and/or LABA
If symptoms persist, add ICS/LABA combination to LAAC or
replace LABA with ICS/LABA combination
theophylline
Frequent
exacerbations
c
( 1 per yr)
Consider
alternative
cause
d
LAAC
or ICS/LABA combination
or LAAC + ICS/LABA combination
theophylline
Respiratory
failure
Consider alternative
cause
d
LAAC + ICS/LABA combination
theophylline
Long-term oxygen therapy
Consider lung transplantation/LVRS
26 27
Figure 6-2: Algorithm for Managing Stable COPD in Resource-Limited Settings
Notes:
1. SABA Short-acting b
2
agonist; SAAC Short-acting anticholinergic; LAAC Long-acting anticholinergic; LABA Long-
acting b
2
agonist; ICS Inhaled corticosteroid; LVRS lung volume reduction surgery
2. ICS dose per day should be at least 500 g of uticasone or 800 g of budesonide
a. All COPD patients, irrespective of disease severity, should be prescribed SABA or SABA/SAAC combination (Berodual

/
Combivent

) as needed. SABA has a more rapid onset of bronchodilatation than SAAC.


b. Dened as need for rescue bronchodilators more than twice a week.
c. Frequent exacerbation is dened as one or more episodes of COPD exacerbation requiring systemic corticosteroids
antibiotics and/or hospitalisation over the past one year
d. Consider alternative causes - it is less common for patients with mild COPD to have frequent exacerbations; similarly,
respiratory failure is uncommon in patients with mild to moderate COPD severity. Hence, in such patients, an alternative
cause should be explored even if the COPD diagnosis is rmly established.

COPD severity
Pulmonary rehabilitation
Clinical feature
Infrequent
symptoms
SABA/SAAC combination as needed
Mild
SABA as needed
Persistent
symptoms
b
SABA/SAAC
combination
regularly
Moderate Severe Very severe
For all patients: education, smoking cessation, avoidance of exposure, exercise,
maintain ideal BMI, vaccination, short-acting bronchodilator
a
as needed
Frequent
exacerbations
c
( 1 per yr)
Consider
alternative
cause
d
SABA/SAAC combination regularly + ICS
+ theophylline
(Consider referring to a tertiary centre to obtain
long-acting bronchodilators)
Respiratory failure
Consider alternative
cause
d
SABA/SAAC combination regularly
+ ICS + theophylline
Long-term oxygen therapy
Consider lung transplantation/LVRS
SABA/SAAC combination regularly
If symptoms persist, add theophylline and/or ICS
Clinical features
28 29
SECTION 7 MANAGING STABLE COPD: NON-PHARMACOLOGICAL TREATMENTS
7.1 Pulmonary Rehabilitation in COPD
Pulmonary rehabilitation aims to reduce symptoms, decrease disability, increase participation in
physical and social activities, and improve the overall quality of life (QoL) for patients with chronic
respiratory diseases. It includes exercise, education, psychosocial and behavioural intervention by
an interdisciplinary team of specialists.
159 (Level III)
Most structured pulmonary rehabilitation programmes last between 6 and 12 weeks.
160,161 (Level III)

They have been demonstrated to produce benets that last between 12 and 18 months. There
is no consensus on the optimal duration of pulmonary rehabilitation programmes. An exercise
programme can be helpful in the home
162-164 (Level I); 165,166 (Level II-1)
, in the hospital
167 (Level II-1)
or in
community settings.
168 (Level I)
In Malaysia, only a small fraction of patients with COPD are able to get
exercise training as only a few hospitals have programmes that provide closely supervised exercise
training and access to these programs is limited.
General aerobi c condi ti oni ng i s more hel pful than speci fi c trai ni ng of respi ratory
muscles.
160,161 (Level III),169 (Level I)
The muscles of ambulation should be a focus of pulmonary rehabilitation,
emphasising endurance and strength training. Benet is seen even in irreversible pulmonary
disorders, since much of the disability and handicap results not just from the respiratory disorder
per se but from secondary morbidities that often are treatable. Although the degree of airway
obstruction or lung hyperination does not change much with pulmonary rehabilitation, reversal
of muscle deconditioning and better pacing enables patients to walk further with less dyspnoea.
Supplemental oxygen should be used during rehabilitative exercise training in patients with severe
exercise-induced hypoxaemia.
161 (Level III)
Benets of pulmonary rehabilitation include
160,161 (Level III),170,171 (Level I))
:

Improvement in exercise tolerance
Reduction in the sensation of dyspnoea
Improvement in health-related quality of life (HRQoL)
Improvement in peripheral muscle strength and mass
Reduction in number of days spent in hospital
Cost effectiveness
Improvement in the ability to perform routine activities of daily living
Reduction in exacerbations
Reduction in anxiety and depression.
Improvements in exercise tolerance are maintained for 6 to 12 months. Improvements in HRQoL
may be maintained for longer periods.
There is insufcient evidence to determine if pulmonary rehabilitation improves survival among
patients with COPD.
159,161 (Level III)
28 29
Recommendations: Pulmonary Rehabilitation
1. Pulmonary rehabilitation should be considered as an addition to medications for symptomatic
patients who have Stage II, III, or IV COPD. [Grade A]
2. Efforts should be directed towards the setting up of both hospital and home-based
programmes locally. [Grade A]
7.2 Domiciliary Oxygen Therapy for COPD
Long-term administration of oxygen of > 15 hours per day to patients with chronic respiratory failure
has been shown to increase survival.
172,173 (Level I)
Home oxygen therapy does not appear to improve
survival in patients with mild to moderate hypoxaemia or in those with only oxygen desaturation
at night.
174 (Level I)
The goal of long-term oxygen therapy (LTOT) is to increase the baseline PaO
2
to at
least 60 mmHg (or 8.0 kPa) at rest, and/or produce an SaO
2
of at least 90%.
Indications for LTOT
69 (Level III)
:
PaO
2
7.3 kPa (55 mmHg) or SaO
2
88%, with or without hypercapnia; or
PaO
2
between 7.3 and 8.0 kPa (55-60 mmHg) or SaO
2
of 89%, if there is evidence of pulmonary
hypertension, peripheral oedema suggesting congestive heart failure, or polycythaemia
(haematocrit > 55%).
Assessment for LTOT should not be done during an exacerbation or during the recovery period of an
exacerbation. Arterial blood gas measurements should be made on two occasions when the patient
is in a stable condition and on optimal treatment.
69 (Level III)

Oxygen therapy is not indicated for patients:
with severe airfow limitation whose main complaint is dyspnoea but who maintain a PaO
2
> 8
kPa (60 mmHg) and who show no secondary effects of chronic hypoxia
who continue to smoke cigarettes
who have not received adequate therapy of other kinds (eg, inhaled and oral bronchodilators
and corticosteroids, treatment for right ventricular failure or for any respiratory infection)
who are not suffciently motivated to undertake the discipline required for oxygen therapy.
Domiciliary oxygen therapy is available in Malaysia from a variety of providers. Oxygen
concentrators are generally regarded more cost-effective. It should be prescribed by a qualied
medical practitioner and titrated carefully due to concerns of carbon dioxide retention. Patients
should be reassessed 12 months after starting continuous or nocturnal oxygen therapy, both
clinically and by measurement of PaO
2
and PaCO
2
.
175 (Level I)
Subsequent review should be undertaken
at least annually, or more often, according to the clinical situation.
Recommendations: Long-term Oxygen Therapy (LTOT)
1. LTOT should be prescribed for all patients with COPD who have chronic hypoxaemia.
[Grade A]
2. An oxygen concentrator is the most cost-effective method for delivering LTOT. [Grade A]
30 31
7.3 Nutrition in COPD
Cachexia is an important systemic manifestation in COPD.
176 (Level III), 177 (Level II-2)
Weight loss is a marker
of disease severity in advanced COPD and it is associated with adverse outcomes independent of
lung function. Low BMI is associated with higher mortality. Weight loss may further exacerbate
decreased respiratory muscle strength and increase dyspnoea and impair immunity.
178 (Level II-2), 179
(Level I)
The general assessment of patients with COPD should include weight and the calculation of
BMI at each visit. The goal is to try to maintain a reasonable body weight and BMI (between 22
and 27 kg/m
2
) and keep serum albumin levels above 35 g/L.
179 (Level I)
A balanced diet with adequate
caloric intake in conjunction with exercise to prevent or reverse malnutrition and muscle atrophy
is prudent.
180 (Level III)
However, excessive weight gain should be avoided, and obese patients should
strive to gradually reduce body fat. Studies of nutritional supplementation alone have not shown
improvement in pulmonary function or exercise capacity. Trials of anabolic steroids, growth hormone
supplementation, and tumour necrosis factor-a (TNF-a) antagonists in reversing malnutrition and
improving functional status and prognosis in COPD have been disappointing.
179 (Level I), 180 (Level III)
The role of pulmonary rehabilitation is now well-recognised in COPD. Ongoing research is currently
exploring how nutritional support can enhance exercise training and optimise the effects of
pulmonary rehabilitation.
181 (Level III)
Recommendation: Nutrition in COPD
1. A balanced diet with adequate caloric intake in conjunction with exercise is recommended in
patient s with COPD. [Grade B]
7.4 Lung Volume Reduction for COPD
7.4.1 Lung Volume Reduction Surgery (LVRS)
Lung volume reduction by resection of non-functioning emphysematous areas improves exercise
tolerance and decreases 2-year mortality in patients with severe, predominantly upper-lung
emphysema who have low baseline exercise capacity after pulmonary rehabilitation.
182,183 (Level I)

7.4.2 Bullectomy
Bullectomy has been reported to improve lung function and dyspnoea in selected patients by
removal of large bullae compressing on adjacent lung parenchyma.
184 (Level III)
HRQoL was maintained
three years post-bullectomy. Surgical techniques used have included thoracotomy, video-assisted
thoracoscopy and stapled wedge resection.
7.4.3 Minimally-Invasive Lung Volume Reduction Procedures
Newer minimally-invasive techniques of lung volume reduction such as endoscopic bronchial valve
placement await the results of large scale randomised studies.
185,186 (Level III)
30 31
7.5 Lung Transplantation
Lung transplantation is available in Malaysia. However, at the present time it is limited to younger
patients with other chronic lung diseases. Patients with COPD are considered for lung transplantation
when
187 (Level III)
:
life expectancy is not predicted to exceed 24-36 months despite optimal and maximal medical
management
they have class III or IV New York Heart Association (NYHA) symptoms.
< 60 years old with an FEV
1
< 25% predicted after bronchodilator therapy or with severe
pulmonary hypertension.
The 5-year survival after transplantation for emphysema is 45 to 60% in Western series.
188,189 (Level III)

Lifelong immunosuppressive therapy is required.
Recommendation: Surgical Treatment for COPD
1. COPD patients who continue to deteriorate despite optimal medical therapy may be considered
for surgical treatment. [Grade A]
7.6 COPD and Surgery
A careful evaluation of patients with COPD undergoing surgery should include identication of
high-risk patients and aggressive treatment. Elective surgery should be deferred in patients who
are symptomatic, have poor exercise capacity or have acute exacerbations.
Patients with COPD are several times more likely to have a major postoperative complication.
190,191
(Level II-2), 192 (Level I), 193 (Level II-2)
Similarly, an FEV
1
< 60% predicted was found to be an independent predictor
of increased mortality in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft procedures.
194 (Level III)
In
general, the incidence of postoperative pulmonary complications is inversely related to the distance
of the surgical incision from the diaphragm.
194

(Level III)
The risk of respiratory failure is increased in patients undergoing pneumonectomy with a
preoperative FEV
1
of < 2 L or < 50% predicted and/or diffusing capacity of the lungs (DLCO) < 50%
predicted.
195 (Level III)
High risk patients should undergo further testing such as lung perfusion and
exercise capacity tests.
195 (Level III)
Benets of surgery must be weighed against known risks.
Patients with COPD should be treated aggressively to achieve the best possible baseline function.
Bronchodilators, smoking cessation (at least 4-8 weeks preoperatively is optimal), antibiotics, and
chest physical therapy may help signicantly reduce pulmonary complications.
195-197 (Level III)
The
role of pre-operative steroids is uncertain although smaller studies have indicated reduction of
postoperative pulmonary and non-pulmonary complications in COPD patients undergoing coronary
artery bypass surgery.
198 (Level II-1), 199 (Level II-2)
Consider postponing elective surgery if improvement of
pulmonary function is possible and requires more time. The patient should be educated regarding
early postoperative deep breathing and incentive spirometry.
Regional anaesthesia and laparoscopic techniques and limited duration of surgery should be
considered where feasible.
200,201 (Level III)
Careful and vigilant use of muscle relaxants is advisable
to avoid postoperative muscle weakness. Adequate hydration should be maintained to allow
mobilisation of airway secretions. Postoperatively, early ambulation should be encouraged and the
use of opioids that may depress ventilation should be minimised.
32 33
Listed in the following recommendation box are measures to minimise pulmonary complications in
at-risk patients.
201 (Level III), 202 (Level I), 203 (Level III)
Recommendations: Surgery in COPD Patients
The following measures help minimise pulmonary complications in at-risk patients:

Preoperative
Smoking cessation
Antibiotics for acute bronchitis
Optimise COPD treatment regimens
Educate patient on lung expansion manoeuvres
Consider inspiratory muscle training or pulmonary rehabilitation in high-risk patients.
Postoperative
Early mobilisation
Lung expansion manoeuvres
- consider continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) in high-risk patients
Adequate pain control
- consider epidural analgesia in at-risk patients
- avoid opiates
Selective use of nasogastric decompression and total parenteral nutrition
Deep vein thrombosis prophylaxis. [Grade B]

32 33
SECTION 8 MANAGING EXACERBATIONS OF COPD
8.1 Introduction
The natural course of COPD is of gradual decline in lung function with episodes of exacerbations.
8.2 Denition of Acute Exacerbation of COPD
Exacerbation is dened as an event in the natural course of the disease characterised by a sustained
(lasting 48 hours or more) worsening of the patients baseline dyspnoea, cough, and/or sputum that
is beyond normal day-to-day variations, is acute in onset, and may warrant a change in regular
medication.
69,204 (Level III)
8.3 Morbidity and Mortality Associated with Acute Exacerbations of COPD
Acute exacerbation of COPD (AECOPD) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality
205 (Level III)
and incurs
huge cost in terms of healthcare resource utilisation.
206 (Level II-2)
Exacerbations impact negatively on lung
function
207 (Level II-2)
and HRQoL.
208 (Level III)
The impact is signicant and patients may take a long time to
recover.
209 (Level II-2)
Some patients never recover fully and have repeated exacerbations.
209 (Level II-2)

Measures to prevent AECOPD are important to reduce morbidity and mortality. AECOPD should be
suspected if smokers present with symptoms of chest infection.
8.4 Causes of Acute Exacerbations of COPD
Exacerbations are associated with an increase in airway inammation and are caused mainly by
lower respiratory tract infections and inhalation of pollutants. Cigarette smoking is a major cause
of COPD and smoking cessation is effective in reducing risk of exacerbation
210 (Level II-2)
and risk of
hospitalisation.
211 (Level II-2)
Most (50 to 60%) exacerbations are caused by bacterial or viral respiratory
infections,
212 (Level III), 213 (Level II-2)
while 10 to 20% are due to environmental factors
214 (Level II-2)
and non-
compliance to medications, and 30% are of unknown aetiology.
215-217 (Level III)
Bacterial organisms
that have been isolated in various studies of AECOPD include Haemophilus inuenzae, Moraxella
catarrhalis, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Chlamydophila pneumoniae,
Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Acinetobacter baumannii and Staphylococcus
aureus.
217 (Level III), 218, 219 (Level II-3)
Other precipitating factors include congestive heart failure, cold air and
pulmonary embolism.
204 (Level III), 220 (Level II-2)
8.5 Diagnosis and Assessment of Severity
Exacerbation of COPD is a clinical diagnosis which is supported by physical examination and
investigations. Usual symptoms are increased dyspnoea, cough and production of sputum which
may become purulent. Non-specic symptoms such as lethargy, insomnia, sleepiness, depression
and confusion may be present. Patients tend to underestimate their symptoms and underreport
exacerbations
221 (Level III)
probably because they have poor understanding of their disease and the
term exacerbation.
208 (Level III)
Assessment of severity is based on history, physical examination and investigation ndings.
34 35 34
8.5.1 History and Physical Examination
It is important to ascertain the patients baseline condition before the exacerbation, the development
of any new symptoms, the severity of COPD, the presence of co-morbidities, as well as previous and
current medications. Severity of COPD should be assessed based on FEV
1
, previous exacerbations,
hospital admissions especially history of admission into the intensive care unit (ICU) and receiving
invasive or non-invasive ventilation and the presence of complications of COPD. The history may
also help reveal possible cause(s) of and precipitating factors for the exacerbation and concomitant
medical illnesses. It is worth noting that anxiety and depression are common in COPD patients
and in those with exacerbations.
222 (Level II-2), 223 (Level III)
History can also help rule out other differential
diagnoses (see 8.6).
Physical examination includes checking:
Vital signs temperature, respiratory rate, pulse rate and rhythm and blood pressure.
Signs of poorer prognosis confusion, reduced conscious level, cachexia, respiratory distress,
cyanosis and evidence of cor-pulmonale.
Evidence of co-morbid conditions cardiovascular and neurovascular diseases, diabetes
mellitus and lung cancer.
8.5.2 Spirometry and Peak Flow Readings
These tests are difcult to be carried out by patients and to be interpreted during AECOPD.
69 (Level
III)
The measurements are not accurate and therefore their routine testing during the acute phase
of AECOPD is not recommended. However, spirometry may be performed after the patient has
recovered either before hospital discharge or on a follow-up clinic visit especially if they have not
done it before.
8.5.3 Pulse Oximetry
Pulse oximetry is used to evaluate the patients oxygen saturation (SpO
2
), need for supplemental
oxygen and response to treatment and to guide further management. Oxygen supplementation
should be given if SpO
2
< 90%.
69 (Level III)
If arterial blood gas results are not readily available,
controlled oxygen therapy using Venturi mask is recommended to avoid CO
2
narcosis, aiming for
SpO
2
90%. Morbidity and mortality are increased in patients with hypercapnic respiratory failure
when the SpO
2
is increased to above 93-95%.
224 (Level III)
However, pulse oximetry does not provide
information about CO
2
levels.
8.5.4 Arterial Blood Gas Measurement
Arterial blood gas measurement is useful as a tool to assess the severity of AECOPD. It is
recommended for patients attending the accident and emergency department and also in those
who are hospitalised. It should be performed in unwell patients despite them having good SpO
2

levels. In patients who are breathing room air, respiratory failure is dened as PaO
2
< 8.0 kPa
(60 mmHg) and/or SaO
2
< 90% with or without PaCO
2
> 6.7 kPa (50 mmHg). The respiratory
failure and exacerbation is worse if there is respiratory acidosis [pH < 7.36 with hypercapnia
pCO
2
6 - 8 kPa (45 60 mmHg)] and is an indication for assisted (non-invasive or invasive
ventilation) ventilation.
69 (Level III)
It should also be considered in patients who do not respond to
initial medical treatment.
8.5.5 Sputum Gram Stain and Culture
In an outpatient setting, if an AECOPD is infectious in nature and does not respond to initial antibiotic
therapy, sputum culture and sensitivity should be performed.
69 (Level III)
Sputum examination should
also be performed on patients who are hospitalised
225(Level II-3)
or whose chest radiographs show
changes suggestive of pneumonia.
34 35
8.5.6 Chest Radiograph
A chest radiograph is useful to identify possible causes of the AECOPD (for example, pneumonia),
alternative diagnoses that may mimic features of COPD (for example, heart failure and bronchiectasis)
and possible complications (for example, lung cancer and pneumothorax).
8.5.7 Electrocardiogram (ECG)
An ECG is a valuable tool for the diagnosis of tachyarrhythmias, myocardial ischaemia and right
ventricular hypertrophy.
8.5.8 Other Laboratory Tests
Full blood count:
A raised total white blood cell count may indicate underlying sepsis but a normal count does not
rule it out. The presence of purulent sputum in AECOPD is enough to commence empirical antibiotic
therapy.
226 (Level III)
Polycythaemia and raised haematocrit levels suggest cor pulmonale. Anaemia
could be due to underlying chronic disease, malnutrition or blood loss.
Renal prole, blood glucose and liver function test:
Biochemical abnormalities may be present during AECOPD. These additional tests may reveal the
presence of co-morbid conditions such as renal impairment, uncontrolled diabetes and malnutrition.
8.6 Differential Diagnoses
Non-compliance to medications may mimic an exacerbation, therefore careful history taking is
necessary. If patients do not respond to standard therapy, they need to be reassessed to determine
if they have other diagnoses that may imitate or aggravate their AECOPD such as:
Asthma (may co-exist with COPD)
Bronchiectasis
Diffuse parenchymal lung disease
Lung cancer
Pulmonary embolism
Pneumothorax
Heart failure.
Patients with advanced COPD often have several co-morbid conditions.
128 (Level I), 204 (Level III)
8.7 Managing Acute Exacerbations of COPD
The aims of management in exacerbations of COPD are to:
1. Relieve symptoms and airow obstruction
2. Maintain adequate oxygenation
3. Treat any co-morbid conditions that may contribute to the respiratory deterioration or treat any
precipitating factor such as infection.
Most patients with AECOPD are treated in the primary care setting but a minority of patients will
require hospital assessment or admissions. Indications for hospital assessment or admissions for
AECOPD are shown in Table 8-1.
36 37
Table 8-1: Indications for Hospital Assessment or Admission for Acute Exacerbations of
COPD
8.8 Home Management (Refer Figure 8-1)
8.8.1 Bronchodilator Therapy
Inhaled bronchodilators improve airow obstruction and reduce lung hyperination, thereby
improving dyspnoea. Short-acting inhaled b
2
-agonists are preferred for treating AECOPD.
76,196 (Level III),
227 (Level I)
The dosage and frequency of existing short-acting b
2
-agonists therapy should be increased,
for example, salbutamol 200-400 g or terbutaline 500 g every 3-4 hours. Anticholinergic therapy
(ipratropium bromide 40 g 6 hourly) may be added if not yet in use, until the symptoms improve.
8.8.2 Systemic Corticosteroids
Systemic corticosteroids should be used in addition to existing bronchodilator therapy in an AECOPD
with signicant increase in dyspnoea or if the patients baseline FEV
1
is < 50% predicted. Systemic
corticosteroids have been shown to shorten recovery time, improve oxygenation and lung function
and reduce treatment failure.
228 (Level I)
A dose of 30-40 mg prednisolone per day for 7-14 days is
appropriate for most patients.
69,204 (Level III)
There is no advantage in prolonged corticosteroid therapy
as the risk of side effects is signicant.
8.8.3 Antibiotics
The use of antibiotics is discussed in 8.9.4 under hospital management.
8.9 Hospital Management (Refer Figure 8-2)
The initial management of a patient with an AECOPD in the emergency department is to provide
controlled oxygen therapy and assessing the severity of the exacerbation to determine if the patient
can be treated in the emergency department or in the general ward. If the exacerbation is life
threatening, the patient should be admitted to a high dependency unit or the ICU.
8.9.1 Controlled Oxygen Therapy
Supplemental oxygen therapy is considered the cornerstone of hospital treatment for an AECOPD.
Oxygen therapy is given to maintain adequate oxygenation (PaO
2
8 kPa or 60 mmHg or SpO
2

90%) without precipitating respiratory acidosis or worsening hypercapnia. Controlled oxygen
therapy should be given in the form of 24-28% oxygen via a Venturi mask if available to ensure
accurate delivery of oxygen or 1-2 litres per minute of oxygen via nasal prongs.
76,196 (Level III)
Arterial
blood gases should be checked 30-60 minutes later to ensure adequate oxygenation without CO
2

retention or acidosis. Arterial blood gases should be monitored regularly depending on the clinical
state of the patient (Figure 8-3).
Marked increase in intensity
of symptoms such as sudden
development of dyspnoea
Underlying severe COPD
Development of new physical signs
e.g., cyanosis, peripheral oedema
Haemodynamic instability
Reduced alertness
Failure of exacerbation to respond to
initial medical management
Signifcant co-morbidities
Newly occurring cardiac arrhythmias
Older age
Insuffcient home support
36 37
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38 39
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38 39
Adequate oxygenation
SpO
2
>90% or

PaO
2
>60 mmHg
Increase controlled FiO
2

and monitor ABG
Optimise medical therapy
Optimise bronchodilator
treatment
Controlled oxygen therapy, aim
for SpO
2
of 90-93%
Consider NIV/mechanical
ventilation
Refer to specialist
Metabolic acidosis (possible
renal failure or sepsis)
Consider other diagnosis
Maintain oxygen
concentration/flow
Optimise medical therapy
Monitor SpO
2
/ABG
Maintain oxygen
concentration/flow
Optimise medical therapy
Monitor SpO
2
/ABG
Increased PaCO
2
Normal or low PaCO
2
Normal pH
Yes No
Yes
No
High pH
Low pH
Increase controlled
FiO
2

and monitor ABG
Optimise medical
therapy
Optimise
bronchodilator
treatment
Controlled
oxygen
therapy, aim for
SpO
2
of 90-93%
Consider
NIV/mechanical
ventilation
Refer to
specialist
Metabolic acidosis (possible
renal failure or sepsis)
Consider other diagnosis
Maintain O
2

concentration/
flow
Optimise
medical therapy
Monitor
SpO
2
/ABG
No
No
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
High pH Low pH
Adequate
oxygenation?
SpO
2
>90% or

PaO
2
>60 mmHg
Normal or
low PaO
2
Increased
PaCO
2
?
Normal pH?
No
Sansfactory
response?
Increase O
2

concentration/
flow rate,
aim for
SpO
2
> 95%
Monitor
SpO
2
/ABG
Maintain or reduce
FiO
2
, aim for
PaO
2
> 8 kPa
(60 mmHg) and
SpO
2
of 90-93%
Consider NIV/
mechanical
ventilation if
pH < 7.35
Monitor ABG
closely
Increase controlled
FiO
2
, aim for
PaO
2
> 8 kPa
(60 mmHg) and
SpO
2
of 90-93%
Consider NIV/
mechanical
ventilation if
pH < 7.35
Monitor ABG
closely
Normal/Low Normal/Low High High
Adequate
oxygenation?
[SpO
2
> 90% or
PaO
2
> 8 kPa (60 mmHg)]
PaCO
2
? PaCO
2
?
In all situations,
Optimise bronchodilator therapy and other medical therapy
Refer to specialist if patients condition does not improve
Maintain O
2

concentration/
flow rate,
aim for
SpO
2
> 95%
Monitor
SpO
2
/ABG
Figure 8-3: Algorithm for Adjustment of Supplemental Oxygen Settings During Acute
Exacerbations of COPD
40 41
8.9.2 Bronchodilator Therapy
The relief of airow obstruction by bronchodilator therapy is the major goal in the treatment of
AECOPD. Inhaled SABA is usually given in the nebulised form although there is evidence that
administration of inhaled SABA via a metered dose inhaler (10 to 20 puffs via a spacer device)
has equal efcacy to nebulised treatment.
76,196 (Level III), 227 (Level I)
The use of nebulisers poses a risk of
nosocomial infection to healthcare workers and other patients.
229 (Level III)
Extra precautions should be
taken to reduce the risk of transmitting respiratory infections such as inuenza A (H1N1). In severe
exacerbations, nebulised SABA can be combined with a SAAC, for example, Combivent

nebuliser
solution 2.5 mL (ipratropium bromide 500 g, salbutamol 2.5 mg) 6 hourly or Duovent

nebuliser
solution 4 mL (ipratropium bromide 500 g, fenoterol 1.25 mg) 6 hourly.
In severe exacerbations, intravenous methylxanthines can be considered if there is inadequate
response to inhaled SABA and SAAC.
230 (Level II-1)
The recommended loading dose of intravenous
aminophylline is 250-500 mg (5 mg/kg) over 20 minutes followed by a maintenance dose of 500
g/kg/hour, adjusted according to plasma theophylline concentration (1020 mg/L or 55110
mol/L). Patients already on maintenance theophylline treatment should not be given a loading
dose. Doctors need to be aware of interactions between aminophylline with various other drugs.
8.9.3 Systemic Corticosteroids
Corticosteroids are effective treatments for AECOPD and are recommended as an addition to other
therapies in the hospital management of AECOPD in the absence of signicant contraindications.
Systemic corticosteroids improve lung function over the rst 72 hours, shorten hospital stay
and reduce treatment failure over the subsequent 30 days.
231,232 (Level I)
A dose of 30-40 mg of oral
prednisolone daily for 7-14 days appears to be safe and effective. A study has shown that nebulised
corticosteroids may also be benecial during AECOPD as an alternative to oral prednisolone in
the treatment of non-acidotic exacerbations of COPD.
233 (Level I)
Systemic corticosteroids should be
discontinued after the acute episode as they are associated with signicant side-effects.
8.9.4 Antibiotics
Bacterial lower respiratory tract infections, either primary or secondary, following an initial viral
infection are a common cause of AECOPD. Antibiotics are benecial during AECOPD but have no
proven benet to prevent exacerbations.
234 (Level I), 235 (Level III)


Antibiotics should be given to patients with AECOPD having at least 2 out of 3 cardinal symptoms
(i.e., purulent sputum, increased sputum volume and/or increased dyspnoea).
226 (Level III)
Patients with
a severe AECOPD that requires invasive or non-invasive ventilation should also be covered with
antibiotics.
236 (Level I)
The risk factors for Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection include severe airow
limitation, recent hospitalisation (in the last 3 months), frequent administration of antibiotics
(4 courses in the last year), severe AECOPD and isolation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa during a
previous AECOPD or colonisation during the stable period.
69 (Level III)
The choice of antibiotics depends
on the local antibiotic policy (Table 8-2).
40 41
Table 8-2: Antibiotic Treatment for Acute Exacerbations of COPD
(Adapted from the National Antibiotic Guideline 2008, Ministry of Health of Malaysia
237
)
Stable
clinical
state
Symptoms of
exacerbation and
risk factors
Probable
bacterial
pathogen
Suggested treatment
Simple COPD
(without risk
factors)
Increased cough
and sputum volume,
purulent sputum and
increased dyspnoea
Haemophilus
inuenza,
Moraxella
catarrhalis,
Streptococcus
pneumonia,
Atypical respiratory
pathogens
Preferred
Extended spectrum macrolide
e.g., azithromycin 500 mg once daily for
3 days, clarithromycin 250 mg twice daily
for 7 days
OR
2
nd
or 3
rd
generation cephalosporin
e.g., cefuroxime 250-500 mg twice daily
for 7 days
Alternative
b-lactam/b-lactamase inhibitor
e.g., Amoxycillin/clavulanate
625 mg twice daily for 7 days
OR
Erythromycin ethylsuccinate 800 mg
twice daily for 7 days
OR
Doxycycline 100 mg twice daily for 7 days
OR
Moxioxacin 400 mg once daily for 5-7
days
Complicated
COPD (with
risk factors) *
As in COPD without
risk factors plus
at least one of the
following:
FEV
1
< 50%
predicted
> 4 exacerbations/
year
> 65 years old
Signifcant
co-morbidity
(especially heart
disease)
Use of home
oxygen
Chronic oral
corticosteroid use
Antibiotic use in
the past 3 months
Haemophilus
inuenzae,
Moraxella
catarrhalis,
Streptococcus
pneumonia,
Atypical respiratory
pathogens,
Klebsiella spp,
Pseudomonas
aeruginosa,
Other Gram-
negatives
Preferred
b-lactam + b-lactamase inhibitor
e.g. amoxicillin 1 g three times a day or
amoxycillin/clavulanate
2 g twice daily for 7 days
OR
2
nd
or 3
rd
generation cephalosporin
e.g., cefuroxime 500 mg twice daily,
ceftriaxone 1 g once daily for 7 days
OR/AND
Extended spectrum macrolide
e.g., azithromycin 500 mg
once daily for 3-5 days
** Patients at risk for Pseudomonas
aeruginosa infection should receive
anti-Pseudomonas antibiotics
Alternative
Fluoroquinolone e.g., levooxacin 750 mg
once daily for 5 days, moxioxacin 400
mg once daily for 5-7 days, ciprooxacin
250-500 mg twice daily for 5-7 days
* May require parenteral therapy. Consider referral to hospital.
42 43
8.9.5 Other Measures
Further hospital management includes:
Monitoring of fuid balance
Deep vein thrombosis prophylaxis with subcutaneous heparin especially in immobile patients
and those with acute on chronic respiratory failure
238 (Level III), 239 (Level II-2)
Supplementary nutrition
240 (Level II-2)
Sputum clearance.
241 (Level III)
There is no convincing evidence to support the routine use of pharmacological mucus clearance
strategies.
69 (Level III)
Chest physiotherapy has no proven value during exacerbations unless a
large amount of sputum is produced (> 25 mL per day) or there is mucus plugging with lobar
atelectasis.
69 (Level III)

Diuretics are indicated if there is evidence of peripheral oedema.
8.10 Management of Severe but Not Life-Threatening AECOPD in the Emergency Department
or the Hospital
Assess severity of symptoms, blood gases, chest radiograph
Administer controlled oxygen therapy, repeat arterial blood gas measurements after 30 minutes
Bronchodilators
o Increase dose frequency
o Combine inhaled SABA and SAAC
o Use spacers or air-driven nebulisers
o Consider adding intravenous aminophylline, if needed
Oral or intravenous glucocorticosteroids
Antibiotics when signs of bacterial infection are present
Consider non-invasive/invasive mechanical ventilation if patients condition deteriorates
At all times:
o Monitor uid balance and nutrition
o Consider subcutaneous heparin
o Identify and treat associated conditions (e.g. heart failure, arrhythmias)
o Monitor patients condition closely.
Recommendations: Drug Treatment for AECOPD
1. Inhaled bronchodilators and systemic corticosteroids are effective treatments for exacerbations
of COPD. [Grade A]
2. Antibiotics should be used in patients with signs of airway infection (i.e., change in sputum
colour, increased sputum volume and/or increased dyspnoea). [Grade A]
42 43
8.11 Non-invasive Ventilation
In patients with COPD and acute respiratory failure, the use of non-invasive ventilation (NIV) results
in less frequent intubation, decreased complications and mortality as well as a shorter hospital
stay.
242 (Level I)
The primary indication is persistent hypercapnoeic respiratory failure despite optimal medical
therapy. It is recommended that NIV should be delivered in a dedicated setting with staff who
have been trained in its application, are experienced in its use and are aware of its limitations.
When patients are started on NIV there should be a clear plan covering what to do in the event of
deterioration and the agreed ceilings of therapy.
243 (Level III)
Table 8-3: Indications for NIV
69 (Level III)
:
Moderate to severe dyspnoea with use of accessory muscles and paradoxical abdominal
motion.
Respiratory rate > 25 breaths per minute.
Moderate to severe acidosis (pH 7.25 - 7.35) and/or hypercapnia [PaCO
2
> 6.0 kPa
(45 mmHg)].
Table 8-4: Contraindications for NIV
69 (Level III)
:
Respiratory arrest
Cardiovascular instability (hypotension, arrhythmias, myocardial infarction)
At high risk for aspiration
Impaired mental status; uncooperative patient
Signifcant facial injury
Viscous or copious secretions
Recent facial or gastroesophageal surgery
Fixed nasopharyngeal abnormalities
Burns
Extreme obesity
Underlying intestinal obstruction.
8.12 Invasive Mechanical Ventilation
The use of invasive ventilation is inuenced by the likely reversibility of the precipitating event, the
patients wishes (or advance directive) and the availability of intensive care facilities.
44 45
Table 8-5: Indications for Invasive Mechanical Ventilation
69 (Level III)
:
Unable to tolerate NIV or NIV failure
Severe dyspnoea with use of accessory muscles and paradoxical abdominal motion
Respiratory rate > 35 breaths per minute
Severe acidosis (pH < 7.25) and/or hypercapnia [PaCO
2
> 8.0 kPa, (60 mmHg)]
Respiratory arrest
Impaired mental status; somnolence
Cardiovascular instability (hypotension, shock)
Other complications (metabolic abnormalities, sepsis, pneumonia, pulmonary embolism,
barotrauma, massive pleural effusion)
Recommendations: Ventilatory Support
1. NIV should be considered for AECOPD patients with hypercapnic respiratory failure despite
optimal medical therapy. [Grade A]
2. Patients with severe AECOPD requiring NIV should be managed by dedicated and trained staff
in high dependency or intensive care units. [Grade C]
8.13 Hospital Discharge
69 (Level III )
Patients with AECOPD can be discharged when:
Inhaled bronchodilator therapy is required not more frequently than every 4 hours
Patient, if previously ambulatory, is able to walk across the room
Patient is able to eat and sleep without frequent awakening by dyspnoea
Patient has been clinically stable for 12-24 hours
ABG or SpO
2
have been stable for at least 12-24 hours
Patient (or home caregiver) understands the disease and its management (including correct
use of medications) at home
Follow-up has been organised.
A copy of discharge summary should be given to the patient. A close working relationship between
hospital and primary care doctors is desirable.
8.14 Follow Up
69 (Level III )
Patients should be reviewed within 8 weeks after discharge. The following should be assessed
244 (Level II-2)
:
Ability to cope in the patients usual environment
Spirometry measurement
Inhaler technique
Understanding of recommended treatment regimen
Smoking status and cessation
Need for LTOT and/or home nebuliser (for patient with stage IV COPD)
Suitability for pulmonary rehabilitation
Vaccination with infuenza vaccine with or without pneumococcal vaccine
Self-management plans and future monitoring.
44 45
SECTION 9 TRANSLATING GUIDELINE RECOMMENDATIONS TO THE CONTEXT OF
PRIMARY CARE
9.1 Introduction
Primary care provides the rst point of contact for medical care delivery. Most patients with COPD
are seen in primary care and it is therefore paramount that primary care physicians are adept
in identifying, managing and preventing COPD. The best practice recommendations are detailed
in Sections 1 to 8 and require effective translation of such recommendations to individual
circumstances in the primary care setting. In Malaysia, the main providers of primary care are the
public health centres, hospital-based primary care outpatient clinics and private general practice.
The factors that are particularly pertinent in this context are described in this section.
9.2 Early Diagnosis
Early identication of patients at high risk is an important role for primary care doctors. Such
identication allows intervention to be taken such as smoking cessation, reduction of exposure
to tobacco smoke as well as other risk factors such as occupational dusts, indoor and outdoor
pollution.
Diagnosis should be made based on at risk individuals with symptoms of chronic cough, increased
sputum production, or breathlessness, conrmed by spirometry. However, it is not recommended
to use spirometry for the purpose of screening all adults for COPD. Therefore spirometry should be
used as a diagnostic test for patients identied as at risk.
245 (Level III)
9.3 Smoking Cessation
To date, smoking cessation is the only effective way of preventing the development and reducing
the progression of COPD. Smoking cessation interventions, which include brief behavioural sessions
and pharmacotherapy, are effective in making patients quit smoking.
246 (Level III)
All individuals with
COPD who still smoke will benet from smoking cessation.
9.4 Spirometry
In primary care, COPD is diagnosed mainly on clinical grounds alone. However, the diagnosis can be
easily overlooked and the condition therefore is frequently under-diagnosed.
Spirometry is strongly advocated for the conrmation of diagnosis and the assessment of COPD
severity. The training in execution and correct interpretation of the spirometry is therefore necessary.
In sites where spirometry is not available, referral to other centres where this test can be performed
should be arranged. Peak expiratory ow measurement may be considered where spirometry
is not available.
247 (Level III)
However, while low peak expiratory ow rates (PEFR) with little or no
bronchodilator reversibility are consistent with COPD, but such ndings can also be due to other
lung diseases. Furthermore, PEFR is only reduced in advanced COPD. Therefore, it is important to
realise that spirometry is now the choice investigation for diagnosis and assessing severity.
9.5 Long-Term Management
COPD is a chronic disease. The role of primary care doctors include the following:
Education and counselling on COPD, and how it is different from asthma
Raising awareness of COPD and that cigarette smoking cessation and avoidance of other risk
factors can help to prevent the development and progression of COPD
46 47
Preventing exacerbations, such as by risk factor avoidance, vaccination and appropriate
pharmacotherapy
Coordinating care with hospital-based specialists in issues of selection of therapies, prevention
and treatment of exacerbations, treatment of co-morbidities and complications such as cor
pulmonale. Of particular relevance are the awareness of availability of pulmonary rehabilitation
as well as the assessment of the need for and prescribing of LTOT
Dealing with problems in relation to home caregivers, such as coping with the disease, provision
of support and dealing with end-of-life issues especially when the disease is advanced
Encouraging patients to maintain the best level of physical activity.
9.6 When to Refer to Hospital-Based Specialists?
Referral to a hospital-based specialist should be considered in the following situations:
When the diagnosis is in doubt
For spirometry testing when such a facility is not available on site
Onset of cor pulmonale
Assessment and prescribing of LTOT
When there is a rapid decline of FEV
1
indicating severity of the disease
Patient aged < 40 years in whom an underlying genetic predisposition such as alpha-1
antitrypsin deciency is suspected
When access to certain drugs is a problem.
Recommendations: Translating Guideline Recommendations to the Context of Primary Care
1. Early identication of patients at risk for COPD and smoking cessation is important in
primary care. [Grade A]
2. Spirometry is now strongly advocated for the conrmation of diagnosis and the assessment
of COPD severity. [Grade A]
3. All COPD patients who smoke should be advised and assisted to stop smoking. [Grade A]
4. COPD is a chronic disease that should be jointly managed whenever necessary between
primary care and hospital-based doctors. This includes managing exacerbations and
prescribing LTOT. [Grade A]
46 47
AECOPD Acute Exacerbation of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
BMI Body Mass Index
BODE Body mass index (BMI), airow Obstruction, Dyspnoea and Exercise capacity
BUSECr Blood Urea, Serum Electrolytes and Creatinine
COPD Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
CPAP Continuous Positive Airway Pressure
CXR Chest X-Ray
C&S Culture and Sensitivity
DALYs Disability-Adjusted Life Years
DLCO Diffusing capacity of the Lungs for Carbon Monoxide
DVT Deep Vein Thrombosis
ECG Electrocardiogram
EUROSCOP European Respiratory Society study on chronic obstructive disease
FBC Full Blood Count
FCTC Framework Convention on Tobacco Control
FEV
1
Forced Expiratory Volume in the rst second
FiO
2
Fraction of Inspired Oxygen
FVC Forced Vital Capacity
HDAC Histone Deacetylase
HRQoL Health-Related Quality of Life
ICS Inhaled Corticosteroid
ICU Intensive Care Unit
INSPIRE Investigating New Standards for Prophylaxis in Reducing Exacerbations
ISOLDE Inhaled Steroids in Obstructive Lung Disease
LAAC Long-Acting Anticholinergic
LABA Long-Acting b
2
-Agonist
LFT Liver Function Test
LTOT Long-term Oxygen Therapy
LVRS Lung Volume Reduction Surgery
MDI Metered Dose Inhaler
MMRC Modied Medical Research Council
6MWT Six Minute Walk Test
NIV Non-Invasive Ventilation
NRT Nicotine Replacement Therapy
NYHA New York Heart Association
OPTIMAL The Canadian Optimal Therapy of COPD Trial
PaCO
2
Arterial partial pressure of carbon dioxide
PaO
2
Arterial partial pressure of oxygen
PDE
4
Phosphodiesterase-4
PEFR Peak Expiratory Flow Rate
pMDI Pressurised Metered Dose Inhaler
PRN As needed
PPV23 23-Valent Polysaccharide Vaccine
QoL Quality of Life
SAAC Short-Acting Anticholinergic
SABA Short-Acting b
2
-Agonist
SAFE SGRQ score, Air-Flow limitation and Exercise tolerance
SaO
2
Arterial oxygen saturation
SpO
2
Oxygen saturation by pulse oximetry
TNF Tumour Necrosis Factor
TORCH TOwards a Revolution in COPD Health
UPLIFT Understanding Potential Long-term Impacts on Function with Tiotropium
GLOSSARY OF TERMS
48 49
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
The working group members of these guidelines would like to express their gratitude and
appreciation to the following for their contributions:
Panel of external reviewers who reviewed the draft
Technical Advisory Committee for Clinical Practice Guidelines for their valuable input
and feedback
Health Technology Assessment Section, Ministry of Health
CMPMedica for their editorial and secretariat services.
DISCLOSURE STATEMENT
The panel members have completed disclosure forms. None of them hold shares in pharmaceutical
rms or acts as consultants to such rms. (Details are available upon request from the CPG
secretariat)
SOURCES OF FUNDING
The development of the CPG was supported by unconditional educational grants from
AstraZeneca, Boehringer Ingelheim and GlaxoSmithKline. The nal recommendations made by the
Guideline Development Group have not been inuenced by the views or interests of any funding
body.
48 49
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