Ghostly tales of Wisemans Ferry Ghostly tales of Wisemans Ferry Ghostly tales of Wisemans Ferry Ghostly tales of Wisemans

Ferry
Villagers will tell you – if you get them in the right mood
once the most famous haunted house in Australia.
witching hour of midnight echoes to a woman's piteous moans and the ter
convict irons…
The man: The man: The man: The man: Here this ex-smuggler ruled his manacled convict servants
with a rod of iron, and amassed wealth which enabled him, even in
those primitive days of the colony, to live in the comfort and ease of an
English country gentleman. He had in his service 300 assig
men and women, and he was known to the little community over which
he held sway as "Governor" Wiseman. For nearly 30 years he was lord of
the manor on the banks of the picturesque Hawkesbury, an autocrat with
wide powers over his estate, and
on horseback from Sydney to the Maitland district

The “ The “ The “ The “
of the young convict whose ghost periodically visits the old house
to beg a tic
and thirties it was the custom to grant a ticket
convict serving seven years' sentence if on the expiration of
four years of sentence the convict held a good conduct report.
sweetheart in Sydney, begged Wiseman to give him a permit.
"Governor" refused and instead put him under a cruel taskmaster, who had him chained to
the roadmaking gang. He attempted to escape by swimming the river, but his leg
hampered him and he was drowned. For years the ghost of the young boy was supposed to
come to the house and the clank, clank of his chains sent a shiver down the spine of
travellers who claim to have heard it.
A Swagman’s tale: A Swagman’s tale: A Swagman’s tale: A Swagman’s tale: A swagman who was on his way to Sydney put in at the old house for a
night's camp. Telling of his adventures afterwards he
said that he was awakened shortly after midnight
by the most unearthly noises. The screa
woman as if she were being choked was followed by
the slamming of a door. Footsteps echoed along the
stone corridor, and a shadowy form seemed to flit past
him. All was quiet for a while and the troubled
swagman turned over and tried to sleep. He c
The clanking of leg-irons accomp
Ghostly tales of Wisemans Ferry Ghostly tales of Wisemans Ferry Ghostly tales of Wisemans Ferry Ghostly tales of Wisemans Ferry
if you get them in the right mood – that the Wisemans
once the most famous haunted house in Australia. It is haunted by ghosts, and at the
witching hour of midnight echoes to a woman's piteous moans and the terrifying clank of
smuggler ruled his manacled convict servants
with a rod of iron, and amassed wealth which enabled him, even in
those primitive days of the colony, to live in the comfort and ease of an
English country gentleman. He had in his service 300 assigned convicts,
men and women, and he was known to the little community over which
he held sway as "Governor" Wiseman. For nearly 30 years he was lord of
the manor on the banks of the picturesque Hawkesbury, an autocrat with
wide powers over his estate, and a generous host to the few travelers who braved the journey
on horseback from Sydney to the Maitland district
The “ The “ The “ The “Governor Governor Governor Governor:” :” :” :” One of the most picturesque legends is the story
of the young convict whose ghost periodically visits the old house
to beg a ticket-of leave of "Governor" Wiseman. In the twenties
and thirties it was the custom to grant a ticket
convict serving seven years' sentence if on the expiration of
four years of sentence the convict held a good conduct report.
The story goes that a young convict, anxious to see his
sweetheart in Sydney, begged Wiseman to give him a permit.
"Governor" refused and instead put him under a cruel taskmaster, who had him chained to
gang. He attempted to escape by swimming the river, but his leg
hampered him and he was drowned. For years the ghost of the young boy was supposed to
come to the house and the clank, clank of his chains sent a shiver down the spine of
claim to have heard it.
A swagman who was on his way to Sydney put in at the old house for a
night's camp. Telling of his adventures afterwards he
said that he was awakened shortly after midnight
by the most unearthly noises. The screams of a
woman as if she were being choked was followed by
the slamming of a door. Footsteps echoed along the
stone corridor, and a shadowy form seemed to flit past
All was quiet for a while and the troubled
swagman turned over and tried to sleep. He could not.
ompanied by the slow
Ghostly tales of Wisemans Ferry Ghostly tales of Wisemans Ferry Ghostly tales of Wisemans Ferry Ghostly tales of Wisemans Ferry… …… …
Wisemans Inn was
and at the
rifying clank of
who braved the journey
One of the most picturesque legends is the story
of the young convict whose ghost periodically visits the old house
of leave of "Governor" Wiseman. In the twenties
and thirties it was the custom to grant a ticket-of leave to a
convict serving seven years' sentence if on the expiration of
four years of sentence the convict held a good conduct report.
hat a young convict, anxious to see his
sweetheart in Sydney, begged Wiseman to give him a permit. This
"Governor" refused and instead put him under a cruel taskmaster, who had him chained to
gang. He attempted to escape by swimming the river, but his leg-irons
hampered him and he was drowned. For years the ghost of the young boy was supposed to
come to the house and the clank, clank of his chains sent a shiver down the spine of
A swagman who was on his way to Sydney put in at the old house for a
halting steps of a man drove away all attempts at sleep. He sat bolt upright and hearing the
clank of metal approaching his room, grabbed his Matilda and fled out of the door.
Drovers Diary: Drovers Diary: Drovers Diary: Drovers Diary: Thirty years ago a big drover put up at the hotel. He went to sleep in the
small room which forms part of what was in Wiseman's day the great reception room on the
first floor. But when morning came he had disappeared. Afterwards he told how, on waking
from a heavy sleep, he felt that someone was near him. There was a slight rattle, and in
the patch of moonlight that came through the window he saw a pale lady cross the next
room, the door of which was open. He promptly leapt out of bed and,
jumping over the balcony, slid down the post to
the ground, and fled.
Tales of Treasure: Tales of Treasure: Tales of Treasure: Tales of Treasure: Once, it is asserted, a shadowy
female form was seen to rise from the location of
the old vault in the garden after midnight, and
move across the flat and into the old house. It was
supposed to be the spirit of Wiseman's first wife, and
various theories are current as to why she should
haunt her old home. Perhaps she wished to draw
attention to a treasure she left behind, for some years
ago a box of sovereigns was found under the floo
bedroom.
The famous staircase: The famous staircase: The famous staircase: The famous staircase: The narrow, dark stairway which winds to the left room from the hall
is admirably suited to legends of tragedy and mystery. It is up these stairs that the ghostly
convict is supposed to drag his feet with horrible clanks of legirons, and a small room at the
top of them is associated with his appearances. It is also said that on these stairs at the
stroke of midnight, pools of blood can be seen, believed to be that of his first wife Jane


halting steps of a man drove away all attempts at sleep. He sat bolt upright and hearing the
clank of metal approaching his room, grabbed his Matilda and fled out of the door.
Thirty years ago a big drover put up at the hotel. He went to sleep in the
small room which forms part of what was in Wiseman's day the great reception room on the
first floor. But when morning came he had disappeared. Afterwards he told how, on waking
m a heavy sleep, he felt that someone was near him. There was a slight rattle, and in
the patch of moonlight that came through the window he saw a pale lady cross the next
room, the door of which was open. He promptly leapt out of bed and,
balcony, slid down the post to
Once, it is asserted, a shadowy
female form was seen to rise from the location of
the old vault in the garden after midnight, and
move across the flat and into the old house. It was
supposed to be the spirit of Wiseman's first wife, and
various theories are current as to why she should
haunt her old home. Perhaps she wished to draw
attention to a treasure she left behind, for some years
ago a box of sovereigns was found under the floor of what had been Mrs. Wiseman's
The narrow, dark stairway which winds to the left room from the hall
is admirably suited to legends of tragedy and mystery. It is up these stairs that the ghostly
his feet with horrible clanks of legirons, and a small room at the
ssociated with his appearances. It is also said that on these stairs at the
stroke of midnight, pools of blood can be seen, believed to be that of his first wife Jane
halting steps of a man drove away all attempts at sleep. He sat bolt upright and hearing the
clank of metal approaching his room, grabbed his Matilda and fled out of the door.
Thirty years ago a big drover put up at the hotel. He went to sleep in the
small room which forms part of what was in Wiseman's day the great reception room on the
first floor. But when morning came he had disappeared. Afterwards he told how, on waking
m a heavy sleep, he felt that someone was near him. There was a slight rattle, and in
the patch of moonlight that came through the window he saw a pale lady cross the next
r of what had been Mrs. Wiseman's
The narrow, dark stairway which winds to the left room from the hall
is admirably suited to legends of tragedy and mystery. It is up these stairs that the ghostly
his feet with horrible clanks of legirons, and a small room at the
ssociated with his appearances. It is also said that on these stairs at the
stroke of midnight, pools of blood can be seen, believed to be that of his first wife Jane…

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