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Ports and Terminals Support Team

Common Terminal Audit Observations


BP Group HSE Goals
No Accidents
No Damage to the Environment
No Harm to People
Group Shipping Policies
BP (Group) Shipping Audit Policy
BP (Group) Shipping Vetting Policy
BP (Group) Time Charter Policy
It is the responsibility of each BP Business and Associate to comply with
the BP Group Shipping Policies in order to maintain the integrity of our
business and to protect people, property, the environment and the BP
Group from risks which may result from shipping activities
Policy Application
All BP Businesses or Associates involved in the chartering or
operation of ships carrying bulk cargoes on behalf of the BP Group.
The requirements of the Group Shipping Audit Policy apply to the

following
business activities :-
All BP Businesses or Associates which operate their own ship vetting
services or carry out ship vetting inspections on behalf of the BP Group.
All BP Businesses or Associates owning, operating or having a majority
share holding in any marine terminals where bulk cargo is loaded

or
discharged on behalf of the BP Group.
Any third party marine terminal at which BP bulk cargo is transferred and/or
stored where it is believed that a marine incident could have an

adverse
impact upon BP Group reputation or business.
Any other BP location which considers that an incident resulting

from its
shipping activities could adversely affect the BP Group reputation or
business.
Common Audit

Findings
Ship Shore Safety Check List (SSSCL)
Not complying with ISGOTT recommended format
Unfamiliarity with questions / contents -

(training)
No repeat checks
Lack of awareness of Inert Gas
Completed by terminal before ship has berthed
No physical checks
Common Observations:
Used as a tick

list
Training for Ship / Shore Interface
1 expert

used to train everybody else
No formal training
Training carried out on an ad-hoc basis
Vessel Access (including Barges)
Aghhh!
Berth Structure
Berth Criteria (or lack of)
Displacement with LOA and Beam & Draft
to combat the implications of re-measurement
Max/Min Deadweight and Draft for each Berth
We are actively encouraging the change to:-
We find Terminals who are unaware of:-
And frequently terminals are unaware of
BPs Under Keel Clearance (UKC) Policy
Under Keel Clearance Requirements
BP Shipping Policy requires the following Under Keel
Clearance
In Approaches:-


A minimum of 10% of draft regardless of the size of vessel
When Alongside:-


Vessels with a beam of up to 20 mtrs

require a minimum of 0.30 metres UKC


Vessels with beam in excess of 20 mtrs

requires a minimum of 1.5% of
beam UKC.
Example Jetty Acceptance Criteria
Acceptance criteria for a vessel at jetty four


LOA less than 355m

yes

/

no


Displacement less than 190,000 tonnes

yes

/

no


Center of manifold above water line less than 22.4m

yes

/

no


Freeboard at breast lines less than 24m

yes

/

no


Bow to center of manifold less than 190m yes

/

no


Ballast Parallel body length greater than 110 yes

/

no


Negative answer to any of the above and

the vessel is not
acceptable
Parallel mid body length
Point Loading
Moorings
Condition of Fenders
If any!
Jetty Bunding
(or lack of)
-

and the other extreme!
Loss of Containment
Manifold / Pipeline blanks
Sources of Ignition
Mobile Phones used by :-
Agents
Pilots
Chandlers
Surveyors
Port Officials
Ships Crew
Terminal Staff
and even!:-
Mobile Phones
Battery
Stray Currents
Often staff are unclear where their insulating
flanges are located, or even in some cases
whether they even have them. This is particularly
noticeable where hard arms

are used.
Recording of test results is often sparse, and
sometimes, no tests are performed.
Insulating Flanges

ISGOTT preferred method.
Insulating flanges in hose strings are often in
poor condition.
Bonding Wires (If used)
ISGOTT states that if they are used, it must be
in conjunction with an intrinsically safe switch.
Where there is a switch, the procedure is
often not clearly posted or followed.
We find terminals where bonding wires (with
and without switches) are used in addition to
insulating flanges. (In the false belief that it
gives them added protection)
Electrical Fittings / Zone Classification
Emergency Preparedness
No provision for incident on vessel at jetty
Poor management of contact lists details
No Emergency / Oil Spill Pollution Plan
Inadequate equipment to cope with emergency
situation
Little or no drill scenarios
Flexible Hoses
Poor condition (age)
Poor stowage
Inadequate rigging, slings and strops
Physical damage
Lifting Equipment
Life Saving & Fire Fighting Appliances
No policy for the wearing of lifejackets
Inadequate provision of lifebuoys
Lack off or poor condition of fire hoses
Maintenance of LSA & FFE
Defective foam installations
Bunding

of fuel tank for diesel fire pumps
Housekeeping
Best Practices
Pollution Control Vessel
Safety Signage
And the more unusual !
Escape Routes
Protected Lifebuoys
Mooring Dolphin Access
Adequate lighting
Safety rails each side
Non slip grating walkway
Hard Arm Limits
Tidal Mooring Pontoon
ESD Cable Stowage
Fire Hose Reel