The History of SQL Server

Presented by Scott Whigham

It All Began in the 80s

• In 1989, Microsoft (“MSFT”) was a $200 million a year company with no database product • Ashton-Tate had the popular dBASE package • Sybase had DataServer, a new product

It All Began in the 80s

• MSFT signed deal to license Sybase’s DataServer on OS/2 and other MSFTbased operating systems • MSFT convinced Ashton-Tate to help them market the product • Ashton-Tate/Microsoft SQL Server
– Version 1.0 shipping in May, 1989

It All Began in the 80s

• Microsoft SQL Server 1.1 shipped in 1990
– No more Ashton/Tate – Now for Windows 3.0

The 1990s

• Microsoft SQL Server 4.2 release timeline
– There was no 2.x or 3.x – 16-bit originally for OS/2 released in 1992 – Windows NT 3.1 32-bit release in 1993

The 1990s

• Original license with Sybase was restrictive
– MSFT could not add or change features without Sybase’s approval – Sybase and MSFT parted ways in 1994

The 1990s

• Next up: SQL95
– SQL95 was released in Spring, 1995
• Technically Microsoft SQL Server 6.0

– Replication is here! – MSSQL was now one of The Big Guys in the database world
• Sybase, Informix, Oracle, and IBM still strong

The 1990s

• SQL Server 6.5 in 1996
– Short release cycle due to pressure from other companies – Can you say ”ANSI Standard Compliant”? – Still built on the “old” Sybase code

The 1990s

• SQL Server 7.0 in 1998
– Total rewrite – no more Sybase code! – Language is still Transact-SQL but it starts to fork – Tons of new features
• Debut of Data Transformation Services • Row-Level locking • OLAP Services debuts

The Millenium

• SQL Server 2000 in 2000
– Originally planned as SQL Server 7.5 – Not that many new features but far more powerful – Built to work with Windows Server 2000 – OLAP Services becomes SQL Server Analysis Services – Reporting Services debuts a few years later as a ”free” add-on

The Millenium

• SQL Server 2005 in 2005
– Delays caused by integration with .NET team – Made to work with Windows Server 2003 – Many new features:
• • • • • • SQL CLR Integration Services Full integration of Reporting Services Database Mirroring Tighter XML integration Schemas!

The Millenium

• SQL Server 2008 in 2008
– Not a huge step but built for Windows Server 2008
• This allows for more memory, better 64-bit support

– Some new features but primarily enhancements
• • • • • Transparent data encryption Management policies Geo-spatial data and datatypes Filestream Backup compression

The Millennium

• SQL Server .NEXT
– What’s next? – Business Intelligence (“BI”) continues to grow – Storing images is hot – Will we ever see an O.S. built on SQL Server?

Editions of SQL Server 2008

Presented by Scott Whigham

What We’re Going to Cover

• Editions • Processors • Compact Edition

• Server Editions • Specialized Editions

• Reference Tables

Two Main Pain Points

• Microsoft SQL Server® 2008 comes in two flavors:
– Server Editions
• Enterprise, Standard

– Specialized Editions
• Express, Developer, Workgroup, Web, Compact

Processor Architecture

• Microsoft SQL Server® 2008 is further segmented by processor architecture:
– x86
• All

– x64
• All except Compact

– IA64
• Enterprise and Developer only

Server Editions
• Enterprise (x86, x64, IA64) • Standard (x86, x64)

Specialized Editions
• Developer (x86, x64, IA64) • Workgroup (x86, x64) • Web (x86, x64) • Express (x86, x64) • Compact (x86)

Compact Edition

• SQL Server 2008 Compact Edition
– Compact is meant to run on phones/portable devices – Prior names include “SQL Server for Windows CE” and “SQL Server Mobile Edition”

• Targets the .NET Framework 3.5 • Free! • Not discussed further in this videobook

What We’re Going to Cover

• Editions • Processors • Compact Edition

• Server Editions • Specialized Editions

• Reference Tables

Server Editions

• The Server Editions target companies running Windows Server who need:
– Large databases – Lots of users – Scalability and availability

• Enterprise and Standard Editions are also the most expensive!

Enterprise Edition

• Enterprise Edition is the most powerful edition available
– No hard limit for CPUs or Memory (OS maximum)
• This allows for VLDBs (Very Large Databases)

– Expensive to buy – Used for mission-critical databases and data warehouses where uptime is paramount (even across distances)

Enterprise Edition

• Enterprise Edition is:
– Expensive to buy
• Averages around 5x Standard Edition cost

– Used for mission-critical databases and data warehouses where uptime is paramount (even across distances)

Standard Edition

• Standard Edition is the next most powerful edition
– 4 CPU limit but no Memory limit (OS maximum)
• This allows for KLDBs (Kinda Large Databases)
– Okay, so that’s not technically an industry term…

– Used when needs are similar to Enterprise Edition but budget isn’t available
• Even with just 4 CPUs you can potentially handle 100s of GBs of data

Standard Edition

• Standard Edition is the next most powerful edition
– 4 CPU limit but no Memory limit (OS maximum)
• This allows for KLDBs (Kinda Large Databases)
– Okay, so that’s not technically an industry term…

– Used when needs are similar to Enterprise Edition but budget isn’t available
• Even with just 4 CPUs you can potentially handle 100s of GBs of data

Comparing the Server Editions

Enterprise Edition Business Critical Large scale online transaction processing (OLTP) Large scale reporting Data warehousing

Standard Edition

Advanced analytics Server consolidation
Departmental Small-to-medium scale OLTP Reporting and analytics

Comparing the Server Editions

Enterprise Edition Number of CPUs Number of Instances Hypervisor support Database snapshots Parallelism, index, and DBCC enhancements Number of clustered nodes Database mirroring Hot-add CPU, memory Fast recovery 16 Full O.S. maximum 50

Standard Edition 4 16

2 Single-thread

In the Next Video…

• Editions • Processors • Compact Edition

• Server Editions • Specialized Editions

• Reference Tables

Editions of SQL Server 2008

Presented by Scott Whigham

What We’re Going to Cover

• Editions • Processors • Compact Edition

• Server Editions • Specialized Editions

• Reference Tables

Server Editions
• Enterprise (x86, x64, IA64) • Standard (x86, x64)

Specialized Editions

• Developer (x86, x64, IA64) • Workgroup (x86, x64) • Web (x86, x64) • Express (x86, x64) • Compact (x86)

Specialized Editions

• The Specialized Editions are for specific situations
– Developer Edition: for testing and development
• Same feature-set as Enterprise Edition but different license, O.S. & hardware requirements/limits

– Workgroup: for branches, small depts
• Great for replication to remote sites

Specialized Editions

• Web: ideal for web hosts
– Licensing allows for low Total Cost of Ownership (TCO)

• Compact: for mobile devices
– Usually sync up with Enterprise/Standard to upload/download new data

Specialized Editions

• Express: free; great for learning or redistributing
– Perfect for very small databases with small numbers of users – The most confusing edition since there are three “versions” of Express

The Express Editions

• There are three “flavors” of Express:
– SQL Server Express
• The SQL Server database but without tools, reporting

– SQL Server Express with Tools
• Same as above but with feature-limited versions of management and development tools

– SQL Server Express with Advanced Services
• Same as SQL Server Express with Tools but with reporting, more admin

What We’re Going to Cover

• Editions • Processors • Compact Edition

• Server Editions • Specialized Editions

• Reference Tables

Comparing the Editions

Enterprise/ Developer
Number of CPUs O.S. maximum

Standard
4

Workgroup
2

Web
4

Express
1

Number of Instances
Memory Database snapshots Log shipping Number of clustered nodes Database mirroring Replication Support Data Compression Transparent Data Encryption

50
O.S. maximum

16
O.S. maximum

16
4GB O.S. maximum 1GB

16 Full Full

2 Single-thread Full Witness only Subscriber only Witness only Subscriber only Witness only Subscriber only

Pricing and Licensing SQL Server 2008

Presented by Scott Whigham

What We’re Going to Cover

• Licensing Model • Virtualization

• Cost per edition

Two Ways to License

• When you purchase Microsoft SQL Server® 2008, you purchase:
– A license to run SQL Server on the server and one of the following:
• CPU license • Client Access License (“CAL”) for a user • Client Access License (“CAL”) for a device

CAL Licensing

• CAL Licensing Model Explained
– User model: Requires single CAL “… for each user who accesses a system running SQL Server.”
• One user can use the same CAL to access different SQL Servers separately
• Source: “Database Pricing” whitepaper, MSFT 2008

CAL Licensing

• CAL Licensing Model Explained
– Device model: Requires single CAL “… for each device that accesses a system running SQL Server.”
• Devices can be PC, workstations, terminal, PDA, mobile phone, etc

CAL Licensing

• User model or Device model?
– First question: Should you use CPU licensing instead? – If you cannot/should not use CPU licensing:
• Use device model when there are multiple users per device • Use user model when there are multiple devices per user • When in doubt, consider user model

CAL Licensing

• Example scenario: Your CRM application has 50 users worldwide but only 10 use at the same time all using their individual workstations
– Need a minimum of 10 user CALs

CRM: Customer Relationship Management

CPU Licensing

• CPU Licensing Model Explained
– Unlimited number of connections, users for a single CPU – License only needed for physical CPU
• A server with one quad-core CPU would require only a single CPU license

How MSFT Determines Usage

• Consider this scenario:
– DBA installs SQL Server Enterprise Edition on web server – One web application makes a single connection to SQL Server – Web application is used by 500 people worldwide

• How many licenses do you need?

How MSFT Determines Usage

• Answer: “Not enough information to answer!”
– Many people think the answer is “One CAL” since there is only one app accessing the database server! – You need to ask a follow-up question
• What is the follow-up question you should ask?

How MSFT Determines Usage

• “How many of those 500 users will be using the system at the same time (concurrently)?”
– Answer: 10
• Then you need 10 user CALs

– Answer: 100
• Then you need 100 CALs or 1 CPU license

CPU or CAL?

• At some point it makes sense to switch from CAL to CPU
– 10 CALs or 1 CPU? – Depends on cost of each – Likely to be somewhere between 60 and 90 concurrent users that you save money by using CPU – Don’t forget to add in growth

In the Next Video

• Licensing Model • Virtualization

• Cost per edition

Pricing and Licensing SQL Server 2008

Presented by Scott Whigham

What We’re Going to Cover

• Licensing Model • Virtualization

• Cost per edition

Virtualization

• What about licensing when you install SQL Server inside VMware or another virtualized environment?
– Same basic rules – For Enterprise Edition, if all processors are licensed, customers can run “unlimited instances of SQL Server on an unlimited number of virtual operating environments on that same machine”
• Source: “Database Pricing” whitepaper, MSFT 2008

What We’re Going to Cover

• Licensing Model • Virtualization

• Cost per edition

Costs (Retail only)

Enterprise
CPU License $24,999

Standard
$5,999

Workgroup
$3,899

Web
$15/CPU/month

CAL

$8,487 for server license plus $162 per CAL

$885 for server license plus $162 per CAL

$730 for server license plus $162 per CAL

Not available

Developer Edition: $50 total cost

Prices are in U.S. dollars Source: http://www.microsoft.com/sqlserver/2008/en/us/pricing.aspx, Nov, 2008

What’s New in SQL Server 2008

Presented by Scott Whigham

What to Expect

• This is an overview, not a detailed discussion • Expect to see “Here’s what it is and here’s 1 or 2 sentences about it” • Many if not all will be covered later in detail • Not all new features are covered

What We’re Going to Cover

• Overview of new features and how it relates to DBAs • Performance • Security • Management • Availability

• T-SQL Improvements • Datatypes • Geospatial • Debugging

Business Intelligence

DBAs

Developers

• SSIS • SSRS • SSAS

SQL 2008 Is About…

• SQL 2008 is likely to be interesting to most people because of it’s ability to scale rather than because of new features
– While there are lots and lots of new features, only a few of them are major new features

SQL 2008 Is About…

• Many of the new features target “5%ers”
– Geospatial support is one such example

• Some of the new features are simply “better ways”
– Geospatial support and FILESTREAM are examples

SQL 2008 Is About…

• If you were creating a first-time app for storing/working with geospatial data, SQL Server 2008 would be ideal
– What if your app already uses a technique for storing/working with geospatial data that was different from the way SQL Server 2008’s internal datatypes and use?

SQL 2008 Is About…

• A SQL Server 2005 DBA can administer a SQL 2008 box without learning anything new
– Obviously wouldn’t be aware of new features and enhancements but it is very possible (and likely) – SQL Server Management Studio (“SSMS”) has been augmented but not drastically changed

SQL 2008 Is About…

• SQL Server 2008 new features further segment “The Talent”
– It’s not possible for one person to know it all
• This was possible as recently as SQL Server 7.0 or even SQL Server 2000

SQL Server 2005 Changed Everything

• In SQL Server 2005, The Business Intelligence side of SQL Server matured thus adding (needed) complexity to existing products
– SQL Server – Integration Services (“SSIS”) – Reporting Services (“SSRS”) – Analysis Services (“SSAS”)

Changing Roles

• Today, it’s easier to be a “Specialist” in one area and a “Generalist” or even a “Deep Generalist” in others
– You might specialize in SQL Server DBA but have deep, general knowledge of SSIS, a general knowledge of SSRS and scant knowledge of SSAS

SQL Server 2008

• In SQL Server 2008, the DBA must work harder than ever to be a Specialist
– Fairly easy to be a generalist – Tough to be a deep generalist – Very hard to be a specialist
• What size databases do you specialize in? • At your last job, did you implement encryption? • Did you do database mirroring and use snapshots at your last job? • How many active/active clusters have you built? • What’s the best way to do document/file storage?

Why is this discussion here?

• Why have this discussion now?
– Don’t get intimidated into thinking you have to know it all – Don’t be afraid to say, “That’s not my specialty” – Pick the areas you like and will need to continue employment and master those

In the next video

• Overview of new features and how it relates to DBAs • Performance • Security • Management • Availability

• T-SQL Improvements • Datatypes • Geospatial • Debugging

Business Intelligence

DBAs

Developers

• SSIS • SSRS • SSAS

What’s New in SQL Server 2008

Presented by Scott Whigham

In this video

• Overview of new features and how it relates to DBAs • Performance • Security • Management • Availability

• T-SQL Improvements • Datatypes • Geospatial • Debugging

Business Intelligence

DBAs

Developers

• SSIS • SSRS • SSAS

Performance Improvements

• Compression Enhancements:
– Backup compression
• Are your backups taking up too much space?

– Log Stream compression
• Are you using database mirroring? If so, log stream compression can offer significantly better performance

– Data compression
• Do you have a lot of data that is similar or bloated? • Easy to use: BACKUP DATABASE … WITH COMPRESSION

Performance Improvements

• Enhancements and improvements for databases of all sizes
– Enhanced/Improved Plan Guide Support
• Freezing plan guides, pull plans directly from plan cache, SSMS integration

Performance Improvements

• Enhancements and improvements for databases of all sizes
– Resource Governor
• Allows you to manage workload and resources by setting limits to incoming requests • Can limit certain users/groups/roles to fewer resources

Performance Improvements

• Enhancements and improvements for databases of all sizes
– Performance Data Collection
• Includes a central repository for storing performance data as well as tools and reports

Performance Improvements

• Enhancements and improvements for larger databases:
– Partition-aligned indexed views
• Are you using indexed views or partitions already? If so, this is great. If not, probably unnecessary for you at the moment

– Partitioned Table Parallelism
• In SQL Server 2005, each partition was limited to a single thread

In this video

• Overview of new features and how it relates to DBAs • Performance • Security • Management • Availability

• T-SQL Improvements • Datatypes • Geospatial • Debugging

Business Intelligence

DBAs

Developers

• SSIS • SSRS • SSAS

Security Improvements

• Lots of new features that are potentially “better ways”
– Transparent Data Encryption
• Extends SQL Server 2005 encryption • Easier to turn on/off encryption for the entire database without having to modify calling applications

Security Improvements

• Lots of new features that are potentially “better ways”
– Extensible Key Management (EKM)
• Allows the keys that protect the database files to be stored externally

Security Improvements

• Some are just changes…
– New database roles
• MSDB database:
– db_dts… roles have been renamed to be db_ssis… – Server group roles: ServerGroupAdministratorRole, ServerGroupReaderRole – Policy-Based Management role: PolicyAdministratorRole – Data Collector: dc_admin, dc_operator, dc_proxy

In this video

• Overview of new features and how it relates to DBAs • Performance • Security • Management • Availability

• T-SQL Improvements • Datatypes • Geospatial • Debugging

Business Intelligence

DBAs

Developers

• SSIS • SSRS • SSAS

Management Improvements

• New Feature:
– Policy-Based Management
• DBAs can set policies that cover everything from naming conventions to CLT integration • One of the most exciting new features for DBAs

Management Improvements

• New Feature:
– SQL Server Audit
• Allows customizing what you want audited • Allows for auditing at server and database level
– – – – SELECT, INSERT, UPDATE, DELETE, EXEC DBCC Login/logout attempts State changes

• Scripts can be generated from audits

Management Improvements

• New Feature:
– Change Data Capture (CDC)
• Allows you to record changes to data into another table without triggers
– INSERT, UPDATE and DELETE

• Perfect for applications that update external databases • Example: you need to synchronize two 200GB databases nightly in a one-hour window

Management Improvements

• New Feature:
– Data Profiling Task
• New SSIS Task allows DBAs to profile for things like:
– – – – Number of rows Number of unique values Percentage of NULL values in column Duplicate values in potentially key columns

Management Improvements

• New Feature:
– Extended Events (Xevents)
• Capture, filter, and act upon events generated both by SQL Server, the operating system, and other applications • Can trace events at any level • Can choose aggregated data or event details

Management Improvements

• Enhancements
– Central Management Servers & Server Groups
• DBAs can now designate one SQL Server a Central Management Server and create a Server Group
– – – – Queries can be executed on the servers in the server group Policies can be evaluated against the group Changes made in Object Explorer can be propagated Windows authentication required

In this video

• Overview of new features and how it relates to DBAs • Performance • Security • Management • Availability

• T-SQL Improvements • Datatypes • Geospatial • Debugging

Business Intelligence

DBAs

Developers

• SSIS • SSRS • SSAS

Availability Enhancements

• Hot pluggable CPUs • Automatic recovery of suspect pages • Add nodes to peer-to-peer replication without stopping system activity • Enhanced database mirroring

In the next video

• Overview of new features and how it relates to DBAs • Performance • Security • Management • Availability

• T-SQL Improvements • Datatypes • Geospatial • Debugging

Business Intelligence

DBAs

Developers

• SSIS • SSRS • SSAS

What’s New in SQL Server 2008

Presented by Scott Whigham

In this video

• Overview of new features and how it relates to DBAs • Performance • Security • Management • Availability

• T-SQL Improvements • Datatypes • Geospatial • Debugging

Business Intelligence

DBAs

Developers

• SSIS • SSRS • SSAS

T-SQL Improvements

• Intellisense is finally here! • Table-valued parameters are here!
– Goofy syntax and requirements but you can now pass table results to stored procedures
• Not to user-defined functions though

T-SQL Improvements

• Compound operators are finally here!
SET @i += 1

• Declaration and assignment in one statement is finally here!
DECLARE @i INT = 1

T-SQL Improvements

• XML enhancements
– Better and easier schema validation – Better XQuery support
• Use of “let” clause to assign values

– Full xs:dateTime support

T-SQL Improvements

• FILESTREAM
– Allows DBAs and Developers to store documents as part of the operating system yet to be able to access those as part of the database
• COMMIT/ROLLBACK aware • Uses new VARBINARY(MAX) FILESTREAM storage type • Users can use regular SELECT, INSERT, UPDATE, and DELETE statements to query and modify FILESTREAM data

In this video

• Overview of new features and how it relates to DBAs • Performance • Security • Management • Availability

• T-SQL Improvements • Datatypes • Geospatial • Debugging

Business Intelligence

DBAs

Developers

• SSIS • SSRS • SSAS

Datatypes and Geospatial

• New datatypes for working with date/time data
Datatype DATETIME SMALLDATETIME DATE Accuracy 3/1000th of a second Minute Day Used when…
Need to store milliseconds Need to store minutes Need to store only date

TIME DATETIME2
DATETIMEOFFSET

100 nanoseconds 100 nanoseconds
100 nanoseconds

Need to store only time Need more accuracy than 3/1000th of a second
Same as DATETIME2 with TimeZoneOffset capability

New datatypes

• HierarchyId
– Used to represent the position in a hierarchy – Has it’s own functions to work with hierarchical data
• GetAncestor() • IsDescendant()

Geospatial Datatypes

• SQL Server 2008 adds native support for storing and working with geospatial data • New datatypes:
Datatype GEOMETRY GEOGRAPHY Used when…
Represents a flat 2D surface with X and Y coordinates for points Same as GEOMETRY but for Earth

More…
The GEOMETRY data type doesn’t really work as expected when you pass in latitude and longitude pairs. For GEOMETRY, the distance between the POINTS (90 0) and (90 180) is 180 but in GEOGRAPHY, since both points refer to the same location (the North Pole), the distance is 0.

In this video

• Overview of new features and how it relates to DBAs • Performance • Security • Management • Availability

• T-SQL Improvements • Datatypes • Geospatial • Debugging

Business Intelligence

DBAs

Developers

• SSIS • SSRS • SSAS

The Debugger is finally in SSMS

• In SQL Server 2005, the T-SQL Debugger was not in the SQL Programmer’s native environment
– SQL Server 2000 included it in the Query Analyzer – SQL Server 2005 forced us to Visual Studio

• SQL Server 2008 features the T-SQL Debugger in SSMS

In the next video

• Overview of new features and how it relates to DBAs • Performance • Security • Management • Availability

• T-SQL Improvements • Datatypes • Geospatial • Debugging

Business Intelligence

DBAs

Developers

• SSIS • SSRS • SSAS

What’s New in SQL Server 2008

Presented by Scott Whigham

In this video

• Overview of new features and how it relates to DBAs • Performance • Security • Management • Availability

• T-SQL Improvements • Datatypes • Geospatial • Debugging

Business Intelligence

DBAs

Developers

• SSIS • SSRS • SSAS

SSIS Enhancements

• New SQL Server Integration Services (SSIS) features and enhancements include:
– C# is finally here! – Scripting is VSTA (Visual Studio Tools for Applications) instead of old SQL Server 2005 way: VSA (Visual Studio for Applications)
• Easier to use custom assemblies

– Performance improvements such as better threading and pipeline scalability

SSIS Enhancements

• More (SSIS) features and enhancements:
– Lookups are way better
• SQL 2005 had many restrictions and inefficiencies
– Limited to ~3GB of memory – OLEDB only – Binary matching mean case+accent sensitivity (with workarounds)

• SQL 2008 makes life easier
– Persistent Lookups store a cached copy locally – OLEDB, ADO.NET, and flat file sources – More memory

SSIS Enhancements

• New and Improved
– Data Profiling Task (already covered) – Change Data Capture makes ETL (Extract, Transform, Load) easier – New SSIS datatypes for working with new SQL date/time datatypes

In this video

• Overview of new features and how it relates to DBAs • Performance • Security • Management • Availability

• T-SQL Improvements • Datatypes • Geospatial • Debugging

Business Intelligence

DBAs

Developers

• SSIS • SSRS • SSAS

Reporting Services Improvements

• IIS no longer required to be on same machine to host the Reporting Services web service
– Http.sys now handles HTTP requests just like IIS

• Better caching and better memory management

Reporting Services Improvements

• Tablix data regions for free-form reporting • Reports now can be rendered in Microsoft Word® • Able to respond to “3-4 times the number of users and their requires on the same hardware” compared to SQL Server 2005 Reporting Services1
1 – Source: Carl Rabeler, Program Manager on the SQL Server Customer Advisory Team

Reporting Services Improvements

• Prettier, nicer, better
– Microsoft purchased Dundas Data Visualization technology to use inside SSRS and we now have
• Gauges • Better calendar controls • Easier to manage charts

– Report Builder 2.0 – Report Designer

In this video

• Overview of new features and how it relates to DBAs • Performance • Security • Management • Availability

• T-SQL Improvements • Datatypes • Geospatial • Debugging

Business Intelligence

DBAs

Developers

• SSIS • SSRS • SSAS

Analysis Services

• Star JOINs • MERGE statement • Various enhancements

Deprecated and Discontinued in SQL Server 2008

Presented by Scott Whigham

What this video covers

• This is an overview, not a complete list
– Check Books Online for complete list

Deprecated

• “Deprecated” items are slated for removal in a “future version, hot fix, or service release” • “Discontinued” items are “things that don’t work that way anymore”
– Usually Discontinued items were once Deprecated

Discontinued Items that may affect you

• Some Discontinued items that may affect you are:
Discontinued item BACKUP LOG WITH NO_LOG BACKUP LOG WITH TRUNCATE_ONLY 60, 65, and 70 compatibility models Northwind and Pubs Surface Area Configuration Tool Replacement None. Switch to SIMPLE recovery model instead None. Switch to SIMPLE recovery model instead Databases must be at least 80 (SQL Server 2000) Gone – use AdventureWorks instead Lasted only one version – SQL Server 2005

Deprecated Items that may affect you

• Some Deprecated items that may affect you are:
Deprecated item BACKUP WITH PASSWORD = DATABASEPROPERTY sp_dboption FASTFIRSTROW hint sp_dbcmptlevel Replacement None DATABASEPROPERTYEX ALTER DATABASE OPTION(FAST n) ALTER DATABASE… SET COMPATIBILITY LEVEL

BACKUP … TO TAPE SET ANSI_NULLS OFF and ANSI_NULLS OFF

Backup to disk only None – they will always be one

Deprecated Items that may affect you
Deprecated item SQLOLEDB is not a provider TIMESTAMP syntax for ROWVERSION datatype text, ntext, and image datatypes sp_attach_db sp_change_users_login DBCC DBREINDEX DBCC INDEXDEFRAG Replacement Use SQL Native Client Use ROWVERSION datatype Use VARCHAR(MAX), NVARCHAR(MAX) and VARBINARY(MAX) CREATE DATABASE … FOR ATTACH ALTER USER REBUILD option of ALTER INDEX REORGANIZE option of ALTER INDEX

DBCC SHOWCONTIG

sys.dm_db_index_physical_stats

Deprecated Items that may affect you
Deprecated item sp_configure ‘allow updates’ sp_configure option ‘priority boost’ sp_addapprole sp_addlogin sp_adduser sp_grantdbaccess sp_addrole sp_changeobjectowner sp_defaultdb Replacement No effect No effect CREATE APPLICATION ROLE CREATE LOGIN CREATE USER CREATE USER CREATE ROLE ALTER SCHEMA or ALTER AUTHORIZATION ALTER LOGIN

Deprecated Items that may affect you
Deprecated item sp_grantlogin sp_denylogin sp_revokelogin GRANT ALL DENY ALL REVOKE ALL Replacement CREATE LOGIN ALTER LOGIN DISABLE DROP LOGIN Must specify permissions independently

Lots of system tables
WRITETEXT UPDATETEXT READTEXT TEXTPTR()

Compatibility views and Catalog views
None.

Deprecated Items that may affect you
Deprecated item 3 and 4-part column names in queries Replacement Use 1 or 2-part names only such as SELECT t.ProductName

GROUP BY ALL

Use custom case-by-case solution with UNION, CTE, or derived table

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