Thursday, May 29, 2014 • Vol. 49, No. 1 • Verona, WI • Hometown USA • ConnectVerona.

com • $1
The
Verona Press
The
Verona Press
Call 845-8860
to schedule your appointment for GREAT HEALTH
Providers: DeanHealthPlan, WEA/HSM, WPS, Te Alliance and more
115 Enterprise Drive, Verona
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Your Hometown Chiropractors
Dr. Joe Beyler & Dr. Steve Beyler
Chiropractic is Your Best Choice for Natural Health Care
Hands on Healthcare: No Drugs, No Surgery!
29th Annual
Verona Hometown Days
2014 Run-Walk
June 15th - Harriet Park, Verona
Register on-line at active.com
(search: Verona Hometown Days)
Late Registration same day at 7am
10K/5K/Walk starts at 7:45am
1K & 2K Kids Run, register at 11:15, race at 11:40 at
Wildcat Lanes (under 12 Free)
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Huge hotel, new West End on agenda
Big box plans replaced
with new ideas
JIM FEROLIE
Verona Press editor
If you’ve lived in Verona a
while, you might remember the
days when T. Wall Properties and
Clark Street Development were
competing for the right to bring
a Kohl’s-anchored commercial
development to Verona.
With big boxes all the rage in
2007-08 and each representing
an area served by a high-capacity
off-ramp from the U.S. 18-151
bypass, they sparred back and
forth in separate appearances in
front of the Plan Commission
and Common Council and in the
media.
How times have changed.
Both properties have major
projects coming before the city
next week, and not only are they
not in competition, neither has a
big box and the projects are not
remotely similar.
Vanta Commercial Properties
– which last month changed its
name from T. Wall and no longer
answers to company founder Ter-
rence Wall – is responding to cur-
rent economic conditions with a
significantly reduced commercial
area at the West End fronting a
40-acre spot for the Verona Area
School District.
And Liberty Business Park –
still owned by David Reinke but
now represented by local builder
Haack gets funding
for children’s book
Kickstarter
campaign taking
donations to May 31
VICTORIA VLISIDES
Unified Newspaper Group
A Verona man’s Kick-
starter campaign has met
its $25,000 funding goal in
less than a month.
Ryan Haack, who has a
website devoted to show-
ing others how he lives
with one hand, created
the campaign to help fund
a children’s book called
“Different is Awesome.”
The illustrated picture book
is designed to foster self-
acceptance among kids,
including those with “limb
differences,” like himself.
Haack sai d he has
received overwhelming sup-
port from people who con-
nected with his message,
but is also receiving support
Ryan Haack,
who has a
website devot-
ed to showing
others how he
lives with one
hand, created
the campaign
to help fund
a children’s
book called
“Different is
Awesome.”
Screenshot courtesy
Kickstarter.com
City of Verona
inside
Your
Family
Summer
2014
edition!
Turn to Funded/Page 3
Verona Area School District
If you go
What: Plan Commission
When: 6:30 p.m. Monday
Where: Verona City Center, 111
Lincoln St.
TV: VHAT, Ch. 98
Turn to Hotel/Page 5
A ‘dream’ comes to an end
Hoffman, three other VAHS teachers leave with 91 years in district
SCOTT GIRARD
Unified Newspaper Group
For Kevi n Hof f man,
t eachi ng i n t he Verona
Area School District was a
“dream job.”
He had known it since his
senior year in high school
in 1975. It’s the same high
school he will retire from at
the end of this year after 24
years.
The Verona Area High
School agriculture teach-
er, who is also heavily
involved as an advisor for
Future Farmers of America,
began his teaching career in
Barneveld, where he spent
nine years before receiv-
ing the chance he wanted to
return to his hometown.
“It was surreal,” Hoffman
said. “Hopefully I made a
difference in some peoples’
lives positively.”
Sci ence t eacher Ann
Moffat, physical education
teacher Dan Bergsbaken
and English teacher Susan
Jane Watson join Hoffman
to create a void of 91 years
of VASD experience head-
ing into next year at the
high school.
VAHS pri nci pal Pam
Hammen cited the student
relationships, both personal
and on a level of develop-
ing long-term interests, the
teachers have built in their
careers at the school as
something that will be sore-
ly missed.
Turn to Retirements/Page 7
Photo by Scott Girard
Above, Verona Area High School teacher and FFA advisor Kevin Hoffman, who graduated from VAHS in 1975, will retire at the end of
the year after 24 years teaching in the district. Below, Verona Area High School teachers Ann Moffat, left, and Susan Jane Watson will
retire at the end of the year with a combined 49 years of experience in the district. Moffat teaches physics and chemistry, while Watson
teaches English.
2
May 29, 2014 The Verona Press ConnectVerona.com
Culver’s of Verona invites you to join in
celebrating our 18th anniversary!
June 2 - June 8
It’s our way of saying thanks for making us part of your family and community
Culver’s of Verona • 430 E. Verona Ave. • 608-845-2010 • culvers.com
Offers valid at Verona location only. Expires after 6/9/13.
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Monday, June 2 $1 Short Chocolate Shakes
Face Painting from 5-8 p.m. (free)
Tuesday, June 3 $1 Corn Dogs
Strolling Balloon Artist from 5-8 p.m. (free)
Wednesday, June 4 $2 One Scoop Turtle Sundaes
Face Painting from 5-8 p.m. (free)
Thursday, June 5 $1.50 Cheese Curds
Strolling Balloon Artist from 5-8 p.m. (free)
Friday, June 6 $1 Waffe Cones
Happy 18th Anniversary Day
Saturday, June 7 $2 BBQ Pork Sandwiches
Sunday, June 8 $1 Short Coolers
12-4 p.m. Wagon Rides (free) Featuring
Clydesdale John & Cletus and their Friend
Daisy Mae The Miniature Horse
CELEBRATE!
Culver’s Gift Card
Give-A-Ways!
DAILY
Stop in to enter.
Thank you to Leo Peterson, Slick Homee and the staff
of the Firehouse Bar & Grill for hosting a benefit for me
on May 10. I have been living for the last two years
with ALS. Because ALS is a disease that attacks the
body’s muscles, I can no longer speak, have trouble
swallowing and my legs are so weak I need a wheel-
chair to get around. There is no cure for ALS. I am at
the point now where I need nursing care, so the benefit
money will help pay someone to come into my home to
help my husband, Tom care for me so that I can stay in
my home rather than go to a nursing home. I want to
thank my family for everything they did for the benefit.
I also want to thank all of the local businesses for their
donations for the silent auction as well as all of the
people who made cash donations. The money raised
will go a long way in paying for my care. I am eternally
grateful for the generosity of this community.
Janine Gerke
Thank You!
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29th Annual
Verona
Hometown Days
2014 Run-Walk
June 15th
Harriet Park, Verona
(start and fnish lines)
Packet Pick-up and Late Registration from 7:00-7:30am
Register on-line at active.com (search: Verona Hometown Days)
10K/5K/Walk starts at 7:45am
1K & 2K Kids Run, register at 11:15, race at 11:40 at
Wildcat Lanes (12 & under Free)
Promoting a healthy lifestyle and ftness
Sponsored by: Miller & Sons, Sweeney Construction, First Choice Dental, Stafford
Rosenbaum LLP, Epic, First Business Financial Services, Inc., Culver’s, Capitol Bank,
Park Bank, State Bank of Cross Plains, Kehl School of Dance, Tuvalu Coffeehouse &
Gallery, Zurbuchen Oil, OnCampus College Planning & Berkeley Running Company.
UN352918
Photos by Mark Ignatowski
A tribute to the fallen
Veronans honored America’s war dead during a ceremony Monday
at the high school and cemetery. The event featured speakers,
moments of reflection and a 21-gun salute, above.
A veterans salutes the American flag during Monday’s Memorial
Day program at Verona Area High School.
Rachel Elsing and Hannah Helt place poppies in a basket in remem-
brance of the fallen soldiers involved in all our nation’s conflicts.
The flag is raised from half-staff to its peak during the Memorial
Day observance in the Verona Cemetery.
Find more photos
online
View photo galleries, and order
prints and gifts:
ungphotos.smugmug.com
SELL IT
NOW…
in the Classifieds!
845-9559 or
connectverona.com
May 29, 2014 The Verona Press ConnectVerona.com
3
from local people who would
stop to talk to him after a sto-
ry in the Verona Press helped
announce the campaign.
“The support so far has
been staggering,” he said in
an email to the Press.
The campaign began May
1 and, with more than 450
people donating, was fund-
ed by May 23. That’s good
news for Haack because part
of Kickstarter.com’s rules
is that each project must
have a definitive beginning
and end, and if the project
doesn’t reach its funding
goal it receives no funding.
The deadline for Haack’s
project is May 31, and even
though it reached the goal,
the project can still get
donations until then.
The project already sur-
passed the $25,000 mark by
more than $1,000 and has
garnered donations from
people from around the world
including from the United
Kingdom and Australia.
With more funding will
come more copies of the
book. He initially hoped
to print around 1,000, but
he told the Verona Press in
an email Monday that he’s
looking into creating an app
and interactive digital book
for the project, as well.
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JIM OLMSTED
(608) 575-7562 | jolmsted@charter.net
JIM OLMSTED
has Moved to Verona!
43 Years of Success in
Real Estate Sales!
UN352410
See website or call for
information on other
classes.
www.springdaleyoga.com
215-7218
Free Newcomer’s Class
Saturday, June 7, 10:30 a.m.
Beginning Yoga
Tuesdays, 6:30 p.m.
&
Fridays, 8:30 a.m.
Many other classes
2674 Allen Dr., off Cty. Rd. PD
Between Verona & Mt. Horeb
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Dane County
County
giving away
compost,
will close
sites in July
Dane County will give
away compost by the car
and truckload for free dur-
ing the next several weeks
before closing later this
summer due to a projected
loss of compostable mate-
rial.
The count y compost
sites in Verona and Wau-
nakee will stay open until
around July 1 to help back-
yard gardeners and grow-
ers get through another
growing season. After that,
the two sites will close.
The county will offer
one load of free compost
for residential use per per-
son, per day, to exhaust
its current stockpile. The
Verona compost site will
be open from 7 a.m. to 3
p.m. Monday through Fri-
day, and 7 a.m. to 11 a.m.
on Saturday. The site is
closed on Sundays.
Dane County executive
Joe Parisi said in a news
release that nearby munici-
palities have signed agree-
ments to send leaves and
other material elsewhere,
meaning the county won’t
have enough material to
compost in the future.
“While the situation is
not ideal, we hope resi-
dents will take advantage
of our compost giveaway
to start this growing sea-
son,” Parisi said.
Madison has signed an
agreement with a compa-
ny in DeForest to process
all of the leaves and yard
waste picked up by the
city. Material from Madi-
son represented nearly 80
percent of the content that
had been brought to the
county’s compost sites and
convert ed i nt o compost
and mulch.
After the compost sites
close this summer, resi-
dent s wi l l st i l l be abl e
to drop off compost at a
compost operation at the
county’s Rodefeld Landfill
(7102 U.S. Hwy. 12 near
Cottage Grove), but com-
post will no longer be sold.
The landfill is also home
t o t he count y’ s Cl ean
Sweep program.
For more information on
the compost site closure
and the free compost offer,
residents are encouraged
to call John Welch at 267-
8815.
Funded: Haack meets Kickstarter goal to print inspirational kids’ book
Continued from page 1
Ryan Haack’s picture book for kids met its Kickstarter goal.
Police hold active shooter training drill
Passing by Stoner Prai-
rie Elementary School last
Tuesday might have set off
some alarm bells to wor-
ried neighbors, as police
cars, fire engines and EMS
trucks were all parked in
front of the school.
But not to worry, as it
was only a drill to help
e me r ge nc y pe r s onne l
ensure they are ready if an
emergency situation ever
does present itself.
Safety personnel from
Fitchburg and Verona, the
two cities that send stu-
dents to the Verona Area
School Di st ri ct , j oi ned
together to go through an
“active shooter” situation
three times at the school.
The May 20 training was
a preparation for another
drill as well, planned for
Aug. 19 at Savanna Oaks
Middle School.
Fitchburg Police Depart-
ment Lt. Chad Brecklin
said the August date will
feature a full-scale event,
while this focused on a spe-
cific emergency situation.
After each run-through,
t h e g r o u p me t a n d
debriefed on what went
right and wrong.
The training came as
VASD begins to rework
its crisis communication
plan after a recent com-
munications audit found
the district was behind in
the area. The district will
spend $36,000 to outsource
the creation of a new plan
to Voss and Associates.
– Scott Girard
‘The support
so far has been
staggering,’
Ryan Haack, on his
Kickstarter campaign
Photos by Scott Girard
Above, paramedics work to categorize “victims” based on the severity of their injuries. Right, a pair of
officers enter the Stoner Prairie Elementary School building and discuss where to go. Below, a pair of
paramedics help a “victim” shot in the leg out of the school to safety.
4
May 29, 2014 The Verona Press ConnectVerona.com
Verona Press
Thursday, May 29, 2014 • Vol. 49, No. 1
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General manager
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david.enstad@wcinet.com
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Carolyn Schultz
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veronapress@wcinet.com
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ungsportseditor@wcinet.com
Website
Victoria Vlisides
communityreporter@wcinet.com
Reporters
Scott Girard, Bill Livick, Anthony Iozzo,
Mark Ignatowski, Scott De Laruelle
What’s the meaning
behind that mascot?
A
s Donald Sterling has
proved, racism is sadly all
too alive in America.
To the NBA’s credit, with the
backing of all the other teams’
owners, they dealt with this mat-
ter swiftly and decisively, expel-
ling the Los Angeles Clippers
owner from the NBA.
Sports in America are a high-
profile, micro-
cosm mirror of
the country. At
the same time,
its reflection
has unique,
influential pow-
ers over the
country’s col-
lective behavior
and values.
Sterling was
the overt racist among us, and the
NBA’s message has far-reaching
influence. However, there are far
more subtle and accepted forms
of racism out there daily, and
sports reflect those, as well.
Owners of teams in other
sports should follow the NBA’s
example. Their fight likely would
not be against overt racism, but
instead against the subtle, per-
vasive, quiet-message-racism
of owners who continue to use
Native American team names,
mascots, and logos.
The NFL has the Redskins and
Chiefs; MLB has the Braves and
Indians; and the NHL has the
Blackhawks as Native American
team names in the other major
professional sports leagues.
The pros are not the only prob-
lem. In fact, it becomes more
pervasive the deeper we slip
into the common culture of the
American sports system. Col-
leges and universities also bear
responsibility for this continued
and outdated practice.
Certainly, there are plenty of
outdated college and university
team names, like the Oberlin
College Yeomen or the Purdue
Boilermakers. There are also
oxymoronic names, like Wilm-
ington College Fighting Quakers,
or names that modern interpre-
tation makes them comical or
inappropriate like the Earlham
College Hustlin’ Quakers (think
street hustler), Rhode Island
College Anchormen (think Ron
Burgundy), or the Idaho Vandals
(think spray paint).
But silly as they sometimes
are, none of these are offensive.
For example, while I’ve known
an Irishman or two who’ve got-
ten into their share of scraps, the
Notre Dame Fighting Irish is not
a stereotype that is offensive to
Irish-Americans in the same way
the North Dakota Fighting Sioux
is to Native Americans.
I’m sure there could be dis-
sertation papers written on why
that is, but in this case, does the
“why” really matter? It’s kind of
common sense. If something is
offensive, it’s not respectful to
continue it.
Where the problem grows more
entangled into local culture is
at the local school district level.
This affects every state, includ-
ing Wisconsin.
In fact, on Dec. 19, 2013
Governor Walker signed a bill
into law that rewrote a 2010
law. Doing so made it more dif-
ficult to change schools’ Native
American team names, mascots,
or logos. It put the burden of
proof on the person making the
complaint that the team name or
mascot promotes discrimination
by requiring signatures from dis-
trict residents equal to 10 percent
of the student population of the
district.
So let’s think about this. An
outside group, in fact a race of
people, is offended by the use of
names, images and mascots that
it claims discriminates against
them. Yet the only way the com-
plaint is taken seriously is if at
least 10 percent of the insiders –
who are not of this race – decide
it is offensive to the people tak-
ing offense.
Don’t get me wrong, I think
there’s a lot of protection and
political correctness gone over-
board in American culture, but
we know how derisive and divi-
sive racial issues can be.
Perhaps we would we think of
this differently if it were one of
the other protected classes. What
if it were women who were upset
that a female stereotype was
being used as a logo? Or what if
it were a team with an “Over the
Hill-40 year old” mascot stereo-
type? Better yet, what if it was a
veteran’s image being used as a
football team logo that veterans
felt cheapened the sacrifices they
made?
I suspect readers will agree
that these protected classes have
come a long way since the times
when stereotypes for each class
were perpetuated. Native Ameri-
cans have changed as well.
Native Americans, similarly
to Jews, are a race with religion
intertwined. Also like Jews,
Native Americans suffered their
own Holocaust; first at the hands
of disease and colonial wars, and
later through imprisonment and
outright extermination efforts by
the United States government.
Yet, I doubt we would ever con-
sider using stereotype imagery of
Jews for sports teams.
Sticking with religion, what if
the image were of a priest with
an altar boy? This is the level
of misrepresentation that Native
American images represent when
used as team names, mascots,
and logos.
Misrepresentation is a quiet
form of discrimination, espe-
cially when it’s done knowingly.
If we want to be a country where
we are truly free of discrimina-
tion, we need to look into those
corners of society to see what
really hides in them.
Dealing with the Donald Ster-
lings in society is the easy part.
It’s time we do the deeper dig-
ging and look closer into that
mirror.
That is as simple as voting with
the money we spend at sporting
events, with calls to our legis-
lators, and with our actions as
examples to future generations.
Brian Simons is the director of
the Verona Public Library.
Simons
Community Voices
Letters to the editor
Land purchase needs good bike access
I read the article about the pro-
posed purchase of 40 acres of land
for a school.
That seems a good plan, but I
hope that access will be provided
to the bicycle trail, as was sup-
posed to happen with the previous
approval for T. Wall to develop
that land.
Sure, Epic made a connection
north of the bypass bridge, but it
is dangerous.
Charles Gerhards
City of Verona
Corrections
A story in last week’s Verona Press on Memorial Day stated the event
would be Sunday, May 25. The correct date was Monday, May 26.
• • •
Last week’s business story on Reinen Beyler Chiropractic misnamed
the father of the business’ new owners as Mark Beylers. His name is
Mike Beyler.
The Press regrets these errors.
See something wrong?
The Verona Press does not sweep errors under the rug. If you see
something you know or even think is in error, please contact editor
Jim Ferolie at 845-9559 or at veronapress@wcinet.com so we can get
it right.
The Verona Press encourages citizens to engage in discussion
through letters to the editor. We take submissions online, on email and
by hard copy. All letters should be signed and include addresses and
phone numbers for verification. Anonymous letters will not be printed.
Special rules apply during election season or other times of high let-
ter volume, and the editorial staff reserves the right not to print any
letter, including those with libelous or obscene content. We can accept
multiple submissions from local authors, but other letters will take pri-
ority over submissions from recently printed authors. Please keep sub-
missions under 400 words.
Deadline is noon Monday the week of publication. For questions
on our editorial policy, call editor Jim Ferolie at 845-9559 or email
veronapress@wcinet.com.
Submit a letter
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Easily
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May 29, 2014 The Verona Press ConnectVerona.com
5
KSW Construction – is
bringing plans for a 218-
room hotel. That’s more
than double the size of the
Holiday Inn Express and
roughly comparable to the
Monona Terrace Hilton in
downtown Madison.
Both plans are still in the
conceptual phase, in what the
city terms an “initial review,”
seeking feedback and enough
agreement for developers to
find value in investing fur-
ther money into the projects.
But if carried out, they repre-
sent enormous changes from
the pre-recession days, when
developers were crawling all
over each other to bring retail
stores here.
It seems i ncreasi ngl y
unlikely that the west side of
Verona will ever have a big
box store, and it’s uncertain
whether we’ll see one on
Reinke’s property, either,
though there’s a small sec-
tion of his 240 acres where it
still is feasible. The “big box-
es” now appear to be hotels
and possibly a high school.
West End
The Vanta project, look-
ing much more basic now,
still reserves a spot for two
properties owned by other
companies – a hotel along
the U.S. Hwy. 18-151 bypass
and a long-planned UW
Credit Union branch – along
with other retail that would
surround the apartments. It
also suggests building one
final set of apartments south
of the current set of three
buildings.
The $3.4 million sale of
two-thirds of the property for
less than half the company’s
investment suggests a desire
to move on and make the
best out of a bad situation.
A $110 million capital
investment by a New York
firm into T. Wall Proper-
ties in 2007 was followed
by what appeared to be
progress: the burning of a
house on the site and then a
$2.5 million investment in
grading and doing the first
road and utility work in the
summer of 2008. But by
2009, with the economy in
a free-fall, Wall was out as
president and everything had
ground to a halt.
Wall re-emerged in Vero-
na in 2011 to pitch apart-
ments built by his new com-
pany, T. Wall Enterprises,
and suggest that the added
activity would spur UW
Credit Union to finally build
its long-planned bank there,
but things have been quiet
since.
Vanta CEO Randy Guen-
ther told the Press last week
that the original plan, featur-
ing two big-box stores ringed
by smaller retail shops, sim-
ply is no longer feasible.
“The l arge-box ret ai l
environment has been very
slow,” he said.
Not only that, while the
slopes and the rocky base
under the soil can be made
to work for single-family
homes or a school, they’re
particularly challenging for
large retail developers that
want wide, flat spaces. Big-
box developers just aren’t
investing that sort of money
– to either flatten the ground
or use extraordinary con-
struction techniques – in our
post-recession, online-friend-
ly economy.
Guenther said his compa-
ny approached VASD about
a smaller site, suitable for an
elementary school, toward
the back end of the property
but that discussions led to a
much larger area. The new
spot clearly could accommo-
date a high school or some
sort of multi-building cam-
pus that could draw students
from all over the district.
“We’ve been considering
alternative uses (and) the
school district opportunity
came up,” he said. “We think
it will ultimately be a good
use on the site.”
It wouldn’t be surprising
to see Wall return to pitch
yet another set of apartments,
because the new plan would
rezone 5.7 acres – between
the currently developed area
and the part that would be
sold to the school – as multi-
family (up to 69 units).
Hotel, retail
Reinke, meanwhile, spent
most of 2007-2008 trying
to persuade the city to allow
a big retail development at
what’s now known as Lib-
erty Business Park. And after
he agreed to start with indus-
trial and office development
in 2009, the project went
through several false starts.
But the city installed utili-
ties and part of a road last
year and KSW construction
broke ground on a building
last month that will include
its new headquarters.
Next week it will bring
plans for a three-story hotel
and a third multi-user build-
ing on the site – this time a
17,000-square-foot, two-sto-
ry office-over-retail building
that appears to be set up for
two restaurants with patios.
If the hotel comes to frui-
tion, Reinke’s company still
might not meet its 2015 obli-
gations that came from the
city’s use of tax-increment
financing, but probably
would more than catch up for
it in 2016.
The 144, 435- squar e-
foot hotel would feature an
on-site public restaurant, a
100-person meeting room
space, a pool, a sizeable fit-
ness center and a meeting
room space that can handle
100 people. It would be dou-
ble the capacity of the city’s
current biggest hotel, the
Holiday Inn Express on West
Verona Avenue.
Located on the west side
of Liberty Drive, there would
be room (and proper zon-
ing) for some small retail to
go in between it and County
Highway M.
Though Liberty and KSW
both have had their share of
projects that didn’t pan out
in recent years, city planning
director Adam Sayre said
he’s hopeful because “my
understanding is they have a
hotel flag lined up.”
Several steps would need
to be taken before it could
break ground, including
combining properties and
vacating a road, and Sayre
said he was told construction
would be about 15 months,
which would effectively put
the opening in spring 2016.
Other items
The commission will also
be following up on sev-
eral issues that came up last
month.
The one that has yielded
the most discussion is the
Sugar River United Method-
ist Church move, which got
the support of the Common
Council and Plan Commis-
sion in informal votes earlier
this month.
Also included are the
two-story Epic construction
annex that will eventually
replace the current single-
story building, another step
for the Hometown Grove
development that barely
won an initial, but impor-
tant approval last month and
apartments at Scenic Ridge.
The commission will also
begin discussing the North
Neighborhood Plan, which
would be the first of several
required steps in a several-
month process before the city
can stretch north to County
Highway PD.
The plan shows a space
for a school in the middle
surrounded by mostly medi-
um-density housing, some
room for apartments and a
commercial area on the cor-
ner of County Highways PD
and M. But the plan is still
in the early stages and could
change significantly before it
is submitted.
5'x10' $27 Month
10'x10' $38 Month
10'x15' $48 Month
10'x20' $58 Month
10'x25' $65 Month
At Cleary Building Corp.
190 S. Paoli St., Verona WI
(608) 845-9700
EMERALD INVESTMENTS
MINI STORAGE
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WWW.MTHOREBSUMMERFROLIC.COM WWW.MTHOREBSUMMERFROLIC.COM
BANDS
THE UNION SUITS
STAFF INFECTION
FRIDAY
CHARM
SCHOOL
REJECTS
SATURDAY
CHERRY PIE
EVENTS
YOUTH BASEBALL
TOURNAMENT

VOLLEYBALL
BEAN BAG
TOURNAMENT
2014 MOUNT HOREB
SUMMER FROLIC
VACATION WITH THE FROLIC!!!
S
IG
N
U
P

T
O
D
A
Y
!
FEATURING
5 MILE NORSK RUN - NEW!
AND 2 MILE RUN/WALK
MtHorebFrolicPoster2014_print-NEW.pdf 1 4/30/14 8:29 AM
O CARNIVAL RIDES
ADVANCED RIDE
TICKET SALE - $1.50
Sold through June 5 at 5pm at
Miller & Sons and Anchor Bank.
Wristbands will be Thursday 5-9
and Saturday 12-4.
O RAFFLE DRAWING:
25 PRIZES OVER $16,000
TOTAL VALUE! 1ST PRIZE:
Vacation to Jamaica or Riviera Maya
in Mexico (Retail value $4,000)
2ND PRIZE: John Deere X300
Lawn Tractor (Retail value: $3,165)
O FIREWORKS
Presented by Miller & Sons
Supermarket and the Summer Frolic
Committee
O MAIN STREET PARADE
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BANDS
THE UNION SUITS
STAFF INFECTION
FRIDAY
CHARM
SCHOOL
REJECTS
SATURDAY
CHERRY PIE
EVENTS
YOUTH BASEBALL
TOURNAMENT

VOLLEYBALL
BEAN BAG
TOURNAMENT
2014 MOUNT HOREB
SUMMER FROLIC
VACATION WITH THE FROLIC!!!
S
IG
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FEATURING
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AND 2 MILE RUN/WALK
MtHorebFrolicPoster2014_print-NEW.pdf 1 4/30/14 8:29 AM
Scan this code or
visit the website
below for more
details and a full
schedule of events.
WWW.MTHOREBSUMMERFROLIC.COM WWW.MTHOREBSUMMERFROLIC.COM
BANDS
THE UNION SUITS
STAFF INFECTION
FRIDAY
CHARM
SCHOOL
REJECTS
SATURDAY
CHERRY PIE
EVENTS
YOUTH BASEBALL
TOURNAMENT

VOLLEYBALL
BEAN BAG
TOURNAMENT
2014 MOUNT HOREB
SUMMER FROLIC
VACATION WITH THE FROLIC!!!
S
IG
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FEATURING
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Hotel: Vanta asking to put apartments, school area in former retail spot
Continued from page 1
Photo submitted
VAHS class
of 2014 top 10
The top 10 students of the
Verona Area High School 2014
graduating class will speak
at the graduation ceremony
Sunday, June 8, at 3 p.m.
Front, from left: Ally Dykman,
Olivia Lilly, Karen Wong, Taylor
Weigel and Anna Kopp. Back,
from left: Grace Schwantes,
Katie Goetz, Rachel Samz, Elliott
Imhoff, Lillie Pankratz and
Student Council president Abbie
Homan.
SELL IT
NOW…
in the Classifieds!
845-9559 or
connectverona.com
P
IC
N
IC IN THE PA
R
K
S
p
r
in
g

F
l
in
g
PICNIC IN
THE PARK
8
TH
ANNUAL
SUNDAY
JUNE 1
ST

3-6PM
HARRIET PARK
(ON MARY LOU ST. IN VERONA)
Featuring student
soloists and bands
with music from the
1950s to present
Free and open
to the public!
Bring a picnic,
blanket, and
yard games!
Call (608) 848-2045 or visit rhapsodyarts.org for more information
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The current West End plan is no longer viable, Vanta’s CEO says.
6
May 29, 2014 The Verona Press ConnectVerona.com
Coming up
Community calendar
Call 845-9559
to advertise on the
Verona Press
church page
430 E. Verona Ave.
845-2010
Being a Saint
Do you expect to become a Saint? Perhaps you should.
Have you ever noticed that just about every person in the
Bible who is chosen by God for some important mission
balks at the idea? It almost seems as if it is “bad form”
to be too ready and willing to be God’s standard-bearer.
Moses was full of excuses for why he couldn’t be God’s
mouthpiece, chief among them that he didn’t speak well.
Young Samuel thought he was hearing his master Eli’s voice
when he was really hearing the voice of God. And, even
Jesus appeared to have His moment of doubt, asking His
heavenly Father to “remove this cup from me” in the garden
at Gethsemane (Mark 14: 36). The life of a saintly person is
likely to be more filled with doubts than that of the ordinary
man or woman, not less. Perhaps that is because so much
more is asked of the saintly man and woman. How could
one fail to be doubtful when facing such fearful circumstanc-
es as martyrdom? Ultimately, we are all called to be saints,
because God is both our origin and our ultimate goal.
- Christopher Simon via Metro News Service
To all those in Rome who are loved by God and called to be
saints: Grace to you and peace from God our Father and the
Lord Jesus Christ.
Romans 1:7
Churches
ALL SAINTS LUTHERAN
CHURCH
2951 Chapel Valley Road, Fitchburg
(608) 276-7729
allsaints-madison.org
Pastor Rich Johnson
8:30 and 10:45 a.m. worship times
THE CHURCH IN FITCHBURG
2833 Raritan Road, Fitchburg, WI
53711
(608) 271-2811
livelifetogether.com
Sunday Worship: 8 and 10:45 a.m.
THE CHURCH IN VERONA
Verona Business Centre
535 Half Mile Rd. #7, Verona.
(608) 271-2811
livelifetogether.com
Sunday Worship: 9 a.m.
FITCHBURG MEMORIAL UCC
5705 Lacy Road, Fitchburg
(608) 273-1008 • memorialucc.org
Phil Haslanger
GOOD SHEPHERD LUTHERAN
CHURCH ELCA
(608) 271-6633
Central: Raymond Road & Whitney
Way
SUNDAY
8:15, 9:30 & 10:45 a.m. Worship
West: Corner of Hwy. PD & Nine
Mound Road, Verona
SUNDAY
9 & 10:30 a.m. and 6 p.m. Worship
LIVING HOPE CHURCH
At the Verona Senior Center
108 Paoli St. • (608) 347-3827
livinghopeverona.com, info@living-
hopeverona.com
SUNDAY
10 a.m. Worship
MEMORIAL BAPTIST CHURCH
201 S. Main, Verona
(608) 845-7125
MBCverona.org
Lead pastor: Jeremy Scott
SUNDAY
10:15 a.m. Worship
REDEEMER BIBLE FELLOWSHIP
102 N. Franklin Ave., Verona
Pastor Dwight R. Wise
(608) 848-1836 www.redeemerbible-
fellowship.org
SUNDAY
10 a.m. Family Worship Service
RESURRECTION LUTHERAN
CHURCH
Wisconsin Synod, 6705 Wesner
Road, Verona
(608) 848-4965 • rlcverona.org
Pastor Nathan Strutz and Assistant
Pastor: Jacob Haag
THURSDAY
6:30 p.m. Worship
SUNDAY
9 a.m. Worship Service
ST. CHRISTOPHER CATHOLIC
PARISH
301 N. Main St., Verona
(608) 845-6613
Stchristopherverona.com
Fr. William Vernon, pastor
SATURDAY 5 p.m. Sunday Vigil,
St. Andrew, Verona
SUNDAY 7:30 a.m., St. William,
Paoli
9 and 11 a.m., St. Andrew, Verona
Daily Mass: Tuesday-Saturday at 8
a.m., St. Andrew, Verona
ST. JAMES EVANGELICAL
LUTHERAN CHURCH
427 S. Main Street, Verona
(608) 845-6922
www.stjamesverona.org
Pastors Kurt M. Billings and Peter
Narum
Services 5 p.m., Saturday, 9 a.m.
Sunday - office hours 8-4 Monday,
Tuesday, Thursday and Friday; 8
a.m. to noon Wednesday
SALEM UNITED CHURCH OF
CHRIST
502 Mark Dr., Verona, WI
Phone: (608) 845-7315
Rev. Dr. Mark E. Yurs, Pastor
Laura Kolden, Associate in Ministry
www.salemchurchverona.org
9 a.m. Sunday School - 10:15 a.m.
worship service - Staffed nursery
from 8:45 a.m. - 11:30 a.m. - 11:30
a.m. Fellowship Hour
SPRINGDALE LUTHERAN
CHURCH-ELCA
2752 Town Hall Road (off County
ID)
(608) 437-3493
springdalelutheran.org
Pastor: Jeff Jacobs
SUNDAY
8:45 a.m. Communion Worship
SUGAR RIVER
UNITED METHODIST CHURCH
130 N. Franklin St., Verona
(608) 845-5855
sugar.river@sugarriverumc.org,
sugarriverumc.org
Pastor: Gary Holmes
SUNDAY
9:00 & 10:30
Contemporary worship with chil-
dren’s Sunday school.
Refreshments and fellowship are
between services.
WEST MADISON BIBLE CHURCH
2920 Hwy. M, Verona, WI 53593
Sunday (nursery provided in a.m.)
9:15 a.m. - Praise and worship
10:45 - Sunday School (all ages)
6 p.m. - Small group Bible study
ZWINGLI UNITED CHURCH OF
CHRIST – Located at Hwy. 92 & Ct.
Road G, Mount Vernon
(608) 832-6677 for information
Pastor: Brad Brookins
SUNDAY
10:15 a.m. Worship
ZWINGLI UNITED CHURCH OF
CHRIST –
At Hwy. 69 and PB, Paoli
(608) 845-5641
Rev. Sara Thiessen
SUNDAY 9:30 a.m. Family Worship
What’s on VHAT-98
Thursday, May 29
• 10:30 a.m., free movie at the
senior center, “Glory”
• 12:30 , financial power of attorney
presentation, senior center
• 7 p.m., BR/SOMS 8th grade band
and jazz concert, PAC
Friday, May 30
• Reddan Thunder Invitational,
Reddan Soccer Park (through
Monday, June 1), veronawi@gmail.
com
Saturday, May 31
• 8 a.m.-4 p.m., Hike from Brooklyn
through Verona to Madison on Ice
Age Trail
Sunday, June 1
•3 p.m., Rhapsody Arts Center
Spring Fling, Harriet Park on Mary
Lou Street
Monday, June 2
• 6:30 p.m., Plan Commission, City
Center
• 7 p.m., Verona Area School
District, administration building
Tuesday, June 3
• 5:30 p.m., Citizens’ Budget
Hearing, VASD administration
building
• 6 p.m., Vegetable Gardening 101,
library
• 6:30 p.m., Town Board, Town Hall
Wednesday, June 4
• 6:30-7:30 p.m., Make College
Visits Count, VPL
Sunday, June 8
• 3 p.m., VAHS graduation, Epic
Monday, June 9
• Firemen’s Park beach open
• 7 p.m., Common Council, City
Center
Tuesday, June 10
• 6 p.m., free English classes for
adult Spanish speakers, library
Wednesday, June 11
• 7-8 p.m., Beginning Beekeeping,
VPL
Thursday, June 12
• Hometown Days (run through
June 15), veronawi@gmail.com
Friday, June 13
• 9 a.m., “Chat and Chew,” senior
center
• 7 p.m.-8 a.m., Library Sleepover,
VPL
Sunday, June 15
• 8 a.m.-3 p.m., Sugar River
Cruisers Annual Car Show, Verona
Fire Station
Yard waste drop-off hours
Beginning April 1 and continuing
through mid-November, the drop-off
site hours at 410 Investment Court
will be: Saturday 8 a.m. to 3 p.m.;
Monday 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. and Tuesday
- Friday from 7 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.
Celebrate 90-plus years
The Verona Senior Center is host-
ing the Kat Trio, a highly acclaimed
musical act from Russia, during a
luncheon honoring those 90 years
and older from 11:45 a.m. to 2 p.m.
All are invited to attend. Lunch is
at 11:45 with reservations needed by
noon on Thursday, May 29. The Kat
Trio performs at 12:30.
Rhapsody Arts Center Spring
Fling
The annual event is set for Sun-
day, June 1, from 3-6 p.m. at Harriet
Park on Mary Lou Street. Attendees
will experience live performances of
music from the 1950s to the present,
featuring Rhapsody Arts Center stu-
dent soloists, ensembles and School
of Rock bands. Attendees should
bring picnics, blankets and yard
games. No glass containers, please.
Meals at St. James
St. James Lutheran Church (427
S. Main St.) invites the community
to come dine with them Wednesday,
June 4 and each first Wednesday of
the month for a “community meal” at
6 p.m. The church is serving a meal
for the public. Please call and make a
reservation at 845-6922.
Fun with ‘Bernie Brewer’
Get your photo taken with Bernie
Brewer and get some fun prizes at
Centi Park when the Brewers’ mascot
visits the Verona Little League from
10 a.m. to noon Saturday, June 7.
Library garden planting week
Starting Monday, June 9, people
can adopt a seedling or seedlings
throughout the week and plant it
in the garden at the Verona Public
Library.
Beginning Beekeeping
At 7 p.m. Wednesday, June 11,
people are invited to listen to Luke
Nelson, a member of the Dane County
Beekeeper’s Association, will discuss
how to start, maintain and harvest a
beehive. He will also talk about the
special challenges of keeping bees in
a northern climate and in urban envi-
ronments.
Summer reading program
People are invited to join the sum-
mer reading program - a free reading
incentive program where kids (ages
3-18) keep track of the books they
read between June 12 - July 25.
They earn coupons and prizes just
for reading, can enter to win grand
prizes by visiting the library and can
attend programs and special events.
Thursday, May 29
10 a.m. - Promise Band at Senior
Center
3 p.m. - Daily Exercise
4 p.m. – Parkinson’s Presentation at
Senior Center
5 p.m. – A Taste of Theater
6 p.m. - Salem Church Service
7 p.m. - Words of Peace
8 p.m. - Daily Exercise
9 p.m. – Chatting with the Chamber
10 p.m. – Maple Grove School at
Historical Society
Friday, May 30
7 a.m. – Parkinson’s Presentation at
Senior Center
1:30 p.m. - Chatting with the Chamber
3 p.m. – Foot Care at Senior Center
4 p.m. – A Taste of Theater
5 p.m. - 2012 Wildcats Football
8:30 p.m. - Foot Care at Senior Center
10 p.m. - Pam Vankampen at Senior
Center
11 p.m. – Promise Band at Senior
Center
Saturday, May 31
8 a.m. – Common Council from 05-27-
14
11 a.m. - Foot Care at Senior Center
1 p.m. - 2012 Wildcats Football
4:30 p.m. – Maple Grove School at
Historical Society
6 p.m. – Common Council from 05-27-
14
9 p.m. - Foot Care at Senior Center
10 p.m. - Maple Grove School at
Historical Society
11 p.m. - Promise Band at Senior
Center
Sunday, June 1
7 a.m. - Hindu Cultural Hour
9 a.m. – Resurrection Church
10 a.m. - Salem Church Service
Noon - Common Council from 05-27-
14
3 p.m. - Foot Care at Senior Center
4:30 p.m. - Maple Grove School at
Historical Society
6 p.m. – Common Council from 05-27-
14
9 p.m. - Foot Care at Senior Center
10 p.m. – Maple Grove School at
Historical Society
11 p.m. - Promise Band at Senior
Center
Monday, June 2
7 a.m. – Parkinson’s Presentation at
Senior Center
1:30 p.m. - Chatting with the Chamber
3 p.m. - Foot Care at Senior Center
4 p.m. – A Taste of Theater
5 p.m. - 2012 Wildcats Football
6:30 – Plan Commission Live
9 p.m. - Hindu Cultural Hour
10 p.m. – Pam Vankampen at Senior
Center
11 p.m. – Promise Band at Senior
Center
Tuesday, June 3
7 a.m. – Pam Vankampen at Senior
Center
9 a.m. - Daily Exercise
10 a.m. - Promise Band at Senior
Center
3 p.m. - Daily Exercise
4 p.m. – Parkinson’s Presentation at
Senior Center
5 p.m. – A Taste of Theater
6 p.m. - Resurrection Church
7 p.m. – Common Council Live
8 p.m. - Words of Peace
9 p.m. - Chatting with the Chamber
10 p.m. - Maple Grove School at
Historical Society
Wednesday, June 4
7 a.m. – Parkinson’s Presentation at
Senior Center
1:30 p.m. - Chatting with the Chamber
3 p.m. – Foot Care at Senior Center
6 p.m. – Plan Commission from 6-02-
14
7 p.m. - Capital City Band
8 p.m. – Foot Care at Senior Center
10 p.m. - Pam Vankampen at Senior
Center
11 p.m. – Promise Band at Senior
Center
Thursday, June 5
7 a.m. – Pam Vankampen at Senior
Center
9 a.m. - Daily Exercise
10 a.m. – Promise Band at Senior
Center
3 p.m. - Daily Exercise
4 p.m. – Parkinson’s Presentation at
Senior Center
6 p.m. - Salem Church Service
8 p.m. - Daily Exercise
9 p.m. – Chatting with the Chamber
10 p.m. – Maple Grove School at
Historical Society
May 29, 2014 The Verona Press ConnectVerona.com
7
A walk in the woods led me to ...
m
y
n
e
igh
b
o
r’s
h
o
u
s
e
.
Oakwood Village University Woods • 6205 Mineral Point Road • Madison, WI 53705
On Oakwood Village University Woods’ 30-acre campus, you’ll have interesting neighbors of
all kinds—including those who live in our 9-acre nature preserve. As you follow the walking
trails, you’ll be greeted by squirrels jumping from tree to tree, mallards and wood ducks
relaxing in our pond, and Great Horned owls keeping watch over the neighborhood. No
doubt you’ll have interesting observations to share with your other neighbors over dinner.
Call today to schedule a personal appointment and discover a community where you’ll
enjoy neighbors of all kinds: 608-230-4266. Or visit us online at www.oakwoodvillage.net.
Find us on
Facebook.
Life’s explorations
continued.
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27343AD N3-14
Tim Pederson
FIC
Financial Consultant
115 N. Main St.
Verona, WI, 53593
608-848-5150
608-217-9375
Strength and stability—
without compromising integrity
Thrivent Financial is more than a fnancial services
provider—we’re a membership organization of Christians,
and we honor our members in everything we do. For the third
year running, we’ve been named one of the “World’s Most
Ethical Companies” by Ethisphere Institute.
We earned this award as a result of our leadership in
promoting ethical business standards and for introducing
innovative ideas to beneft the public.
Ethisphere Institute is a leading international think tank
dedicated to the creation, advancement and sharing of best
practices in business ethics.
VALUES ARE IMPORTANT
TO US AND OUR MEMBERS
Appleton, Wisconsin • Minneapolis, Minnesota
Thrivent.com • 800-THRIVENT (800-847-4836)
27343AD N3-14
Tim Pederson
FIC
Financial Consultant
115 N. Main St.
Verona, WI, 53593
608-848-5150
608-217-9375
Strength and stability—
without compromising integrity
Thrivent Financial is more than a fnancial services
provider—we’re a membership organization of Christians,
and we honor our members in everything we do. For the third
year running, we’ve been named one of the “World’s Most
Ethical Companies” by Ethisphere Institute.
We earned this award as a result of our leadership in
promoting ethical business standards and for introducing
innovative ideas to beneft the public.
Ethisphere Institute is a leading international think tank
dedicated to the creation, advancement and sharing of best
practices in business ethics.
VALUES ARE IMPORTANT
TO US AND OUR MEMBERS
Appleton, Wisconsin • Minneapolis, Minnesota
Thrivent.com • 800-THRIVENT (800-847-4836)
27343AD N3-14
Tim Pederson
FIC
Financial Consultant
115 N. Main St.
Verona, WI, 53593
608-848-5150
608-217-9375
Strength and stability—
without compromising integrity
Thrivent Financial is more than a fnancial services
provider—we’re a membership organization of Christians,
and we honor our members in everything we do. For the third
year running, we’ve been named one of the “World’s Most
Ethical Companies” by Ethisphere Institute.
We earned this award as a result of our leadership in
promoting ethical business standards and for introducing
innovative ideas to beneft the public.
Ethisphere Institute is a leading international think tank
dedicated to the creation, advancement and sharing of best
practices in business ethics.
VALUES ARE IMPORTANT
TO US AND OUR MEMBERS
Appleton, Wisconsin • Minneapolis, Minnesota
Thrivent.com • 800-THRIVENT (800-847-4836)
27343AD N3-14
Tim Pederson
FIC
Financial Consultant
115 N. Main St.
Verona, WI, 53593
608-848-5150
608-217-9375
Strength and stability—
without compromising integrity
Thrivent Financial is more than a fnancial services
provider—we’re a membership organization of Christians,
and we honor our members in everything we do. For the third
year running, we’ve been named one of the “World’s Most
Ethical Companies” by Ethisphere Institute.
We earned this award as a result of our leadership in
promoting ethical business standards and for introducing
innovative ideas to beneft the public.
Ethisphere Institute is a leading international think tank
dedicated to the creation, advancement and sharing of best
practices in business ethics.
VALUES ARE IMPORTANT
TO US AND OUR MEMBERS
Appleton, Wisconsin • Minneapolis, Minnesota
Thrivent.com • 800-THRIVENT (800-847-4836)
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1
4
Tim Pederson
FIC
Financial Consultant
203 Horizon Dr. Ste 101-A
Verona, WI 53593
608-848-5150
608-217-9375
New location as of 6-9-14 • 203 Horizon Dr. Ste 101-A
Other retirements
“When I think of each
of these teachers, I think of
the positive relationships
they’ve developed with stu-
dents, whether they’re in
their classes or maybe not
even in their classes and
how those relationships will
impact those students even
after they leave Verona Area
High School,” Hammen said
Tuesday. “Sometimes we as
educators may not fully real-
ize in the moment the impact
those relationships have, and
how powerful they can be.”
Moffat and Watson
Moffat , who t eaches
Advanced Placement classes
in Physics and Chemistry and
began using a “flipped class-
room” model last year to “real-
ly good results,” said a number
of factors made this year the
right time for her to retire after
20 years in the district and 30
years of teaching overall.
“There are some things
coming down the road that
I’m thinking, ‘Oh my gosh
how am I going to do that?’”
Moffat said, mentioning per-
sonalized learning and other
new ideas spreading through
the education world. “I’ve
got the time, I’ve got the
years in, I’m at a place in my
life where I’m ready to take
another risk and test some-
thing new or different.”
She recalled beginning her
time at VAHS as the only
woman on the science staff,
and now seeing so many
staff members that there are
some she doesn’t even know.
Watson mentioned the
school’s growth in her 29
years as a major change as
well, one that brought both
positives and negatives.
“I felt like I knew the entire
district staff, K-12,” Watson
said, recalling meetings in
the Sugar Creek step room
that fit all of them when she
began teaching here.
But the growth has helped
the community embrace the
arts, something she appreci-
ated as an English teacher,
and has created an “amazing
community to teach in.”
She said she kept her enthu-
siasm for the job because of
discussions among her stu-
dents during class where she
could see their passions and
interests come out.
“That helps me feel like
I’m alive,” she said. “I went
home at the end of the day
and thought, ‘Wow what a
great day.’”
Moffat said she enjoyed
seeing her students find suc-
cess, especially seeing them
step out of their comfort zone
and work in programs like
that in which her physics
students taught elementary
school students on the sub-
ject.
“I’ve been really blessed
in that the classes that I’ve
taught are elective classes, so
I get the kids that want to be
there,” she said. “I just get a
kick out of sharing the stuff
with them.”
Bergsbaken
Bergsbaken held a few dif-
ferent roles around the dis-
trict in his time, beginning
as a substitute teacher in the
early 1990s.
He later became the build-
ing sub for VAHS, and then
moved to working one-on-
one with a struggling stu-
dent before being placed
with the “at risk” students in
the school’s VIP program.
When that program began
to change a few years ago,
he was offered a chance to
return to his physical educa-
tion roots – he had started his
career as a phy ed teacher in
Madison schools.
“Just put somebody in a
physical arena where they’ve
got to compete and pro-
duce, not only individually
but with a team, and that’s
the best way to get to know
somebody’s heart and soul,”
Bergsbaken said of his draw
to phy ed.
The 62-year-old said he
will miss the students the
most, especially hearing
words of praise from them.
“The coolest thing I heard
one time, because I had (a
student’s) brother and helped
him through some tough
times, (the student) said to
me, ‘Mr. B you’re my favor-
ite teacher and I never had
you,’” he said. “That beats
any plaque or whatever
somebody wants to hand
you ever, words from kids
like that. You can’t buy that
stuff.”
Once a teacher...
Each of the four teachers
has some relaxation in their
plans, and most will find a
way to continue educating
others.
Watson plans to open a
pilates studio, something she’s
always enjoyed teaching. Mof-
fat hopes to help supervise stu-
dent teachers, tutor, work with
the Boys and Girls Club and
find other ways to be involved
with children between travel-
ing with her husband.
Hoffman will continue
some of his work with FFA,
specifically in serving at the
FFA alumni vice president for
another year. Bergsbaken will
move to northern Wisconsin
and has a goal “to get sick of
fishing and hunting. That’s it.”
But Hoffman, who recalled
a vacation in 1984 and “maybe
one since then,” looks forward
to a small change from the
24-year routine he’s devel-
oped of taking care of the ani-
mals and his other duties at the
school, whether on an average
Tuesday during the school
year or Christmas morning.
“I’d like to see what it’s
like not to come to school for
a day,” Hoffman said with a
laugh.
Frank Kufel, Stoner
Prairie
Years in VASD/Total years in education: 17
years in VASD/ 31 years total; including Manawa,
Wisconsin Rapids, Guam, London, and Verona
Hometown: Oshkosh
Education: Bachelor’s Degree in Elementary
Education, with a minor in Social Sciences, from
the University of Wisconsin – Oshkosh
Why retiring now? I’m retiring now because a
variety of conditions are favorable for me to do
so now.
Retirement plans: My retirement plans include
being a stay-home dad for my two teen-aged
sons and my working wife. I also plan on taking
better care of myself and spending more time
golfing with my sons and friends.
Photo by Scott Girard
Dan Bergsbaken demonstrates
proper position for a catcher
covering home plate for a class
Tuesday afternoon.
Retirements: Teachers will miss students
Continued from page 1
8
May 29, 2014 The Verona Press ConnectVerona.com
David Jennings, Badger Ridge
Years in VASD/Total years in education: 18 years as administrator (10 years associate
principal, 8 years as principal all at BRMS) 32 years in education
Hometown: Lived in Verona with wife and two daughters for 18 years
Education: Special Education Teacher certification and Masters in Educational
Leadership.
Why retiring now? My young-
est daughter is graduating from
Verona High School and will be
a freshman at Winona State next
year and my oldest daughter
is a senior at UW-Eau Claire.
Watching them grow up in Verona,
being taught by the finest teach-
ers around defines my career at
Verona.
Retirement plans: My wife and I
plan to spend more time together,
traveling, boating and enjoying
Wisconsin and Florida more.
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Bonnie Klassy, Savanna Oaks
Years of experience: 22 years – I began as a “shared”
teacher with the high school and middle school. I was
then “shared” between two middle schools. The last six
years I have been on leave 50 percent in order to teach
at UW-Madison in the School of Education. I have always
“been on the road.”
Hometown: New Glarus. My familial roots are Swiss.
Education: I have a major in Family and Consumer
Education, a minor in Health, and a Masters in Curriculum
and Instruction.
Why retiring now? Most educators will say it is not
a rational decision to retire, it is a heart decision. It is
just time for me to leave. I will continue my work with
UW-Madison preparing Health students to become Health
teachers.
Retirement plans: Continue to work part-time and be at
water’s edge in Door County.
Custodian: Every day a highlight for 31 years
Ken Anderson has seen
plenty in 31 years and four
different schools around the
Verona Area School District
as a custodian.
At the end of the year, the
current Verona Area High
School head custodian will
hang up his keys.
“It was time,” the 70-year-
old Anderson said last week
in his basement office at the
high school.
Anderson, who began as
a night custodian at VAHS
31 years ago, also spent time
at Country View and Stoner
Prairie elementary schools
and Savanna Oaks Middle
School. That gave him a
chance to first meet students
in their kindergarten years
and then see them grow up
when he returned to the high
school 10 years ago.
“It was fun … to see all the
students that remember the
things that we did in the ele-
mentary schools,” Anderson
said. “Cleaning the marks off
the floors, the garbage can
rides, it was fun to hear their
stories.”
While that was one of the
experiences Anderson said he
enjoyed in his time, he had a
tough time choosing anything
specific he’ll miss. It’s simply
“everything.”
“I liked every minute I was
here,” he said. “Every time
you turn the key to the door,
you never know what you’re
walking into.”
Trouti Winkelman, who
has spent 15 years in the dis-
trict and is a special education
assistant at VAHS, and Ruth
Olson, a cook at SP for eight
years, join Anderson as sup-
port staff on their way out at
the end of the year.
Photo by Scott Girard
Verona Area High School head custodian Ken Anderson sits at his desk in his basement office at VAHS.
Anderson will retire after 31 years as a district custodian at four different schools.
Also retiring: Sharon Smith, 19 years, Country View, who declined to take part in the
survey.
Other retirements
SPORTS
Jeremy Jones, sports editor
845-9559 x226 • ungsportseditor@wcinet.com

Thursday, May 29, 2014
Anthony Iozzo, assistant sports editor
845-9559 x237 • sportsreporter@wcinet.com
Fax: 845-9550
For more sports coverage, visit:
ConnectVerona.com
The
Verona Press
9
Boys tennis
Swinging into sectionals
Pletta plays to runner-up
finish at No. 2 singles
JEREMY JONES
Sports editor
Sophomore Alex Pletta knew mov-
ing from No. 4 singles to No. 2 this
season was going to be a big jump,
but just how big a jump was a sur-
prise to even him.
Pletta was the only Wildcat to
reach the championship match of last
week’s Big Eight Conference tourna-
ment inside Nielsen Tennis Stadium.
Though he cruised to the first
round on Tuesday, Pletta found
himself pushed to the brink in the
Photo by Jeremy Jones
Sophomore No. 2 singles player Alex Pletta tracks down a ball against Middleton’s Ben Luskin in their championship match last
Wednesday. Pletta dropped the match 6-1, 6-2 to finish runner-up. Verona finished third overall as a team.
Track and field
Olson, Queoff, Nameth earn titles
JEREMY JONES
Sports editor
Freshman Kailey Olson won
the high jump with a personal best
height of 5 feet, 2 inches Tuesday
at the WIAA Division 1 regional at
Verona Area High School.
“It was pretty amazing,” Olson
said. “I’ve been going at it all year,
jumping 4-10 pretty much every
time. To get above 5 feet and now
5-2 in consecutive weeks, it’s pretty
cool.”
Senior Lexy Richardson added a
second-place finish in the high jump.
“With Lexy’s back problems it
was cool to see her do really well
again,” Olson said. “It was nice just
to be able to cheer each other on.”
Though the girls high jump was
long since over, lightning led to
a nearly hour-long postponement
shortly before 7 p.m. with rain fol-
lowing 20 minutes after.
Freshman Sie’anna Mitchell
(13.28) finished second in the 100,
while teammate Dajah Jones fin-
ished just behind in third place.
Sophomore Autumn Gaillard (34)
PRed by nearly two feet to finish
second in the triple jump.
All four relays advanced as the
4x200 and 4x400 took second, while
the 4x800 and 4x100 took third.
Senior Nicole Zimbrick and Han-
nah Semmann finished third and
fourth in the pole vault.
Securing the final sectional berths
were: Europa Christoffel (long
jump), Lexy Alt (200) and the 4x200
relay.
The defending regional cham-
pions, Verona finished second to
Stoughton 138-103.
Boys
Senior Steven Queoff and junior
Ryan Nameth both secured regional
titles Tuesday evening.
Despite not performing his best,
Queoff still managed to earn him-
self a regional championship with a
height of 6-1 in the high jump.
“It always feels good to win, but
it would have almost felt better to
take second and perform my best,”
he said.
Queoff watched former teammate
Matt Dietlin advance to state where
he and rival Andy Keeler of Middle-
ton both placed in the top three. This
season Queoff is hoping for a taste of
his first state meet.
“I’ve competed with those guys
for a long time, and it would be nice
to achieve the same things,” Queoff
said. “But really it’s been a personal
goal of mine for a long time.”
While Nameth battled through
an injury-plagued sophomore sea-
son, the junior has already raced
to a runner-up finish at the WIAA
Photo by Jeremy Jones
Freshman Kailey Olson cleared a personal best 5 feet, 2 inches to win the high
jump Tuesday evening at the WIAA Division 1 Verona regional meet. Turn to Regionals/Page 12
Boys golf
Cats fall a
stroke short
of sectionals
ANTHONY IOZZO
Assistant sports editor
The Verona Area High
School boys golf team all
hit the tee on a playoff
hol e wi t h
sect i onal s
on the line
Tuesday in
a WI AA
Di v i s i o n
1 regi onal
at Pleasant
View Golf
Course.
One after one, five play-
ers from t he Wi l dcat s,
Waunakee and Sauk Prai-
rie battled it out to see
which team would survive
and move on.
Verona came close after
three pars and two bogeys
to finish with an 18 on the
extra hole. But Waunakee
did one better with a 17,
ending the Wildcats’ sea-
son.
“At the beginning of the
day, if you said we would
have a shot in a playoff for
a final spot, I would have
been OK with that,” head
coach Jon Rebholz said.
“But I st i l l t hought we
could make it in.”
Verona entered the club-
house in the first group
tied with Sauk Prairie with
a 341. With Middleton,
Madison Memorial, Wau-
nakee and Oregon left on
the course, the Wildcats
were going to need a little
luck to make a sectional
berth as a team.
After Middleton (308),
Madison Memorial (314)
and Oregon (323) clinched
spots. Waunakee shot a
341, forcing a three-team
tiebreaker hole.
One by one, 15 golfers
exchanged shots in one of
Turn to Golf/Page 10
Turn to Conference/Page 12
Team scores – Middleton
51, Madison West 31, Verona
23, Sun Prairie 22, Madison
Memorial 19 1/2, Beloit Memo-
rial 6, Janesville Craig 6, Madi-
son East 4 1/2, Madison La Fol-
lette 1 1/2.
Singles
No. 1 – Van Emburgh (M)
defeated Turrubiartes (SP) 6-1,
6-0. Third: Glasgow (MW)
defeated Treves (MM). No. 2
– Luskin (M) defeated Pletta
(V) 6-1, 6-2. Third: Molden-
hauer (SP) defeated Gunara-
tnam (MW) 6-3, 6-4. No. 3 –
Drenoske (SP) defeated Forest
(MW) 6-0, 6-4. Third: Conley
(V) defeated Jin (M) 3-6, 6-4,
7-6 (5). No. 4 – Veeramani (M)
defeated Carre (MW) 6-3, 6-4.
Third: Wiedholz (MM) 6-4,
6-3 defeated Sylla (SP).
Doubles
No. 1 St one/ Nei sen (M)
defeat ed Si monson/ Munns
(MW) 6-3, 6-2. Third: Gray/
Powell (MM) defeated Hutch-
croft/Yan 7-5, 6-0. No. 2 –
Bellisimo/Biggs (M) defeated
Morgan/Willauer (MW) 6-3,
6-2. Third: Bogost/Vreden-
bregt (MM) defeated Branden-
burg/Popovich (JP) 6-0, 6-0.
No. 3 – Webber/Markel (M)
defeated Corkery/Graf (MW)
6-4, 2-6, 7-5. Third: Pederson/
Gross (V) defeated Amundson/
Howell (JP) 3-6, 6-3, 6-2.
For more photos
from conference
and regionals
ungphotos.
smugmug.
com
10
May 29, 2014 The Verona Press ConnectVerona.com
the rarest of tiebreakers,
and pars by sophomore
Ni ck Mel and, freshman
Wi l l Zunker and j uni or
Joey McCormick helped
put Verona in contention.
Seni ors John Tacket t
and Riley Schmitz both
bogeyed the playoff hole,
and it was a tough end to
their high school careers,
as both finished with 83s
for the tournament and did
not move on as individuals.
“I f eel bad f or t he
seni ors, ” Rebhol z sai d.
“You want to go out and
let the seniors play as long
as possible. John has been
a warrior this year, and
Riley has had a couple of
good rounds too.
“Tackett put up some
unbelievable rounds this
year. Ri l ey had a ni ce
stretch and played great at
the Morgan Stanley Invite.
That group of golfers there
... that is a really impres-
sive finish for him.”
The future does seem
bri ght for t he Wi l dcat s
with the experience gained
by the younger golfers, and
it was an interesting way to
end the season.
“Although we are not
moving on, it is a pretty
neat experience, for the
younger guys especially,
to be put in the pressure
cooker like that. I am sure
if you asked all the guys on
the tee of the playoff, there
voices would have been
trembling a little bit.”
Zunker shot an 84, and
McCormick finished Vero-
na’s scoring with a 91.
Meland shot a 95.
“I think any playoff golf
– whether it is an extra
hole or the regionals itself
– is really helpful for the
young guys, ” Rebhol z
said. “There is an elevated
sense of urgency probably.
Just to get a taste of that is
going to be beneficial in
the long run.”
The individuals moving
on to sectionals with Mid-
dleton, Memorial, Oregon
and Waunakee are Sauk
Prairie juniors Darrin Puls-
fus (77) and Jack Rauner
(81) and Stoughton senior
Max Fergus (82) and Sam
Anderson (78).
Big Eight meet
The Wildcats had their
work cut out for t hem-
selves if they were going
to crack the top 4 at the
Big Eight Conference meet
Tuesday at Evansville Golf
Course.
The Wi l dcat s, whi ch
took third place with a 341,
were up against Middleton
(313) and Madison Memo-
rial (343), two teams that
were consistently in the
low 300s-320s this season,
Beloit Memorial (331) and
Janesville Parker (367).
Verona did have a bet-
ter nine-hole average than
Parker (171.25- 175.95)
coming in but were in the
second group due to dual
conference record. The
Wildcats were able to jump
the Vikings and the Spar-
tans into third.
Tackett led the way with
an 82 – just missing the top
10 by a scorecard playoff
– while McCormick and
Zunker each added an 86.
Schmitz followed with an
87.
Austin Lois shot a 101,
but his score didn’t count
for the team.
The t op 10 i ndi vi du-
als were: Beloit’s Kolton
Kelley (74), Middleton’s
Emmett Herb (76), Mid-
dleton’s Joey Levin (78),
Middleton’s Brady Thom-
as, Craig’s Nolan Moran
(79), Madison Memorial’s
Br yce Dani el son ( 79) ,
Middleton’s Josh Haunty
(81), Parker’s John Milner
(81), Beloit’s John Pol-
glaze (81) and East’s Nils
Arneson (82).
The all-conference team
is expected to be selected
Thursday.
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Baseball
Cats drop three games
ANTHONY IOZZO
Assistant sports editor
The Verona Area High
School baseball team had a
tough week, dropping games
to Janesville Parker, 8-3,
Beaver Dam, 4-3 and Madi-
son East, 9-5.
Verona finishes the regu-
lar season with two games
this week. It travels to Man-
sfield Stadium to take on
Madison West at 5 p.m.
Thursday and travels to Fire-
man’s Park in Cottage Grove
to take on Monona Grove at
5 p.m. Friday.
Parker 8, Verona 3
A five-run third inning
was too much to overcome
for the Wildcats last Thurs-
day at Riverside Park.
Verona scored a run in
the second, third and fifth
innings for its only runs.
Sophomor e Keat on
Knueppel hit an RBI sin-
gle to score junior David
Rogowski in the top of the
fifth to cut Janesville’s lead
to 5-3. The hit also loaded
the bases with no out.
The Wildcats failed to
score again, however, as two
strikeouts and a fly out ended
the inning.
Senior John Moynihan has
an RBI walk in the third, and
junior Brodie Roehrig hit an
RBI sacrifice fly in the sec-
ond.
Moynihan picked up the
loss. He went six inning and
allowed three earned runs on
nine hits. He struck out seven
and walked three.
Collin Powers was the
winner for Parker. He went
five innings and allowed
three earned runs on three
hits. He struck out six and
walked seven.
Darin Brewster picked up
the save. He struck out four
in two innings of relief.
Beaver Dam 4, Verona 3
Verona tied Beaver Dam
with two runs in the top of
the fourth last Friday, and
it tied the game again in the
fifth with a run. But that was
all the offense the Wildcats
could muster up in the loss.
Moynihan singled in
senior Mitch Flora to knot
the game at 3-all in the fifth,
but Beaver Dam retook the
Golf: Wildcats grab third in the Big Eight meet
Continued from page 9
Photo by Anthony Iozzo
(Clockwise from above), fresh-
man Will Zunker tees off on the
16th hole Thursday, May 22, at
the Big Eight Conference golf
meet at Evansville Golf Course;
senior John Tackett chips to
the green on the ninth hole and
senior Riley Schmitz tees off on
the 13th hole.
The Wildcats took third at the
conference meet with a 341.
Turn to Baseball/Page 11
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May 29, 2014 The Verona Press ConnectVerona.com
11
lead in the bottom half of the
inning with an RBI single by
Sam White to score Quinn
McCallum.
Knueppel picked doubled
in sophomore Ben Rortvedt
in the fourth for the Wildcats’
first run, and senior Ryan
Pynnonen hit an RBI sacrifice
fly to score Knueppel.
That tied the game at 2, but
Beaver Dam squeezed anoth-
er run home in the bottom of
the fourth on an RBI single
by Tyler Budde that scored
Anthony Schumann.
Junior Jake Toman picked
up the loss. He allowed three
earned runs on nine hits in 4
1/3 innings. He struck out one
and walked three.
Junior Tekoa Whitehead
struck out three and walked
one in 1 2/3 innings of score-
less relief.
McCallum picked up the
win for Beaver Dam. He
pitched 2 2/3 innings and
allowed a hit. He struck out
three.
Matt Berg started for Bea-
ver Dam. He went 4 1/3
innings and allowed three
earned runs on four hits. He
walked four and struck out
six.
East 9, Verona 5
The Wildcats hosted Madi-
son East on Tuesday and
dropped the Big Eight Confer-
ence game 9-5.
The game was called in the
sixth due to poor field con-
ditions created by thunder-
storms that rolled through the
area.
Verona cut a 7-2 deficit to
7-5 in the bottom of the sec-
ond but the offense stopped
there.
Senior Tony Granick sin-
gled in Rogowski to start the
scoring in the second, and
Flora scored on an error.
Moynihan later hit a sacri-
fice fly to score Granick.
East started with two runs
in the first, but the Wildcats
were able to tie the game in
the bottom of the inning.
Flora and Granick scored
on an error.
Pynnonen picked up the
loss. Pynnonen allowed five
earned runs on six hits in one
inning. He struck out two and
walked one.
Connor Volker finished
the game. Volker went five
innings and allowed an earned
run on five hits. He struck out
four and walked four.
Cameron Cratic picked up
the win for the Purgolders.
Cratic pitched 5 1/3 innings
and allowed an earned run on
five hits. He walked three and
struck out one.
Lady Cats clinch Big 8 title, earn No. 1 seed
JEREMY JONES
Sports editor
Verona softball suffered
its first Big Eight Confer-
ence loss last week, but
bounced back with a vic-
tory to secure the title out-
right last Thursday.
Following the team’s
first loss earlier in the day,
Northern Illinois-bound
recruit Emma Ray, tossed
seven solid innings in the
nightcap to help the Wild-
cats officially lock up the
Big Eight Conference title
outright with a 1-0 vic-
tory.
Whitmus, who was hit-
less on the night up to
the seventh, knocked the
game-winning run to cen-
ter field with one out in
the bottom of the seventh.
Katie Keyes, who came
on to run for Bea Kealy
following a walk, scored
the winning run,
Ne wma n , a Dr a k e
recruit, struckout seven
and scattered two hits over
6 1/3 innings in the loss.
Verona fell 2-1 to the
Lancers earlier in the day.
Nicole Newman struck
out 13 to go along with
seven hi t s i n t he wi n.
Newman fought through
a bases-loaded jam in the
top of the seventh and then
scored on a two-rout RBI
single by Amy Lazendorf
in the bottom of the sev-
enth.
Lanzendorf also doubled
for the Lancers, while Ray
went 3-for-4 off Newman.
Ra y t ook t he l os s ,
striking out seven, while
allowing three hits and
four wal ks over 6 2/ 3
innings.
Verona 12,
Beloit Memorial 3
Verona closed out the
regular season with a 12-3
victory over the Purple
Knights on Saturday at
Krueger Park in Beloit.
Having Beloit Memo-
rial’s Senior Night ruined
by Tue s da y’ s s hoot -
ing incident, the Purple
Knights returned to the
s ame venue Sat ur day
looking to upset Verona.
The only firepower dis-
played on Saturday were
t hose of t he Wi l dcat s’
bats. Verona scored four
runs in the first inning
Bel oi t managed onl y
t wo hi t s of f Ver ona’ s
Shannon Whitmus — sin-
gles by Lindsey Soria and
Taylor Mathews, who also
belted a sacrifice fly.
Top- s e e de d Ve r ona
(18-2 overall) hosts ninth-
seeded Tomah (8-12) at
Country View Elementary
at 5 p.m. Thursday.
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NO TRASH PICKUP ON MEMORIAL DAY!
Residential Trash & Recycling Customers:
HAPPY MEMORIAL DAY!
Residents normally serviced the
week of May 26th-May 30th will be
serviced one day later than their
normal pickup day.
City of Fitchburg · City of Middleton ·
DSI/Veridian/HOA’s · Town of Dunn · Town of Pleasant
Springs · Town of Verona · Village of Arena · Village of
Belleville · Village of Brooklyn · Village of McFarland ·
Village of Oregon · Village of Shorewood Hills · Village
of Waunakee
www.pellitteri.com
(608) 257-4285
NO TRASH PICKUP ON MEMORIAL DAY!
Residential Trash & Recycling Customers:
HAPPY MEMORIAL DAY!
Residents normally serviced the
week of May 26th-May 30th will be
serviced one day later than their
normal pickup day.
City of Fitchburg · City of Middleton ·
DSI/Veridian/HOA’s · Town of Dunn · Town of Pleasant
Springs · Town of Verona · Village of Arena · Village of
Belleville · Village of Brooklyn · Village of McFarland ·
Village of Oregon · Village of Shorewood Hills · Village
of Waunakee
www.pellitteri.com
(608) 257-4285
NO TRASH PICKUP ON MEMORIAL DAY!
Residential Trash & Recycling Customers:
City of Fitchburg · City of Middleton · DSI/Veridian/HOAs
Town of Dunn · Town of Pleasant Springs · Town of Verona
Village of Arena · Village of Belleville · Village of Brooklyn
Village of McFarland · Village of Oregon
Village of Shorewood Hills · Village of Waunakee
Residents normally serviced the
week of May 26th-May 30th will be
serviced one day later than their
normal pickup day.
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VERONA AREA SCHOOL DISTRICT
CITIZEN BUDGET INPUT SESSION
A Citizen Budget Input Session for
the 2014-15 Verona Area School
District budget will be held on
June 3rd, 2014. The meeting will
begin at 5:30 pm in the Board
Room of the District Administra-
tion Building, 700 N. Main Street,
Verona.
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Continued from page 10
Baseball: Verona ties Beaver Dam twice but can’t pull ahead in 4-3 loss
Softball
Photo by Todd K. Olsen
Senior Emma Ray helped Verona hold off Madison La Follette 1-0
last Thursday to give the Wildcats the Big Eight Conference title
outright.
Girls soccer
Wildcats clinch a spot in
the top four of the Big 8
ANTHONY IOZZO
Assistant sports editor
The Verona Area High
School girls soccer team
kept its hopes of sharing a
Big Eight Conference title
alive with a 1-1 tie at Madi-
son West last Thursday.
The Wildcats (9-6-3 over-
all, 5-1-2 conference) are
behind Madison Memorial
(6-8-3, 6-0-2), West (6-0-2,
9-1-3) and Middleton (11-5,
7-1).
The fifth-place Purgold-
ers, which Verona closes
the regular season against at
5 p.m. Thursday at Lussier
Stadium, is 5-3 in confer-
ence (6-7-1 overall).
Senior forward Felicia
Retrum scored the Wild-
cats’ lone goal in the 61st
minute with an assist to
j uni or f or war d Ar i ana
Makuch.
The 1-0 lead was short-
lived however as West’s
Rachel Peaslee tied the
game a little more than a
minute later.
Verona seni or goal i e
Madison Westfall and West
goalie Meredith Thompson
stopped everything else to
preserve the tie through two
overtimes.
Both goalies finished with
eight saves.
Regi onal s begi n on
Thursday, June 5, wi t h
games and t i mes t o be
announced.
The seedi ng meet i ng
results were not available by
the Verona Press’ Tuesday
deadline. Information will
be in next week’s paper.
For i mmedi at e i nfor-
mation on Verona’s seed
when i t i s announced,
go to Twitter and follow
@UNG_AIozzo.
Lacrosse
Girls win twice last week
The Verona Area High
School girls lacrosse team
defeated Middleton 13-10
and Oregon 15-3 last week.
The Wildcats travel to
Waunakee at 5 p.m. Thurs-
day to close out the regular
season.
Verona 13, Middleton 10
Junior Madison Jeddeloh
led Verona with four goals,
and junior Bethany Rus-
sell added three more as the
Wildcats held off Middle-
ton on May 20.
Junior Jenna Butler added
two goals and two assists,
while junior Sammy Sey-
mour scored a goal and an
assist. Junior Rachel Ken-
nedy and sophomore Aman-
da Best also scored goals.
Senior Rachel Romens col-
lected eight saves.
Verona 15, Oregon 3
Verona avenged an ear-
lier loss to Oregon last
Thursday, led by Jeddeloh
(3 goals, 4 assists), Butler
(3G, 2A) and Butler (3G).
Junior Sarah Guy and
Russell each added two
goals, and sophomore Abby
Filsinger picked up a goal
and an assist.
Seymour also scored a
goal. Romens finished with
13 saves.
Home Talent League
Cavaliers improve to 5-0 in Western Section
JEREMY JONES
Sports editor
Verona Home Talent secured a
pair of Western Section wins last
week, defeating Mount Horeb/Pine
Bluff.
The Caval i ers ki cked off t he
Memorial Day weekend with a 10-7
wins over Mount Horeb/Pine Bluff.
Justin Tune hit a pair of two-
run singles and David Lund added
a two-run home run for the host
Cavaliers.
Cole Kroncke got the win on the
mound, striking out seven over sev-
en innings. He allowed two earned
runs on eight hits.
Danny Koss (2-for-4), Landon
Flora (2-for-4), Klayton Brandt
(2-for-3), Lund (2-for-3) and Tune
(2-for-5) all collected multiple hits
in the win.
Ben Wallace worked six innings,
allowing three singles and striking
out 11 Monday as Verona cruised
to a 6-0 win over Dodgeville.
Koss ( 4- f or - 5) si ngl es t hr ee
times, doubled and dove in two
runs for the Cavaliers.
Justin Scanlon (2-for-5) and Der-
ek Murphy (2-for-4) also collected
multiple hits.
Verona hosts Sun Prairie in Cen-
tral Night League action at 7 p.m.
Thursday.
The Cavaliers then hosts Shulls-
burg/Benton at 1 p.m. Sunday.
Who wants to see a picture?
Visit
ungphotos.smugmug.com/VeronaPress
to share, download and order prints
of your favorite photos from
local community and sports events.
All orders will be mailed
directly to you!
12
May 29, 2014 The Verona Press ConnectVerona.com
semifinals before eventually
falling 6-1, 6-2 to Middle-
ton senior Ben Luskin.
“I think it’s good that I
reached the championship
match,” Pletta said. “I had
a tough match earlier in the
day against Sun Prairie, so
I was really glad I got the
chance to play in the cham-
pionship.”
Pletta survived a 7-5, 7-5
battle against Sun Prairie
senior Keegan Moldenhauer
in the semifinals, opened
the tournament by blow-
ing past Beloit sophomore
Drew Collins 6-1, 6-1.
Sophomore No. 3 sin-
gles player Patrick Conley,
seeded f our t h, cr ui sed
through a first-round match
against Madison Memorial’s
Alessandro Puglielli before
droppi ng a hard-fought
three-setter against Sun Prai-
rie top-seeded Yuri Dreno-
ske 3-6, 6-3, 6-2.
Conley went on to defeat
third-seeded junior Dan Jin
of Middleton 3-6, 6-4, 7-6
(5) in the third-place match.
Drenoske went on t o
become the only non-Mid-
dleton player to claim a title.
Drenoske took the No. 3 sin-
gles champion 6-0, 6-4 over
Madison West senior Gabe
Forest.
Fourth-seeded Verona
senior Trent Pederson and
junior Christian Gross added
a third-place finish against
Janesville Parker juniors
Sam Amundson and David
Howell at No. 3 doubles.
Senior No. 1 singles play-
er Philip Rudnitzky fell 6-1,
6-4 against Madison Memo-
rial’s Isaac Treves in the
opening round. Rudnitzky
went on to win his next three
matches on the consolation
championship.
Sophomores Matt Bless-
ing and Mitch Kealy took a
similar path, rattling off two
wins after a 6-4, 7-5 loss to
Janesville Parker in the first
round.
Verona’s No. 1 doubles
team of Jackson Hutchcroft
and Johnny Yan fell 7-5, 6-0
to Madison Memorial senior
Andy Gray and junior Doug
Powell in their third-place
match.
Freshman Jake VanEm-
burgh dropped only two
games on his way one of
the Cardinals six conference
titles. Van Emburgh cruised
to a 6-1, 6-0 win over Sun
Prairie junior Iram Turrubi-
artes.
Middleton (51) ran away
with the team title behind
wins at No. 2 and 4 singles.
The Cardinals went on to
sweep all three doubles
flights.
Madison West (39) fin-
ished second overall while
Verona (23) placed third –
one point ahead of Sun Prai-
rie.
“I thought our guys played
well for the most part, but
they played young,” Wild-
cats head coach Rick Engen
said.
Madison Memorial
subsectional
Ve r ona r e t ur ne d t o
Nielsen Tennis Stadium on
Tuesday for the Madison
Memorial subsectional.
Rudnitzky (11-13) and
Pletta (18-4) advanced on to
sectionals.
J ohnny Yan/ J acks on
Hutchcroft (12-11) also
moved on at No. 1 doubles.
The Wildcats travel to
Lake Geneva Badger for
sectionals at 8:30 a.m. where
Madison West, Oregon, Sun
Prairie and Verona will be
among the favorites.
“It’s going to be tough,”
Engen said. “There are a lot
of good players in that sub-
sectional.”
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EARLY DEADLINES
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Division 1 state cross country meet. And
he’s shooting for similar results at state.
First, however, Nameth had to take
care of business at regionals blowing the
field away.
“It’s great to repeat as the regional
champion,” he said. “Being healthy
this season, I certainly thought that was
within my reach.”
Both Nameth, who will also run on
the 4x800 at sectionals, and Queoff
will be among the top athletes in their
respective events come Friday in Lake
Geneva.
Fellow distance runner, Ben Feller
finished second in the 800, while the
4x800 also matched the finish.
Verona advanced a pair in both
throwing events as senior Adam Stiner
and freshman Austin Schwartz took
third and fourth in the shot put and
Stiner (141-4) and junior Noah Roberts
finished second and fourth in the discus.
Freshman Jack Herkert, who had tied
the freshman high jump record earlier
this season, broke it with a height of 6-1
– good for second place.
Alec Shiva placed in the mile, while
fellow sophomore Brady Traeder
advanced in the two mile.
Junior Cameron Tindall added a third-
place finish in the 100.
Taking fourth place as the final sec-
tional qualifiers were: seniors Steven
Hartnett (110 & 300 hurdles), junior
Jacob Auman (triple jump), junior Cam-
eron Tindall (100 dash), the 4x200 and
4x400 relays.
Verona (150) dominated the meet,
scoring 37 more points than runner-up
Janesville Craig.
“We have a lot of depth, but you need
to have a lot of top-end talent to advance
through sectionals, so we’ll see how
things go on Friday,” Wildcats head
coach Joff Pedretti said.
Regionals: Wildcats boys track and field team’s depth carries them to regional title
Conference: Wildcats finish third overall
Continued from page 9
Photos by Jeremy Jones
Above, Ben Feller finished runner-up in the 800-meter run Tuesday evening at
the WIAA Division 1 Verona regional meet; (left) Europa Christoffel advanced
on to this Friday’s WIAA Janesville Parker sectional in the long jump.
Continued from page 9
May 29, 2014 The Verona Press ConnectVerona.com
13
Legals
NOTICE OF LIQUOR
LICENSE RENEWALS
Public notice is hereby given
that renewal applications have been
received for Class A and Class B Fer-
mented Malt Beverage and Intoxicating
Liquor licenses, and Class C Wine li-
censes for the license period beginning
July 1, 2014 and ending June 30, 2015
from the following establishments in the
City of Verona:
American Legion Mason-Lindsay
Post #385, 207 Legion St.; Agent: Rich-
ard Zurbuchen
Angel, LLC dba Cuco’s Mexican
Restaurant, 1050 North Edge Trail;
Agent: Lazaro De Vicente
Brews Brothers Pub, LLC, 611
Hometown Circle; Agent: Steven Day
Cahoots, LLC dba Cahoots Bar, 102
W Railroad St.; Agent: Joshua Jiru
Edelweiss Cheese Authentic WI,
LLC dba Edelweiss Cheese Shop, 202 W
Verona Ave.; Agent: Kathleen Workman
FK&P LLC, dba Gray’s Tied House,
950 Kimball Lane; Agent: Sean Foley
Francois Oil Co, Inc. dba Francois
Oil Convenience Center, 103 Prairie
Oaks Dr.; Agent: Steven Merry
I & U Mart, LLC, 101 E Verona Ave.;
Agent: Uran Mezezi
Kwik Trip Inc. dba Kwik Trip #456,
2145 County Rd PB; Agent: Naomi Olayo
Kwik Trip Inc. dba Kwik Trip #837,
400 E Verona Ave.; Agent: Carol Cutler
LBO Inc. dba 5th Quarter Sports
Bar, 161 Horizon Drive Ste#110; Agent:
James Latsch
M&K Kubly, LLC dba Tuvalu Coffee-
house & Gallery, 300 S Main St.; Agent:
Michelle Kubly
Madison Oil, LLC dba Verona Li-
quor, 103 S Main St.; Agent: Lakhvir
Kauer
Madison Epicureans, LLC dba
Pasqual’s Cantina, 100 Cross Country
Rd; Agent: Julie Mirenda
Miller & Sons, Inc. dba Miller &
Sons Supermarket, 210 S Main St.;
Agent: Carlton Miller
MIRK, LLC dba The Draft House,
1010 Enterprise Dr.; Agent: Mike Frank-
lin
Monte’s Grill & Pub, Inc. dba Mon-
te’s Grill & Pub 608 A W Verona Ave.;
Agent: Monte Stoleson
JPM Investments, LLC dba Dok’s
Klassik Tavern, 410 W Verona Ave.;
Agent: Bruce Meier
Tommaso Vincenzo, LLC dba Vin-
cenzo BP, 991 Kimball Lane; Agent:
Courtney Weiss
Walgreen Co. dba Walgreens
#01159, 104 N Main St.; Agent: Michael
Waldvogel
Applications will be considered on
June 9, 2014 by the City of Verona Pub-
lic Safety & Welfare Committee at 5:30
p.m. and by the City of Verona Common
Council at 7:00 p.m. at City Hall, 111 Lin-
coln Street, Verona, WI.
Kami Scofeld, City Clerk.
Published: May 29, 2014
WNAXLP
* * *
TOWN OF VERONA
REGULAR TOWN
BOARD MEETING
TUESDAY, JUNE 3, 2014
6:30 P.M.
TOWN HALL,
335 N. NINE MOUND ROAD,
VERONA, WI 53593-1035
1. Call To Order
2. Pledge of Allegiance
3. Approval of Agenda
4. Announcements
5. Public Comment - This section of
the meeting provides the opportunity for
comment from persons in attendance
on items not listed below over which
this governing body has jurisdiction.
Comments on matters not listed on this
agenda could be placed on a future Plan
Commission meeting agenda.
6. Unfnished business
A. Discussion and action re: ordi-
nance establishing a municipal court
and an agreement with the Town of
Madison for the operation of a munici-
pal court.
7. New business
A. Public Hearing, Discussion, and
Action - applications for liquor licenses
from Blackhawk Bowhunters and Ole
Duffers Pub
B. Approval of operators licenses
for the year ending 6/30/2015
C. Discussion and action re: bids
on 2008 Ford 550
8. Reports
A. Plan Commission:
i. Discussion and Action re: CSM
#9601 dated May 12, 2014 for 7226
Pine Row as a follow up to a rezoning
approve in December 2013 for Sharon
Edwards.
ii. Discussion and Action re: CSM
#9591 dated April 14, 2014 for 062-0608-
131-9690-2 on Tonto Trail, submitted by
Russ Swiggum
iii. Discussion and Action re: CSM
Dated May 2, 2014 for property located
at 6583 Grandview Rd. submitted by
Ed Short for Dave Bischoff (Grandview
Properties).
iv. Discussion and Action re: Land
Use Change Application #2014-1 – dat-
ed March 7, 2014 for property located
at 6622 Sunset (60608-362-9070-3 and
0608-351-9500-5) submitted by Ron
Klass for Tony Heinrichs. The purpose
of the application is to allow for a pool,
pool house, and driveway through the
rezoning of 11.31 acres from A-1Ex to
RH3.
v. Discussion and Action re: Land
Use Change Application #2014-5 – Dated
May 1, 2014 for property located at 7711
Midtown Rd. submitted by Dane Barre of
Heartland Farm Sanctuary for Maxwell
Family LLC. The purpose of the applica-
tion is to allow for an animal sanctuary
for natural and educational purposes.
The application consists of a rezoning,
conditional use permit, and certifed
survey map.
vi. Update on blanket rezoning
B. Public Works:
i. Update re: Range Trail bidding
ii. Driveway permit for Tonto Trail
C. EMS:
D. Open Space and Parks:
E. Town Chair:
i. Update on conversations with
Fitchburg
ii. Discussion and action re: addi-
tional appointments to commissions
F. Supervisors:
G. Clerk/Treasurer:
i. Discussion and possible action
re: driveway ordinance
ii. Update on open book
H. Planner/Administrator:
i. Discussion of Dane County com-
post site closure
ii. Report on year to date expenses/
Action re: budget amendment for mu-
nicipal court related costs
9. Motion to go into closed session
per Wis. Stats. §19.85 (1) (c) to discuss a
possible staff beneft adjustment
10. Motion to return to open ses-
sion
11. Approval of payment of bills for
May
A. Status of funds for annuitant
health care
B. Return of drive escrow for 2646
Stardust Trail
12. Review of Building Permits, In-
spection Reports, Road Haul Permits,
and Right-of-Way Permits
13. Discussion and approval of min-
utes of the May 6th
14. Adjourn
Board agendas are published in the
Town’s offcial newspaper, The Verona
Press. Agendas are also posted at the
Town Hall, Miller & Sons Grocery, and
the Verona Public Library. If an agenda
is amended after publication, the offcial
sites for notice of the fnal version are
the Verona Public Library, Town Hall and
Miller & Sons Grocery.
If anyone having a qualifying dis-
ability as defned by the American with
Disabilities Act needs an interpreter,
materials in alternate formats, or other
accommodations to access these meet-
ings, please contact the Town of Verona
Clerk @ 608-845-7187 or jwright@town.
verona.wi.us. Please do so at least 48
hours prior to the meeting so that proper
arrangements can be made.
Other upcoming meetings include
Open Space and Parks Commission
on 6/4/2014 and Plan Commission
on 6/26/2014. Agendas will be posted
at the locations listed above and www.
town.verona.wi.us. Use the ‘subscribe’
feature on the Town’s website to receive
agendas and other announcements via
email. Notice is also given that a pos-
sible quorum could occur at this meet-
ing of the Plan Commission and/or Open
Space and Parks Commission, for the
purposes of information gathering only.
David K. Combs,
Town Chair, Town of Verona.
Posted: May 29, 2014
Published: May 29, 2014
WNAXLP
* * *
NOTICE APPLICATION
FOR 2014/2015
ALCOHOL LICENSES
Notice is hereby given, that the fol-
lowing applications to serve alcoholic
beverages in the Town of Verona have
been received, and are on fle in the Of-
fce of the Town Clerk. A public hearing
will be held on June 3, 2014 at 6:30 pm
to allow for comments regarding these
applications.
CLASS B BEER
Dale Goytowski, President d/b/a/
Blackhawk Bowhunters
2103 CTH PB in the Town of Verona
CLASS B BEER & CLASS B LI-
QUOR Susan Kaye Buchanan, President
d/b/a Ole Duffers Pub
1755 CTH PB in the Town of Verona
These applications are available for
inspection at the Verona Town Hall, 335
N. Nine
Mound Road between the hours of
8:00 a.m.& 2:00 p.m. M-F.
Tammy Dresser
Deputy Clerk/Treasurer, Town of Verona
Published: May 29, 2014
WNAXLP
* * *
OFFICIAL NOTICE
TO BIDDERS
2014 STREET
REHABILITATION PROJECT
CITY OF VERONA, WI
OWNER: Notice is hereby given by
the City of Verona, Wisconsin that it will
receive Sealed Bids for the 2014 Street
Rehabilitation Project.
PROJECT: The major work consists
of the following items: Approximately
4,165 lineal feet of curb and gutter re-
moval, 1,325 square yards of concrete
driveway approach removal, 1,205 cu-
bic yards of common excavation, 780
cubic yards undercut excavation, 1,750
tons of crushed aggregate base course,
2,916 lineal feet of 30” curb and gutter
machine replacement, 1,249 lineal feet
of 30” curb and gutter hand replace-
ment, 1,325 square yards of 7” concrete
approach, 1,500 tons of crushed stone
subgrade stabilization, 21,170 square
yards pulverize and reshape, 4,600 tons
of bituminous pavement, Type E-1, 59
lineal feet of 12” dia., RCP storm sewer,
2 each storm sewer inlets, erosion con-
trol and all appurtenant work.
PLANS AND SPECIFICATIONS: The
Bidding Documents are on fle for review
at the offce of the City Clerk, City Hall,
111 Lincoln Street, Verona, WI and at the
offce of the Director of Public Works,
410 Investment Court, Verona, WI.
Copies of the Bidding Documents
are available at www.questcdn.com.
Bidders may download the digital Plan
Documents for $10.00 non-refundable
payment by inputting Quest Project
#3325841 on the website’s project
search page. Please contact QuestCDN.
com at 952-233-1632 or info@questcdn.
com for assistance in free membership
registration, downloading, and working
with the digital project information. No
paper plan documents will be provided.
TIME: Sealed Bids will be received
until 10:00 A.M., June 5, 2014, in the of-
fce of the Director of Public Works, 410
Investment Court, Verona, Wisconsin. At
this time, all bids will be publicly opened
and read aloud.
BIDS: All Bids shall be sealed in an
envelope clearly marked “2014 Street
Rehabilitation Project”. The name and
address of the bidder shall be clearly
identifed on the outside of the enve-
lope.
BID SECURITY: A bid bond or cer-
tifed check, payable to the City of Ve-
rona, in the amount of not less than 5%
or more than 10% of the Bid shall ac-
company each Bid as a guarantee that
if the Bid is accepted, the bidder will
execute the contract and furnish 100%
performance and payment bonds within
10 days after notice of award of the con-
tract by the City.
WAGE SCALE: Each Contractor
or Subcontractor performing work on
the project shall be required to pay not
less than the prevailing wage rate on
the project as established by the State
of Wisconsin Department of Workforce
Development. Copies of these wage
rates are on fle in the offce of the City
Clerk and will be incorporated into the
contract documents.
BID REJECTION: The City reserves
the right to reject any and all Bids, to
waive any technicality, and to accept
any Bid which it deems advantageous to
the City’s best interest.
BID WITHDRAWAL: All Bids shall
remain subject to acceptance for a pe-
riod of 60 days after the time and date
set for the opening thereof.
Published by authority of the City of
Verona, Wisconsin
Jon H. Hochkammer,
Mayor
Kami Scofeld,
City Clerk
Published: May 22 and 29, 2014
WNAXLP
* * *
“It rapidly becomes
home at Sienna Crest.
Care is excellent and the
staf are family.”

-Alma
Resident
Memory Care
989 Park St. Oregon, WI
(608) 835-0000
Assisted Living
981 Park St. Oregon, WI
(608) 835-7781
Verona History
February
40 years ago
• The village and town boards gave
approval to buy eight acres from the
county for a community center. The
center was never built, but a fire sta-
tion was put on the land instead.
The plan at the time was to dedi-
cate about 5,000 square feet to village
and town administration and police,
about 10,000 square feet for the fire
station and another 3,000 square feet
for public meeting space.
The fire department, meanwhile,
opposed building a station there at
the time, because its location at the
east end of the village was considered
too far from the firefighters’ homes.
• The boys basketball team set an
all time scoring record in a 102-41
victory over DeForest.
• The Dane County Conservation
League gave a presentation to a
joint meeting of the village and town
boards about the Sugar River and
how it had been eroded away from
neglect.
• The county began holding a series
of meetings exploring the needs of
seniors as a result of an $80,000
appropriation in the county’s budget
for unspecified senior services.
• A representative from WHA met
with village officials to prepare them
for future cable television franchising
opportunities, informing them of the
expansion of cable and their rights in
making franchise agreements.
• Former Verona High School alge-
bra teacher Nelson Mackin celebrated
his 100th birthday.
• The Town of Verona began col-
lecting paper and metal for recycling,
while the village began collecting old
newspapers.
30 years ago
• The city approved a referendum
for the April ballot on whether to
pursue construction of a community
park east of the fire station on Lincoln
Street.
The referendum authorized the city
and town to borrow $275,000 each
to develop the land into a baseball
diamond, two softball diamonds, a
soccer field, a multipurpose building,
shelter and parking.
• St. Andrew Church celebrated
paying off its 19-year-old mortgage
with a “burning” ceremony.
The church, which had been found-
ed as a 25-family mission parish 66
years earlier by Fr. Andrew Mason,
had moved into its home on North
Main Street in 1965. It was origi-
nally named after Fr. Mason and later
switched to honor St. Andrew the
Apostle.
• The city approved the first phase
of a downtown revitalization study,
which was performed for free by
Ehlers and Associates of Minneapolis.
Ehlers, which is still the city’s finan-
cial adviser, used the study to look
into creating a tax-increment financ-
ing district downtown and explore
alternatives, with the hope of con-
tracting with the city on future phases
of the plan, which included paper-
work and public hearings for the TIF
district.
Meanwhile, the Verona Area
Chamber of Commerce, which
endorsed the plan, was working on
its own, complementary downtown
revitalization study.
• Verona residents Ken Anderson,
Fred Disch and Ken Herlein traveled
1,056 miles on snowmobiles -- to the
Michigan border at Hurley and back
again -- on a seven-day trip.
The three, aged between 63 and 72,
had planned the trip for several years,
waiting for the weather conditions to
be cooperative.
• The city banned the sale of liquor
within 300 feet of an entrance to
a school, hospital or church and
began reviewing the number of liquor
licenses in the city.
• The school board debated the
meaning of “paternity or adop-
tive proceedings” when a teacher
requested seven days off (five paid)
when his wife was to give birth.
Board members and the superinten-
dent argued that the contract referred
to legal proceedings, not childbirth.
• Verona’s Jacqui Rockweiler
was honored by the Verona Jaycee
Women for being one of 10
Outstanding Young Wisconsinites by
the state Jaycee club. The award rec-
ognized business, civic, political and
religious contributions.
• John and Dessy Ponti of Belleville
opened Dessy’s Burritos on West
Verona Avenue.
20 years ago
• Developer Doug Backus present-
ed a proposal for a small mall similar
to Hilldale on the 160 acre Horizon
property on the east side of the city.
The property later was centered
around the Post Office and Park
Printing and treated as an industrial
park but now features a mix of com-
mercial and retail properties.
• Community leader Bob Kaeher
died at 55. The Town Pump owner
had been president of the cham-
ber of commerce, commander of the
American Legion, general chairman
of the 1972 quasquicentennial cel-
ebration that begat Hometown Days,
organizer of the Verona Open golf
tournament and was instrumental
in establishing a Vietnam Veterans
memorial and the Hometown
Junction recreational area, which
included two sand volleyball courts,
three horseshoe pits and a shelter.
• The district eliminated special
needs screening from its annual kin-
dergarten welcome night.
Many parents had shown anxiety
over the screening, and administra-
tors determined special needs evalu-
ations could be made in other ways.
• The school board began looking
into creating a policy to regulate the
use of milk laden with bovine growth
hormone. The Monsanto-created
chemical, which became legal to use
in February, was designed to increase
milk production in cows.
Veterinarian Bill Resop, a school
board candidate, asked the board
to look into the matter and noted
that many other school districts had
banned the chemical.
• The parks commission debat-
ed possibly moving the annual
Hometown USA celebration away
from the area it had been held for
several years, the parkland south of
City Hall.
Among the options were Fireman’s
Park and Badger Prairie Park, but the
discussion didn’t last long because
of the extra expense involved. It now
has its own area east of City Hall,
called Festival Park.
•  A Madison city planner warned
that the cities of Madison and Verona
might some day touch around PD
and M. He noted that a consolidation
would stop Madison from growing
that way.
Two years later, the cities would
sign an agreement creating a “green”
belt at that PD-M intersection. The
cities are in talks to revise that agree-
ment now.
•  Hundreds of people toured
Verona’s new $1.8 million medical
facility, the Verona Family Medical
clinic at 524 W. Verona Ave.
The clinic later expanded and
moved to North Nine Mound Road,
and the building was repurposed for
a veterinary clinic and now is empty.
• Future Olympian Neil Walker
swam to a state record 100 back-
stroke time of 51.54 seconds to win
the Southern Swim Conference title.
• Ice Inc. presented preliminary
plans for a $1.1 million hockey rink
to the Plan Commission. What would
become the Eagles Nest showed
seating for 700 on the main floor and
250 in the mezzanine.
• Kenneth and Viola Zahler cel-
ebrated their 50th anniversary.
• The official expansion of the flood
plain area around the Badger Mill
Creek was the source of some con-
cern.
10 years ago
• Construction crews began tear-
ing down all the structures on the
northwest corner of Main Street and
Verona Avenue to make way for a
Walgreens and an extra turn lane
from Main to Verona.
The casualties were one of Verona’s
oldest buildings, a former Physicians
Plus clinic, several smaller buildings
and a house.
Several people, including repre-
sentatives of Habitat for Humanity,
gathered as much of the material for
recycling as they could.
Other major projects in a heavy
construction season included the
expansion of World of Variety and
the demolition of the oldest portion of
the Badger Prairie Health Care Center.
• Construction on the Verona
Athletic Complex, later named the
MAC Sports Center and now again
the VAC (Verona Athletic Center), a
58,000-square-foot facility with four
basketball courts.
• With the impending construc-
tion of Walgreens, the Verona Press
moved its offices to the back of the
120 W. Verona Ave. building it had
been occupying.
• Verona police cars replaced their
old rotating roof lights with low-
profile, low-energy LED models.
• Police and district officials inter-
vened in a plot in which a Badger
Ridge Middle School student had
hired two Verona Area High School
students to attack another BRMS
student.
• A Madison man was charged
with writing more than $1,200 worth
of bad checks to two Verona busi-
nesses.
– Jim Ferolie
14 - The Verona Press - May 29, 2014
140 LOST & FOUND
FOUND SET of keys on Racetrack Rd
Stoughton call to identify. 608-873-7639
143 NOTICES
WCAN (Wisconsin Community Ad Net-
work) and/or the member publications
review ads to the best of their abil-
ity. Unfortunately, many unscrupulous
people are ready to take your money!
PLEASE BE CAREFUL ANSWERING
ANY AD THAT SOUNDS TOO GOOD
TO BE TRUE! For more information, or to
file a complaint regarding an ad, please
contact The Department of Trade, Agri-
culture & Consumer Protection 1-800-
422-7128 (wcan)
HERO MILES to find out more about
how you can help our service members,
veterans and their families in their time of
need, visit the Fisher House website at
www.fisherhouse.org (wcan)
WANTED TICKETS to Oregon High
School graduating class ceremony. June
8th in the gym. 608-770-4491
163 TRAINING SCHOOLS
DENTAL ASSISTANT Be one in just 10
Saturdays! WeekendDentalAssistant.
com Fan us on Facebook! Next class
begins 9/6/2014. Call 920-730-1112
Appleton (Reg. WI EAB) (wcan)
320 AIRCRAFT PARTS & SERVICE
AIRCRAFT HANGER at Baraboo/Dells
Airport. DLL,
Post-war, Quonset-style T-hanger.
New paint, some remodeling, heated.
$10,900/OBO. Everett 608-356-5324
340 AUTOS
1998 FORD MUSTANG Bright blue,
White leather interior. 4 speed. New
transmission. Needs work. Good engine.
$1000/obo. 608-669-2243
DONATE YOUR CAR, BOAT or Motor-
cycle to Rawhide. Donate before Decem-
ber 31st for a tax deduction and help a
life in your local wisconsin community.
888-653-2729 (wcan)
342 BOATS & ACCESSORIES
$2,000,000 LIQUIDATION @ Boat
World. Fininacing Available on over 700
new and used Pontoons, Fishing Boats,
Deck Boats, Ski-Boats, Bass & Walleye
Boats, Cuddys, Cruisers up to 35 Feet
& Outboards @ the Guaranteed Best
Prices! Crownline, Axis, Malibu, Triton,
Alumacraft, Mirrorcraft, Misty Harbor
& Crest Pontoons. American Marine &
Motorsports Super Center, Schawano.
Where Dreams come true. 866-955-2628
www.americanmarina.com (wcan)
SHOREMASTER DOCK & LIFT
Headquarters. New & Used. We do it
all.Delivery/Assembly/Install/Removal
American Marine & Motorsports,
Schawano = Save
866-955-2628 (wcan)
355 RECREATIONAL VEHICLES
ATVS SCOOTERS & Go-Karts. Youth
ATV's & Scooters (80mpg) @ $49/mo.
Sport & 4x4 Atv's @ $69/mo. Ameri-
can Marine & Motorsports, Schawano
=Save= 866-955-2628 www.american-
marina.com (wcan)
360 TRAILERS
TRAILERS @ LIQUIDATION Pricing.
Boat, ATV, Sled or Pontoons. 2 or 4
Place/Open or Enclosed. American
Marine, Shawano 866-955-2628 www.
americanmarina.com (wcan)
THEY SAY people don’t read those little
ads, but YOU read this one, didn’t you?
Call now to place your ad, 873-6671 or
835-6677.
402 HELP WANTED, GENERAL
APARTMENT COMMUNITY in
Verona has two positions:
Grounds Keeper-Assistant
Maintenance. Full time. Landscaping
maintenance, light building
maintenance, painting and cleaning.
Leasing Agent: Flexible part time.
Will handle all aspects of leasing
apartments. Experience in sales or
hospitality is helpful. Strong customer
service a must. Please call
608-845-7255.

SKI AND Furniture Service Person.
We are now accepting applications
for a part time and full time service
position working in our warehouse in
summer and our ski shop in winter.
This is an entry level position which
includes: unloading shipments,
assembling furniture, assisting on
deliveries, along with ski tuning and
repairs. Individual should have some
downhill skiing experience and a good
driving record. Chalet is a fun and
friendly place to work and we have
great appreciation for our employees
and customers. These positions are
year round jobs with flexible shifts on
weekdays and weekends. We offer
a generous starting salary with paid
training, free skiing at local hills, a
clean non-smoking work environment
and opportunities for advancement.
Apply in person at: Chalet Ski & Patio
5252 Verona Rd, Madison, Wl 53711
608-273-8263

CARRIERS NEEDED for delivery
of WSJ to Oregon/Stoughton area.
Must be available early a.m., 7 days
a week, dependable vehicle. Route
earns between $950. to $1200/month.
For more information call
Pat 608-212-7216
MECHANIC WANTED Part time to
full time. Flexible Hours. Call or text
608-576-5607(corrected#)
CLASSIFIED AD DEADLINE IS Noon
Friday for the Verona Press unless
changed because of holiday work sched-
ules.
MEDICAL-PHLEB-MA-RN-LPN-MT-
MEDIC NEED recent Venipuncture. Do
Mobile Insurance Exams/Draws. Set you
own appt! Good $. www.appslive.com,
appswi@bizwi.rr.com (wcan)
WANTED:
Part-Time Teacher to Tutor
Students at Various Grade Levels.
Please Call Norland Learning Center
608-497-1299
PART-TIME CARE SPECIALISTS ~
ALL SHIFTS.
Sienna Crest Assisted Living, Inc.
is looking for dedicated and caring
individuals to join our team of
compassionate care staff. We offer
competitive wages designed to
attract and retain qualified individuals.
Training provided. Preferred
candidate will have some assisted
living experience. Applicants may
download an application at www.
siennacrest.com or stop by to pick
one up.
Completed applications should be
returned to the Manager at your
choice location:
Sienna Crest, Attn:
Lois Gilbert, 981 Park St, Oregon,
WI 53575 608-835-7781 or Sienna
Meadows, Attn:
Chris Kiesz, 989 Park St., Oregon,
WI 53575
608-835-0000 EOE

423 WORK WANTED
COMPUTER REPAIR in your home.
Worried about your XPMachine? I will fix
it so you are safe, clean and get speed
back. Back up service available. $65/
hr. 25+ years experience. Raoul 608-
698-1350
$10 off seniors and veterans.
449 DRIVER, SHIPPING
& WAREHOUSING
LOOKING FOR Experienced CDL semi-
driver. Our business has expanded. We
are adding new equipment. Must be
professional, courteous and have clean
MVR. Runs from Madison area to Ari-
zona and S. California. No touch freight,
paid mileage and insurance. Serious
inquries only. 608-516-9697
OTR DRIVERS WANTED
Above Average Mileage Pay
Performance and Safety BONUSES!
Health/Dental/Vision/HSA/Matching
401K/Vacation and Holiday Pay
Avg 2500-3500 miles/week
100% No Touch- 12 mo. CDL/A
Exp Preferred 888-545-9351 ext 13
www.doublejtransprot.com (wcan)
ROUTE DRIVER Merchandiser
Grocery store experience helpful.
Contact Darrell 608-514-4148
CLASSIFIED AD DEADLINE IS Noon
Monday for the Verona Press unless
changed because of holiday work sched-
ules. Call now to place your ad, 873-6671
or 835-6677.
453 VOLUNTEER WANTED
HOME HEALTH United's Meal on
Wheels program is currently looking for
volunteers to help deliver nutrition and
smiles over the noon hour to those who
are homebound in the Madison, Monona,
Middleton or Sun Prairie area. The com-
mitment level is flexible; volunteers can
choose what days and locations work
best with their schedule. Do you have
good communication skills, enjoy working
with people and like to work? If so, you
could be a Food Pantry Shopper at The
Salvation Army of Dane County. Shop-
pers engage our clients while assisting
them with their food choices and answer
questions they have about the program.
United Way 2-1-1 is seeking new volun-
teers to become Information and Referral
Specialists. If you are looking for an
opportunity to learn more about com-
munity resources and would like to assist
people in finding ways to get and give
help, United Way 2-1-1 may be the place
for you! Our volunteers staff our tele-
phone lines, answering questions about
resources available in the service area.
Call the Volunteer Center at 608-246-
4380 or visit www.volunteeryourtime.org
for more information or to learn about
other volunteer opportunities.
516 CLEANING SERVICES
SUNSHINE HOUSE CLEANING LLC
Since 1982 Detailed cleaning service.
Owner Operated. Weekly, bi-weekly, or
monthly. Call Jodi 608-835-2775
548 HOME IMPROVEMENT
A&B ENTERPRISES
Light Construction/Remodeling
No job too small
608-835-7791
ALL THINGS BASEMENTY! Basement
Systems Inc. Call us for all your base-
ment needs! Waterproofing? Finishing?
Structural Repairs? Humidity and Mold
Control? Free Estimates! Call 888-929-
8307 (wcan)
ASPHALT SEAL COATING
Crack filling, striping.
No Job Too Small.
Call O&H: 608-845-3348 or
608-832-4818

DOUG'S HANDYMAN SERVICE
GUTTER CLEANING
"Honey Do List"
No job too small
608-845-8110
HALLINAN-PAINTING
WALLPAPERING
**Great-Spring-Rates**
35 + Years Professional
Interior/Exterior
Free-Estimates
References/Insured
Arthur Hallinan
608-455-3377
DANE COUNTY’S MARKETPLAE. The
Verona Press Classifieds. Call 873-6671
or 835-6677.
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Hardtland
Home Improvement, LLC
Roofng • Siding • Gutters
Shingle & Steel Roofng
Gutter Covers & Cleaning
(608) 845-9100
TomD@tds.net • www.hardtland.net
Locally Owned – Verona, WI
Serving U Since '72
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We Can Remove Unsightly
Black Streaks From
Your Roof!
STOUGHTON
307 S Forrest
Retail or
Offce Space.
400 sq ft.
$299/month
utilities
included.
608-271-0101
REAL ESTATE AUCTION
IMKAHLNG AUCTIONS
Auctioneer: Riley Kahl, Registered Wisconsin Auctioneer #736
8385 County Road A, Verona, WI 53593 • 608-832-4839
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For more information and to
view property by appointment
(608) 770-3930
TUESDAY, JUNE 17
11:00 A.M.
735 South Perry Parkway • Oregon, WI 53575
Property is being sold for cash. 5% buyers fee to be added to final bidding price and sign an offer
to purchase with no contingencies. Balance will be due on closing. Bidders are required to have
$5000.00 in earnest money in form of certified check to obtain bidding number. Property is sold
subject to approval. Property is sold in its "as is" condition, with all its faults. There are no guarantees
or warranties as to condition of buildings, mechanical systems, or any other aspects of the property.
If used as residential rental property, buyer is responsible for rental weatherization code compliance,
including cost of inspection. Information in this advertising was derived from sources believed to be
correct but is not guaranteed. Buyers shall rely entirely on their own information, judgement, and
inspection of the property and records. All announcements from the auction block take precedence
over printed material and any other oral statements made.
For more information and pictures go to www.auctionzip.com
• Driveways
• Floors
• Patios
• Sidewalks
• Decorative Concrete
Phil Mountford 516-4130 (cell)
835-5129 (office)
Al Mittelstaedt 845-6960
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PAR Concrete, Inc.
Increase Your sales opportunities…
reach over 1.2 million households!
Advertise in our
Wisconsin Advertising Network System.
For information call 845-9559 or 873-6671.
FOR SALE- MISCELLANEOUS
SAWMILLS from only $4397.00- MAKE & SAVE MONEY
with your own bandmill- Cut lumber any dimension. In stock
ready to ship. FREE Info/DVD: www.NorwoodSawmills.
com 1-800-578-1363 Ext.300N (CNOW)
HELP WANTED - PROFESSIONAL
Wanted: Daily newspaper circulation manager in Sierra Vista,
Arizona. The only thing better than the climate is the job. Full
job description here: http://wicknet.com/QyYVi (CNOW)
HELP WANTED- SALES
Become an Independent Insurance Agent (English or
Bilingual). Part time. $50k+ yearly potential. Retirement
plans with Living Benefits. Join us now! www.
FEGcareers.com 1(800)296-0115. (CNOW)
HELP WANTED- SKILLED TRADES
HBI, Inc., UTILITY CONTRACTOR HAS Immediate
Opportunities In the Telephone Industry for: ï Aerial
Technicians, ï Cable Plow/Bore Operators, ï Foremen, ï CDL
Laborers. Training Offered. Travel Required for All Positions.
920-664-6300. www.holtger.com EOE by AA (CNOW)
HELP WANTED- TRUCK DRIVER
MARTEN TRANSPORT Regional Runs Available
CHOOSE the TOTAL PACKAGE: AUTOMATIC
DETENTION PAY AFTER 1 HR! Regular, Frequent
HOME TIME; TOP PAY BENEFITS; Mthly BONUSES
& MORE! CDL-A, 6 mos. Exp. Req’d. EEOE/AAP 866-
322-4039 www.drive4marten.com (CNOW)
Knight Refrigerated CDL-A Truck Drivers Needed. Get
Paid Daily or Weekly. Consistent Miles. Pay Incentive &
Benefits! Become a Knight of the Road. EOE. 855-876-
6079. (CNOW)
ON THE ROAD TO A BRIGHTER FUTURE! Midwest
Truck Driving School. Class starts every 4 weeks. Next
class starts June 23rd. www.midwesta.com Financing
Available:1-800-377-5567, 906-789-6311 (CNOW)
MISCELLANEOUS
This classified spot for sale! Advertise your product or
recruit an applicant in over 179 Wisconsin newspapers!
Only $300/week. Call this paper or 800-227-7636 www.
cnaads.com (CNOW)
Parents & Grandparents
Celebrate Your
Graduate’s Achievement!
For that special keepsake
place an ad in the
Black & White Ad Color Ad
1 column x 3 inch ad:
$
15
$
39
2 column x 3 inch ad:
$
30
$
54
2 column x 5 inch ad:
$
50
$
85
Contact Diane Beaman
at (608) 873-6671
or insidesales@wcinet.com
for more information
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May 29, 2014 The Verona Press ConnectVerona.com
15
NIELSEN'S
Home Improvements
Repairs, LLC
Kitchens/Bathrooms
Wood & Tile Flooring
Decks/Clean Eaves
*Free Estimates* Insured*
*Senior Discounts*
Home 608-873-8716
Cell 608-576-7126
e-mail zipnputts@sbcglobal.net

TOMAS PAINTING
Professional, Interior,
Exterior, Repairs.
Free Estimates. Insured.
608-873-6160
554 LANDSCAPING, LAWN,
TREE & GARDEN WORK
ARTS LAWNCARE- Mowing,
trimming, roto tilling, Garden
maintenance available.608-235-4389
JAYS LAWN MAINTENANCE
Spring Cleanup, Garden Roto tilling
Lawn mowing, Brick and Flagstone
walkways and patios, Hedge Trimming
608-728-2191
LAWN MOWER Blade Sharpening in
Stoughton. $5. per blade. Call 608-
235-4389
LAWN MOWING Residential and com-
mercial. 608-873-7038
ROTOTILLING, SKIDLOADER, Small
Dumptruck for Brooklyn, Oregon, Evans-
ville and surrounding areas. 608-513-
8572, 608-206-1548
SHREDDED TOPSOIL
Shredded Garden Mix
Shredded Bark
Decorative Stone
Pick-up or Delivered
Limerock Delivery
Ag Lime Spreading
O'BRIEN TRUCKING
5995 Cty D, Oregon, WI
608-835-7255
www.obrientrucking.com
SNOWMARE ENTERPRISES
Property Maintenance
Lawn Mowing
Bush Trimming
Powerwash Houses
Spring/Summer Clean-Up
Gutter Cleaning
608-219-1214
560 PROFESSIONAL SERVICES
APPLIANCE REPAIR
We fix it no matter where
you bought it from!
800-624-0719 (wcan)
MY COMPUTER WORKS - Computer
Problems? Viruses, Spyware, Email,
Printer Issues, Bad Internet Connec-
tions - FIX IT NOW! Professional, US
based technicians. $25 off service. Call
for immediate help. 888-885-7944 (wcan)
ONE CALL DOES IT ALL! Fast and
Reliable Handyman Services. Call Ser-
viceLive and get referred to a pro today.
Call 800-604-2193 (wcan)
576 SPECIAL SERVICES
2EYEZ 4 Pawz Pet sitting and dog walk-
ing. 5 yrs experience. Call Tara 279-3330
RESEARCH SERVICES: We locate
Family, Former Friends, Neighbors
Classmates, Co-workers.
Joy 608-712-6286
CLASSIFIED AD DEADLINE IS Noon
Friday for The Great Dane and Noon
Monday for the Verona Press unless
changed because of holiday work sched-
ules. Call now to place your ad, 873-6671
or 835-6677.
586 TV, VCR &
ELECTRONICS REPAIR
DIRECTV 2 Year Savings Event. Over
140 channels only $29.99 a month. Only
Directv gives you 2 years of savings and
a FREE Genie upgrade! Call 800-320-
2429 (wcan)
DISH TV RETAILER. Starting at $19.99/
mo for 12 mos. High Speed Internet
starting at $14.95/month (where
available) Save! Ask about same day
installation! Call now -
800-374-3940 (WCAN)
REDUCE YOUR Cable Bill! Get whole-
home Satellite system installed at NO
COST and programming starting at
$19.99/mo. FREE HD/DVR Upgrade to
new callers, so call now. 888-544-0273
(wcan)
602 ANTIQUES & COLLECTIBLES
COLUMBUS ANTIQUE MALL
& CHRISTOPHER COLUMBUS
MUSEUM "Wisconsin's Largest
Antique Mall" Enter everyday
8am-4pm. 78,000 sq. ft.
200 Dealers in 400 Booths. Customer
Appreciation Week 20% discount
on all items $10 and over June 2-8.
Third floor furniture, locked cases.
Location:
239 Whitney St., Columbus,
WI 53925 920-623-1992 www.
columbusantiquemall.com

636 COMPUTERS & ACCESSORIES
HP MEDIA CENTER Computer.
Flat screen, wired mouse, tower,
remote, keyboard. Mega Memory to use
for recording, streaming. New in 2005.
Make offer. 608-669-2243
648 FOOD & DRINK
ENJOY 100%GUARANTEED,
delivered to the door Omaha Steaks!
SAVE 74% plus 4 FREE burgers - The
Family Value Combo - ONLY $39.99.
ORDER today!
800-831-1898 Use Code 49381GVT
www.OmahaSteaks.com/sp25 (wcan)
SHARI'S BERRIES Order delicious
strawberries for any occasion. Save 20%
on qualifying orders over $29! Fresh
dipped berries starting at $19.99. Visit
www.berries.com/happy or call
800-975-3296 (wcan)
650 FURNITURE
LARGE FABRIC Couch in Good Condi-
tion Free . 608-279-1882
652 GARAGE SALES
EDGERTON- 2103 Rivirie Ln 5/30-
5/31 8am-3pm. Moving Sale. Wicker,
antiques, furniture, kitchen, Holiday and
garden
STOUGHTON- 1616 Roby Rd. Multi-
Family 5/29 8am-7pm, 5/30 8am-4pm,
5/31 8am-12pm Books, clothes, furniture,
knick knacks, flowers, etc
STOUGHTON- 1726 Lunde Circle(off of
Hwy N), Sat 5/31 1 Day Only. 8am-5pm.
Multi-Family. Foosball table, TV, filing
cabinet, shabby chick, lots of Misc
STOUGHTON- 224 N Franklin St 5/30-
5/31 8am-5pm. Multi-family. Lots of
Womans clothing size 14. Some new,
antiques, funiture, pool table, misc
THEY SAY people don’t read those little
ads, but YOU read this one, didn’t you?
Call now to place your ad, 873-6671 or
835-6677.
STOUGHTON- 302 N Page We're Back!
5/29-5/31 7:30am-? Craftsman table
saw, 2 lion statues, new ceramic tile,
1930's chest of drawers/dresser w/mirror,
Mission Rocker. 6 ladder back chairs,
artwork, lamps, frames, bedding, home
decor, juicer, small/appliances, elec-
tronics, gardening raised beds frames,
wind chimes, area rugs, folding screens,
antiques & collectibles, drying racks,
(Hoosier, buffet, ladies desk in the rough)
store display/jewelry display/ Furby, Billy
Bass, Jaws, and more, Also more at
Stoughton City Wide
STOUGHTON- 3062 Linnerud Dr, 5/29
4-7, 5/30 8-6, 5/31 8-1. Lrge mult-family
Lds & mens clothing, furniture, nautical
and misc items.
664 LAWN & GARDEN
3'-12' EVERGREEN and Shade Trees.
Pick Up or Delivery! Planting available.
Detlor Tree Farms
715-335-4444 (wcan)
666 MEDICAL & HEALTH SUPPLIES
MEDICAL GUARDIAN Top-rated medi-
cal alarm and 24/7 monitoring. For a
limited time, get free equipment, no acti-
vation fees, no commitment, a 2nd water-
proof alert button for free and more. Only
$29.95 per month. 800-281-6138
SAFE STEP WALK-IN TUB Alert for
Seniors. Bathrooms falls can be fatal.
Approved by Arthritis Foundation. Thera-
peutic Jets. Less than 4 inch step-in.
Wide door. Anti-slip floors. American
made. Installation included. Call 888-
960-4522 for $750. off (wcan)
668 MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS
AMP: LINE 6 Spider IV 75 watt guitar
amp. Tons of built in effects, tuner, and
recording options. Like new, rarely used,
less than 2 years old. Asking $250 OBO.
call 608-575-5984
GUITAR: FENDER American made
Standard Stratocaster guitar. Tobacco
burst finish, mint condition. Includes
tremelo bar, straplocks, and custom fit-
ted Fender hard-shell case. Asking $950
OBO. Call 608-575-5984
676 PLANTS & FLOWERS
PROFLOWERS ENJOY SEND FLOW-
ERS for any occasion. Birthday, Anni-
versary or Just Because! Take 20%
off your order over $29! Go to www.
Proflowers.com/ActNow or call 800-315-
9042 (wcan)
688 SPORTING GOODS
& RECREATIONAL
18'X38' DOUGHBOY above ground pool.
LP heater, automatic cleaner, liner 2
yrs old. 6'x30' wood deck, solar cover,
$3500/obo. Excellent condition. 608-426-
0624 or 608-214-9600 leave message.
FISH CANADA Kingfisher Resort.
Cottage-Boat-Motor-Gas/ $75. per
person/day. Call for specials. 800-452-
8824 www.kingfisherlodge.com
(wcan)
STOCK YOUR pond or lake now. Order
early. Varieties of pan/game fish. Forage
minnows. Aeration systems. Pond weed
control products. roeselerfishfarm.com
920-696-3090 (wcan)
WE BUY Boats/RV/Pontoons/ATV's &
Motorcycles! "Cash Paid" now. Ameri-
can Marine & Motorsports Super Center,
Shawano 866-955-2628 www.american-
marina.com (wcan)
CLASSIFIEDS, 873-6671 or 835-6677. It
pays to read the fine print.
696 WANTED TO BUY
TOP PRICES Any Scrap Metal
Cars/Batteries/Farm Equipment
Free appliance pick up
Property clean out. Honest
Fully insured. U call/We haul.
608-444-5496
WANTED BARNS & Tobacco Sheds for
Salvage. Also buying barnboards and
tobacco laths. Leave message: Rudy
608-624-3990
WE BUY Junk Cars and Trucks.
We sell used parts.
Monday thru Friday 8am-5:30pm.
Newville Auto Salvage, 279 Hwy 59
Edgerton, 608-884-3114
705 RENTALS
BRAND NEW Duplex Split Level, 3 bed-
room, 3 bath, 2 car garage. 2,375sq ft.
Laundry room with washer dryer. Stain-
less Appliances, Large Family room with
3rd bedroom/bath in lower level. $1775/
mo.+ utilities No Pet/Smoking Please.
Available now. Evans Properties LLC,
608-839-9100
GREENWOOD APARTMENTS Apart-
ments for Seniors 55+, currently has 1
& 2 Bedroom Units available starting at
$725 per month, includes heat, water,
and sewer. 608-835-6717 Located at 139
Wolf St., Oregon, WI 53575
HAMILTON CONDO 1101 Hamilton St,
Stoughton. 1500 square ft of luxury. 2
bedroom, 2 decks, fireplace, washer/
dryer. Underground parking included.
$1350/mo. Available Now. 608-877-9388
OREGON 1-BEDROOM Apartment.
2-Car garage. $650/month. No pets.
Jane 608-271-7071
OREGON 2-Bedroom in quiet well kept
building. Convenient location. Includes
all appliances, A/C, blinds, private park-
ing, laundry and storage. $200 Security
deposit. Cats OK. $665/month. 608-219-
6677
STOUGHTON- 2 bedroom upper Suit-
able for 2 adults. Available Now No Pets/
Smoking New carpets, laminate flooring
in kitchen, New stove, frig, dishwasher
furnished. Water divided with down stairs
tenant. Window A/C. Driveway with pri-
vate entrance. Share the large fenced in
back yard. room for garden. $750/mo +
utilities 608-873-3679.
STOUGHTON- 517 E Jefferson 2 bed-
room, Upper. $680 Utilities included Call
608-455-7100.
STOUGHTON AREA- 2 bdrm, 2 bath, all
appliances, fenced yard, 2 car attached
garage, 2 3 season porches, lots of stor-
age, in quiet rural subdivision between
Stoughton and Madison. $1,195 w/$500
sec dep. Please call 608-286-5282
STOUGHTON/KENILWORTH- QUIET
2-bedroom, balcony, water. Private
Owner. No Pets. $750/mo. Available
July/1 Handicap Accesible 608-212-0829
STOUGHTON- UPPER apartment $650/
mo +utilites. 608-873-3432
720 APARTMENTS
OREGON-2 BDRM, 1 bath. Available
for spring/summer. Great central loca-
tion. On-site or in-unit laundry, patio,
dishwasher and A/C. $720-$730/month.
Call 255-7100 or www.stevebrownapts.
com/oregon
OREGON DOWNTOWN Location
1 Bed, 1 Bath, Appliances, Laundry,
Heat and Water included.
$650./mo. Call 608-206-7596
ROSEWOOD APARTMENTS for Seniors
55+, has 1 & 2 bedroom units available
starting at $695 per month. Includes
heat, water and sewer. Professionally
managed. 608-877-9388 Located at 300
Silverado Drive, Stoughton, WI 53589
750 STORAGE SPACES FOR RENT
ALL SEASONS SELF STORAGE
10X10 10X15 10X20 10X30
Security Lights-24/7 access
BRAND NEW
OREGON/BROOKLYN
Credit Cards Accepted
CALL (608)444-2900
C.N.R. STORAGE
Located behind
Stoughton Garden Center
Convenient Dry Secure
Lighted with access 24/7
Bank Cards Accepted
Off North Hwy 51 on
Oak Opening Dr. behind
Stoughton Garden Center
Call: 608-509-8904
DEER POINT STORAGE
Convenient location behind
Stoughton Lumber.
Clean-Dry Units
24 HOUR LIGHTED ACCESS
5x10 thru 12x25
608-335-3337
FRENCHTOWN
SELF-STORAGE
Only 6 miles South of
Verona on Hwy PB.
Variety of sizes available now.
10x10=$50/month
10x15=$55/month
10x20=$70/month
10x25=$80/month
12x30=$105/month
Call 608-424-6530 or
1-888-878-4244
NORTH PARK STORAGE
10x10 through 10x40, plus
14x40 with 14' door for
RV & Boats.
Come & go as you please.
608-873-5088
RASCHEIN PROPERTY
STORAGE
6x10 thru 10x25
Market Street/Burr Oak Street
in Oregon
Call 608-206-2347
CLASSIFIED AD DEADLINE IS Noon
Friday for The Great Dane and Noon
Monday for the Verona Press unless
changed because of holiday work sched-
ules. Call now to place your ad, 873-6671
or 835-6677.
UNION ROAD STORAGE
10x10 - 10x15
10x20 - 12x30
24 / 7 Access
Security Lights & Cameras
Credit Cards Accepted
608-835-0082
1128 Union Road
Oregon, WI
Located on the corner of
Union Road & Lincoln Road
801 OFFICE SPACE FOR RENT
2 UNITS in Brooklyn: 1050 sq ft.
Retail/Office/Pub/Sandwich, Ice Cream
or Coffee Shop with glass storefront,
energy efficient windows, private
restrooms, outdoor seating. Available
now- $895/month.
Office or Retail: 2700 sq ft currently
divided into 5 separate offices (one w/
gas fireplace), waterfall, break room,
2 restrooms, storage, and large open
areas. Available July 4th; $1490/month
608-712-6555
STOUGHTON 307 S Forrest Retail or
Office Space. 400 sq ft. $299/month utili-
ties included. 608-271-0101
STOUGHTON 316 S Gjertson St. Office/
Retail space. 1200 sq ft. $850/month,
utilities included. Will build to suit. Private
customer parking. 608-843-9125
965 HAY, STRAW & PASTURE
GRASS HAY, Big Squares and
Round Bales. Darris 608-938-4586
Monticello
970 HORSES
WALMERS TACK SHOP
16379 W. Milbrandt Road
Evansville, WI
608-882-5725
990 FARM: SERVICE
& MERCHANDISE
RENT SKIDLOADERS
MINI-EXCAVATORS
TELE-HANDLER
and these attachments. Concrete
breaker, posthole auger, landscape rake,
concrete bucket, pallet forks, trencher,
rock hound, broom, teleboom, stump
grinder.
By the day, week, or month.
Carter & Gruenewald Co.
4417 Hwy 92
Brooklyn, WI, 608-455-2411
905 AUCTION SALE DATES
REAL ESTATE Auction June 7- 1pm at
N5702 Murray Rd, Manawa, WI on 52
acre farm being sold in parcels. Visit:
www.nolansales.com or call for maps.
Nolan Sales LLC, Marion WI 800-472-
0290. Reg Auctioneers #165 & #142.
(wcan)
Part-time. Excellent Wages
20+ hours/wk. CDL bonus program
Paid training/testing. Signing bonus.
5501 Femrite Dr. Madison
Call Paul at 608-310-4870 or email
paulm@badgerbus.com
EOE

SCHOOL BUS DRIVERS
& PARATRANSIT
DRIVERS
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Attention College Students
and 2014 HS Grads!
Summer Work,
$17 base-appt, FT/PT
customer sales/service,
no exp nec, conditions apply,
all ages 17+, call now for
interview 608-662-2092
or apply online at
www.SummerWorkNow.com

Specialized Light Assembly, full or part-time
The work requires energetic people that can work on
their feet for periods of 4-6 hours, must have excellent
eye/hand coordination and hand/finger dexterity. Work
requires assembling parts either individually or as part
of a team at the rate of 200 – 300 per hour. Work shifts
are 4 - 8 hours/day, Monday – Friday, between the hours
of 5 a.m. and 9 p.m.
Production Positions, Plastic Molding, full-time
This work requires operating plastic molding machines
in a high tech facility. Prior experience in plastic
manufacturing is required. Should be mechanically
inclined in order to help maintain the equipment as
necessary. Must have shift flexibility. EOE
Apply in person M-F, 8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.,
Minitube of America, 419 Venture Ct., Verona,
845-1502, or email your resumé to
hr@minitube.com.
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Screen Printer
Full-time start immediately. Seeking individual
with experience in all areas of screen printing
from screen making to actual printing.
Call for appointment
835-5791 or 276-6050
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** DRIVERS **
FULL TIME DRIVERS NEEDED FOR REGIONAL WORK
$1000 SIGN ON BONUS
$1000 RETENTION BONUS
$750 GUARANTEE WEEKLY
Tractor-trailer drivers needed for the Walgreen’s Private
Fleet Operation based in Windsor, WI. Drivers make hand
deliveries to Walgreen’s stores within a regional area (WI,
IL, IA, MN, ND, SD). Workweek is Tues ~ Sat. All drivers
must be willing & able to unload freight.
*Earn $21.90/hour (OT after 8 hours) or $0.4650/mile
* Full Benefit Pkg includes Life, Dental, Disability & Health
Insurance with Prescription Card
*401k Pension Program with Company Contribution
*Paid Holidays & Vacation
*Home every day except for occasional layover
Drivers must be over 24 years old, have a min 18 months
T/T exp or 6 months T/T exp with a certificate from an from
an accredited driving school & meet all DOT requirements
Send resume to:
b.kriel@callcpc.com
or call CPC Logistics at 1-800-914-3755
www.qpsemployment.com
APPLY ONLINE TODAY AT:
Madison
608-819-4000
ASSEMBLERS
WELDERS
CHEESE PACKAGING
PRODUCTION
Monroe
608-325-4690
www.qpsemployment.com
APPLY ONLINE TODAY AT:
MATERIAL HANDLING
MACHINE OPERATING
PRODUCTION / GENERAL LABOR
MAINTENANCE
Baraboo - Mauston
608-448-4411
Richland Center - Sparta
608-647-8840
16
May 29, 2014 The Verona Press ConnectVerona.com
Food - Fun - Entertainment
Friday, May 30 - Sunday, June 1
McKee Farms Park, Fitchburg
www.iwcmadison.com
facebook.com/IWCMadison
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VISIT THE STOUGHTON AREA FARMERS MARKET
ON FRIDAY MORNINGS IN FRONT OF DOLLAR GENERAL
1828 Sandhill Rd., Oregon, WI
53575 • 608-835-7569
New Hours: Monday-Friday 8:30 am-7:30 pm;
Saturday 8:30 am-6 pm; Sunday 9 am-5 pm
Come & visit Wisconsin’s premier grower
of quality bedding plants and
hanging baskets!
Mid-Season Planting
Specials
.
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CTY. M
Directions from Stoughton:
Take 138 toward Oregon. Go past Eugster’s
Farm Market, one mile and turn right on
Sunrise Rd. Go one more mile then turn left
on Town Line Rd. Continue on to Sand Hill Rd.
(approximately one mile) and turn right.
Directions from Fitchburg:
Take Fish Hatchery Road south to Netherwood
Road. Turn left and go through Oregon past
Walgreen’s to a left on Sand Hill Road.
Directions from Verona:
Take Cty. M to Fish Hatchery Rd. Turn
right and go to Netherwood Road. Turn left
at Netherwood Rd. through Oregon past
Walgreen’s to a left on Sand Hill Rd.
H
When in Stoughton,
visit our
sales house
located in the
Main Street Plaza
parking lot.
Koupons and sale prices
honored at both locations.
KOPKE’S KOUPON
50¢ off each
Save up to $3.00
Limit 6. Limit 1 koupon per kustomer per day. Valid May 28-June 3, 2014.
PERENNIAL
SPECIAL
KOPKE’S KOUPON
ANNUAL FLOWER & VEGETABLE FLATS
$2 off each. Save up to $6
While supplies last. Reg. $18.99. Limit 3. Limit 1 koupon per kustomer per day. Valid May 28-June 3, 2014.
KOPKE’S KOUPON
HANGING BASKETS Save up to $6
$1 off 1
st
basket
$2 off 2
nd
basket
$3 off 3
rd
basket
Limit 1 koupon per kustomer per day. Valid May 28-June 3, 2014.
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Brat sale
Roger Ringgenbert, left, and
Fred Foreman fire up the grill at
the Verona Senior Center Friday,
April 25, for the center’s first
brat sale of the season. Along
with a brat came the option for a
bag of chips and a drink.
Photo by Scott Girard
POLICE REPORT
Information from Verona
police log books:
March 30
9:54 a.m. A 38-year-old man
reported that his neighbor’s
dogs are allowed to roam free
and defecate on his property on
the 900 block of Questa Ridge
Trail. The neighbors were ver-
bally warned for not keeping
their animals on a leash and
were told to clean up after them.
March 31
2:32 p.m. A 48-year-old
woman reported being fol-
lowed by a burgundy Chevrolet
Malibu after leaving Subway. It
was making many of the same
turns as her throughout the city
but did not follow her into the
police station parking lot.
April 2
A 32-year-old man on the
800 block of Glenview Drive
reported an unknown man
driving slowly past his house
and taking pictures.
April 4
2:12 a.m. After a caller
reported a man stumbling
around on the 400 block of
Venture Court, police contacted
a 36-year-old who said he had
been drinking at Cahoots but
had gotten lost on his way home
due to his night blindness.
12:03 p.m. A business
owner of the 300 block of Main
Street reported a man coming
into his store and helping him-
self to the coffee reserved for
the customers, charging his cell
phone and frequently sitting in
the waiting area. The man was
informed and understood that
he was no longer welcome.
April 5
10:26 a.m. Two women
reported seeing skeletal
remains in the grass on the
2000 block of Old Hwy. PB.
When investigated, it was dis-
covered that the bones were
the carcass of a dead deer that
had gotten its head sawed off.
April 6
12:08 a.m. Eight juvenile
boys were reported for tak-
ing ketchup and mustard
bottles from Wildcat Lanes
and vandalizing property with
them. They had put ketchup
in bowling balls, squeezed the
condiments all over cars in the
parking lot and on the walls
and power unit at Sugar Creek
Elementary School.
April 8
9:16 p.m. A 54-year-old
man was cited for his third
OWI offense after being
stopped for exceeding the
speed limit on Main Street.
April 10
4:58 p.m. A 26-year-old
woman reported seeing two
kids climbing and jumping
around on the rings in front
of Country View Elementary
School, along with the Dump-
sters on the campus. The two
told police they had only been
doing parkour.
8:24 p.m. An 87-year-old
woman reported being held
prisoner at Four Winds Manor
and said she was afraid the
employees wanted to hurt her.
Employees informed police that
the woman has only been there
for a month and has dementia.
April 12
3:04 a.m. A caller reported a
45-year-old man standing near
picnic tables near Carnes. The
man said he was just out for a
walk and was advised to stay on
public property.
April 13
5:27 p.m. The parents of a
juvenile girl reported having
one of her Instagram follow-
ers post a racist and threat-
ening comment on one of her
pictures. The girl and three of
her friends follow the person
back, but do not know who it
is due to the person recently
changing their profile and
name on the social media app.
April 15
9:38 a.m. A high school
student was found to have
overdosed on Paxil. The
high school nurse had been
advised to call an ambulance
after calling Poison Control.
April 16
1:40 p.m. A caller reported
that an intoxicated 53-year-old
man was asking customers in
the Walgreens parking lot for
money. The man, who has a
long history of such behavior,
was vulgar and uncooperative.
He was also reported for the
same thing at Miller and Sons
Supermarket earlier in the week
and was told he was no longer
welcome at either place.
-Kimberly Wethal

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