OREGON OBSERVER

The
Thursday, May 29, 2014 • Vol. 129, No. 47 • Oregon, WI • ConnectOregonWI.com • $1
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UN347639
Citizens
against
'Citizens'
Local group aims for
November referendum
BILL LIVICK
Unified Newspaper Group
A grassroots movement is
afoot in the Village of Oregon.
Oregon Area Progressives
are working with South Central
Wisconsin Move to Amend as
part of a statewide and national
effort to enact a constitutional
amendment to reverse the 2010
U.S. Supreme Court decision
known as Citizens United v.
FEC.
OAP has organized a rally
at Waterman Triangle Park in
downtown Oregon beginning
at 1 p.m. Sunday, June 1. The
group will have petitions to
sign and literature about Move
to Amend.
South Central Wisconsin
Move To Amend is an affili-
ate of the national Move to
Amend (MoveToAmend.org),
“a citizens group organized to
overturn Citizens United and
reclaim the liberties and privi-
leges guaranteed in the U.S.
Constitution to human beings
but now being usurped by cor-
porations,” according to the
organization’s website.
OAP or gani zer Car l ene
Bechen said the local group is
trying to have a referendum put
on the Village of Oregon ballot
for the November 2014 elec-
tion.
“Our goal is to show that
there’s a lot of local support
and to do an educational piece
A Word about Birds
Software business owner is birding enthusiast, too
BILL LIVICK
Unified Newspaper Group
Greg Hottman has lived in the
Village of Oregon since 1984,
when he moved here from his
hometown of Cross Plains.
But the owner of Camnetics
Inc., a software design business
he started in 1997, doesn’t spend
all his time in front of a com-
puter screen. He is a woodworker
by hobby and has made coffee
tables, among other items, that
are on display and for sale at the
Firefly Coffeehouse.
Hottman has also built three
kayaks and loves to take them
out on area lakes and rivers, and
his latest passion involves bird
watching and photography.
Hottman’s company does about
Know Your Neighbor
Turn to Hottman/Page 7
Turn to Citizens/Page 3
SCOTT DE LARUELLE
Unified Newspaper Group
Personalizing student
learning in the class-
room is nothing new for
Oregon Hi gh School
business and informa-
tion technology teacher
Bruce Nelson.
But for many of his
fellow educators, it’s a
leap into the unknown.
To help bridge the gap,
he’s served as a valu-
able resource for teach-
ers who are beginning
to incorporate personal-
ized learning methods
into their classrooms.
OHS teachers have been
working on projects as
diverse as a tailored gym
class, a sophomore-level
English journal and an
outdoors-based televi-
sion project.
Nelson, who used to
teach technology con-
ferences to educators
across the state, first
heard about personalized
learning a few years ago.
The more he learned, the
more he realized he was
already doing it, particu-
larly with the teachers he
was working with.
“They woul d cr e-
ate a project and learn
what t hey needed t o
learn based on that proj-
ect, and I was more of a
resource,” Nelson said.
“I found adults just natu-
rally learn that way, so
began teaching my kids
that way.”
In the past, using a
more traditional class-
room method, Nelson
found he wasn’t get-
ting through to all his
students when he was
teaching them all the
same lessons.
“My best kids were
learning nothing, my
lowest-ability kids were
overwhelmed, and the
kids in the middle, they
were great, ” he said.
“(Personalized learning)
solved some of the prob-
lems I had in the past of
making sure we keep all
kids together and they all
learn the same things in
the same period of time.”
Nelson said he’s excit-
ed district administrators
are getting behind the
personalized learning
effort.
“We wanted it to be
a grass-roots effort; we
didn’t want it to be a top-
down mandate,” he said.
Oregon School District
Getting the ‘snowball’ rolling
Business and tech teacher a catalyst for personalized learning at OHS
Turn to Learn/Page 13
‘We wanted it
to be a grass-
roots effort; we
didn’t want it to
be a top-down
mandate. As a
teacher, it’s hard
when people
are constantly
telling you what
to do and how to
teach.’
Bruce Nelson,
OHS teacher
Photo by Scott De Laruelle
Personalizing student learning in the classroom is nothing new for Oregon High School business and
information technology teacher Bruce Nelson. He’s served as a valuable resource for teachers who are
beginning to incorporate personalized learning methods into their classrooms.
inside
Your Family summer
edition!
2
May 29, 2014 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
Food - Fun - Entertainment
Friday, May 30 - Sunday, June 1
McKee Farms Park, Fitchburg
www.iwcmadison.com
facebook.com/IWCMadison
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Graduation Sale!
Friday May 30th - Sunday June 1st
Hours:
Monday-Friday: 8am - 6pm
Saturday: 8am - 4pm
Sunday:10am - 4pm
all trees, shrubs,
perennials,
evergreens &
annuals in-stock
10%
Off:
(608) 873-9141
www.moyersinc.net
936 Starr School Road Stoughton, WI
Delivery and Installation not Included in Sale, Cash and Carry
$2
Off per
yard:
all Mulches,
Topsoil,
Compost
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THYROID PROBLEMS?
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> The 6 different patterns to Thyroid
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Tuesday, November 8th, at 1:00pm and 6:15pm
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1-800-827-0288
THYROID PROBLEMS?
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Memorial Day
Brooklyn Area Veterans selling U.S. flags
The Brooklyn Area Vet-
erans Committee is selling
U.S. flags as a fundraiser to
support the construction of
the Brooklyn Area Veter-
ans Memorial.
The flags will be on dis-
play on the southeast cor-
ner of Douglas Drive and
County Hwy. MM near the
fundraising thermometer.
Each $5 will purchase an
8-by-12-i nch Ameri can
memorial flag that will be a
patriotic display of support
for our service men and
women who have served or
are serving and those who
will serve to protect our
country.
Buy flags by sending your
money to Brooklyn Area
Veterans Memorial, P.O.
Box 272, Brooklyn, WI
53521.
For i nf or ma t i on on
t he monument or proj -
e c t s , c o n t a c t l y l e @
wanlessauctiongroup.com
or call 455-5049.
Photo by Scott De Laruelle
Memorial
Day 2014
Above, VFW 10272 members
stand at attention. From left, Ken
Anderson, quartermaster Cal
Gilbertson, funeral honor guard
leader Oscar Larson, post adju-
tant Jim Klarich, Jim Nettesheim
and sergeant of the guard Gil
Hohenberger.
Right, Wanless, left, waits to
speak alongside VFW 10272
members during Monday’s
Memorial Day commemoration.
Photo by Scott De Laruelle
Front, American Legion 160 Commander Lyle Wanless reads an invocation at Monday’s Memorial
Day commemoration in downtown Oregon as he stands next to VFW Post 10272 Commander
Aaron Ingham; back row, from left: VFW 10272 members Dan Cobb, Leroy Schumacher, Sr. Vice
Commander Rich Bergemann, Ed Webb, Darwin Utynek, Past Commander Bill Meier and Junior Vice
Commander Bart Schley.
Buy/View photos
The Oregon Observer has
photo galleries online to view
photos that are in the paper
– and additional ones that
didn’t fit.
You can view and easily pur-
chase photos online at
Ungphotos.smugmug.
com
May 29, 2014 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
3
BREITBACH
CHIROPRACTIC
Serving the Community Since 1961
167 N. Main St., Oregon
Dr. John E. Breitbach
HOURS:
Monday, Tuesday and Friday
8 am-12 noon; 1:30 pm-6 pm
Wednesday
8 am-12 noon; 1:30 pm-5 pm; 7-9 pm
Saturday 8 am-11 am
835-5353
www.breitbachchiropractic.com
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New Patients
Always Welcome
Mueller Dental
(608) 835-0900
152 Alpine Pkwy, Oregon
www.muellerdental.com
Proudly Serving the Oregon Area for Over 16 Years!
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CARING
DENTISTRY
FOR THE ENTIRE
FAMILY
NO TRASH PICKUP ON MEMORIAL DAY!
Residential Trash & Recycling Customers:
HAPPY MEMORIAL DAY!
Residents normally serviced the
week of May 26th-May 30th will be
serviced one day later than their
normal pickup day.
City of Fitchburg · City of Middleton ·
DSI/Veridian/HOA’s · Town of Dunn · Town of Pleasant
Springs · Town of Verona · Village of Arena · Village of
Belleville · Village of Brooklyn · Village of McFarland ·
Village of Oregon · Village of Shorewood Hills · Village
of Waunakee
www.pellitteri.com
(608) 257-4285
NO TRASH PICKUP ON MEMORIAL DAY!
Residential Trash & Recycling Customers:
HAPPY MEMORIAL DAY!
Residents normally serviced the
week of May 26th-May 30th will be
serviced one day later than their
normal pickup day.
City of Fitchburg · City of Middleton ·
DSI/Veridian/HOA’s · Town of Dunn · Town of Pleasant
Springs · Town of Verona · Village of Arena · Village of
Belleville · Village of Brooklyn · Village of McFarland ·
Village of Oregon · Village of Shorewood Hills · Village
of Waunakee
www.pellitteri.com
(608) 257-4285
NO TRASH PICKUP ON MEMORIAL DAY!
Residential Trash & Recycling Customers:
City of Fitchburg · City of Middleton · DSI/Veridian/HOAs
Town of Dunn · Town of Pleasant Springs · Town of Verona
Village of Arena · Village of Belleville · Village of Brooklyn
Village of McFarland · Village of Oregon
Village of Shorewood Hills · Village of Waunakee
Residents normally serviced the
week of May 26th-May 30th will be
serviced one day later than their
normal pickup day.
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Town of Rutland 2014 Recycling Event
Computers, Electronics and Appliances
Stoughton Lumber - 3188 Deer Point Dr., Stoughton
Saturday, June 14 • 8 a.m.-12 p.m.
Residents of Rutland, Stoughton and surrounding
communities may bring these items to Stoughton Lumber.
No charge for these items: computer mice, CPU’s, laptops,
keyboards, computer cords, circuit boards, flat screen
computer monitors (LCD), UPS, power strips, scanners,
printers cables, printers, copiers, telephones, cell phones,
fax machine, VCR’s DVD players, stereo equipment, remote
control, calculators, lead acid car batteries, rechargeable
batteries from laptops, cell phones and power tools, lawn
mowers (oil must be drained and tires removed)
Recycling fee for these items:
CRT monitors - $5 each
televisions - $10/$20/$40 each
small to mid-size televisions (29" & under) - $10 each
large televisions (30" & over) - $20 each
wooden convole televisions - $40 each
Appliances - $5 each
microwaves, stoves, washers, dryers, water heaters, furnaces
Freon-containing appliances - $10 each
air conditioners, dehumidifiers, dorm size refrigerators
Fluorescent light bulbs: 4' 8' - $1 each
**Please call Resources Solutions for a price quote if yo don't see you items listed (608) 244-5451
UN353624
District, teachers
reach tentative deal
Contract would
increase
compensation 2
percent
Wi t h t h e 2 0 1 3 - 1 4
s chool year wi ndi ng
down, the Oregon School
Board' s Human Assets
Committee and Oregon
Educat i on Associ at i on
(OEA) have tentatively
reached a deal on t he
2013-14 collective bar-
g a i n i n g a g r e e me n t ,
according to a joint press
release issued Tuesday
by t he Oregon School
District and OEA.
The bargaining agree-
ment i ncl udes a wage
increase of 2.07 percent
for the teachers (the max-
i mum amount al l owed
by Act 10), supplemental
compens at i on i n t he
amount of approximate-
l y $193 per f ul l - t i me
t eacher and cont i nued
compensation for teach-
ers completing a master's
degree and new teach-
ers completing their Pro-
fessional Development
Plans.
OEA of f i ci al s pl an
t o vot e on whet her t o
appr ove t he t ent at i ve
agreement on June 3.
The Or egon School
Board is set to vote on
whether to approve the
tentative agreement at its
meeting June 9.
If the tentative agree-
ment i s approved, t he
part i es hope t o begi n
negot i at i ng t he 2014-
15 collective bargaining
agreement this summer,
according to the press
release.
a r o u n d i t , ” Be c h e n
expl ai ned. “We’re say-
ing that corporations aren’t
people and money is not
speech.”
She said OAP hopes to
collect about 800 signatures
in the 50 days following
Sunday’s rally asking the
Oregon Village Board to
approve a resolution placing
a referendum on the ballot.
If organizers can collect
the signatures of 15 per-
cent of village residents
who voted in the last regu-
lar gubernatorial election
– about 500 people – they
are entitled per state statute
(Sec. 9.20) to have a refer-
endum put on the Novem-
ber ballot, said Tim Sager,
of South Central Wisconsin
Move to Amend.
“We’re using the direct
legislation statutes to try to
get a referendum on the bal-
lot and to have the Village
Board initiate support for
an amendment to declare
that corporations are not
people and that money is
not speech,” Sager said.
“Since we don’t have the
ability through direct legis-
lation to ask for or force the
state to put a referendum on
the statewide ballot, we can
only do it in our municipali-
ties, so we’re trying to do it
through villages and cities.”
Move to Amend wants a
constitutional amendment
that would have the effect
of reversing both Citizens
United and the more recent
McCutcheon v. FEC deci-
sion, Sager said.
In McCutcheon case, the
U.S. Supreme Court’s 5-4
decision in April removed
limits on how much indi-
viduals can donate direct-
l y t o f eder al pol i t i cal
candidates and national par-
ties. Previously, the limit
was $117,000 per donor.
The per-candidate maxi-
mum of $2,600 still applies.
There are two ways to
propose an amendment: by
a two-thirds majority vote
in both houses of Congress,
or through a Constitutional
Convention called by two-
thirds of state legislatures.
Ei t her way, t he pr o-
posed amendment must be
approved by three-fourths
of the states.
“As a ci t i zen of t he
United States, I think each
person should be equally
valued, and each person’s
vote should be equally val-
ued as well as each person’s
voice,” Bechen said.
Sager said corporations
are "important" but still
aren't people.
“We feel constitutional
rights should be for people
– human beings, not cor-
porations," he said. “Also,
we feel that money is not
speech. So those two things
we feel are very important
to have in a Constitutional
amendment.”
In the Citizens United
decision, the court over-
turned decades of prece-
dents and decided the First
Amendment prohibits the
government from restrict-
ing political independent
expenditures by corpora-
tions, associations or labor
unions.
It followed a line of deci-
sions going back to 1976,
when the court interpret-
ed freedom of speech to
include spending money.
Bechen st r essed t hat
Move to Amend is a non-
partisan movement that has
been supported by people
of all political persuasions.
“Money and the ability to
purchase commercial time
or access should not take
precedence over regular
citizens and the needs and
desires of regular people,”
she said.
Citizens: OAP hopes to collect about 800 signatures in the 50 days following the rally
Continued from page 1
Village of Oregon
Police must be 'on-duty' at Summer Fest
Recent practice
violated village
policy
BILL LIVICK
Unified Newspaper Group
Village of Oregon police
officers will no longer be
allowed to work at Oregon
Summer Fest as off-duty
securi t y offi cers – but
they’ll still have a presence
at the annual event.
Vi l l age admi ni st rat or
Mike Gracz said last week
that in previous years, offi-
cers had been hired for
security and wore their
uniforms at Summer Fest
while off-duty. But a pol-
icy does not allow village
police officers to work in
uniform when not on police
department duty.
“Based on policies, if
an officer from Oregon
is going to be working at
Summer Fest, they have
to be on-duty,” Gracz told
the Observer last week.
“So they’ll be in uniform at
Summer Fest, but they’ll be
working for the village.”
He explained that for
years, the chamber had
hired off-duty Dane County
sheriff’s deputies, as well
as guards from pri vat e
security companies, to work
at Summer Fest. Gracz said
a few years ago, the cham-
ber stopped hiring security
guards and sheriff’s depu-
ties and only used off-duty
Oregon police officers.
He said an employee at
Village Hall came across
the policy and brought it to
his attention.
New crosswalks
The board also autho-
rized the village to create
pedestrian crosswalks at the
intersection of Kierstead
Lane and Janesville Street.
Village resident Kelly Sul-
livan had contacted Oregon
police chief Doug Pettit to
request the crosswalk.
In an emai l , Sul l i van
wrote that several children
from the High Meadows
neighborhood “will be trav-
eling to summer school and
need to be able to safely
cross t hat st reet t o get
there.”
Kierstead Lane, Janes-
ville Street and Oak Street
come together to form an
unusual and often busy
intersection southeast of the
downtown.
Last Monday, the board
authorized public works
di r e c t or Ma r k Be l ow
to work with the police
department to create the
crosswalk.
“We’re going to put a
crosswalk on both sides of
Kierstead Lane and Janes-
ville Street,” Gracz said.
Water problems
The board also authorized
the village to hire Kevin
Lord, engineer for MSA
Professional Services, to
meet with Jerry and Bonnie
Thiel to check on a water
issue the Thiels are hav-
ing in the basement of their
properties at 113 and 119
S. Main St. – the buildings
that house the Mason’s on
Main restaurant.
In an email to village
officials, the Thiels wrote
“it appears that the side-
walk was raised to the point
where it required the metal
plates to be lifted as well,
thus causing the pitch of
the plates to go toward the
buildings. We are experi-
encing water on rainfalls in
both buildings.”
The couple recently built
a lounge and private party
facility in the basement at
119 S. Main St., and “now
our floor, ceiling and fur-
niture require repair or
replacement.” They asked
the village to investigate
the problem and adjust the
front sidewalk.
The village had installed
new sidewalk and other
downtown infrastructure in
2008-09, and it hired MSA
to do the engineering for
the project. Gracz said the
issue would come back to
the Village Board on June
2.
Oregon School District
If you go
What: “Move to Amend” rally led by Oregon Area
Progressives
When: 1-2:30 p.m. Sunday, June 1
Where: Waterman Triangle Park, 121 Janesville St.
Who: Featured speaker is U.S. Rep. Mark Pocan (D-2nd
District), welcomed by Village President Steve Staton; musi-
cians Casey and Greg
Info: Call Carlene Bechen, 513-7655 or visit
oregonareaprogressives.org or scwmta.org
4
May 29, 2014 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
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POSTMASTER: Send Address Corrections to
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Thursday, May 29, 2014 • Vol. 129, No. 47
Unified Newspaper Group, a division of
WOODWARD COMMUNICATIONS,INC.
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Good People. Real Solutions. Shared Results.
Opinion
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Scott Girard, Bill Livick, Anthony Iozzo,
Mark Ignatowski, Scott De Laruelle
Summer program builds
critical literacy skills
R
eading is one of the most
important skills children
acquire, dictating to a
large degree their success in
other subject areas, and in life.
As Victor Hugo put it, in “Les
Miserables,” “To learn to read
is to light a fire; every syllable
that is spelled out is a spark.”
We put that ideal into prac-
tice through the many innova-
tive programs and resources we
offer free to
families and
adult learn-
ers. Among
the creative
literacy pro-
grams people
are enjoying
at the Oregon
Public Library
are: 1,000
Books before
Kindergarten; baby, toddler and
preschool storytimes; teen advi-
sory board; Brown Bag Book
Club; Ten Books for Adults
Book Club; OPL Puppet The-
atre; Chess Club; LEGO Club;
and Dads and Donuts storytime.
And of course, every year, we
have the Summer Reading Pro-
gram, which begins next month.
Acquisition of reading skills
– generally referred to as “liter-
acy skills” – begins when small
children listen to the books
their parents, siblings, grand-
parents and other caregivers
read to them. At an early age,
it’s not about letter recognition
but gaining an appreciation and
value for reading and learning
to understand the spoken word.
All of these experiences fac-
tor into the acquisition of litera-
cy skills, and later on the ability
to recognize letters and words
and understand their meaning.
Understanding that meaning is
the ultimate goal of literacy, for
without understanding we can-
not hope to communicate our
thoughts and ideas.
A great deal of attention has
been focused at the national and
state levels on developing ini-
tiatives that support the devel-
opment of literacy skills in chil-
dren. Still others are focusing
on helping adult non-readers to
obtain the skills that will open
the doors to new employment
options and education.
For decades the public library
has been working diligently to
help develop these important
skills, and the annual Summer
Reading Program is one exam-
ple of this. It’s a great oppor-
tunity for children to make
friends and stay connected to
their reading skills during the
summer vacation, and it’s a
great deal of fun. But it’s more
than that.
Research about the educa-
tional importance of good read-
ing skills is plentiful and pretty
obvious. However, that same
research also paints a pretty
grim picture for those children
who are not given the tools and
resources they need to become
good readers.
Once children fall behind, it
is nearly impossible for them
to catch up, which in turn nega-
tively impacts their ability to
learn other subjects like math-
ematics, science, and social
studies. A brief video at you-
tube/Ahhj3wxxkdM explains
how quickly children can fall
far behind their peers in reading
ability.
As Wisconsin works to
address these and other literacy
issues through programs like
“Read to Lead” and “Growing
Wisconsin Readers,” public
libraries stand ready to work as
partners in support of children
and families. Our mission is to
act in support of the needs of
the community, and developing
literacy skills is at the top of
our list.
Not only does the library
make books available in an
abundant and cost-effective
manner, it offers programs that
help instill in children a love of
reading that is necessary to be
a truly good reader. The library
also provides a support network
for parents through interac-
tion with trained librarians. By
attending programs with their
children, parents can learn to
model different techniques and
strategies to make reading a fun
and valuable learning experi-
ence for their children.
The Oregon Public Library
summer reading registrations
open June 9 and the programs
continue through Aug. 23. They
include four levels for different
ages:
• Rubber Ducky Club for ages
0-3.
• Fizz, Pop, Boom! for ages
4-12.
• Spark a Reaction for ages
12-17.
• Literary Elements for
adults.
The new Rubber Ducky Club
for children from birth to age
3, helps parents and children
build early literacy skills in
early childhood by encouraging
children to love language and
books and have fun. Studies
have shown that preschoolers
who recognize words, sounds
and letters, and have an envi-
ronment rich in letters, sounds
and listening to books enter
school ready to learn.
This summer there are some
exciting changes for the chil-
dren’s program Fizz, Pop,
Boom! There will be monthly
reading logs that include litera-
cy and science activities.
As always, there will be a lot
of great incentive prizes. For
an added incentive this year the
Friends of the Oregon Library
will be donating 10 cents to the
Oregon/Brooklyn Food Pantry
for every reading log completed
by a child.
The literary sparks will fly
during teen program entitled
Spark a Reaction. There will
also be incentives and creative
events for teens during the sum-
mer.
The adult Summer Reading
Program recommends reading
for fun. This year’s theme is
science: Literary Elements.
Experiment by reading some-
thing you have been putting off
reading, or something outside
your normal reading interests.
Participants have a chance to
win prizes with every book they
read or listen to. Don’t forget
that sharing your reading time
with children counts towards
your total, too.
Susan Santner is the director
of the Oregon Public Library.
She can be contacted at 835-
3656, and more information is
available at oregonpublicli-
brary.org.
Santner
Community Voices
Letters to the editor
Annual OHS Variety Show gives
you more than you bargained for
Have you ever spend $1 and
then wondered if you had gotten
your money’s worth?
If you were one of the lucky
members in the audience at the
recent OHS Vocal Music Depart-
ment Variety Show, you know
you not only got your $1 worth
of entertainment but were treated
to some of the most beautiful and
inspiring music and talent OHS
has to offer.
Comic hosts, Wesley Korpela
and Luke Davis kept the audience
engaged (even throughout the
intermission) while the audience
was treated to a variety of solo &
group performances.
As the grandparent of one of the
seniors, Amanda Douglass, the
show was a bittersweet experience
as it was their last performance.
Choral director, Ms. Yancy paid
tribute to the seniors and it was
obvious that they were moved.
Oregon School District is so for-
tunate to have a music staff at all
levels that inspires, encourages
and allows the talented students
with venues to share their talents
with the public.
Although I will no longer have
a student at OHS, it will not pre-
vent me from attending these
wonderful musical performances
in the future – I invite you to do
the same.
You will be totally entertained
and impressed.
Chris Johnson
Town of Oregon
The Oregon Observer encourages citizens to engage in discussion
through letters to the editor. We take submissions online, on email and
by hard copy. All letters should be signed and include addresses and
phone numbers for verification. Anonymous letters will not be printed.
Special rules apply during election season or other times of high let-
ter volume, and the editorial staff reserves the right not to print any
letter, including those with libelous or obscene content. We can accept
multiple submissions from local authors, but other letters will take pri-
ority over submissions from recently printed authors. Please keep sub-
missions under 400 words.
Deadline is noon Monday the week of publication. For questions
on our editorial policy, call editor Jim Ferolie at 845-9559 or email
ungeditor@wcinet.com.
Submit a letter
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BANDS
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STAFF INFECTION
FRIDAY
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REJECTS
SATURDAY
CHERRY PIE
EVENTS
YOUTH BASEBALL
TOURNAMENT

VOLLEYBALL
BEAN BAG
TOURNAMENT
2014 MOUNT HOREB
SUMMER FROLIC
VACATION WITH THE FROLIC!!!
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O CARNIVAL RIDES
ADVANCED RIDE
TICKET SALE - $1.50
Sold through June 5 at 5pm at
Miller & Sons and Anchor Bank.
Wristbands will be Thursday 5-9
and Saturday 12-4.
O RAFFLE DRAWING:
25 PRIZES OVER $16,000
TOTAL VALUE! 1ST PRIZE:
Vacation to Jamaica or Riviera Maya
in Mexico (Retail value $4,000)
2ND PRIZE: John Deere X300
Lawn Tractor (Retail value: $3,165)
O FIREWORKS
Presented by Miller & Sons
Supermarket and the Summer Frolic
Committee
O MAIN STREET PARADE
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BANDS
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REJECTS
SATURDAY
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BANDS
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FRIDAY
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SATURDAY
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BEAN BAG
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CAST A VOTE at any UB&T
location for your high school’s
BEST MILK MOOSTACHE

UB&T will donate to your
school’s Ag Program
1st Prize: $200 2nd Prize $100
Contest runs June 1– 30.
See more about UB&T’s support of
dairy and agriculture at www.ub-t.com

Visit our lobby on
Mon. June 2nd for a
delicious dairy treat!

See our lobby display
featuring a local dairy
farm neighbor.

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Oregon youth part
of spring concerts
W i s -
c o n s i n
Y o u t h
S y m -
p h o n y
Orches-
t r a s
k i c k e d
o f f i t s
s p r i n g
concerts series May 17
in Madison. Oregon
seventh-grader Isabelle
Krier is a member of
WYSO and participated
in the concerts.
Krier
Photo by Dave Miess
The band consists of (left to right) freshman Sam Miess on guitar, freshman Nic Tierman on vocals, freshman Nate Krause on guitar,
freshman Ben Lokuta on drums, and sophomore Beryl Miess on bass. 
Local rock band in state competition
Distant Cuzins, a local
rock band comprising of
five Oregon High School
students, is the wild card
band to compete in the
WSMA Launchpad State
competition on June 7.
Launchpad is a music
compet i t i on f or hi gh
school students who are in
bands formed outside of
school. Each year, bands
from all over Wisconsin
submit audio recordings
of three songs for consid-
eration.  Up to sixty bands
are selected to compete in
the four regional competi-
tions.
The t op t hr ee f i nal -
ists from each region and
one wild card band who
receives the highest score
on Broadj am. com t hen
compet e for t he grand
prize: the prestigious Les
Paul Launchpad Award,
free studio recording time
at Blast House Studios in
Madison, a 2014 Milwau-
kee Summerfest appear-
ance, and $5,000 worth of
Yamaha equipment donat-
ed to their school music
program. 
OHS orchestra teach-
er Leyl a Sanyer spon-
sored the Distant Cuzins’
Launchpad application. 
The band consists of
f r es hman Sam Mi es s
on guitar, freshman Nic
Tierman on vocals, fresh-
man Nate Krause on gui-
tar, freshman Ben Lokuta
on drums and sophomore
Beryl Miess on bass. 
The band is scheduled
to play at 2:20 p.m. at The
Sett in the University of
Wisconsin Union South
at 1308 W. Dayton St., in
Madison.
Community Band
starts concert series
The Oregon Community
Band plays summer con-
certs June 3, 10, 17, 24 and
July 1 at 7 p.m. in Water-
man Triangle Park.
The series consists of
out door band concer t s
offered free to the com-
munity by volunteer band
members.
The concerts also feature
refreshments, sponsored by
various community groups.
It i s t he band’s 33rd
concert season. The band
includes around 45 mem-
bers from Dane County and
beyond.
James Baxt er i s t he
founder and director and
he is also a retired Oregon
Middle School band direc-
tor.
Each concert will have
its own theme with differ-
ent styles of music. In case
of inclement weather, con-
certs are held in the Oregon
Middle School cafeteria.
About the band
After the concerts, they
break for the summer and
return for a short fall season
starting the last Tuesday
in September and running
through mid-November.
The group plays a broad
selection of popular pieces,
including marches, musi-
cals, classical, film scores,
big band and Dixieland.
If interested players have
any questions, they could
contact director Jim Baxter
director at 835-9066.
Summer concerts
Dates Themes Refreshments
June 3 Animated Classics Oregon/Brooklyn
Optimist Club
June 10* On the March Oregon Headliners 4-H
June 17 Around the World Oregon Straw Hat Players
June 24 Shared program Oregon Area Historical
Society with Stoughton
City Band
July 1* American Salute Eastern Star
*Colors & flags by Oregon/Brooklyn/McFarland VFW
Showcase features students’ orginal work
Oregon High School held
the 15th annual Fine Arts
exhibition and auction on
April 17, featuring 2013-
2014 student artwork.
Drawings, paintings, pho-
tographs and sculptures were
exhibited on tables and ver-
tical boards with about 100
students, teachers, family
members, local artists, board
members and administrators
in attendance.
There was high traffic
around State Silver Key
Art winner Jen Zernick’s
anatomy illustrations, and
a lot of chatter about junior
Alexa Uselman’s photore-
alistic charcoal and pastel
portraits. Sophomore, Daisy
Garrett dazzled viewers with
her dark, yet comical illus-
trations, while senior Dani
Loomis fascinated viewers
with her charcoal portrait and
mixed media pieces.
Another senior, Casey
Bonno, impressed view-
ers with her digital drawing
illustrations. Amanda Black-
well showed her leader-
ship skills by helping as the
spokesperson for the art auc-
tion and Mystery Box fund-
raiser. With the assistance of
OHS teachers and students,
the “Seeds of Inspiration”
were thrown on the pottery
wheel, designed with glass
as a mosaic, and planted
with some of the agriculture
department’s greenhouse
plants. A combination of
student artwork, community
member’s art pieces, and the
“Seeds of Inspiration” potted
plants helped earn $500.
This will allow the art
department to continue the
tradition of an art scholar-
ship to a senior this year. To
make a donation to the art
department, or for informa-
tion, contact art chair Mike
Derrick at mjderrick@ore-
gonsd.net.
OMS dodgeballers raise funds
Oregon Middle School Student Council students
dodged, dipped, ducked, dove and dodged some more,
raising more than $500 for the Ronald McDonald
House of Madison earlier this spring at the several
annual OMS Dodgeball Tournament was held March
21.
Addie Schipper captained the OMS Student Coun-
cil winning team, who selected the Ronald McDonald
House - Madison as the charity they wished to repre-
sent.
Team members are Kyrsten George, Addie Schipper,
Lexi Cina and Myah Matthew; back row, from left:
Tyler Damon, Devon Keast, Cedric Girard, Jack Zan-
der, Dillon Heyn, Carson Timberlake, Victor Lovan
and Tristan Hughes and Charlie Dombrowski.
6
May 29, 2014 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
Coming up
Community calendar
Churches
ALL SAINTS LUTHERAN CHURCH
2951 Chapel Valley Rd., Fitchburg
(608) 276-7729
Pastor Rich Johnson
SUNDAY
8:30 a.m. classic service
10:45 a.m. new song service
BROOKLYN LUTHERAN CHURCH
101 Second Street, Brooklyn
(608) 455-3852
Pastor Rebecca Ninke
SUNDAY
9 a.m. Holy Communion
10 a.m. Fellowship
COMMUNITY OF LIFE LUTHERAN
CHURCH
PO Box 233, Oregon, 53575
(608) 286-3121
office@communityoflife.us
Pastor Eric Wenger
SUNDAY
10 a.m. Worship at 1111 S. Perry
Parkway, Oregon
COMMUNITY UNITED METHODIST
CHURCH
Brooklyn
(608) 455-3344
Pastor Dave Pluss
SUNDAY
9:30 a.m. Worship
FAITH EVANGELICAL LUTHERAN
CHURCH
143 Washington Street, Oregon
(608) 835-3554
Pastor Karl Hermanson
SUNDAY - 9 a.m. Worship
Holy Communion 2nd & last
Sundays
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
408 N. Bergamont Blvd. (north of CC)
Oregon, WI 53575  
608-835-3082 - fpcoregonwi.org
Pastor: Bob Vetter
SUNDAY:
10 a.m. Blended Worship
11 a.m. Coffee Bar/Fellowship
11:15 a.m.  All-ages activity

FITCHBURG MEMORIAL UCC
5705 Lacy Road, Fitchburg
(608) 273-1008
www.memorialucc.org
Pastor: Phil Haslanger
Associate Pastor Twink Jan-
McMahon
SUNDAY
8:15 and 10 a.m. Worship
GOOD SHEPHERD LUTHERAN
CHURCH ELCA
Central Campus: Raymond Road and
Whitney Way
SATURDAY - 5 p.m. Worship
SUNDAY - 8:15, 9:30 and 10:45
a.m. Worship West Campus: Corner
of Hwy. PD and Nine Mound Road,
Verona
SUNDAY - 9 & 10:15 a.m., 6 p.m.
Worship (608) 271-6633
HILLCREST BIBLE CHURCH
752 E. Netherwood, Oregon
Eric Vander Ploeg, Lead Pastor
(608) 835-7972
www.hbclife.com
SUNDAY
8:30 am & 10:15 am Worship service
at Oregon High School PAC
Quest for grades 1-6 during 10:15
service
HOLY MOTHER OF CONSOLATION
CATHOLIC CHURCH
651 N. Main Street, Oregon
Pastor: Fr. Gary Wankerl
(608) 835-5763
holymotherchurch.weconnect.com
SATURDAY: 5 p.m. Worship
SUNDAY: 8 and 10:15 a.m. Worship
PEOPLE’S UNITED METHODIST
CHURCH
103 North Alpine Parkway, Oregon
Pastors Jason and Johanna Mahnke
(608) 835-3755
www.peoplesumc.org
Communion is the 1st & 3rd
weekend
SATURDAY - 5 p.m. Worship
SUNDAY - 9 a.m. worship and
Sunday school; 10:30 a.m. worship;
5 p.m. The Gathering Sunday night
service with simple supper to follow
ST. JOHN’S LUTHERAN CHURCH
625 E. Netherwood, Oregon
Pastor Paul Markquart and Pastor
Emily Tveite
(608) 835-3154
5 p.m. Saturday evening Worship
8 a.m. Traditional Sunday Worship
9:15 a.m. Sunday School & Coffee
Fellowship
10:30 a.m. New Community Worship
(9:30 a.m. Summer)
VINEYARD COMMUNITY CHURCH
Oregon Community Bank & Trust,
105 S. Alpine Parkway, Oregon - Bob
Groth, Pastor - (608) 513-3435
welcometovineyard.com
SUNDAY - 10 a.m. Worship
ZWINGLI UNITED CHURCH OF
CHRIST - Paoli
At the Intersection of Hwy. 69 & PB
Rev. Sara Thiessen
(608) 845-5641
SUNDAY -
9:30 a.m. Family Worship
• 7 p.m., Alcoholics
Anonymous meeting
at First Presbyterian
Church, every Monday
and Friday
• 7 p.m., Alcoholics
Anonymous closed
meeting, People’s United
Methodist Church, every
Tuesday
• 6:30-7:30 p.m.,
Diabetes Support Group
meeting, Evansville
Senior Center, 320 Fair
St. Call 882-0407 for
information. Second
Tuesday of each month
• 6:30-8 p.m., Parents
Supporting Parents,
LakeView Church,
Stoughton. Third
Tuesday of every month
• Relationship & Divorce
Support Group. State
Bank of Cross Plains.
Every other Monday
night at 6:30 p.m.
Support groups
Call 835-6677 to advertise on the
Oregon Observer Church Page
Being a Saint
Do you expect to become a Saint? Perhaps you should.
Have you ever noticed that just about every person in the
Bible who is chosen by God for some important mission
balks at the idea? It almost seems as if it is “bad form”
to be too ready and willing to be God’s standard-bearer.
Moses was full of excuses for why he couldn’t be God’s
mouthpiece, chief among them that he didn’t speak well.
Young Samuel thought he was hearing his master Eli’s voice
when he was really hearing the voice of God. And, even
Jesus appeared to have His moment of doubt, asking His
heavenly Father to “remove this cup from me” in the garden
at Gethsemane (Mark 14: 36). The life of a saintly person is
likely to be more filled with doubts than that of the ordinary
man or woman, not less. Perhaps that is because so much
more is asked of the saintly man and woman. How could
one fail to be doubtful when facing such fearful circumstanc-
es as martyrdom? Ultimately, we are all called to be saints,
because God is both our origin and our ultimate goal.
- Christopher Simon via Metro News Service
To all those in Rome who are loved by God and called to be
saints: Grace to you and peace from God our Father and the
Lord Jesus Christ.
Romans 1:7
Village of Oregon Cable Access TV program times same for both channels.
A new program begins daily at 1 p.m. and repeats at 4, 7 and 10 p.m. and at 1,
4, 7 and 10 a.m. 900 Market St., Oregon. Phone: 291-0148;
email: oregoncableaccess@charter.net, or visit www.OCAmedia.com.
Community cable listings Senior center
WOW 983 ORE 984
Thursday, May 29
• Library closed until 1 p.m.
• 7 p.m., OHS orchestra concerts,
OHS PAC
Friday, May 30
• 10 a.m., container gardening,
Stoughton Hospital, Bryant Health
center, 873-2356
Saturday, May 31
• 1-5:30 p.m., Academy of Sound
Spring Recitals, Oregon Performing
Arts Center, free, 456 N. Perry
Pkwy.
Monday, June 2
• 5-6 p.m., Picnic at the
Playground, Brooklyn Elementary
School
• 6 p.m., Oregon Village Board
meeting
Tuesday, June 3
• 6:30-8 p.m., Stoughton/
McFarland/Oregon Relay For Life
planning team meeting, 220-8783
• 7 p.m. Oregon Community Band
summer concert, Triangle Park,
835-9066
Sunday, June 8
• 1 p.m., OHS graduation, OHS
Monday, June 9
• Oregon Public Library summer
reading program kick-off week
(through June 14)
• Brush collection, village of Oregon
• 6:30 p.m., Oregon School District
Board of Education meeting, Rome
Corners Intermediate, 11 S. Perry
Pkwy., 835-4000
Tuesday, June 10
• 1 p.m., Brooklyn Elementary
fourth-grade graduation, Brooklyn
Elementary School
• 7 p.m. Oregon Community Band
summer concert, Triangle Park,
835-9066
Wednesday, June 11
• Last day of school, Oregon
School District
Saturday, June 14
• 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., Hayloft Gallery
Art Fair, 1239 South Fish Hatchery
Road, thehayloftgallery.com
• 1:30 p.m., Putts for Paws golf
fundraiser for Oregon Police
Department, Foxboro Golf Club,
1020 County Road MM
• 7:30 p.m., Art in the Barn Concert
featuring Lucy Kaplansky, a fund-
raiser for Haiti Allies, 5927 Adams
Road, Fitchburg, facebook.com/
artinthebarnwi
Sunday, June 15
• 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., Hayloft Gallery
Art Fair, 1239 South Fish Hatchery
Road, thehayloftgallery.com
Tuesday, June 17
• 7 p.m. Oregon Community Band
summer concert, Triangle Park,
835-9066
Thursday, June 19
• 10-10:45 a.m., “Duke Otherwise”
concert at Prairie View Elementary
Little Theater
Friday, June 20
• Relay For Life, Mandt Park,
Stoughton, relayinstoughton.com
Thursday, May 29
Oregon Summer Fest
Hilites-2012 (of June, ‘12)
Friday, May 30
Oregon Summer Fest
Hilites-2011
Saturday, May 31
Oregon Summer Fest
Hilites-2010
Sunday, June 1
Worshi p Servi ce:
Community of Life Church
Monday, June 2
6 pm--LIVE--Oregon Village
Board Meeting
Tuesday, June 3
“SqueezeBox Jamboree”
part 1 (of May 4)
Wednesday, June 4
“SqueezeBox Jamboree”
part 2 (of May 4)
Thursday, June 5
Oregon Village Board
Meeting (of June 2)
Thursday, May 29
PVE Pioneer Day (of May
23)
Friday, May 30
“Puppet Theater” @ Oregon
Library (of May 19)
Saturday, May 31
Oregon Daycare Kids @
Oregon Senior center (of May
20)
Sunday, June 1
OHS Band Concert (of May
27)
Monday, June 2
OHS Percussion & Jazz
Concert (of May 28)
Tuesday, June 3
OHS Orchestra Concert (of
May 29)
Wednesday, June 4
OHS German Exchange
Students (of Apr. 14)
Thursday, June 5
OHS Girls Varsity Soccer vs
Stoughton (of May 23)
Monday, June 2
Roast Beef, Roasted Red
Potato, Roasted Vegetables,
Chunky Applesauce, Multi
Grain Bread
VO-Veggie Patty
Tuesday, June 3
Shrimp Pasta Salad,
Cucumbers & Onions,
Fruit Cup, W.W. Bread,
Strawberry Ice Cream
V0-Pasta Salad w/Cheese

Wednesday, June 4
Tomato Barley Soup,
Crackers, Sliced Turkey
& Cheese on Rye, Fresh
Orange, Bar
VO- Cheese Sandwich
Thursday, June 5
Three Cheese Lasagna,
California Mix, Fruit Cup,
Bread Stick, Sherbet
SO-Taco Salad
Friday, June 6
*Roast Pork w/Gravy,
Mashed Potatoes, Corn,
Strawberry Shortcake w/
Topping, W.W. Bread
VO-Veggie Lasagna
Monday, June 2
AM—Diabetic Foot Care
9:00 CLUB
9:00 Wii Bowling
1:00 Get Fit
1:30 Bridge
4:00 Weight Loss Support
Tuesday, June 3
8:30 Zumba Gold
9:00 ST Board Meeting
9:00 Pool Players
*9:00 Arthritis Movement
9:45 Tai Chi
10:00 Wii League
12:30 Sheepshead
12:30 Stoughton Shopping
1:00 “The Monuments Men”
Wednesday, June 4
AM—Foot Care
9:00 CLUB
10:00 South Towne Shopping
11:00 1/1 Computer Help
1:00 Get Fit
1:00 Euchre
Thursday, June 5
AM Legal Counsel
8:30 Zumba Gold
9:00 Pool Players
9:00 Arthritis Movement
11:00 CarFit Program
12:30 Shopping at Bill’s
1:00 Cribbage
Friday, June 6
9:00 CLUB
9:00 Wii Bowling
*9:00 Pilates
9:30 Blood Pressure
10:00 Dog Show
PM—Legal Counsel
Field of flags
The Brooklyn Area Veterans Com-
mittee is selling U.S. flags to support
the construction of the Brooklyn Area
Veterans Memorial. The flags will be
on display on the southeast corner of
Douglas Drive and County MM.
Every $5 will purchase an 8 inch by
12 inch flag. Flags can be purchased
by through the Brooklyn Area Veter-
ans Memorial, P.O. Box 272, Brook-
lyn, Wisconsin 53521. For informa-
tion, call 455-5049.
Pantry pickup
Oregon-Brooklyn Food Pantry has
pickup coming up Thursday, May
29. Residents in the Oregon School
District are welcome to come to the
pantry from 3-7 p.m. at 1092 Union
Road. For more information, visit
obfp.org.
Cruizin’ for a Cure
The fourth annual car and bike
show will be held at Prairie View
Elementary School (300 Soden Drive)
from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, May
31, with registration beginning at 9
a.m.
All makes and models are welcome,
with dash plaques for the first 50 cars.
There will be music, T-shirts, baked
goods, food and drinks available. All
proceeds will benefit the Crohn’s and
Colitis Foundation.
Cooksville concerts
The Cooksville Community Center
will sponsor a concert given by the
Stoughton Chamber Singers and the
Bell Canto String Ensemble at 7 p.m.
Wednesday, June 4, in the Cooksville
Church.
"Sing Me a Song and Play Me a
Tune" is the title that the group has
chosen for their Spring program, to
be directed by John Beutel. Follow-
ing the concert there will be a recep-
tion at the Cooksville Community
Center, two blocks east of the church.
Admission is $5 at the door.
CarFit
AARP is sponsoring this event from
11 a.m. to 2 p.m., Thursday, June 5 at
the Oregon Area Senior Center (219
Park St.) CarFit is a FREE, interactive
and educational program that teaches
participants how to make their per-
sonal vehicle "fit" them to increase
safety and mobility when they hit the
road.
To schedule an appointment, call
835-5801.
Oregon Dog Show
Show off your canine best friend at
the very first Oregon Dog Show at 10
a.m. Friday, June 6 (rain date Friday,
June 13) at the senior center. Dog
trainer Amy Robinson from Country
View Animal Services will be here to
judge our contestants.
Awards will be given for such cat-
egories as “Happiest Tail,” “Longest
Ears,” and “Most Distracted.” The
show will take place in the parking
lot. Call Anne at 835-5801 by Mon-
day, June 2, to register your dog.
May 29, 2014 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
7
UN346107
A walk in the woods led me to ...
m
y
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e
igh
b
o
r’s
h
o
u
s
e
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On Oakwood Village University Woods’ 30-acre campus, you’ll have interesting neighbors of
all kinds—including those who live in our 9-acre nature preserve. As you follow the walking
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doubt you’ll have interesting observations to share with your other neighbors over dinner.
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Life’s explorations
continued.
U
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one-third of its business in
international sales.
“I hardly do any advertis-
ing,” Hottman said. “I just
get orders that come in. I’m
checking my phone at 4 a.m.
to see what orders came in
from overseas at night.”
Camnetics involves three
software packages that are
part of comput er-ai ded
design (CAD) packages.
Two of them are made to
design gears.
Hottman said he attended
a user group meeting in the
mid-1990s on developing
software when someone
asked about an “involute
curve – the basis for a gear
design.”
“From that simple ques-
tion evolved this program
over the last 17 years or so,”
he said.
The Observer asked Hott-
man about what he called “an
obsession” with birding dur-
ing a recent interview.
OO: When di d your
‘obsession’ with birding
begin?
Hottman: It really took
off about a year or so ago.
But I’ve always been inter-
ested in birds since I was a
kid. I found a bunch of bird-
ing resources here a little over
a year ago. I probably added
over 100 birds to my life-list
this last year. I went out and
photographed probably over
260 species last year.
OO: Where are some of
your favorite places to go to
see and photograph birds?
Hottman: A lot in Dane
County. I spend a lot of time
in Middleton at Pheasant
Branch Conversancy, where
t ons of warbl ers come
through in the springtime.
But I go to all different areas
around Dane County and
southern Wisconsin.
Probably the place I go
to the most is the Brook-
lyn (State) Wildlife Area.
It’s a huge area. One of my
other favorite spots is Surch
Thompson. It was established
by prairie enthusiasts and is
a great little tract of land. It’s
about five miles south of Blue
Mounds.
I went up a few months ago
for my fourth time up by Plo-
ver, looking for a gyrfalcon
– it’s the largest falcon in the
world. I got it after 30 hours
of looking and 15 hours of
driving. I got some nice shots
of it.
OO: Are they kind of rare?
Hottman: They are for
Wisconsin, yes. There were
two known gyrfalcons in
Wisconsin this winter.
OO: Do you just go out
and look around, or do you
have more of a specific goal
in mind when you go out?
Hottman: Both of those,
sometimes. It depends on the
circumstances. Like there’s a
Nelson sparrow at Lake Bar-
ney, and so I went out specifi-
cally looking for that. It’s an
absolutely beautiful sparrow.
I got some great shots of it.
It’s a pretty rare bird. I’ve
also seen one at Lerner Park
in Oregon.
When most people think of
sparrows, they think of house
sparrows. But the native spar-
rows can be really beautiful
birds.
OO: Is this primarily a soli-
tary thing that you do?
Hottman: Yeah, pretty
much. Sometimes I’ll go to
an outing where there could
be a dozen people and I get
to know quite a few people
through that. Usually I’m
off on my own, just hik-
ing around and if something
pops up, I start taking pic-
tures of it. Sometimes I don’t
know what I’m shooting and
sometimes I do. It’s a good
way to identify new birds.
Hottman: Spent 30 hours seeking gyrfalcon
Continued from page 1
Photo by Greg Hottman
Hottman photographed this
Nelson sparrow on one of his
birding excursions.
Greg Hottman
Age: 60
Family: two adult daugh-
ters; longtime partner,
Melanie Tavera
Occupation:
Independent software
design, sales
Hometown: Cross Plains
Years in Oregon: 30
Photo submitted
Scavenger hunt
A group of students from Brooklyn Elementary School visits Anderson Park Friday, April 25, for an
Arbor Day celebration. The students took part in a scavanger hunt in the park. The park is currently
being cleared and worked on by Anderson Park Friends, Inc. on its way to becoming a fully used
property. Above, volunteer Nancy Murphy searches with the kids.
8
May 29, 2014 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
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Holistic Horse Fair makes mark on Brooklyn area
The Holistic Horse Fair
at the Horse First Farm in
Brooklyn was the place to
be for all equine enthusiasts
on the weekend of May 17.
The Horse First Farm, a
leader in advancing natu-
ral horsemanship, makes
a contribution to restoring
Oregon’s lost claim as horse
capital, which dates back to
a time when there had once
been more horses than peo-
ple in Oregon.
Host to the event, THFF
rough estimates suggest
more than 200 people turned
out despite other major com-
munity events in the sur-
rounding areas, including
Stoughton’s Syttende Mai
festival and Fitchburg Days.
Adoptable horses from
various rescue horse orga-
nizations in surrounding
areas were front and cen-
ter at the event, including
Spirit Horse Equine Res-
cue and Education Center,
a non-profit organization
out of Janesville, whose
efforts help raise awareness
of the problems that all too
often result from traditional,
coercive, dominance-based
horse practices.
Dozens of other equine
specialists and holistic prac-
titioners were on hand shar-
ing their expertise of natural
horsemanship and holistic
theory with demonstrations
or presentations.
Roughly 50 hands-on,
vendor displays filled the
arena, including experts in
the fields of veterinary care,
acupressure, chiropractic
care, craniosacral therapy,
essential oils, farrier trades,
ani mal communi cat i on,
Reiki, massage, behavior
training, performance based
training for riders,and nutri-
tional consultants – all lead-
ers in the natural approach
to equine wellness, advo-
cating the mind-body-spirit
connection with balanced
nutrition and healthy body
mechanics as critical com-
ponents of equine perfor-
mance.
The two-day headline
event was colt starting with
Ryan Rose, an internation-
ally known Parelli horse-
man, who makes his home
at THFF in Brooklyn.
Using two mares selected
by Spirit Horse Rescue,
Rose demonstrated how
prey animals become part-
ners through the Parelli prin-
ciples of love, language and
leadership.
By continually reading the
horse, using full understand-
ing of the dynamics of horse
movement while also tak-
ing into consideration how
horses think (horsenality),
Rose established the trust
and calmness necessary for
the horses to be able to ulti-
mately accept the rider.
In the process, he empha-
sized the importance of the
iterative nature of the pro-
cess and the horse’s need
to incrementally accept first
the human, then pressure,
then the saddle, and then
ultimately, the rider. Put-
ting the relationship first is
the foundation of a Parelli
horseman’s promise.
This marks Rose’s 1,000th
horse start. A 5-year-old,
14-hand buckskin quarter
horse mare, bred to be a cut-
ting horse, named Luna, pre-
sented a sizable challenge
despite her seeming waifish-
ness.
She had come to Spirit
Horse for complaints of
striking out at anyone who
tried to approach her. Spirit
Horse had crossed over a
few of the challenges in han-
dling her, but to date, no one
had ever saddled or mounted
her.
Rose was assisted by
Maureen Dunn, a savvy
natural horseman and horse
trainer at THFF.
Under the guidance of
Rose, Dunn, an Oregon
local, started Helpful, a 4
year-old, 14.3-hand choco-
late paint mare. Helpful is
also a rescue horse brought
to THFF by Spirit Horse
Equine Rescue.
This was Dunn’s first
horse start in her career as
trainer, having worked her
way up at THFF from her
start as farm hand several
years ago.
More on the fair
Three-star Parelli instruc-
tor Michelle Manshardt of
Oregon came to THFF in
2009 straight from her work
at the Parelli Centers having
met THFF owner, Carlos
Osorio, through the Parelli
network. Manshardt, newly
married to Troy Knapp,
another natural horseman
who makes his home in
Oregon, very recently cel-
ebrated with a most beauti-
ful wedding on horseback
at THFF; bride, groom,
and groomsmen alike, all
mounted, along with a most
adorable minnie, named
Dovey, bearing rings.
Manshardt gave a Satur-
day morning presentation on
saddle fit in the THFF out-
door arena.
Specialist in qi gong ener-
gy healing, Bryan Sieger,
owner of Healing Release
in Oregon and instructor at
the Martial Arts Center of
Oregon, presented an intro-
duction to the Chi of Horse-
manship along with Kirsten
Engel, one of the founders
of the Holistic Horse Fair.
Dr. Judy Batker of Ore-
gon’s Country View Vet-
erinary Clinic, shared details
of the successes of her
work with Equitarian Initia-
tive, providing assistance
to working horses and their
owners in Haiti. She also
spoke of her work helping
the people of South Dako-
ta’s Pine Ridge Reservation
with their equine challenges.
Dr. Batker’s magnanimous
efforts with the Equitar-
ian Initiative and in South
Dakota are truly estimable.
An enriching, rewarding
experience with long-term
benefits for all in attendance
– including the four-leggeds
– heralds this year’s event.
THFF is a natural board-
ing facility and equestrian
center on Alpine Road in
Brooklyn where the Parelli
pathway and never end-
ing self-improvement is the
essence.
For information, contact
Kelly Messera, manager at
THFF, at 455-1805 or visit
thehorsefirst.net.
Photo by Heather K McManamy/ShortHorse Studios
Helpful, the Paint horse, with natural horsewoman, Maureen Dunn. This was Dunn’s first horse start.
She, along with other equine enthusiasts, participated in the Holisitic Horse Fair in Brooklyn.
SPORTS
Jeremy Jones, sports editor
845-9559 x226 • ungsportseditor@wcinet.com

Thursday, May 29, 2014
Anthony Iozzo, assistant sports editor
845-9559 x237 • sportsreporter@wcinet.com
Fax: 845-9550
For more sports coverage, visit:
ConnectOregonWI.com
The Oregon Observer
9
Boys tennis
Freshman phenoms
Girls soccer
Panthers share Badger South crown
ANTHONY IOZZO
Assistant sports editor
Unl i ke t he l ast t wo Badger Sout h
Conference t i t l es, t he Oregon Hi gh
School girls soccer team needed a little
bit of help this season.
But t he Pant her s, whi ch had i t s
14-game conference-win streak snapped
against Fort Atkinson, were able to
fight back and allow them to once again
control their destiny.
Oregon j ust needed a wi n agai nst
Stoughton last Friday, and it did so with
an exclamation point in a 7-0 victory.
Junior midfielder Kelsey Jahn fin-
ished with a hat trick, scoring twice in
the second half and once more in the
first half.
Seni or mi dfi el der El i za Nei dhart ,
junior defender Brenna Petersen and
freshman defender Holly Kaboord all
had assists on Jahn’s goals.
Seni or mi df i el der Megan Lowe,
senior forward Kristin Marshall, senior
forward Megan Brugger and sophomore
forward Makena Fanning also scored
goals for Oregon. Junior midfielder
Pai t yn Fl emi ng and Brugger added
assists.
Freshman Madelyn Breitbach had one
save. Stoughton’s Hannah Wood picked
up eight saves.
Oregon travels to Madison West at
Mansfield Stadium at 7 p.m. Thursday
and closes the regular season at 7 p.m.
Friday against Middleton at home.
The Pant hers are 4-0 agai nst Bi g
Eight Schools this year.
The seeding meeting for the WIAA
Division 2 playoffs is this week. Results
of the meeting should be available by
the weekend. Look for Oregon’s seed in
next week’s paper.
Oregon, Sauk Prairie (PPD)
The Panthers were supposed to host
Sauk Prairie on Tuesday in a non-con-
ference game but thunderstorms rolled
through the area forcing the game to be
postponed until Wednesday.
Results were unavailable by the Tues-
day deadline of the Observer. Look for
results in next week’s paper.
Track and field
Jones, Duff,
4x200 take
regional titles
JEREMY JONES
Sports editor
Sophomore hurdler Alex
Duff and the Oregon boys
4x200-meter relay team
both secured regional titles
Tuesday evening at Verona
Area High School.
Duff, who finished third
in the 300 hurdles a year
ago in Verona, took top
honors with a personal best
time of 40.5 seconds.
“Havi ng won confer-
ence last week, I felt real-
ly confident coming into
tonight,” Duff said. “I had
a lot of good athletes push-
ing me.”
Though he left Verona
with a regional champi-
onship title, Duff was far
from content.
“My goal is to make state
and this is definitely some
extra motivation,” he said.
Oregon travels to Lake
Geneva Badger for section-
als on Friday.
The Pa nt he r s ot he r
r egi onal champi onshi p
team entering sectionals
with lofty expectations will
be the 4x200 meter relay
team.
Consi st i ng of seni or
Lance Peterson, junior Josh
Sromovsky, sophomore
Lucas Mathews and senior
Jawon Turner, who coming
off an MCL injury during
the football season wasn’t
sure how much of a help
he could be to the team
this year, Oregon posted a
meet-best 1:31.09.
“I wasn’t expecting to
come back this fast from
the injury,” said Turner,
who also finished third in
the triple jump. “I wasn’t
as worried about my speed
coming off the injury, as
Turn to Regionals/Page 12
Freshmen Schneider,
Donovan take
championship matches
JEREMY JONES
Sports editor
Entering last week’s Badger Con-
ference tennis tournament with four
No. 1 seeds, a second seed and two
four seeds, the expectations were
high for the Oregon boys tennis team.
And while the Panthers faltered
just a bit to end up co-conference
champions, no one was too upset, fin-
ishing the two-day tournament with a
pair of conference champions at No.
2 and 4 singles.
Talk around the Oregon tennis
courts the past year or two had talk-
ed about this season when Calvin
Schneider would join the primarily
senior-laden team as a freshman.
Schneider didn’t disappoint to live
up to the hype, adding the first con-
ference title at No. 2 singles with a
6-4, 6-3 win against Madison Edge-
wood’s Billy O’Brien.
Despite only losing four games
up to that point, Schneider expected
things to get a little tougher in the
championship.
“Winning a conference champion-
ship has been the goal from Day 1,”
he said. “I had confidence going into
the championship that I could beat
either of the players in the other semi-
final.”
Schneider cruised past Fort Atkin-
son’s Willy Lemke 6-1, 6-0 and Mil-
ton’s Sean Grote 6-2, 6-1.
“Although the scores may not
reflect it, I struggled in those first two
matches,” Schneider said. “They got
me good and warmed up.”
Also a top seed, and a fellow fresh-
man, Charles Donovan had little drop
in his first two matches, blowing past
Portage 6-1, 6-1 and Monona Grove
6-3, 6-2.
The championship match against
second-seeded Daniel Garlock
proved a little tougher, though.
Despite cruising past Garlock dur-
ing the regular season, Donovan
was pushed to the end in the first
set before closing out the match in
straight sets 7-5, 6-3.
“I think it’s a great achievement
to start my high school tennis career,
along with Calvin as conference
champions,” Donovan said.
It’s something both are hoping to
repeat the next three years.
Finishing second to Edgewood the
past four or five seasons and with
only one conference champion a
year ago, Panthers head coach Ben
Conklin said the Panthers’ program is
headed in the right direction.
“It’s a big deal for our program, but
it’s a little bittersweet, obviously,”
Conklin said of splitting the team’s
first conference title with Edgewood.
“We didn’t want to share the title, but
tying for first was better than finish-
ing second.”
Following the team’s first Bad-
ger South Conference dual meet win
over Madison Edgewood this season,
the Crusaders came to play over the
course of the two-day tournament.
Switching up the team’s No. 1 dou-
bles team lineup, the Crusaders went
on to sweep all three doubles flights
to finish with and win the conference
tournament with 48 points compared
to 42 by Oregon.
With the finish Edgewood earn a
share of their sixth consecutive Bad-
ger South title.
Oregon’s Alec Onesti and Dakota
Tollakson fell 6-0, 6-4 in the No. 1
doubles championship to Crusad-
ers Noah Colletti and Charlie Kirsh.
Dropped down to No. 2 doubles in
favor of Colleti, Connor Maloney
joined Thomas Thelen to add the No.
2 doubles championship over Mono-
na Grove’s Michael Frisque and Sam
Taylor 4-6, 6-2, 6-4.
The Crusaders’ Patrick Croake
and Michael Keller completed the
sweep with a 6-2, 6-4 victory over
Panthers’ Matt Reisdorf and Spencer
Krebsbach at No. 3 doubles.
Oregon, which won the No. 2 and
No. 4 singles titles, took second in the
conference meet with 42 points.
Photos by Jeremy Jones
(Above) Freshman No. 4 singles player
Charles Donovan backhands a shot dur-
ing his Badger Conference champion-
ship match against Madison Edgewood’s
Daniel Garlock. Donovan, the top seed
entering the tournament at his flight,
won the match 7-5, 6-3.
Donovan was one of two Oregon fresh-
man to win a conference title. Calvin
Schneider (at right) added the other at
No. 2 singles, defeating third-seeded
Billy O’Brien of Madison Edgewood 6-4,
6-3.
The Panthers, who went undefeated dur-
ing the Badger South dual meet season,
finished runner-up to the Crusaders
at conference. Both teams, however,
shared the conference title when points
for both seasons were added up.
Turn to Conference/Page 12
Photo by Joe Koshollek
Sophomore Jen Brien shoots toward the goal last Friday in a Badger South Conference game against
Stoughton. The host Panthers won 7-0 and clinched a share of the conference title.
10
May 29, 2014 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
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Boys golf
Michek, Torhorst lead Panthers to sectionals as a team
ANTHONY IOZZO
Assistant sports editor
Head coach Bill Scheer said
the Oregon High School boys
golf team had to go lower than it
did for the Badger South Confer-
ence meet if it was to move on
Tuesday in a WIAA Division 1
regional at Pleasant View Golf
Course.
The Panthers not only went
lower, securing a third-place fin-
ish and a sectional berth with a
322, but shot its lowest round of
the season.
Sophomore Brandon Michek
and junior Carson Torhorst led
the way with a 77 and a 78,
respectively.
“It feels pretty good,” Michek
said. “Our whole team hasn’t
moved on in a while. And to be
able to shoot that number and
Carson shooting low to also help
us move on is nice.”
Junior Collin Bundy shot an
82, and sophomore Brandon
Rogers followed with an 86 to
finish the scoring for Oregon.
Junior Austin Busler shot a 94.
Mi ddl et on (308), Madi son
Memorial (314) and Waunakee
(341) also moved on. Waunakee
defeated Verona and Sauk Prai-
rie in a three-team tiebreaker
for the final team sectional spot
with a 17 on the playoff hole,
edging Verona (18) and Sauk
Prairie (20).
The individuals moving on
to sectionals with Middleton,
Memorial, Oregon and Wauna-
kee are Sauk Prairie juniors Dar-
rin Pulsfus (77) and Jack Rauner
(81) and Stoughton senior Max
Fergus (82) and Sam Anderson
(78).
The Pant hers now l ook t o
make some more noise at sec-
tionals at 9 a.m. Tuesday, June
3, at Baraboo Country Club.
Michek said that if the team
plays to its potential they have a
definite shot to make state as a
team.
Badger South meet
Torhorst said he would have
liked to shoot better at the Bad-
ger Sout h Conf er ence meet
Wednesday, May 21, at t he
House on the Rock Golf Resort.
But he still shot an 80 – which
was good enough to help Oregon
take fourth overall as a team
(344) in the tournament and the
final conference standings – and
earned No. 5 all-conference hon-
ors.
“It is pretty cool,” Torhorst
said. “There are a lot of good
guys in our conference. It is kind
of nice to be able to compete
with them and know that I am
there.”
What made i t sweet er for
Torhorst was that the play of
the team allowed the Panthers
to jump Stoughton, which had a
better conference dual record.
“We played well as a team. I
think it was close to our lowest
this year,” he said. “Everybody
played pretty solid. I would have
liked to be a little bit lower, but
Photos by Anthony Iozzo
Above, junior Austin Busler tees off on the sixth hole last Wednesday, during
the Badger South Conference meet at the House on the Rock Golf Resort; (right)
junior Carson Torhorst putts on the sixth hole. Torhorst was named to the All-
Badger South team.
Baseball
Weber strikes out 10 in regional preview
ANTHONY IOZZO
Assistant sports editor
Junior Mitch Weber and the Ore-
gon High School baseball team host-
ed Monona Grove last Thursday in a
regional semifinal preview.
The Panthers will be moving on if
it repeats its performance after win-
ning 4-0. Weber was a big reason, only
allowing a hit and a walk in a complete-
game 10-strikeout game.
Senior Bryan Putnam had a pinch-
hit RBI double in the sixth inning,
and seniors Logan Laski and Tyler
Mortensen each added RBIs.
Senior Pierce Peterson, junior Will
Paltz, Laski and Mortensen all scored
runs.
Easton Gerber took the loss for the
Silver Eagles. He pitched six innings
and allowed three earned runs on six
hits, while striking out one and walking
one.
Oregon closes the regular season on
the road. It travels to Watertown at 5
p.m. Thursday and travels to Wisconsin
Lutheran on Saturday. Saturday’s game
time was not available.
If you go
What: WIAA D1 regional semifinal
against Monona Grove
Where: Oregon High School
When: 5 p.m. Tuesday, June 3
Turn to Baseball/Page 11
Oregon rugby club upsets top-seeded Green Bay
The Oregon/Stoughton
Rugby Club advanced to the
Final Four last Thursday night
after defeating the Northeast
Wisconsin Conference cham-
pions and top-seeded Green
Bay Mavericks 24-7 in Neen-
ah.
With the victory the tean-
now advances to the Final
Four to take on last year’s
defending state champion, the
Elkhorn rugby club. Game
time is 5:30 p.m. in Elkhorn.
O/S controlled the rucks for
most of the game last Thurs-
day. The first try came at the
6-minute mark when Ryan
Hale (Oregon) ran it in from
5 meters out. Set up nicely
by Jesse Adams (Stoughton)
who broke up the middle, off
of a loose play. Matt Samp-
son (Oregon) scored at the
16-minute mark with a strong
run from 22 meters out. JJ
Rogers made the conversion
and O/S Rugby led at half
12-0.
From the start of the second
half, the Green Bay club test-
ed fullback Nick Miller (Ore-
gon), kicking to him often.
At the 4-minute mark of the
second half Miller received
a kick just in front of the 22
meter line and ran it back for a
try. JJ Rogers (Oregon) made
the conversion and O/S Rug-
by led 19-0.
Ten minutes later Rogers
scampered through Green
Bay’s defense to score a cor-
ner try. Green Bay did get a
try with 10 minutes left in the
game, but it was too little too
late.
In addition to the state play-
off tournaments, the Oregon/
Stoughton rugby club will be
entering the “Wisconsin Cup”
rugby tournament held May,
31 at the Cottage Grove Rug-
by Complex.
This will be held in con-
junction with USA Rugby’s
National Championships. The
best clubs in the Nation will
complete for the national title
May 31-June 1 in Madison at
Breese Stevens Field.
There will be three divi-
sions of men senior clubs
and two divisions of women
senior clubs.
This will mark the first
time the men’s and women’s
nationals were at the same
venue.
Rugby
Photo by Paul Peckam
Members of the Oregon/Stoughton rugby club celebrate their 24-7
upset of top seeded Green Bay last Thursday in Neenah.
Turn to Golf/Page 11
May 29, 2014 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
11
Rain postpones regional semifinal
JEREMY JONES
Sports editor
Fifteenth-seeded Oregon
traveled to Olbrich Park on
Tuesday to face second-seed-
ed Madison La Follette in the
WIAA Division 1 regional.
Shortly after taking the
field for warm-ups rain
forced the game to be post-
poned to Wednesday – after
the Observer’s deadline.
The winner advanced to
the regional finals Thursday
against No. 7 Madison East
or No. 10 Sun Prairie.
MG 6, Oregon 1
The Panthers closed out
the Badger South Confer-
ence season last Thursday
with a 6-1 loss at home
against Monona Grove.
Oregon (2-14 overall,
2-10 conference) opened
its season with a 16-6 win
against the Silver Eagles
(8-10, 5-7).
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125 N. Main St.
Oregon, WI 53575
835-6677
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Stoughton, WI 53589
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845-9559
The Panthers, seeded
seventh, then host Mono-
na Grove, seeded 10th,
in a WIAA Division 1
regional semifinal at 5
p.m. Tuesday, June 3.
The winner plays at
No. 2 Stoughton at 5
p.m. Thursday, June 5.
Oregon 3,
Oconomowoc 1
The Panthers hosted
Oconomowoc on Tues-
day and picked up a 3-1
win.
Abe Maurice led the
Panthers with two RBIs
on a double in the sixth
inning.
Weber added produc-
tion at the plate. He was
2-for-3 with a run scored.
Laski went the distance
for Oregon. He allowed
one earned run on five
hits in seven innings and
struck out five.
Lukas Brockway took
the loss for Oconomowoc.
He allowed two earned
runs on five hits. He struck
out one and walked two.
Photo submitted
U12 squad wins Waukesha title
The Oregon U12 Explosion recently won first place in their division in the Waukesha Soccer tourna-
ment two weeks ago.
Home Talent League
Orioles earn their first win of the season
JEREMY JONES
Sports editor
The Oregon Orioles split
a pair of Western Section
games over the Memorial
Day weekend.
Hollandale 4, Oregon 1
Hollandale’s Roy Hehn
went seven innings, allowing
one unearned run on five hits
as the Orioles fell 4-1.
Ben Riffle took the loss
for Oregon, allowing three-
earned runs on seven hits
and one walk over eight
innings. He struck out seven.
Eric Engler and Ryan
Hoodjer both doubled for
Oregon.
Oregon 9,
Mt. Horeb/Pine Bluff 7
Blake Watzke hit a
two-run double with one
out in the ninth inning to
give Oregon a 9-7 vic-
tory, its first win of the
season, over host Mount
Horeb/Pine Bluff.
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Baseball: Oregon stops Oconomowoc
Continued from page 10
Lacrosse
Lady Panthers split games last week
The Oregon High School
girls lacrosse team split
games last week, knock-
ing off Waunakee 11-9 and
falling to Verona 15-3.
Or egon f i ni s hes t he
regular season at 5 p.m.
Thursday at Middleton.
Oregon 11, Waunakee 7
The Panthers were led
by junior Mackenzie Tor-
py with seven goals on
May 20 against Waunakee.
Seni or Hannah Kane
added t hree goal s, and
s eni or Rachel Dvor ak
collected the other goal.
Dvorak and Torpy added
assists.
Junior Tasha Martin fin-
ished with 10 saves for the
Panthers.
Verona 15, Oregon 3
Seni or Kat i e Gl over ,
sophomore Maddi Hess
a n d f r e s h ma n Le x i e
Knudt son al l had goal s
in last Thursday’s loss to
Verona.
Martin finished with five
saves.
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I am not going to com-
plain.”
Mi chek s hot an 85,
while Busler followed with
an 86. Bundy finished the
scoring with a 90. Rog-
ers shot a 94, but his score
didn’t count for the team.
“I think they all would
have played a little bit bet-
ter, but I thought we would
be right around this num-
ber so I am happy with
that,” Scheer said.
Madison Edgewood won
the meet with a 313. Fort
Atkinson (321) and Milton
(324) were second and
third, respectively. Monroe
was fifth (344), Stoughton
was sixth (355) and Mono-
na Grove rounded out the
teams in last (369).
Milton’s Joe Meyer shot
a 73 t o medal . He al so
was the overall medalist
between the Badger South
and the Badger North.
Edge wood’ s J ohnny
Decker was second (75),
and Fort Atkinson’s Nate
Gilbert was third (76).
The all-conference team
was Decker (No. 1), Mey-
er (No.2), Gilbert (No. 3),
Edgewood’s Tommy Mohs
(No. 4), Torhorst (No. 5),
For t At ki nson’ s Mi t ch
Strom (No. 6) and Mon-
roe’s Eric Timm (No. 7).
Golf: Torhorst is No. 5 all-conference
Continued from page 10
12
May 29, 2014 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
Edgewood freshmen Cecil Lingard and
Felipe Campos and Oregon’s Calvin Schnei-
der and Donovan all were seeded No. 1 in their
respective flights and won conference titles.
Lingard defeated Waunakee’s Joey Schnei-
der 6-3, 7-6 (3) at No. 1 singles, winning the
tiebreaker after holding a 5-1 lead in the sec-
ond set. Campos defeated Waunakee’s Brad-
ley Pagnucci 6-2, 6-1 for the No. 3 singles title.
While sharing the conference title was great,
this year’s team has much higher aspiration,
aiming for a first-ever trip to the WIAA Divi-
sion 1 team state meet all season.
“We weren’t really concerning the players
so much with conference as with subsectionals
and team state,” Conklin said. “That’s still the
case. Beating Edgewood in the dual changed
things a little bit, that’s all the icing on the
cake.”
Waunakee, which repeated as Badger North
champion, finished third in the team tourna-
ment with 33 points.
Mad. Memorial subsectional
Oregon was back inside Nielsen Tennis Sta-
dium on Tuesday for the Madison Memorial
subsectional meet.
Jackson Schneider (10-8), Calvin Schneider
(18-4), Behrend (19-6) and Donovan (22-3) all
advanced in singles action.
The Panthers also saw all three of its dou-
bles teams move on as Tollakson/Onesti (15-
5), Wilhelm/Christoffereson (12-7) and Kres-
bach/ Reisdorf (16-6) won.
The Panthers travel to Lake Geneva for the
Badger sectional at 8:30 a.m. Thursday look-
ing to finish first overall as a team to clinch a
WIAA Division 1 state team tennis berth.
Winners at No. 1 singles and doubles need
only to win once to advance on to next week’s
individual state tennis tournament.
“Every point is going to count,” Conklin
said. “Seeding for this tournament was huge.
In the end we’re going to have to get there and
beat Madison West in a number of spots.”
Madison West, which defeated Oregon 4-3
in a dual late in the season, has a slight edge
over the Panthers. The Regents represented the
sectional at team state last year.
Friday & Saturday
June 20 & 21, 2014
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Brooklyn
Village-wide
much as the stress jumping put
on my legs.”
The Panthers’ have not have a
state qualifier for the boys since
Jake Ninneman won the discus in
2010.
“I think that would be a huge
accomplishment and definitely
some extra motivation for the
younger guys coming up,” Turn-
er said.
The Panthers’ 4x100 finished
second to Janesville Craig in
44.09, while the 4x800 relay took
third. Sromovsky added a runner-
up finish in the long jump (21-1).
Sophomore Chris Cutter ran
to third place in the 800, while
junior John Hermus moved on in
the 110 hurdles (third) and pole
vault (fourth).
Nick Kapusta earned the final
sectional qualifier in the 400, tak-
ing fourth place.
The Panthers finished fourth
overall with 85 points. Verona
dominated the meet with 150
points.
GIRLS
Oregon head coach Ned Lease
simply refers to senior Valerie
Jones as his rock for the Panthers.
“Val is so consistent in every-
thing she does and it showed
tonight,” Lease said.
Jones qualified for sectionals
in all four of her events Tues-
day, including wins in the 1,600
(5:49.98) and 800 (2:21.87).
“Tonight went really well,” she
said. “I wanted to win the mile,
but I also wanted to try and save
something for the 800.”
Havi ng al r eady advanced
to sectionals with a height of
5-2 i n t he hi gh j ump, Jones
admitted that her legs were dead
by the time the 4x400 relay rolled
around.
With the meet pushed back
about an hour behind sched-
ule following a lightning delay,
Jones bounced back t o hel p
anchor the 4x400 on to sectionals
with a third-place finish.
“Hopefully, I can advance on
to state in all four events, but
anything would be great,” said
Jones, who plans to run at the site
of the WIAA state meet this fall.
“I’m planning on running at UW-
La Crosse, so this isn’t really the
end.”
Oregon travels to Lake Geneva
for the Badger sectional on Fri-
day.
Junior thrower Katie Boehnen
finished second overall in the
discus with a toss of 109-10.
Sophomore Maddie LeBrun
(1:00.1) and senior Jamie Wood
(1:01.46) took second and third
in the 400, respectively.
Securing fourth place and also
advancing on to sectionals were:
senior Ruby Carpenter, who had
to re-run the 100 hurdles after
being tripped in the finals, fresh-
man Isabella Musillami (shot
put) and the Panthers’ 4x200
relay.
“The goal tonight was simply
to advance on to sectionals,”
Lease said. “With the weather
conditions being what they were,
I was really happy to see some
many of our athletes step up to
the challenge.”
The girls matched the boys fin-
ish to place fourth overall with
87.5 points.
Stoughton claimed the regional
championship with 138 points.
“On both the boys and girls
side tonight, we were a really
well-rounded team that scored
everywhere,” Lease said.
Regionals: Panthers boys and girls teams finish fourth overall at Verona regional meet
Photos by Jeremy Jones
Above, senior Ruby Carpenter looks toward the finish line of the 100-meter hur-
dles after being tripped by Janesville Parker’s Chanel Eichelberger. Carpenter and
Milton’s Aibgail Martin had to re-run the race to determine fourth place and the
final sectional qualifying spot. Carpenter posted a time of 15.4 to advance; (right)
Senior Jawon Turner triple jumps to third place with a distance of 41-11 1/2.
Continued from page 9
Conference: All four singles make sectionals
Continued from page 9
If you go
What: WIAA D1 sectionals
Where: Janesville Parker High
School
When: 4 p.m. (field events);
4:45 p.m. (track)
Updates: Go to Twitter and fol-
low @UNG_AIozzo for news pho-
tos and video during the meet
Conference standings
Singles
No. 1 – Lingard (ME) defeated J.
Schneider (W) 6-3, 7-6 (3). Third: Dahl
(FA) defeated J. Schneider (O) 6-2, 5-7,
6-0. No. 2 – C. Schneider (O) defeated
O’Brien (ME) 6-3, 6-4. Third: Paradisn
(W) defeated Grote (Mi) 6-2, 6-2. No.
3 – Campos (ME) defeated Pagnucci
(W) 6-2, 6-1. Third: Behrend (O)
defeated Gdaniec (FA) 6-4, 6-4. No. 4 –
Donovan (O) defeated Garlock (ME) 7-5,
6-3. Third: Zellner (W) defeated Nelson
(MG) 6-1, 2-6, 6-4.
Doubles
No. 1 – Kirsh/Colletti (ME) defeated
Onesti/Tollakson 6-0, 6-4. Third:
McCarthy/Austria-Kemble (W) defeated
Webber/Sherwood (R) 6-2, 7-5. No.
2 – Thelen/Maloney (ME) defeated
Frisque/Taylor (MG) 4-6, 6-2, 6-4.
Third: Wilhelm/Christofferson defeated
Baerschi/Althaus (Mo) 6-3, 6-1. No.
3 – Croake/Keller (ME) defeated
Kresbach/Reisdorf (O) 6-2, 6-4. Third:
Berthiaume/Pratt (Mi) defeated Meske/
Haskins 6-4, 6-1.
BADGER SOUTH
Team scores — Madison
Edgewood 48, Oregon 42, Milton 17,
Monona Grove 16, Monroe 14, Fort
Atkinson 13, Stoughton 8.
Final standings — Madison
Edgewood and Oregon 11, Milton
8, Monroe 5, Monona Grove 4, Fort
Atkinson 2, Stoughton 1.
BADGER NORTH
Team scores — Waunakee 33,
Reedsburg 8, Baraboo and Sauk Prairie
6, Portage 2.
Final standings — Waunakee 8,
Reedsburg 5, Sauk Prairie 4½, Baraboo
2½, Portage 0.
May 29, 2014 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
13
Legals
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
ON THE REZONING REQUEST
FOR PART OF LOT 1, ALPINE
MEADOWS, AND OUTLOT
2, DRUMLIN ADDITION TO
ALPINE MEADOWS (THE
“PROPERTY”).
VILLAGE OF OREGON
AMENDING THE PLANNED
DEVELOPMENT ZONING
PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that the
Planning Commission of the Village of
Oregon will hold a public hearing at 6:30
p.m. on Thursday, June 5, 2014 in the
Board Room of the Oregon Village Hall,
117 Spring Street, Oregon, Wisconsin,
to consider the rezone application of
Oregon Community Bank, owner of the
Property, to amend the General Develop-
ment Plan for the Property.
A map of the area requested to be re-
zoned is on fle at the offce of the Village
Clerk. Offce hours of the Clerk are 8:00
a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday.
Subsequent to the hearing, the Com-
mission intends to deliberate and act
upon the request.
Peggy S.K. Haag
Village Clerk
Published: May 22 and 29, 2014
WNAXLP
* * *
TOWN OF OREGON
BOARD OF REVIEW
1138 UNION ROAD
OREGON, WI 53575
SATURDAY, MAY 31, 2014
9:00 A.M. – 11:00 P.M.
The 2014 Town of Oregon Board of
Review will be held on Saturday, May 31,
2014 from 9:00 a.m. to 11:00 p.m. To ap-
pear at the Board of Review, it is required
that an appointment is scheduled 48
hours prior to the start of Board of Re-
view. Appointments are scheduled with
the Clerk’s Offce at 835-3200.
Denise Arnold
Town Clerk
Published: May 22 and 29, 2014
WNAXLP
* * *
RUTLAND
PLANNING COMMISSION
JUNE 2, 2014 – 6:30 P.M.
Agenda:
1. Call meeting to order.
2. Roll Call.
3. Approval of May meeting minutes.
4. Preliminary and Final CSM for Pe-
tition 10648 by Pete Dunn. Town approval
of building site and driveway location.
5. Preliminary inquiry by Don Wah-
lin regarding splitting land and creating
homesite(s) for Robert Allen farm on Old
Stage Road.
6. Preliminary inquiry by Kevin
Klahn regarding possible rezoning to al-
low construction of ag buildings for prop-
erty located on Hwy 92.
7. Inquiry by Robert Helley regarding
split eligibility of Vike Investment Group
property.
8. Petition 10672/CUP 2270 by
Stoughton Farms Inc., located at 3768
Old Stage Rd. (Sec. 34) to rezone 15
acres from A-1 Ex. to A-2(8) creating a
parcel in order to construct a FM radio
tower. Review of materials received to
date. Discussion and necessary action
on questions and comments received
today prior to Public Hearing scheduled
for Thursday, June 12, 2014 at 6:30 p.m.
9. Discussion/update/necessary ac-
tion on items from previous meetings:
* FUDA and proposed cooperative
agreement statement
* Highway 14 Update including
neighborhood meeting schedule
* Comp Plan Updates
10. Adjournment.
Dawn George, Clerk
Published: May 29, 2014
WNAXLP
* * *
RUTLAND TOWN
BOARD MEETING
JUNE 3, 2014 – 6:30 P.M.
AGENDA:
1. Appearance by Dane Co. Sheriff
Dept. representative.
2. Constable Reports.
3. Rutland Cemetery and Church
report.
4. Public Comment for items not on
the agenda:
5. Planning Commission report.
6. Action as necessary on 2014 road
work projects. Receive seal coating bids
and take necessary action. Review task
list.
7. Consent Agenda:
* Minutes April meeting.
* Treasurer’s Report.
* Vouchers and Checks.
8. Correspondence.
* Special Event – Tour de Food
– 6/8/14
* Call to Action and Solidar-
ity Against Dane Co. Zoning Change At-
tempts.
9. Action on alcohol license renewal
applications, Operator’s licenses and
other licenses.
10. Discussion on meeting with DOT
regarding Hwy 14 and neighborhood
meeting schedule.
11. Update on Environment Corridor.
12. Discussion and necessary ac-
tion on approval of the purchase of a new
thermal imaging camera by the Oregon
Fire/EMS.
13. Discussion regarding Ted Olson/
Dunkirk letter to Stoughton regarding
disposition of old fre truck.
14. Discussion and necessary ac-
tion on approval of fooring expense for
the Oregon Senior Center.
15. Discussion and necessary action
on new Town Hall matters.
16. Discussion and necessary action
regarding requesting bids for Rutland
Comprehensive Plan revisions.
17. Adjournment.
Dawn George, Clerk
Published: May 29, 2014
WNAXLP
* * *
AGENDA -
OREGON TOWN BOARD
TUESDAY, JUNE 3, 2014 AT
6:30 P.M.
OREGON TOWN HALL
1138 UNION ROAD
OREGON, WI 53575
6:30 P.M. BOARD MEETING
1. Call Town Board meeting to order.
2. Reading and Approval of minutes
from previous meeting.
3. Financial Report and Acceptance.
4. Public Comment.
a. Appearance by Trevor Passmore,
resident of the Village of Oregon.
5. Discussion and possible Approval
of Recommendations from Plan Commis-
sion:
a. Conditional Use Permit; Petition #
DCPCUP-2014-02275; Parcel # 0509-173-
8500-3. The request is to obtain a condi-
tional use permit (CUP) for a limited rural
business (metal fabrication, welding, art
and repairs). The property is zoned A-
1Ex. Petitioner and Owner Richard Fiz-
zell, 895 Storytown Road, Brooklyn, WI
53521.
b. Land Division and Rezone Re-
quest; Petition # DCPREZ-2014-10692;
Parcel # 0509-162-9000-9 & 0509-162-
9561-1. The request is to create one
building parcel for son and a second
agricultural parcel. The land is currently
zoned A-1 Ex. Parcel 1 would be 2.0
acres, zoned A-2(2) and Parcel 2 would
be 35.1 acres, zoned A-1 Ex. Petitioner
and Owner is Dale Secher, 5683 Lincoln
Rd., Oregon, WI 53575.
6. Discussion and possible Action
re: the Anderson Farm Park.
7. Communication and Action of the
Dane County Board – Bollig.
8. Fire & EMS Report (Oregon – Van
Kampen, Belleville & Brooklyn – Clark).
9. Park Committee Report and Ac-
tion – Root.
10. Assessor’s Report and Recom-
mendation – Blomstrom.
11. Discussion and possible Amend-
ment of Town of Oregon Ordinance, Sec-
tion 10.1.5 Building Permit and Inspec-
tion. Eliminating the fees under 10.1.5(g)
and replacing with, “Building permit fees
are subject to change. Please see current
Town of Oregon Permit Fee Schedule.”
12. Discussion and possible Ap-
proval re: Changes to Building Inspec-
tion Fees.
13. Building Inspection Services Re-
port – Arnold.
14. Constable’s Report – Wackett.
15. Discussion and possible Ap-
proval re: Appointment of Plan Commis-
sion members Dave Hagemann and Sha-
ron Christensen to another three (3) year
term – 6/2014-6/2017.
16. Plan Commission Report and
Recommendation - Weber.
17. Discussion and possible Action
re: Potential Impacts of the state’s 2014-
15 Budget Bill.
18. Discussion and possible Action
re: Senior Center – Van Kampen.
19. Discussion and possible Action
re: purchase of truck.
20. Public Works and TORC Report
– Ace
21. Board Communications/ Future
Agenda Items.
22. Approval of payment vouchers
– Arnold.
23. Discussion and possible Approv-
al re: Resolution 01-2014; Resolution
Designating Offcial Registering Voters
on Election Day.
24. Clerk’s Report – Arnold.
25. Adjournment.
Note: Agendas are subject to amend-
ment after publication. Check the offcial
posting locations (Town Hall, Town of
Oregon Recycling Center and Oregon
Village Hall) including the Town website
at www.town.oregon.wi.us or join the
Town’s e-mail list to receive agendas at
townoforegon@mailbag.com. It is possi-
ble that members of and possibly a quo-
rum of members of other governmental
bodies of the town may be in attendance
at any of the meetings to gather informa-
tion; however, no action will be taken by
any governmental body at said meeting
other than the governmental body spe-
cifcally referred to in the meeting notice.
Requests from persons with disabilities
who need assistance to participate in
this meeting or hearing should be made
to the Clerk’s offce at 835-3200 with 48
hours notice.
Posted: May 22, 2014
Published: May 29, 2014
WNAXLP
* * *
AGENDA
OREGON TOWN BOARD
SATURDAY, MAY 31, 2014
8:50 A.M.
OREGON TOWN HALL
1138 UNION ROAD
OREGON, WI 53575
8:50 A.M. BOARD MEETING
1. Call Town Board meeting to order.
2. Discussion and possible Action
re: Approval of seal coating Tipperary
Road – Cty A to Lincoln Road.
3. Adjournment.
Note: Agendas are subject to amend-
ment after publication. Check the offcial
posting locations (Town Hall, Town of
Oregon Recycling Center and Oregon
Village Hall) including the Town website
at www.town.oregon.wi.us or join the
Town’s e-mail list to receive agendas at
townoforegon@mailbag.com. It is possi-
ble that members of and possibly a quo-
rum of members of other governmental
bodies of the town may be in attendance
at any of the meetings to gather informa-
tion; however, no action will be taken by
any governmental body at said meeting
other than the governmental body spe-
cifcally referred to in the meeting notice.
Requests from persons with disabilities
who need assistance to participate in
this meeting or hearing should be made
to the Clerk’s offce at 835-3200 with 48
hours notice.
Posted: May 15, 2014
Published: May 29, 2014
WNAXLP
* * *
VILLAGE OF BROOKLYN
NOTICE OF
LICENSE REQUEST
(LICENSE YEAR JULY 1, 2014
– JUNE 30, 2015)
The Village Board for the Village of
Brooklyn, 210 Commercial St., Brooklyn,
WI, will meet on June 9, 2014, at 6:30 p.m.
to discuss the following license applica-
tions:
COMBINATION “CLASS B”: FER-
MENTED MALT BEVERAGE & INTOXI-
CATING LIQUORS:
Renewal- Arlene Elmer, dba Anchor
Club, 112 Hotel Street
COMBINATION “CLASS B” RE-
SERVE: FERMENTED MALT BEVERAGE
& INTOXICATING LIQUORS:
Renewal-Scout Enterprise, LLC, dba
Country Place Café, Scott Zeitler, Agent
233 Douglas Drive
COMBINATION “CLASS A”: FER-
MENTED MALT BEVERAGE & INTOXI-
CATING LIQUORS:
Renewal- Brooklyn Mini Mart, LLC,
Nissin Rodriguez, Agent, 355 N Rutland
Ave
Carol Strause
Clerk/Treasurer
Published: May 29, 2014
WNAXLP
* * *
“As a teacher, it’s hard
when people are constantly
telling you what to do and
how to teach. We started
to give people ideas and
sharing different ways they
could personalize learning
in their classrooms.”
District technology direc-
tor Jon Tanner said Nelson
is a “key leader” in per-
sonalized learning at the
school.
“Students in his classes
understand not only what
they are learning, but why
it’s important, and how it
will benefit them in the
future,” he said. “Bruce
understands that not all
students learn at the same
pace, and he has designed
classes to allow students to
move at a pace that is right
for them.”
The great outdoors
One collaborative proj-
ect that involved several
different teachers and sub-
ject areas is one Nelson is
working on with art teacher
Michael Derrick and ag
teacher Jillian Beaty for a
student “outdoor TV show”
project. With the show,
ki ds have a vari et y of
options on how to demon-
strate their learning in dif-
ferent subject areas.
Nelson said by tailor-
ing students’ projects to
t hei r educat i onal needs
and strengths, they end up
learning more than in a reg-
ular classroom setting.
“It’s amazing, because
not only are they learn-
ing about the subject they
wanted to focus on, but
they are learning about
other areas often not even
realizing it,” Derrick said.
“It has become a cross-cur-
riculum adventure.”
Since Derrick and Nel-
son have worked before on
personalized learning proj-
ects, this latest one seemed
natural.
“You have so many kids
here, when you see them in
the halls, you can see they
like the outdoors, they have
the camouflage hats on,
so we came up with idea
of doing a hunting show,
whi ch ar e so popul ar ,
and a lot of kids already
(record) their hunts,” he
said. “Bruce has kind of
been leading the charge at
the high school for a lot of
personalized learning, and
he said it would be great
for personalized learning,
so we took and ran with it.”
This spring, Derrick’s
students are learning “so
much more than just pho-
tography.”
“They do their story on
turkey hunting, and all of a
sudden they’re researching
turkeys in the state of Wis-
consin, which were almost
extinct,” he said. “When
they write their story, it’s
English, they have to write
out a script. They’re learn-
ing history, they’re learn-
ing biology and the life
cycle of the deer and eco-
logical stuff. It all comes
t oget her, and i t ’s been
great.”
Beatty said it’s great that
her ag students are earning
art credit with the class.
“It’s wonderful to hear
my students talking about
camera settings at a trap
shoot,” she said.
Gaining momentum
Personalizing learning
“isn’t easy,” Nelson said
– particularly for teachers
who must adapt to a new
method and take up more
of their own time to plan
things out – but once start-
ed, the process will grow
“exponentially.”
“It’s like a snowball – it
starts really small, and it
starts to grow exponen-
tially – and we’re still in
the small snowball stage,”
he said. “We’re not by any
means starting to incorpo-
rate even half the teachers
in any one building. It will
slowly evolve.”
That ’s not t o say he
expects the district to one
day convert to an all-per-
sonalized learning curricu-
lum, as – true to the con-
cept – it might not be the
best fit for every pupil.
“A good number of kids
will really like the ‘legacy’
or traditional classroom,
where a teacher tells them
what to do and then they
do it,” Nelson said. “Some
kids have a real hard time
with trying to come up
with ideas for projects and
then assessing themselves.
They need the structure.
We’re trying to create a
structure that is flexible for
them, and it seems to be
working.”
Yet, for many students
who have tried personal-
ized learning, they seem to
resist going “back” to the
old ways, Nelson said.
“This last unit, I did it
traditional – I was teach-
ing on the board, they fol-
low the same exact steps
with me, and I found a lot
of them didn’t like that
anymore,” he said. “Once
they’ve experienced it, I
think then they found they
really like it.”
The main advantage of
personalized learning, Nel-
son said, is getting students
more engaged, which helps
them learn faster and retain
information longer.
“Think back about that
course in a class in high
school you really didn’t
care for,” he said. “You
pr obabl y wer en’ t pay-
ing attention, you were
thinking of a million other
things, you did the work to
get it done – ‘just give me
a grade’ and you move on.
“ Wi t h pe r s ona l i z e d
learning, every topic, they
should really be able to get
into, and my experience is,
they do a much better job.”
While Nelson cautions
that no learning method
is a “silver bullet,” he’s
excited to see how the stu-
dents who are already get-
ting personalized learning
in elementary and middle
school will do once they
get to high school.
“I t hi nk t hey’l l bri ng
other kids with them,” he
said. “My hope is, as the
students experience this
more in other classrooms,
they may put some pressure
on their teachers to at least
offer them more choices, or
give them options, or they
will gravitate to the classes
that are more personalized,
and away from ones that
are the more legacy model,
1800s model.
“The most i mpor t ant
thing is giving students
choices and a voice in their
learning and how they are
assessed. Because once
they have choices in how
they can show the instruc-
tor they’re learning, they
are going to learn it at a
much deeper level.”
Learn: ‘Personalized learning’ can require teachers to use more of their own time to plan
Continued from page 1
Photo by Scott De Laruelle
Home-schooled junior Marcus Tobias, who plays on the OHS basketball team, works out last
week as part of his personalized training regimen under the watchful eyes of Gerald Maddi, a
UW-Madison student teacher who has worked this year with OHS phy ed teacher Mark Diercks.
Personalized training at OHS
Sometimes, personalized learning
requires a bit of sweat and pain, and
that’s quite all right with Mark Diercks.
The OHS physical education teacher
has been working this year with Marcus
Tobias, a home-schooled high school
junior who plays on the OHS basketball
team. Diercks, along with UW-Madison
student teacher Gerald Maddi, who’s
finishing up his secondary student
teaching placement in Physical Educa-
tion, have taken their lunch hours and
class prep time to work with the 6-foot-
4 forward-center as he tries to take his
game – and fitness – to a new level.
The program is a one-credit course
that students can choose (there were 19
students this year), though Diercks cau-
tioned it’s “a hard course,” and not for
everyone.
“Most of these kids are very driven,
and grades are important, so they are
highly motivated, and that helps,” he
said. “ We want a student who works.
Kids can learn a lot from a group set-
ting, but (this is an option) for kids who
can’t fit it in their schedule, or want it
tailored to them or are not good in a
group setting. We look at it as another
option in the phy ed curriculum.”
With Tobias, Diercks has been able
to formulate a program that gets him
where he wants to go. This year, it’s
focusing on basketball training, with
lots of agility work and movement with
the basketball.
“It’s very fluid, and we can change
it,” Diercks said. “It’s been a learning
curve the first semester, the second
semester has gotten better, and next
year I think it’s going to go even bet-
ter.”
Tobias said while the workouts have
been “really tough,” he enjoys the chal-
lenge and has gotten a lot out of his per-
sonalized program, and not just physi-
cally.
“I’ve noticed a big improvement,”
he said. “With Mr. Diercks, it’s a lot of
mental stuff he teaches. It really helps
you improve on a lot of skills.”

14
May 29, 2014 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
140 LOST & FOUND
FOUND SET of keys on Racetrack Rd
Stoughton call to identify. 608-873-7639
143 NOTICES
HERO MILES to find out more about
how you can help our service members,
veterans and their families in their time of
need, visit the Fisher House website at
www.fisherhouse.org (wcan)
WANTED TICKETS to Oregon High
School graduating class ceremony. June
8th in the gym. 608-770-4491
CLASSIFIED AD DEADLINE IS Noon
Friday for The Great Dane and Noon
Monday for the Oregon Observer unless
changed because of holiday work sched-
ules. Call now to place your ad, 873-6671
or 835-6677.
THE Oregon Observer CLASSIFIEDS,
the best place to buy or sell. Call 873-
6671 or 835-6677.
WCAN (Wisconsin Community Ad Net-
work) and/or the member publications
review ads to the best of their abil-
ity. Unfortunately, many unscrupulous
people are ready to take your money!
PLEASE BE CAREFUL ANSWERING
ANY AD THAT SOUNDS TOO GOOD
TO BE TRUE! For more information, or to
file a complaint regarding an ad, please
contact The Department of Trade, Agri-
culture & Consumer Protection 1-800-
422-7128 (wcan)
163 TRAINING SCHOOLS
DENTAL ASSISTANT Be one in just 10
Saturdays! WeekendDentalAssistant.
com Fan us on Facebook! Next class
begins 9/6/2014. Call 920-730-1112
Appleton (Reg. WI EAB) (wcan)
320 AIRCRAFT PARTS & SERVICE
AIRCRAFT HANGER at Baraboo/Dells
Airport. DLL,
Post-war, Quonset-style T-hanger.
New paint, some remodeling, heated.
$10,900/OBO. Everett 608-356-5324
340 AUTOS
1998 FORD MUSTANG Bright blue,
White leather interior. 4 speed. New
transmission. Needs work. Good engine.
$1000/obo. 608-669-2243
DONATE YOUR CAR, BOAT or Motor-
cycle to Rawhide. Donate before Decem-
ber 31st for a tax deduction and help a
life in your local wisconsin community.
888-653-2729 (wcan)
CLASSIFIED AD DEADLINE IS Noon
Monday for the Oregon Observer unless
changed because of holiday work sched-
ules. Call now to place your ad, 873-6671
or 835-6677.
342 BOATS & ACCESSORIES
$2,000,000 LIQUIDATION @ Boat
World. Fininacing Available on over 700
new and used Pontoons, Fishing Boats,
Deck Boats, Ski-Boats, Bass & Walleye
Boats, Cuddys, Cruisers up to 35 Feet
& Outboards @ the Guaranteed Best
Prices! Crownline, Axis, Malibu, Triton,
Alumacraft, Mirrorcraft, Misty Harbor
& Crest Pontoons. American Marine &
Motorsports Super Center, Schawano.
Where Dreams come true. 866-955-2628
www.americanmarina.com (wcan)
SHOREMASTER DOCK & LIFT
Headquarters. New & Used. We do it
all.Delivery/Assembly/Install/Removal
American Marine & Motorsports,
Schawano = Save
866-955-2628 (wcan)
355 RECREATIONAL VEHICLES
ATVS SCOOTERS & Go-Karts. Youth
ATV's & Scooters (80mpg) @ $49/mo.
Sport & 4x4 Atv's @ $69/mo. Ameri-
can Marine & Motorsports, Schawano
=Save= 866-955-2628 www.american-
marina.com (wcan)
360 TRAILERS
TRAILERS @ LIQUIDATION Pricing.
Boat, ATV, Sled or Pontoons. 2 or 4
Place/Open or Enclosed. American
Marine, Shawano 866-955-2628 www.
americanmarina.com (wcan)
402 HELP WANTED, GENERAL
APARTMENT COMMUNITY in
Verona has two positions:
Grounds Keeper-Assistant
Maintenance. Full time. Landscaping
maintenance, light building
maintenance, painting and cleaning.
Leasing Agent: Flexible part time.
Will handle all aspects of leasing
apartments. Experience in sales or
hospitality is helpful. Strong customer
service a must. Please call
608-845-7255.

CARRIERS NEEDED for delivery
of WSJ to Oregon/Stoughton area.
Must be available early a.m., 7 days
a week, dependable vehicle. Route
earns between $950. to $1200/month.
For more information call
Pat 608-212-7216
MECHANIC WANTED Part time to
full time. Flexible Hours. Call or text
608-576-5607(corrected#)
MEDICAL-PHLEB-MA-RN-LPN-MT-
MEDIC NEED recent Venipuncture. Do
Mobile Insurance Exams/Draws. Set you
own appt! Good $. www.appslive.com,
appswi@bizwi.rr.com (wcan)
PART-TIME CARE SPECIALISTS ~
ALL SHIFTS.
Sienna Crest Assisted Living, Inc.
is looking for dedicated and caring
individuals to join our team of
compassionate care staff. We offer
competitive wages designed to
attract and retain qualified individuals.
Training provided. Preferred
candidate will have some assisted
living experience. Applicants may
download an application at www.
siennacrest.com or stop by to pick
one up.
Completed applications should be
returned to the Manager at your
choice location:
Sienna Crest, Attn:
Lois Gilbert, 981 Park St, Oregon,
WI 53575 608-835-7781 or Sienna
Meadows, Attn:
Chris Kiesz, 989 Park St., Oregon,
WI 53575
608-835-0000 EOE

SKI AND Furniture Service Person.
We are now accepting applications
for a part time and full time service
position working in our warehouse in
summer and our ski shop in winter.
This is an entry level position which
includes: unloading shipments,
assembling furniture, assisting on
deliveries, along with ski tuning and
repairs. Individual should have some
downhill skiing experience and a good
driving record. Chalet is a fun and
friendly place to work and we have
great appreciation for our employees
and customers. These positions are
year round jobs with flexible shifts on
weekdays and weekends. We offer
a generous starting salary with paid
training, free skiing at local hills, a
clean non-smoking work environment
and opportunities for advancement.
Apply in person at: Chalet Ski & Patio
5252 Verona Rd, Madison, Wl 53711
608-273-8263

DANE COUNTY’S MARKETPLACE.
The Oregon Observer Classifieds. Call
873-6671 or 835-6677.
WANTED:
Part-Time Teacher to Tutor
Students at Various Grade Levels.
Please Call Norland Learning Center
608-497-1299
423 WORK WANTED
COMPUTER REPAIR in your home.
Worried about your XPMachine? I will fix
it so you are safe, clean and get speed
back. Back up service available. $65/
hr. 25+ years experience. Raoul 608-
698-1350
$10 off seniors and veterans.
449 DRIVER, SHIPPING
& WAREHOUSING
LOOKING FOR Experienced CDL semi-
driver. Our business has expanded. We
are adding new equipment. Must be
professional, courteous and have clean
MVR. Runs from Madison area to Ari-
zona and S. California. No touch freight,
paid mileage and insurance. Serious
inquries only. 608-516-9697
OTR DRIVERS WANTED
Above Average Mileage Pay
Performance and Safety BONUSES!
Health/Dental/Vision/HSA/Matching
401K/Vacation and Holiday Pay
Avg 2500-3500 miles/week
100% No Touch- 12 mo. CDL/A
Exp Preferred 888-545-9351 ext 13
www.doublejtransprot.com (wcan)
ROUTE DRIVER Merchandiser
Grocery store experience helpful.
Contact Darrell 608-514-4148
453 VOLUNTEER WANTED
HOME HEALTH United's Meal on
Wheels program is currently looking for
volunteers to help deliver nutrition and
smiles over the noon hour to those who
are homebound in the Madison, Monona,
Middleton or Sun Prairie area. The com-
mitment level is flexible; volunteers can
choose what days and locations work
best with their schedule. Do you have
good communication skills, enjoy working
with people and like to work? If so, you
could be a Food Pantry Shopper at The
Salvation Army of Dane County. Shop-
pers engage our clients while assisting
them with their food choices and answer
questions they have about the program.
United Way 2-1-1 is seeking new volun-
teers to become Information and Referral
Specialists. If you are looking for an
opportunity to learn more about com-
munity resources and would like to assist
people in finding ways to get and give
help, United Way 2-1-1 may be the place
for you! Our volunteers staff our tele-
phone lines, answering questions about
resources available in the service area.
Call the Volunteer Center at 608-246-
4380 or visit www.volunteeryourtime.org
for more information or to learn about
other volunteer opportunities.
Dave Johnson
(608) 835-8195
We recommend septic
pumping every two years
B & R PUMPING
SERVICE LLC
U
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6
1
9
5
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7
7
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Hardtland
Home Improvement, LLC
Roofng • Siding • Gutters
Shingle & Steel Roofng
Gutter Covers & Cleaning
(608) 845-9100
TomD@tds.net • www.hardtland.net
Locally Owned – Verona, WI
Serving U Since '72
U
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We Can Remove Unsightly
Black Streaks From
Your Roof!
STOUGHTON
307 S Forrest
Retail or
Offce Space.
400 sq ft.
$299/month
utilities
included.
608-271-0101
REAL ESTATE AUCTION
IMKAHLNG AUCTIONS
Auctioneer: Riley Kahl, Registered Wisconsin Auctioneer #736
8385 County Road A, Verona, WI 53593 • 608-832-4839
U
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4
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For more information and to
view property by appointment
(608) 770-3930
TUESDAY, JUNE 17
11:00 A.M.
735 South Perry Parkway • Oregon, WI 53575
Property is being sold for cash. 5% buyers fee to be added to final bidding price and sign an offer
to purchase with no contingencies. Balance will be due on closing. Bidders are required to have
$5000.00 in earnest money in form of certified check to obtain bidding number. Property is sold
subject to approval. Property is sold in its "as is" condition, with all its faults. There are no guarantees
or warranties as to condition of buildings, mechanical systems, or any other aspects of the property.
If used as residential rental property, buyer is responsible for rental weatherization code compliance,
including cost of inspection. Information in this advertising was derived from sources believed to be
correct but is not guaranteed. Buyers shall rely entirely on their own information, judgement, and
inspection of the property and records. All announcements from the auction block take precedence
over printed material and any other oral statements made.
For more information and pictures go to www.auctionzip.com
• Driveways
• Floors
• Patios
• Sidewalks
• Decorative Concrete
Phil Mountford 516-4130 (cell)
835-5129 (office)
Al Mittelstaedt 845-6960
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PAR Concrete, Inc.
Increase Your sales opportunities…
reach over 1.2 million households!
Advertise in our
Wisconsin Advertising Network System.
For information call 845-9559 or 873-6671.
FOR SALE- MISCELLANEOUS
SAWMILLS from only $4397.00- MAKE & SAVE MONEY
with your own bandmill- Cut lumber any dimension. In stock
ready to ship. FREE Info/DVD: www.NorwoodSawmills.
com 1-800-578-1363 Ext.300N (CNOW)
HELP WANTED - PROFESSIONAL
Wanted: Daily newspaper circulation manager in Sierra Vista,
Arizona. The only thing better than the climate is the job. Full
job description here: http://wicknet.com/QyYVi (CNOW)
HELP WANTED- SALES
Become an Independent Insurance Agent (English or
Bilingual). Part time. $50k+ yearly potential. Retirement
plans with Living Benefits. Join us now! www.
FEGcareers.com 1(800)296-0115. (CNOW)
HELP WANTED- SKILLED TRADES
HBI, Inc., UTILITY CONTRACTOR HAS Immediate
Opportunities In the Telephone Industry for: ï Aerial
Technicians, ï Cable Plow/Bore Operators, ï Foremen, ï CDL
Laborers. Training Offered. Travel Required for All Positions.
920-664-6300. www.holtger.com EOE by AA (CNOW)
HELP WANTED- TRUCK DRIVER
MARTEN TRANSPORT Regional Runs Available
CHOOSE the TOTAL PACKAGE: AUTOMATIC
DETENTION PAY AFTER 1 HR! Regular, Frequent
HOME TIME; TOP PAY BENEFITS; Mthly BONUSES
& MORE! CDL-A, 6 mos. Exp. Req’d. EEOE/AAP 866-
322-4039 www.drive4marten.com (CNOW)
Knight Refrigerated CDL-A Truck Drivers Needed. Get
Paid Daily or Weekly. Consistent Miles. Pay Incentive &
Benefits! Become a Knight of the Road. EOE. 855-876-
6079. (CNOW)
ON THE ROAD TO A BRIGHTER FUTURE! Midwest
Truck Driving School. Class starts every 4 weeks. Next
class starts June 23rd. www.midwesta.com Financing
Available:1-800-377-5567, 906-789-6311 (CNOW)
MISCELLANEOUS
This classified spot for sale! Advertise your product or
recruit an applicant in over 179 Wisconsin newspapers!
Only $300/week. Call this paper or 800-227-7636 www.
cnaads.com (CNOW)
Leoris “Lee” Meyer
Leoris “Lee” Meyer, age
84, of Brooklyn, passed
away on Wednesday, May
21, 2014, at her home with
her family. She was born on
Aug. 14, 1929, in Beaver
Dam, the daughter of Ernest
& Edna (Busse) Jaehnke.
Lee married the love of her
life, Eugene Meyer on June
23, 1951, in Beaver Dam
and they spent 61 wonder-
ful years together.
Lee worked at Brook-
l yn El ement ary for 30
years, retiring in 1997.
She enjoyed reading, bak-
ing, and gardening. Lee
and Gene enjoyed travel-
ing together. Their favor-
ite places included Alaska,
Spain and Thailand. Lee
had a very active social life
and loved spending time
with family. She was a lov-
ing mother, grandmother
and wife. Lee and Gene
exemplified the true mean-
ing of marriage and com-
mitment in loving and car-
ing for each other.
Lee is survived by her
daughters, Lynnette (Perry)
Outhouse, Janelle (Den-
nis) McMannes, and Susan
(John) Statz, and son, Dale
( Denni s Daught r i dge)
Meyer ; gr andchi l dr en,
Kr i st i and Jason Out -
house, Kathryn and Charlie
McMannes, and Jake and
Alyssa Statz.
She was preceded i n
death by her parents; hus-
band; and brother, Clifford
(Mildred) Jaehnke.
Funeral Services were
held at Gunderson Oregon
Funeral Home, 1150 Park
St., Oregon, on Sunday,
May 25, 2014, with the
Rev. Rebecca Ninke pre-
siding. Burial was at St.
Mary’s Catholic Cemetery.
Memorials may be made to
Fisher Center for Alzheim-
er’s Research Foundation
alzinfo.org. Online con-
dolences may be made at
gundersonfh.com.
Gunderson Oregon
Funeral & Cremation Care
1150 Park Street
835-3515
Leoris Meyer
Obituary
“It rapidly becomes
home at Sienna Crest.
Care is excellent and the
staf are family.”

-Alma
Resident
Memory Care
989 Park St. Oregon, WI
(608) 835-0000
Assisted Living
981 Park St. Oregon, WI
(608) 835-7781
Call for photo submission
Did you snap some photos of a community event in the Oregon area? Show us
your stuff! We love to hear from our readers.
Email communityreporter@wcinet.com with photos and/or inquiries.
Email sportsreporter@wcinet.com with sports photos.
May 29, 2014 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
15
516 CLEANING SERVICES
SUNSHINE HOUSE CLEANING LLC
Since 1982 Detailed cleaning service.
Owner Operated. Weekly, bi-weekly, or
monthly. Call Jodi 608-835-2775
548 HOME IMPROVEMENT
A&B ENTERPRISES
Light Construction/Remodeling
No job too small
608-835-7791
ALL THINGS BASEMENTY! Basement
Systems Inc. Call us for all your base-
ment needs! Waterproofing? Finishing?
Structural Repairs? Humidity and Mold
Control? Free Estimates! Call 888-929-
8307 (wcan)
ASPHALT SEAL COATING
Crack filling, striping.
No Job Too Small.
Call O&H: 608-845-3348 or
608-832-4818

DOUG'S HANDYMAN SERVICE
GUTTER CLEANING
"Honey Do List"
No job too small
608-845-8110
HALLINAN-PAINTING
WALLPAPERING
**Great-Spring-Rates**
35 + Years Professional
Interior/Exterior
Free-Estimates
References/Insured
Arthur Hallinan
608-455-3377
NIELSEN'S
Home Improvements
Repairs, LLC
Kitchens/Bathrooms
Wood & Tile Flooring
Decks/Clean Eaves
*Free Estimates* Insured*
*Senior Discounts*
Home 608-873-8716
Cell 608-576-7126
e-mail zipnputts@sbcglobal.net

TOMAS PAINTING
Professional, Interior,
Exterior, Repairs.
Free Estimates. Insured.
608-873-6160
554 LANDSCAPING, LAWN,
TREE & GARDEN WORK
ARTS LAWNCARE- Mowing,
trimming, roto tilling, Garden
maintenance available.608-235-4389
JAYS LAWN MAINTENANCE
Spring Cleanup, Garden Roto tilling
Lawn mowing, Brick and Flagstone
walkways and patios, Hedge Trimming
608-728-2191
LAWN MOWER Blade Sharpening in
Stoughton. $5. per blade. Call 608-
235-4389
LAWN MOWING Residential and com-
mercial. 608-873-7038
ROTOTILLING, SKIDLOADER, Small
Dumptruck for Brooklyn, Oregon, Evans-
ville and surrounding areas. 608-513-
8572, 608-206-1548
SHREDDED TOPSOIL
Shredded Garden Mix
Shredded Bark
Decorative Stone
Pick-up or Delivered
Limerock Delivery
Ag Lime Spreading
O'BRIEN TRUCKING
5995 Cty D, Oregon, WI
608-835-7255
www.obrientrucking.com
SNOWMARE ENTERPRISES
Property Maintenance
Lawn Mowing
Bush Trimming
Powerwash Houses
Spring/Summer Clean-Up
Gutter Cleaning
608-219-1214
560 PROFESSIONAL SERVICES
APPLIANCE REPAIR
We fix it no matter where
you bought it from!
800-624-0719 (wcan)
MY COMPUTER WORKS - Computer
Problems? Viruses, Spyware, Email,
Printer Issues, Bad Internet Connec-
tions - FIX IT NOW! Professional, US
based technicians. $25 off service. Call
for immediate help. 888-885-7944 (wcan)
ONE CALL DOES IT ALL! Fast and
Reliable Handyman Services. Call Ser-
viceLive and get referred to a pro today.
Call 800-604-2193 (wcan)
576 SPECIAL SERVICES
2EYEZ 4 Pawz Pet sitting and dog walk-
ing. 5 yrs experience. Call Tara 279-3330
RESEARCH SERVICES: We locate
Family, Former Friends, Neighbors
Classmates, Co-workers.
Joy 608-712-6286
586 TV, VCR &
ELECTRONICS REPAIR
DIRECTV 2 Year Savings Event. Over
140 channels only $29.99 a month. Only
Directv gives you 2 years of savings and
a FREE Genie upgrade! Call 800-320-
2429 (wcan)
DISH TV RETAILER. Starting at $19.99/
mo for 12 mos. High Speed Internet
starting at $14.95/month (where
available) Save! Ask about same day
installation! Call now -
800-374-3940 (WCAN)
REDUCE YOUR Cable Bill! Get whole-
home Satellite system installed at NO
COST and programming starting at
$19.99/mo. FREE HD/DVR Upgrade to
new callers, so call now. 888-544-0273
(wcan)
602 ANTIQUES & COLLECTIBLES
COLUMBUS ANTIQUE MALL
& CHRISTOPHER COLUMBUS
MUSEUM "Wisconsin's Largest
Antique Mall" Enter everyday
8am-4pm. 78,000 sq. ft.
200 Dealers in 400 Booths. Customer
Appreciation Week 20% discount
on all items $10 and over June 2-8.
Third floor furniture, locked cases.
Location:
239 Whitney St., Columbus,
WI 53925 920-623-1992 www.
columbusantiquemall.com

636 COMPUTERS & ACCESSORIES
HP MEDIA CENTER Computer.
Flat screen, wired mouse, tower,
remote, keyboard. Mega Memory to use
for recording, streaming. New in 2005.
Make offer. 608-669-2243
648 FOOD & DRINK
ENJOY 100%GUARANTEED,
delivered to the door Omaha Steaks!
SAVE 74% plus 4 FREE burgers - The
Family Value Combo - ONLY $39.99.
ORDER today!
800-831-1898 Use Code 49381GVT
www.OmahaSteaks.com/sp25 (wcan)
SHARI'S BERRIES Order delicious
strawberries for any occasion. Save 20%
on qualifying orders over $29! Fresh
dipped berries starting at $19.99. Visit
www.berries.com/happy or call
800-975-3296 (wcan)
650 FURNITURE
LARGE FABRIC Couch in Good Condi-
tion Free . 608-279-1882
652 GARAGE SALES
EDGERTON- 2103 Rivirie Ln 5/30-
5/31 8am-3pm. Moving Sale. Wicker,
antiques, furniture, kitchen, Holiday and
garden
STOUGHTON- 1616 Roby Rd. Multi-
Family 5/29 8am-7pm, 5/30 8am-4pm,
5/31 8am-12pm Books, clothes, furniture,
knick knacks, flowers, etc
STOUGHTON- 1726 Lunde Circle(off of
Hwy N), Sat 5/31 1 Day Only. 8am-5pm.
Multi-Family. Foosball table, TV, filing
cabinet, shabby chick, lots of Misc
STOUGHTON- 224 N Franklin St 5/30-
5/31 8am-5pm. Multi-family. Lots of
Womans clothing size 14. Some new,
antiques, funiture, pool table, misc
STOUGHTON- 302 N Page We're Back!
5/29-5/31 7:30am-? Craftsman table
saw, 2 lion statues, new ceramic tile,
1930's chest of drawers/dresser w/mirror,
Mission Rocker. 6 ladder back chairs,
artwork, lamps, frames, bedding, home
decor, juicer, small/appliances, elec-
tronics, gardening raised beds frames,
wind chimes, area rugs, folding screens,
antiques & collectibles, drying racks,
(Hoosier, buffet, ladies desk in the rough)
store display/jewelry display/ Furby, Billy
Bass, Jaws, and more, Also more at
Stoughton City Wide
STOUGHTON- 3062 Linnerud Dr, 5/29
4-7, 5/30 8-6, 5/31 8-1. Lrge mult-family
Lds & mens clothing, furniture, nautical
and misc items.
664 LAWN & GARDEN
3'-12' EVERGREEN and Shade Trees.
Pick Up or Delivery! Planting available.
Detlor Tree Farms
715-335-4444 (wcan)
666 MEDICAL & HEALTH SUPPLIES
MEDICAL GUARDIAN Top-rated medi-
cal alarm and 24/7 monitoring. For a
limited time, get free equipment, no acti-
vation fees, no commitment, a 2nd water-
proof alert button for free and more. Only
$29.95 per month. 800-281-6138
SAFE STEP WALK-IN TUB Alert for
Seniors. Bathrooms falls can be fatal.
Approved by Arthritis Foundation. Thera-
peutic Jets. Less than 4 inch step-in.
Wide door. Anti-slip floors. American
made. Installation included. Call 888-
960-4522 for $750. off (wcan)
668 MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS
AMP: LINE 6 Spider IV 75 watt guitar
amp. Tons of built in effects, tuner, and
recording options. Like new, rarely used,
less than 2 years old. Asking $250 OBO.
call 608-575-5984
GUITAR: FENDER American made
Standard Stratocaster guitar. Tobacco
burst finish, mint condition. Includes
tremelo bar, straplocks, and custom fit-
ted Fender hard-shell case. Asking $950
OBO. Call 608-575-5984
THEY SAY people don’t read those little
ads, but YOU read this one, didn’t you?
Call now to place your ad, 873-6671 or
835-6677.
676 PLANTS & FLOWERS
PROFLOWERS ENJOY SEND FLOW-
ERS for any occasion. Birthday, Anni-
versary or Just Because! Take 20%
off your order over $29! Go to www.
Proflowers.com/ActNow or call 800-315-
9042 (wcan)
688 SPORTING GOODS
& RECREATIONAL
18'X38' DOUGHBOY above ground pool.
LP heater, automatic cleaner, liner 2
yrs old. 6'x30' wood deck, solar cover,
$3500/obo. Excellent condition. 608-426-
0624 or 608-214-9600 leave message.
FISH CANADA Kingfisher Resort.
Cottage-Boat-Motor-Gas/ $75. per
person/day. Call for specials. 800-452-
8824 www.kingfisherlodge.com
(wcan)
STOCK YOUR pond or lake now. Order
early. Varieties of pan/game fish. Forage
minnows. Aeration systems. Pond weed
control products. roeselerfishfarm.com
920-696-3090 (wcan)
WE BUY Boats/RV/Pontoons/ATV's &
Motorcycles! "Cash Paid" now. Ameri-
can Marine & Motorsports Super Center,
Shawano 866-955-2628 www.american-
marina.com (wcan)
696 WANTED TO BUY
TOP PRICES Any Scrap Metal
Cars/Batteries/Farm Equipment
Free appliance pick up
Property clean out. Honest
Fully insured. U call/We haul.
608-444-5496
WANTED BARNS & Tobacco Sheds for
Salvage. Also buying barnboards and
tobacco laths. Leave message: Rudy
608-624-3990
WE BUY Junk Cars and Trucks.
We sell used parts.
Monday thru Friday 8am-5:30pm.
Newville Auto Salvage, 279 Hwy 59
Edgerton, 608-884-3114
705 RENTALS
BRAND NEW Duplex Split Level, 3 bed-
room, 3 bath, 2 car garage. 2,375sq ft.
Laundry room with washer dryer. Stain-
less Appliances, Large Family room with
3rd bedroom/bath in lower level. $1775/
mo.+ utilities No Pet/Smoking Please.
Available now. Evans Properties LLC,
608-839-9100
GREENWOOD APARTMENTS Apart-
ments for Seniors 55+, currently has 1
& 2 Bedroom Units available starting at
$725 per month, includes heat, water,
and sewer. 608-835-6717 Located at 139
Wolf St., Oregon, WI 53575
HAMILTON CONDO 1101 Hamilton St,
Stoughton. 1500 square ft of luxury. 2
bedroom, 2 decks, fireplace, washer/
dryer. Underground parking included.
$1350/mo. Available Now. 608-877-9388
OREGON 1-BEDROOM Apartment.
2-Car garage. $650/month. No pets.
Jane 608-271-7071
OREGON 2-Bedroom in quiet well kept
building. Convenient location. Includes
all appliances, A/C, blinds, private park-
ing, laundry and storage. $200 Security
deposit. Cats OK. $665/month. 608-219-
6677
CLASSIFIED AD DEADLINE IS Noon
Friday for The Great Dane and Noon
Monday for the Oregon Observer unless
changed because of holiday work sched-
ules. Call now to place your ad, 873-6671
or 835-6677.
STOUGHTON- 2 bedroom upper Suit-
able for 2 adults. Available Now No Pets/
Smoking New carpets, laminate flooring
in kitchen, New stove, frig, dishwasher
furnished. Water divided with down stairs
tenant. Window A/C. Driveway with pri-
vate entrance. Share the large fenced in
back yard. room for garden. $750/mo +
utilities 608-873-3679.
STOUGHTON- 517 E Jefferson 2 bed-
room, Upper. $680 Utilities included Call
608-455-7100.
STOUGHTON AREA- 2 bdrm, 2 bath, all
appliances, fenced yard, 2 car attached
garage, 2 3 season porches, lots of stor-
age, in quiet rural subdivision between
Stoughton and Madison. $1,195 w/$500
sec dep. Please call 608-286-5282
STOUGHTON/KENILWORTH- QUIET
2-bedroom, balcony, water. Private
Owner. No Pets. $750/mo. Available
July/1 Handicap Accesible 608-212-0829
STOUGHTON- UPPER apartment $650/
mo +utilites. 608-873-3432
720 APARTMENTS
OREGON-2 BDRM, 1 bath. Available
for spring/summer. Great central loca-
tion. On-site or in-unit laundry, patio,
dishwasher and A/C. $720-$730/month.
Call 255-7100 or www.stevebrownapts.
com/oregon
OREGON DOWNTOWN Location
1 Bed, 1 Bath, Appliances, Laundry,
Heat and Water included.
$650./mo. Call 608-206-7596
ROSEWOOD APARTMENTS for Seniors
55+, has 1 & 2 bedroom units available
starting at $695 per month. Includes
heat, water and sewer. Professionally
managed. 608-877-9388 Located at 300
Silverado Drive, Stoughton, WI 53589
750 STORAGE SPACES FOR RENT
ALL SEASONS SELF STORAGE
10X10 10X15 10X20 10X30
Security Lights-24/7 access
BRAND NEW
OREGON/BROOKLYN
Credit Cards Accepted
CALL (608)444-2900
C.N.R. STORAGE
Located behind
Stoughton Garden Center
Convenient Dry Secure
Lighted with access 24/7
Bank Cards Accepted
Off North Hwy 51 on
Oak Opening Dr. behind
Stoughton Garden Center
Call: 608-509-8904
DEER POINT STORAGE
Convenient location behind
Stoughton Lumber.
Clean-Dry Units
24 HOUR LIGHTED ACCESS
5x10 thru 12x25
608-335-3337
FRENCHTOWN
SELF-STORAGE
Only 6 miles South of
Verona on Hwy PB.
Variety of sizes available now.
10x10=$50/month
10x15=$55/month
10x20=$70/month
10x25=$80/month
12x30=$105/month
Call 608-424-6530 or
1-888-878-4244
CLASSIFIEDS, 873-6671 or 835-6677. It
pays to read the fine print.
NORTH PARK STORAGE
10x10 through 10x40, plus
14x40 with 14' door for
RV & Boats.
Come & go as you please.
608-873-5088
RASCHEIN PROPERTY
STORAGE
6x10 thru 10x25
Market Street/Burr Oak Street
in Oregon
Call 608-206-2347
UNION ROAD STORAGE
10x10 - 10x15
10x20 - 12x30
24 / 7 Access
Security Lights & Cameras
Credit Cards Accepted
608-835-0082
1128 Union Road
Oregon, WI
Located on the corner of
Union Road & Lincoln Road
801 OFFICE SPACE FOR RENT
2 UNITS in Brooklyn: 1050 sq ft.
Retail/Office/Pub/Sandwich, Ice Cream
or Coffee Shop with glass storefront,
energy efficient windows, private
restrooms, outdoor seating. Available
now- $895/month.
Office or Retail: 2700 sq ft currently
divided into 5 separate offices (one w/
gas fireplace), waterfall, break room,
2 restrooms, storage, and large open
areas. Available July 4th; $1490/month
608-712-6555
STOUGHTON 307 S Forrest Retail or
Office Space. 400 sq ft. $299/month utili-
ties included. 608-271-0101
STOUGHTON 316 S Gjertson St. Office/
Retail space. 1200 sq ft. $850/month,
utilities included. Will build to suit. Private
customer parking. 608-843-9125
965 HAY, STRAW & PASTURE
GRASS HAY, Big Squares and
Round Bales. Darris 608-938-4586
Monticello
970 HORSES
WALMERS TACK SHOP
16379 W. Milbrandt Road
Evansville, WI
608-882-5725
990 FARM: SERVICE
& MERCHANDISE
RENT SKIDLOADERS
MINI-EXCAVATORS
TELE-HANDLER
and these attachments. Concrete
breaker, posthole auger, landscape rake,
concrete bucket, pallet forks, trencher,
rock hound, broom, teleboom, stump
grinder.
By the day, week, or month.
Carter & Gruenewald Co.
4417 Hwy 92
Brooklyn, WI, 608-455-2411
905 AUCTION SALE DATES
REAL ESTATE Auction June 7- 1pm at
N5702 Murray Rd, Manawa, WI on 52
acre farm being sold in parcels. Visit:
www.nolansales.com or call for maps.
Nolan Sales LLC, Marion WI 800-472-
0290. Reg Auctioneers #165 & #142.
(wcan)
THEY SAY people don’t read those little
ads, but YOU read this one, didn’t you?
Call now to place your ad, 873-6671 or
835-6677.
Part-time. Excellent Wages
20+ hours/wk. CDL bonus program
Paid training/testing. Signing bonus.
5501 Femrite Dr. Madison
Call Paul at 608-310-4870 or email
paulm@badgerbus.com
EOE

SCHOOL BUS DRIVERS
& PARATRANSIT
DRIVERS
U
N
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5
0
1
4
0
Attention College Students
and 2014 HS Grads!
Summer Work,
$17 base-appt, FT/PT
customer sales/service,
no exp nec, conditions apply,
all ages 17+, call now for
interview 608-662-2092
or apply online at
www.SummerWorkNow.com

Screen Printer
Full-time start immediately. Seeking individual
with experience in all areas of screen printing
from screen making to actual printing.
Call for appointment
835-5791 or 276-6050
U
N
3
5
2
4
2
2
U
N
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5
1
3
9
0
** DRIVERS **
FULL TIME DRIVERS NEEDED FOR REGIONAL WORK
$1000 SIGN ON BONUS
$1000 RETENTION BONUS
$750 GUARANTEE WEEKLY
Tractor-trailer drivers needed for the Walgreen’s Private
Fleet Operation based in Windsor, WI. Drivers make hand
deliveries to Walgreen’s stores within a regional area (WI,
IL, IA, MN, ND, SD). Workweek is Tues ~ Sat. All drivers
must be willing & able to unload freight.
*Earn $21.90/hour (OT after 8 hours) or $0.4650/mile
* Full Benefit Pkg includes Life, Dental, Disability & Health
Insurance with Prescription Card
*401k Pension Program with Company Contribution
*Paid Holidays & Vacation
*Home every day except for occasional layover
Drivers must be over 24 years old, have a min 18 months
T/T exp or 6 months T/T exp with a certificate from an from
an accredited driving school & meet all DOT requirements
Send resume to:
b.kriel@callcpc.com
or call CPC Logistics at 1-800-914-3755
CDL DRIVERS
WANTED
Health Insurance / Vacation / 401K
Call (608) 275-7627
U
N
3
4
2
8
8
3
Equal Opportunity Employer
www.qpsemployment.com
APPLY ONLINE TODAY AT:
Madison
608-819-4000
ASSEMBLERS
WELDERS
CHEESE PACKAGING
PRODUCTION
Monroe
608-325-4690
www.qpsemployment.com
APPLY ONLINE TODAY AT:
MATERIAL HANDLING
MACHINE OPERATING
PRODUCTION / GENERAL LABOR
MAINTENANCE
Baraboo - Mauston
608-448-4411
Richland Center - Sparta
608-647-8840
16
May 29, 2014 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
VISIT THE STOUGHTON AREA FARMERS MARKET
ON FRIDAY MORNINGS IN FRONT OF DOLLAR GENERAL
1828 Sandhill Rd., Oregon, WI
53575 • 608-835-7569
New Hours: Monday-Friday 8:30 am-7:30 pm;
Saturday 8:30 am-6 pm; Sunday 9 am-5 pm
Come & visit Wisconsin’s premier grower
of quality bedding plants and
hanging baskets!
Mid-Season Planting
Specials
.
F
I S
H
H
A
T
C
H
E
R
Y
R
D
.
CTY. M
Directions from Stoughton:
Take 138 toward Oregon. Go past Eugster’s
Farm Market, one mile and turn right on
Sunrise Rd. Go one more mile then turn left
on Town Line Rd. Continue on to Sand Hill Rd.
(approximately one mile) and turn right.
Directions from Fitchburg:
Take Fish Hatchery Road south to Netherwood
Road. Turn left and go through Oregon past
Walgreen’s to a left on Sand Hill Road.
Directions from Verona:
Take Cty. M to Fish Hatchery Rd. Turn
right and go to Netherwood Road. Turn left
at Netherwood Rd. through Oregon past
Walgreen’s to a left on Sand Hill Rd.
H
When in Stoughton,
visit our
sales house
located in the
Main Street Plaza
parking lot.
Koupons and sale prices
honored at both locations.
KOPKE’S KOUPON
50¢ off each
Save up to $3.00
Limit 6. Limit 1 koupon per kustomer per day. Valid May 28-June 3, 2014.
PERENNIAL
SPECIAL
KOPKE’S KOUPON
ANNUAL FLOWER & VEGETABLE FLATS
$2 off each. Save up to $6
While supplies last. Reg. $18.99. Limit 3. Limit 1 koupon per kustomer per day. Valid May 28-June 3, 2014.
KOPKE’S KOUPON
HANGING BASKETS Save up to $6
$1 off 1
st
basket
$2 off 2
nd
basket
$3 off 3
rd
basket
Limit 1 koupon per kustomer per day. Valid May 28-June 3, 2014.
U
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0
3
Submitted photos
Well spoken
Five Oregon High School students enjoyed good performances at the
District Speaking contest held earlier this semester at Milton High School.
Mikayla Berge earned second place in the Extemporaneous Speaking con-
test, Emma Lust placed third in the FFA Creed Speaking contest, and Jenna
Keiser and Danielle Waldvogel competed in the Job Interview Contest, with
Keiser taking third place. Keiser and Natalie Gefke also discussed agricul-
ture issues in the Discussion Meet contest.
From left are: Natalie Gefke, Emma Lust, Mikayla Berge, Danielle Russell,
and Jenna Keiser.
State FFA treasurer Jon Jennings presents Berge with her second-place
plaque.
Photo submitted
Sasman
Award
Mikayla Berge received the Sasman
Award at the Dane County Kiwanis
Luncheon on March 17 for her out-
standing leadership to the Oregon
FFA this past year.
FFA awards
POLICE
REPORTS
Reports taken from Oregon
Police log book.
April 3
9:20 a.m. A 35-year-old
man reported a broken dish-
washer and a few metal strips
were taken from next to his
house on the 500 block of
Janesville Street. The man
spoke with his neighbors, who
had not noticed anything. The
dishwasher was white, older
and an unknown brand.
3:41 p.m. A 26-year-old
woman reported finding a
dent and scratch on her vehi-
cle’s driver door. She thought
someone may have tried to
break into her vehicle. The
woman wanted to report it in
case there were other similar
incidents in the area.
4:23 p.m. A 23-year-old
woman supervisor at Burger
King found someone had
keyed her vehicle in the park-
ing lot. She suspected an
employee. Police interviewed
the employee, who denied
involvement.
April 4
1 p.m. An 83-year-old
woman reported a man calling
himself John Davis attempted
to scam her by telling her she
had won $3.5 million and a
free car if she sent him $112.
She did not send any money
or provide any information.
April 5
12:19 p.m. A 44-year-
old woman found chemicals
including liquid mercury ain a
52-year-old Wisconsin Rap-
ids man’s items. Oregon Fire
and Hazmat responded and
cleared the scene.
April 7
12:20 p.m. A public works
truck had a truck full of
branches that were falling into
the roadway. Police cleared
the roadway and notified pub-
lic works.
April 9
4:34 p.m. A 53-year-old
man returned home to the
100 block of Club House Drive
to find his front door kicked
in and two safes containing
$20,000 in cash and silver
coins missing. There was no
suspect information.
April 10
12:48 p.m. The library
director reported someone
had drawn on the wall in the
men’s bathroom between 1
and 8 p.m. Staff had cleaned
up the wall before police
arrived. Police reviewed
security footage and acquired
no specific suspect informa-
tion as many people used the
bathroom during those hours.
1:44 p.m. A 69-year-old
man reported several tools
had gone missing from his
bike shop over the last several
days. The man had no suspect
information or suspicions
about any workers. The man
reported more items missing
the next day.
April 11
3:30 p.m. A 77-year-old
woman driving on Charles
Court got her boot cast stuck
on her vehicle’s accelerator.
The woman drove between
houses, off a retaining wall,
across Pleasant Oak Drive
and struck a light pole in front
of the middle school. She was
transported to UW Hospital.
–Scott Girard

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